History Main / AesopCollateralDamage

23rd Sep '16 1:07:20 AM Furienna
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** A strong example to modern eyes is the story of the Minotaur. The gods sent King Minos of Crete a white bull intended as an offering to Poseidon, but he decided to keep it as the prize in his herd instead. Aphrodite retaliated by making his ''wife'', Pasiphaë, fall in lust with it and arrange to play the part of a cow. Sure, Minos was stuck with the result of that union, the [[ImAHumanitarian human-eating]] Minotaur, but that just inspired him to lock it away in a labyrinth and periodically feed innocent Greeks to the beast until Theseus finally killed it. Pasiphaë, the Minotaur, and the innocent Greeks suffered, but Minos himself, not so much - he kept the bull, stayed king, and even became one of the three judges in the paradisical section of the Greek afterlife. Other than his wife sleeping with a bull (which ''would'' have been a blow to his ego, even if she was basically brainwashed Into doing it), Minos came out unscathed.

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** A strong example to modern eyes is the story of the Minotaur. The gods sent King Minos of Crete a white bull intended as an offering to Poseidon, but he decided to keep it as the prize in his herd instead. Aphrodite retaliated by making his ''wife'', Pasiphaë, fall in lust with it and arrange to play the part of a cow. Sure, Minos was stuck with the result of that union, the [[ImAHumanitarian human-eating]] Minotaur, but that just inspired him to lock it away in a labyrinth and periodically feed innocent Greeks to the beast until Theseus finally killed it. Pasiphaë, the Minotaur, and the innocent Greeks suffered, but Minos himself, not so much - he kept the bull, stayed king, and even became one of the three judges in the paradisical section of the Greek afterlife. Other than his wife sleeping with a bull (which ''would'' have been a blow to his ego, even if she was basically brainwashed Into into doing it), Minos came out unscathed.
23rd Sep '16 1:06:35 AM Furienna
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* In Disney's ''Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast'', the household staff are cursed, as well as the Beast himself. The musical version softens the collateral damage by having the staff discuss that they were the ones who turned the Beast into a spoiled brat in the first place.

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* In Disney's ''Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast'', the household staff are cursed, as well as the Beast himself. The musical version softens the collateral damage by having the staff discuss that they were the ones ones, who turned har let the Beast turn into a spoiled brat in the first place.
23rd Sep '16 1:00:26 AM Furienna
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** A strong example to modern eyes is the story of the Minotaur. The gods sent King Minos of Crete a white bull intended as an offering to Poseidon, but he decided to keep it as the prize in his herd instead. Aphrodite retaliated by making his ''wife'', Pasiphaë, fall in lust with it and arrange to play the part of a cow. Sure, Minos was stuck with the result of that union, the [[ImAHumanitarian human-eating]] Minotaur, but that just inspired him to lock it away in a labyrinth and periodically feed innocent Greeks to the beast until Theseus finally killed it. Pasiphaë, the Minotaur, and the innocent Greeks suffered, but Minos himself, not so much -- he kept the bull, stayed king, and even became one of the three judges in the paradisical section of the Greek afterlife. Other than his wife sleeping with a bull (which was basically divine brainwashing anyway), Minos came out unscathed.

to:

** A strong example to modern eyes is the story of the Minotaur. The gods sent King Minos of Crete a white bull intended as an offering to Poseidon, but he decided to keep it as the prize in his herd instead. Aphrodite retaliated by making his ''wife'', Pasiphaë, fall in lust with it and arrange to play the part of a cow. Sure, Minos was stuck with the result of that union, the [[ImAHumanitarian human-eating]] Minotaur, but that just inspired him to lock it away in a labyrinth and periodically feed innocent Greeks to the beast until Theseus finally killed it. Pasiphaë, the Minotaur, and the innocent Greeks suffered, but Minos himself, not so much -- - he kept the bull, stayed king, and even became one of the three judges in the paradisical section of the Greek afterlife. Other than his wife sleeping with a bull (which ''would'' have been a blow to his ego, even if she was basically divine brainwashing anyway), brainwashed Into doing it), Minos came out unscathed.
23rd Sep '16 12:56:27 AM Furienna
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* In a ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' episode Sabrina's boyfriend Harvey is turned into a beast by her saintly but ugly cousin Susie, who has green skin and warts, to teach her lesson about shallowness. Cousin Susie is treated as entirely justified in teaching Sabrina her lesson while everyone ignores the fact that the blameless Harvey is the one who finds himself growing fur, claws and tusks.

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* In a ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' episode episode, Sabrina's boyfriend Harvey is turned into a beast by her saintly but ugly cousin Susie, who has green skin and warts, to teach her lesson about shallowness. Cousin Susie is treated as entirely justified in teaching Sabrina her lesson lesson, while everyone ignores the fact that the blameless Harvey is the one who finds himself growing fur, claws and tusks.
23rd Sep '16 12:51:57 AM Furienna
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** There is King David having sex with the wife of one of his generals and [[UriahGambit getting said general killed in battle to get away with his adultery.]] God inflicts an illness on the child coming out of this affair. David repents and God forgives him. The king, that is. To really teach David that justice has to be done, the child however still has to die from the illness. David, and his new (stolen) have a new son though, the future king Solomon, and sems to live happily ever after [[spoiler:until one of David's own sons goes to war against him]].

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** There is King David having sex with the wife of one of his generals and [[UriahGambit getting said general killed in battle to get away with his adultery.]] God inflicts an illness on the child coming out of this affair. David repents and God forgives him. The king, that is. To really teach David that justice has to be done, the child however still has to die from the illness. David, and his new (stolen) have a new son though, the future king Solomon, and sems seem to live happily ever after [[spoiler:until one of David's own sons goes to war against him]].
23rd Sep '16 12:51:06 AM Furienna
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** There is King David having sex with the wife of one of his generals and [[UriahGambit getting said general killed in battle to get away with his adultery.]] God inflicts an illness on the child coming out of this affair. David repents and God forgives him. The king, that is. To really teach David that justice has to be done, the child however still has to die from the illness. David, his new (stolen) wife and their future kids all live happily... [[spoiler:Until one of his own sons goes to war against him]].
** And then there is the general who arrogantly pledges to sacrifice the first creature he encounters after an upcoming battle if God helps him to win it. His army is victorious, but the price for his hubris is quite terrible: As he's returning home, [[CruelTwistEnding his daughter runs out to meet him]].

to:

** There is King David having sex with the wife of one of his generals and [[UriahGambit getting said general killed in battle to get away with his adultery.]] God inflicts an illness on the child coming out of this affair. David repents and God forgives him. The king, that is. To really teach David that justice has to be done, the child however still has to die from the illness. David, and his new (stolen) wife and their have a new son though, the future kids all king Solomon, and sems to live happily... [[spoiler:Until happily ever after [[spoiler:until one of his David's own sons goes to war against him]].
** And then there is the general Jephta, who arrogantly pledges to sacrifice the first creature he encounters after an upcoming battle if God helps him to win it. His army is victorious, but the price for his hubris is quite terrible: As he's returning home, [[CruelTwistEnding his daughter runs out to meet him]].
23rd Sep '16 12:42:59 AM Furienna
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* In ''Film/SpiderMan1'', Peter refuses to stop a fleeing criminal as petty revenge against the fight promoter who refused to pay Peter his award, and subsequently the hero's beloved Uncle Ben is killed by that criminal, teaching our hero that valuable lesson that With Great Power ComesGreatResponsibility.

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* In ''Film/SpiderMan1'', Peter refuses to stop a fleeing criminal as petty revenge against the fight promoter promoter, who refused to pay Peter his award, and subsequently the hero's beloved Uncle Ben is killed by that criminal, teaching our hero that valuable lesson that With Great Power ComesGreatResponsibility.
23rd Sep '16 12:36:30 AM Furienna
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In mythological, religious and fantasy works, somebody does or says something that shows he's in need of an attitude adjustment. Either a being (often a deity or similarly powerful creature) or Fate itself will act overtly to [[AnAesop teach this lesson]]. Unfortunately, the direct victim of this tutelage isn't the person in need of the lesson, but rather one or more persons close to him who haven't been shown to have done anything wrong. Typical victims are children, spouses and colleagues of the culprit, and the suffering often involves their deaths. In light of this, the culprit expresses remorse and either changes his ways or gives way to grief. Either way, he won't be making ''that'' mistake again. It is rarely, if ever, mentioned that the entirely innocent suffer the most.

This is quite common in many mythologies, where the gods teach someone a lesson by cursing his entire family -- but not necessarily them -- or setting up his descendants for misery. Sometimes this is the result of severe ValuesDissonance. In comic books and the like, in StuffedIntoTheFridge's purest form, female supporting characters die so that male heroes can learn vague lessons about the price of heroism, after which said heroes usually find new love interests and generally move on.

to:

In mythological, religious and fantasy works, somebody does or says something that shows he's in need of an attitude adjustment. Either a being (often a deity or similarly powerful creature) or Fate itself will act overtly to [[AnAesop teach this lesson]]. Unfortunately, the direct victim of this tutelage isn't the person in need of the lesson, but rather one or more persons close to him him, who haven't have not been shown to have done anything wrong. Typical victims are children, spouses and colleagues of the culprit, and the suffering often involves their deaths. In light of this, the culprit expresses remorse and either changes his ways or gives way to grief. Either way, he won't be making ''that'' mistake again. It is rarely, if ever, mentioned that the entirely innocent suffer the most.

This is quite common in many mythologies, where the gods teach someone a lesson by cursing his entire family -- but not necessarily them -- - or setting up his descendants for misery. Sometimes this is the result of severe ValuesDissonance. In comic books and the like, in StuffedIntoTheFridge's purest form, female supporting characters die so that male heroes can learn vague lessons about the price of heroism, after which said heroes usually find new love interests and generally move on.
15th Jul '16 7:18:13 PM Malady
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** Niobe and her children is another example from Greek mythology. She boasted about them, compared herself to Leto and condemned people for worshiping Leto, and Leto's two children (the deities Apollo and Aretimis) slay all 14 of hers by shooting them with arrows. Niobe's husband Amphion either committed suicide or was also killed by Apollo for wanting to avenge his children's deaths; Niobe herself so grieved that she turned to stone with a stream flowing from it said to be caused by her tears.

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** Niobe and her children is another example from Greek mythology. She boasted about them, compared herself to Leto and condemned people for worshiping Leto, and Leto's two children (the deities Apollo and Aretimis) Artemis) slay all 14 of hers by shooting them with arrows. Niobe's husband Amphion either committed suicide or was also killed by Apollo for wanting to avenge his children's deaths; Niobe herself so grieved that she turned to stone with a stream flowing from it said to be caused by her tears.
15th Jul '16 12:21:26 AM PaulA
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* ''Film/ClashOfTheTitans'' (1981). Queen Cassiopeia says that Andromeda is more beautiful than the goddess Thetis herself. The goddess says that Cassiopeia will repent of her boast and demands that Andromeda be sacrificed.[[note]]The original myth is not an example, since the pissed-off god in question (Poseidon, not Thetis) [[DisproportionateRetribution sent a sea monster to kill everyone]], ''including'' Cassiopeia. Andromeda was sacrificed to it because an oracle said it would prevent the rampage.[[/note]]

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* ''Film/ClashOfTheTitans'' (1981).''Film/{{Clash of the Titans|1981}}''. Queen Cassiopeia says that Andromeda is more beautiful than the goddess Thetis herself. The goddess says that Cassiopeia will repent of her boast and demands that Andromeda be sacrificed.[[note]]The original myth is not an example, since the pissed-off god in question (Poseidon, not Thetis) [[DisproportionateRetribution sent a sea monster to kill everyone]], ''including'' Cassiopeia. Andromeda was sacrificed to it because an oracle said it would prevent the rampage.[[/note]]
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