History Main / AdrenalineTime

25th Dec '17 10:03:52 PM PsychedelicEmu
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* There have been actual experiments to determine if people are able to perceive and process information at a faster rate when stressed. The results have been mixed. It turns out that one study's results show that the effect mostly "is a function of [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0001295 recollection, not perception]]: a richer encoding of memory may cause a salient event to appear, retrospectively, as though it lasted longer." Although it does not increase the subject's capabilities to respond effectively to the event, this effect nonetheless has evolutionary value because it provides a vivid recollection of the details of a traumatic and potentially dangerous event, the better to recognize and react to a similar situation if it is encountered in the future. However, in a strange contradiction, newer research suggests that a [[https://gizmodo.com/5940562/time-really-does-seem-to-slow-down-for-athletes focus on performing specific actions]] or an increase in [[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1997301/ neurotransmitters]], actually does increase information processing, slowing down time perception. In addition, a detailed medical[[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384265/ review of several other studies]] done on the topic, including the two above studies, suggests that under certain cases time perception does slow down. Current researchers are still debating exactly how it works but it seems likely that slowed time perception is an actual physical phenomenon experienced at times, not just a function of memory.

to:

* There have been actual experiments to determine if people are able to perceive and process information at a faster rate when stressed. The results have been mixed. It turns out that one study's results show that the effect mostly "is a function of [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0001295 recollection, not perception]]: a richer encoding of memory may cause a salient event to appear, retrospectively, as though it lasted longer." Although it does not increase the subject's capabilities to respond effectively to the event, this effect nonetheless has evolutionary value because it provides a vivid recollection of the details of a traumatic and potentially dangerous event, the better to recognize and react to a similar situation if it is encountered in the future. However, in a strange contradiction, newer research suggests that a [[https://gizmodo.com/5940562/time-really-does-seem-to-slow-down-for-athletes focus on performing specific actions]] or an increase in [[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1997301/ neurotransmitters]], actually does increase information processing, slowing down time perception. In addition, a detailed medical[[https://www.medical [[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384265/ review of several other studies]] done on the topic, including the two above studies, suggests that under certain cases time perception does slow down. Current researchers are still debating exactly how it works but it seems likely that slowed time perception is an actual physical phenomenon experienced at times, not just a function of memory.
25th Dec '17 10:02:48 PM PsychedelicEmu
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* There have been actual experiments to determine if people are able to perceive and process information at a faster rate when stressed. The results have been mixed. It turns out that the one study's results show that the effect mostly "is a function of [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0001295 recollection, not perception]]: a richer encoding of memory may cause a salient event to appear, retrospectively, as though it lasted longer." Although it does not increase the subject's capabilities to respond effectively to the event, this effect nonetheless has evolutionary value because it provides a vivid recollection of the details of a traumatic and potentially dangerous event, the better to recognize and react to a similar situation if it is encountered in the future. However, in a strange contradiction, newer research suggests that a [[https://gizmodo.com/5940562/time-really-does-seem-to-slow-down-for-athletes focus on performing specific actions]] or an increase in neurotransmitters, actually does increase information processing, slowing down time perception. In addition, a detailed medical[[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384265/ review of several other studies]] done on the topic, including the two above studies, suggests that under certain cases time perception does slow down. Current researchers are still debating exactly how it works but seem to have come to the consensus that slow motion time perception, based on increased hormonal output, does in fact exist in some form.

to:

* There have been actual experiments to determine if people are able to perceive and process information at a faster rate when stressed. The results have been mixed. It turns out that the one study's results show that the effect mostly "is a function of [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0001295 recollection, not perception]]: a richer encoding of memory may cause a salient event to appear, retrospectively, as though it lasted longer." Although it does not increase the subject's capabilities to respond effectively to the event, this effect nonetheless has evolutionary value because it provides a vivid recollection of the details of a traumatic and potentially dangerous event, the better to recognize and react to a similar situation if it is encountered in the future. However, in a strange contradiction, newer research suggests that a [[https://gizmodo.com/5940562/time-really-does-seem-to-slow-down-for-athletes focus on performing specific actions]] or an increase in neurotransmitters, [[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1997301/ neurotransmitters]], actually does increase information processing, slowing down time perception. In addition, a detailed medical[[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384265/ review of several other studies]] done on the topic, including the two above studies, suggests that under certain cases time perception does slow down. Current researchers are still debating exactly how it works but seem to have come to the consensus it seems likely that slow motion slowed time perception, based on increased hormonal output, does in fact exist in some form.perception is an actual physical phenomenon experienced at times, not just a function of memory.
25th Dec '17 9:57:16 PM PsychedelicEmu
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* There have been actual experiments to determine if people are able to perceive and process information at a faster rate when stressed. It turns out that the study's results show that the effect "is a function of [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0001295 recollection, not perception]]: a richer encoding of memory may cause a salient event to appear, retrospectively, as though it lasted longer." Although it does not increase the subject's capabilities to respond effectively to the event, this effect nonetheless has evolutionary value because it provides a vivid recollection of the details of a traumatic and potentially dangerous event, the better to recognize and react to a similar situation if it is encountered in the future. However, newer research suggests that a [[https://gizmodo.com/5940562/time-really-does-seem-to-slow-down-for-athletes focus on performing specific actions]] actually does increase information processing, slowing down time perception. In addition, a [[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384265/ review of several studies]] done on the topic, including the two above studies, suggests that under certain cases time perception does slow down. Current researchers are still debating exactly how it works but seem to have come to the consensus that slow motion time perception, based on increased hormonal output, does exist.

to:

* There have been actual experiments to determine if people are able to perceive and process information at a faster rate when stressed. The results have been mixed. It turns out that the one study's results show that the effect mostly "is a function of [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0001295 recollection, not perception]]: a richer encoding of memory may cause a salient event to appear, retrospectively, as though it lasted longer." Although it does not increase the subject's capabilities to respond effectively to the event, this effect nonetheless has evolutionary value because it provides a vivid recollection of the details of a traumatic and potentially dangerous event, the better to recognize and react to a similar situation if it is encountered in the future. However, in a strange contradiction, newer research suggests that a [[https://gizmodo.com/5940562/time-really-does-seem-to-slow-down-for-athletes focus on performing specific actions]] or an increase in neurotransmitters, actually does increase information processing, slowing down time perception. In addition, a [[https://www.detailed medical[[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384265/ review of several other studies]] done on the topic, including the two above studies, suggests that under certain cases time perception does slow down. Current researchers are still debating exactly how it works but seem to have come to the consensus that slow motion time perception, based on increased hormonal output, does exist.in fact exist in some form.
7th Dec '17 4:45:08 PM nombretomado
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* "We Need da Money", the first track on DaYoopers' ''We're Still Rockin''', speeds up slightly with each successive line, bumping the song gradually higher and higher by half-steps.

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* "We Need da Money", the first track on DaYoopers' Music/DaYoopers' ''We're Still Rockin''', speeds up slightly with each successive line, bumping the song gradually higher and higher by half-steps.
4th Dec '17 10:04:36 PM PsychedelicEmu
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* There have been actual experiments to determine if people are able to perceive and process information at a faster rate when stressed. It turns out that the study's results show that the effect "is a function of [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0001295 recollection, not perception]]: a richer encoding of memory may cause a salient event to appear, retrospectively, as though it lasted longer." Although it does not increase the subject's capabilities to respond effectively to the event, this effect nonetheless has evolutionary value because it provides a vivid recollection of the details of a traumatic and potentially dangerous event, the better to recognize and react to a similar situation if it is encountered in the future. However, newer research suggests that a [[https://gizmodo.com/5940562/time-really-does-seem-to-slow-down-for-athletes focus on performing specific actions]] actually does increase information processing slowing down time perception, and a [[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384265/ review of several studies]] done on the topic suggest that under certain cases time perception does slow down. Current researchers are still debating exactly how it works but seem to have come to the consensus that slow motion time perception, based on increased hormonal output, does exist.

to:

* There have been actual experiments to determine if people are able to perceive and process information at a faster rate when stressed. It turns out that the study's results show that the effect "is a function of [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0001295 recollection, not perception]]: a richer encoding of memory may cause a salient event to appear, retrospectively, as though it lasted longer." Although it does not increase the subject's capabilities to respond effectively to the event, this effect nonetheless has evolutionary value because it provides a vivid recollection of the details of a traumatic and potentially dangerous event, the better to recognize and react to a similar situation if it is encountered in the future. However, newer research suggests that a [[https://gizmodo.com/5940562/time-really-does-seem-to-slow-down-for-athletes focus on performing specific actions]] actually does increase information processing processing, slowing down time perception, and perception. In addition, a [[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384265/ review of several studies]] done on the topic suggest topic, including the two above studies, suggests that under certain cases time perception does slow down. Current researchers are still debating exactly how it works but seem to have come to the consensus that slow motion time perception, based on increased hormonal output, does exist.
4th Dec '17 10:03:08 PM PsychedelicEmu
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* There have been actual experiments to determine if people are able to perceive and process information at a faster rate when stressed. It turns out that the study's results show that the effect "is a function of [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0001295 recollection, not perception]]: a richer encoding of memory may cause a salient event to appear, retrospectively, as though it lasted longer." Although it does not increase the subject's capabilities to respond effectively to the event, this effect nonetheless has evolutionary value because it provides a vivid recollection of the details of a traumatic and potentially dangerous event, the better to recognize and react to a similar situation if it is encountered in the future. However, newer research suggests that a [[https://gizmodo.com/5940562/time-really-does-seem-to-slow-down-for-athletes focus on performing specific actions]] actually does increase information processing, and a [[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384265/ review of several studies]] done on the topic suggest that under certain cases time perception does slow down. Current researchers are still debating exactly how it works but seem to have come to the consensus that slow motion time perception, based on increased hormonal output, does exist.

to:

* There have been actual experiments to determine if people are able to perceive and process information at a faster rate when stressed. It turns out that the study's results show that the effect "is a function of [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0001295 recollection, not perception]]: a richer encoding of memory may cause a salient event to appear, retrospectively, as though it lasted longer." Although it does not increase the subject's capabilities to respond effectively to the event, this effect nonetheless has evolutionary value because it provides a vivid recollection of the details of a traumatic and potentially dangerous event, the better to recognize and react to a similar situation if it is encountered in the future. However, newer research suggests that a [[https://gizmodo.com/5940562/time-really-does-seem-to-slow-down-for-athletes focus on performing specific actions]] actually does increase information processing, processing slowing down time perception, and a [[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384265/ review of several studies]] done on the topic suggest that under certain cases time perception does slow down. Current researchers are still debating exactly how it works but seem to have come to the consensus that slow motion time perception, based on increased hormonal output, does exist.
4th Dec '17 10:00:59 PM PsychedelicEmu
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* There have been actual experiments to determine if people are able to perceive and process information at a faster rate when stressed. It turns out that the effect "is a function of [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0001295 recollection, not perception]]: a richer encoding of memory may cause a salient event to appear, retrospectively, as though it lasted longer." Although it does not increase the subject's capabilities to respond effectively to the event, this effect nonetheless has evolutionary value because it provides a vivid recollection of the details of a traumatic and potentially dangerous event, the better to recognize and react to a similar situation if it is encountered in the future.

to:

* There have been actual experiments to determine if people are able to perceive and process information at a faster rate when stressed. It turns out that the study's results show that the effect "is a function of [[http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0001295 recollection, not perception]]: a richer encoding of memory may cause a salient event to appear, retrospectively, as though it lasted longer." Although it does not increase the subject's capabilities to respond effectively to the event, this effect nonetheless has evolutionary value because it provides a vivid recollection of the details of a traumatic and potentially dangerous event, the better to recognize and react to a similar situation if it is encountered in the future. However, newer research suggests that a [[https://gizmodo.com/5940562/time-really-does-seem-to-slow-down-for-athletes focus on performing specific actions]] actually does increase information processing, and a [[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384265/ review of several studies]] done on the topic suggest that under certain cases time perception does slow down. Current researchers are still debating exactly how it works but seem to have come to the consensus that slow motion time perception, based on increased hormonal output, does exist.
15th Feb '17 9:41:06 AM zarpaulus
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'' and ''[[VideoGame/MassEffect3 3]]'' the soldier class's Adrenaline Rush power slows down time for a few seconds, giving time to line up a sniper shot for instance.
16th Jan '17 8:50:13 AM luord
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Added DiffLines:

* Some of the fights in ''Film/KingsmanTheSecretService'' slow down to appreciate important details or just for RuleOfCool.
15th Aug '16 11:16:15 AM intastiel
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Also known as {{Ramping}}.

A frenetic style of video editing where the action is partly [[{{Undercrank}} sped up]], partly at normal speed (or [[{{Overcrank}} even slower]]). For example, there could be an EstablishingShot of helicopter footage that is initially at double speed, then changes to normal speed as it approaches its destination. Or, in a historical battle sequence, an attacker's leap could be fast forwarded, then his sword swung in slow motion, then zipping through the stricken enemy's collapse, then showing the next blow in slow mo again, and so on.

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Also known as {{Ramping}}.

A
Ramping, Adrenaline Time is a frenetic style of video editing where the action is partly [[{{Undercrank}} sped up]], up]] and partly at normal speed (or [[{{Overcrank}} even slower]]). For example, there could be an EstablishingShot of helicopter footage that is initially at double speed, then changes to normal speed as it approaches its destination. Or, in a historical battle sequence, an attacker's leap could be fast forwarded, then his sword swung in slow motion, then zipping through the stricken enemy's collapse, then showing the next blow in slow mo again, and so on.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AdrenalineTime