History Main / AdaptationDistillation

17th Sep '17 12:44:10 PM pinkdalek
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* A frequent criticism of ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' is that, due to the stories WritingByTheSeatOfYourPants nature, it takes way too long for the heroes to actually start moving the plot, instead forcing us to watch them fiddling about with their inventories. ''VideoGame/{{Hiveswap}}'' wastes absolutely no time establishing two two human characters, intrusions of eyeless monsters, burning through puzzles, and even takes us to Alternia to meet a troll, basically squishing the StationsOfTheCanon of five whole acts into about two hours of gameplay.

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* A frequent criticism of ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' is that, due to the stories story's WritingByTheSeatOfYourPants nature, it takes way too long for the heroes to actually start moving the plot, instead forcing us to watch them fiddling about with their inventories. inventories and typing rude things to each other online. ''VideoGame/{{Hiveswap}}'' wastes absolutely no time establishing two two human characters, intrusions of eyeless monsters, burning through puzzles, house destruction, puzzle solving, and even takes manages to get us to Alternia to meet a troll, troll and rescue him before the end of the first act, basically squishing the StationsOfTheCanon of five or six whole acts into about two hours of gameplay.
17th Sep '17 12:41:47 PM pinkdalek
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* A frequent criticism of ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' is that, due to the stories WritingByTheSeatOfYourPants nature, it takes way too long for the heroes to actually start moving the plot, instead forcing us to watch them fiddling about with their inventories. ''VideoGame/{{Hiveswap}}'' wastes absolutely no time establishing two two human characters, intrusions of eyeless monsters, burning through puzzles, and even takes us to Alternia to meet a troll, basically squishing the StationsOfTheCanon of five whole acts into about two hours of gameplay.
15th Sep '17 9:12:26 PM nombretomado
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** The {{G|ameBoyAdvance}}BA game, ''VideoGame/AstroBoyOmegaFactor'', takes almost ''every'' Creator/OsamuTezuka character and weaves them into one giant, all-encompassing storyline. It manages to do justice to the man's entire career. And it plays well, to boot.

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** The {{G|ameBoyAdvance}}BA UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyAdvance}}BA game, ''VideoGame/AstroBoyOmegaFactor'', takes almost ''every'' Creator/OsamuTezuka character and weaves them into one giant, all-encompassing storyline. It manages to do justice to the man's entire career. And it plays well, to boot.
1st Sep '17 1:35:03 PM PistolsAtDawn
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* ''Film/TheLegoBatmanMovie'': Robin/Dick Grayson's origin is largely simplified to "an orphan adopted by Bruce Wayne", leaving out the Flying Graysons and the circus for the sake of focusing on the main plot.
25th Aug '17 1:17:48 PM DustSnitch
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* [[Film/HarryPotter The film versions]] of ''Film/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'' and ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheChamberOfSecrets'' retain much of the dialogue almost word for word (though not all of it is spoken by the same characters Hermione had quite a few of Ron's lines and at least one of Seamus's) and every important scene from the books is left in, with a few merged with other scenes or removed from the story. There are a few other changes here and there, however. The finale of the first film, for example, removes Hermione's challenge of solving a logic puzzle, probably since solving a puzzle isn't the most exciting thing to watch. Hermione's moment to shine became the Devil's Snare, with Ron and Hermione's reactions being swapped (in the book, Hermione panicked and Ron had to tell her to get a grip, while it is the opposite in the film). The later films fall under PragmaticAdaptation and CompressedAdaptation.

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* [[Film/HarryPotter The film versions]] of ''Film/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'' and ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheChamberOfSecrets'' retain much of the dialogue almost word for word (though not all of it is spoken by the same characters Hermione had are quite a few of Ron's lines and at least one of Seamus's) and every important scene from faithful to the books is left in, source, with a few some scenes merged with other scenes together or removed from the story. There are a few other changes here and there, however. removed. The finale of the first film, for example, removes Hermione's challenge of solving a logic puzzle, probably since solving a puzzle isn't the most exciting thing to watch. Hermione's moment to shine became the Devil's Snare, with Ron and Hermione's reactions being swapped (in the book, Hermione panicked and Ron had to tell her to get a grip, while it is the opposite in the film). The later films fall under PragmaticAdaptation and CompressedAdaptation.


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* Many additional details from ''Film/ThePassionOfTheChrist not in [[Literature/TheFourGospels the Gospels]] themselves were taken from Catholic tradition and literature (Emmerich). For instance, Jesus having bloody face wiped by a Jewish woman and meeting his mother Mary on the way is straight from the Catholic "Way of the Cross" (''Via Crucis'') also known as the "Stations of the Cross". Meanwhile, Judas's encounter with a bunch of bullying demons is derived from Emmerich's writings.
13th Aug '17 11:17:57 AM Manny20444
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* ''WesternAnimation/WolverineAndTheXMen'' drew from many of the elements of the ''ComicBook/XMen'' lore, particularly from both of the original (mainly through elements like the formation of the X-Men, the members of the original X-Men team that was founded by Professor Xavier had consisted of Cyclops, Jean Grey, Beast without fur, Angel and Iceman, etc) and modern (mainly through elements like most of the character designs, the disbanding of the X-Men, Kenosha, etc) versions of the X-Men that are from the mainstream Marvel Universe as well as from the Ultimate (mainly through elements like Scarlet Witch and Quicksilver being raised by Magneto, Both Magneto and Quicksilver leading the Brotherhood of Mutants, Toad's design, Wolverine being taller, the event of a fleet of Sentinels being sent to Genosha to attack Magneto and the mutants living there, etc) version of the X-Men.

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* ''WesternAnimation/WolverineAndTheXMen'' drew from many of the elements of the ''ComicBook/XMen'' lore, particularly from both of the original (mainly through elements like the formation of the X-Men, the members of the original X-Men team that was founded by Professor Xavier had consisted of Cyclops, Jean Grey, Beast without fur, Angel and Iceman, etc) and modern (mainly through elements like most of the character designs, the disbanding of the X-Men, Kenosha, Genosha, etc) versions of the X-Men that are from the mainstream Marvel Universe as well as from the Ultimate (mainly through elements like Scarlet Witch and Quicksilver being raised by Magneto, Both Magneto and Quicksilver leading the Brotherhood of Mutants, Toad's design, Wolverine being taller, the event of a fleet of Sentinels being sent to Genosha to attack Magneto and the mutants living there, etc) version of the X-Men.
11th Aug '17 7:32:29 AM Manny20444
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* ''WesternAnimation/WolverineAndTheXMen'' drew from many of the elements of the ''ComicBook/XMen'' lore, particularly from both of the original (mainly through elements like the formation of the X-Men, the members of the original X-Men team that was founded by Professor Xavier had consisted of Cyclops, Jean Grey, Beast without fur, Angel and Iceman, etc) and modern (mainly through elements like most of the character designs, the disbanding of the X-Men, and Genosha.) versions of the X-Men that are from the mainstream Marvel Universe as well as from the Ultimate (mainly through elements like Scarlet Witch and Quicksilver being raised by Magneto, Both Magneto and Quicksilver leading the Brotherhood of Mutants, Toad's design, Wolverine being taller, the event of a fleet of Sentinels being sent to Genosha to attack Magneto and the mutants living there, etc) version of the X-Men.

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* ''WesternAnimation/WolverineAndTheXMen'' drew from many of the elements of the ''ComicBook/XMen'' lore, particularly from both of the original (mainly through elements like the formation of the X-Men, the members of the original X-Men team that was founded by Professor Xavier had consisted of Cyclops, Jean Grey, Beast without fur, Angel and Iceman, etc) and modern (mainly through elements like most of the character designs, the disbanding of the X-Men, and Genosha.) Kenosha, etc) versions of the X-Men that are from the mainstream Marvel Universe as well as from the Ultimate (mainly through elements like Scarlet Witch and Quicksilver being raised by Magneto, Both Magneto and Quicksilver leading the Brotherhood of Mutants, Toad's design, Wolverine being taller, the event of a fleet of Sentinels being sent to Genosha to attack Magneto and the mutants living there, etc) version of the X-Men.
31st Jul '17 12:30:50 PM kvn8907
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* ''Film/{{Watchmen}}'' combined the two Ozymandias plots of getting Dr. Manhattan of Earth by framing him for causing cancer in people and thus removing him from the picture in time for the second plot, the fake alien attack on Earth. Instead he was framed for causing the cancers, resulting in public anger that drove him away, and then framed for striking back in response.

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* ''Film/{{Watchmen}}'' combined the two Ozymandias plots of getting Dr. Manhattan of off Earth by framing him for causing cancer in people and thus removing him from the picture in time for the second plot, the fake alien attack on Earth. Instead he was framed for causing the cancers, resulting in public anger that drove him away, and then framed for striking back in response.
6th Jul '17 3:42:38 PM bwburke94
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* The eponymous hero of ''Series/{{The Flash|1990}}'' was an amalgamation of UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|OfComicBooks}} and ComicBook/PostCrisis [[Franchise/TheFlash Flashes]] in the comics. While his secret identity was that of Silver Age Flash, Barry Allen, some aspects of the character (like his relationship with scientist Dr. Tina [=McGee=] and his need to eat insane amounts of food to maintain his powers) were incorporated from the character of the later Flash, Wally West.

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* The eponymous hero of ''Series/{{The Flash|1990}}'' ''Series/TheFlash1990'' was an amalgamation of UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|OfComicBooks}} and ComicBook/PostCrisis [[Franchise/TheFlash Flashes]] in the comics. While his secret identity was that of Silver Age Flash, Barry Allen, some aspects of the character (like his relationship with scientist Dr. Tina [=McGee=] and his need to eat insane amounts of food to maintain his powers) were incorporated from the character of the later Flash, Wally West.



* ''Series/GameOfThrones'' is an adaptation of a [[Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire series]] of fantasy DoorStopper novels. Even with about 10 hours of screen time devoted to each book, there is a lot of condensing, particularly in the form of reducing the number and combining the roles of various characters. As more and more characters, plotlines and locations are introduced in the books, the distillation becomes more and more pronounced. This is especially true of Season 5, which attempts to adapt the majority of two books whose combined length far exceeds that of the book that required two seasons.
** Jon, Arya, and Rickon also have clear warg connections with their direwolves in the books, but the show removes this trait from everyone except Bran since it's fundamental to his story while the others can mostly work without it.
** In the books, Robb crosses at the Twins with a few thousand cavalry while sending 16,000 men under Roose Bolton to engage Tywin at the Battle of the Green Fork. In the show, Bolton is not introduced until Season 2 and only 2,000 northmen fight on the Green Fork (which requires some HollywoodTactics for Tywin's scouts not to have noticed beforehand). Robb also fights two battles to overcome Jaime and relieve Riverrun in the books, but the show simplifies this to Jaime's capture in the Whispering Wood.
** The books often describe the various TruthInTelevision scouts and guards characters encounter when approaching a military encampment or a powerful individual. In the show, they often stroll right into the camp or up to the leader completely unchallenged and unescorted.
** Jon's apprenticeship under Qhorin is very truncated in favour of a much larger Season 2 role for Ygritte, who has only two scenes in the equivalent novel.
** In the show, Arya is captured by Ser Amory Lorch, made a cupbearer to Tywin at Harrenhal, and has Jaqen kill Ser Amory and the Tickler before strong-arming him into helping her escape when Tywin decides to leave her with the psychopathic Gregor Clegane. In the books, she escapes Lorch only to be caught by the Mountain, set to scrubbing floors at Harrenhal, and have Jaqen kill the rapist Chiswyck and her abusive boss Weese (both AdaptedOut) before strong-arming him into helper her free 100 captives who turn out to already be part of a TrojanPrisoner gambit that results in Lorch's execution and Arya becoming Roose Bolton's cupbearer, only for her to make her own escape after Bolton decides to leave her with the psychopathic Vargo Hoat.
** In the books, Tywin marches west to end Robb's pillaging of the Westerlands but is halted by Edmure all along the Red Fork, prompting him to turn around and engage Stannis at King's Landing. In the show, Tywin simply marches to King's Landing and Edmure's victory is turned into a Pyrrhic skirmish against the Mountain.
** The Battle of Blackwater is simplified to an amphibious assault countered by wildfire and reinforcements, eliminating Stannis' land army, Joffrey's fleet, and the chain boom used to trap both fleets in the wildfire inferno.
** The show combines Sam's confrontation with a White Walker en route to Craster's and with wights at Whitetree into a single scene. The main consequence of this is that many more black brothers refuse to believe him because Gilly is the only witness.
** In the books, a lot of people really do believe Brienne killed Renly, leading to a confrontation between her and Loras that Jaime must step in to resolve. In the show, Loras simply blames the true culprit and even Margaery (who does initially blame Brienne) is easily convinced otherwise.
** Brienne's search for Sansa is condensed to a couple of scenes in which she quickly and coincidentally picks up the correct trail, clearing the way for a more action-oriented AdaptationExpansion than her melancholic ''Literature/AFeastForCrows'' material witnessing the aftermath of the war to provide context for the rise of the Sparrows.
** The Battle of Castle Black is simplified to an all-out, one-night attack from north and south. In the books, there are raids all along the Wall to draw out the garrison and three distinct battles: the Thenn's southern attack (which Jon prevents), Mance's main assault a few days later, which drags on for days, and an attempt by the Weeper to cross the Gorge near the Shadow Tower. The arrival of TheCavalry also borders on BattleDiscretionShot, Mance surrenders rather than leading a counter-charge, and Tormund is captured rather than escaping.
** The Vale arc is very self-contained with a dozen new characters in the novels: Littlefinger creates a patsy for Lysa's murder and wins over the initial investigation with bribery, but seven powerful lords including Bronze Yohn Royce demand his resignation and custody of Robin Arryn, prompting Littlefinger to use diplomacy and duplicity to win over his less zealous opponents, all while Sansa struggles to remain incognito. Since the show-runners consider this "sidelining" the characters, Littlefinger has no patsy, Sansa wins over Yohn Royce for Littlefinger by revealing her identity, and Robin is immediately left in Royce's custody so Sansa can be moved into the role of Ramsay's abused bride Jeyne Poole.
** The witch's prophecy in "The Wars to Come" is trimmed. In the books she concludes that once grief has consumed Cersei, the ''valonqar'' (little brother) will choke the life out of her, which strongly affects Cersei's view of Tyrion especially after Joffrey's death. Cersei's friend Melara is also prophesied to die young, and the books strongly imply Cersei pushed her down a well soon after.
** A number of scenes centered around Tywin's murder and funeral are condensed into a single bier-side scene. Notably missing are Cersei's reactions to the crime scene, the corpse's grotesque rictus and smell (there are parallels to William the Conqueror in a great man stinking up his own funeral), and Jaime's first real attempt at parenting.
** Mance Rayder is legitimately burnt at the stake in the show instead of disguised by Melisandre and later sent to Winterfell as "Abel the Bard" to rescue Ramsay's bride.
** The election of a new Lord Commander takes many days in the books and involves Sam playing TheChessmaster and ultimately lying to sell his compromise candidate to different factions in different ways. In "The House of Black and White", it takes only a few minutes, a single ballot, and Sam's role is reduced to an attack ad against Janos Slynt (who isn't even a candidate in the show).
** In the books, Jon gives Janos Slynt multiple chances to reconsider before executing him for insubordination. In the show, upon Jano's second refusal, Jon calls for his sword without considering hanging him first.
** Jaime's Season 4 arc sees him take over his uncle Kevan's role as Tyrion's quasi-lawyer. Season 5 gives Jaime an AdaptationExpansion RedemptionQuest to Dorne while his book arc has Jaime attempting to reform the Kingsguard, refusing to be Cersei's YesMan, and leading a thoroughly professional mopping up campaign in the Riverlands.
** Cersei simply arrests the reigning High Septon, appoints the High Sparrow and restores the militant orders, and prompts them to strike at the Tyrells. In the books, the previous High Septon dies by VorpalPillow at Cersei's command, the more militant sparrows strong-arm their leader's election, Cersei is coaxed into rearming the Faith in exchange for forgiving Crown debts and acknowledging Tommen as king, and her strike at the Tyrells is part of a separate-but-interconnected plot.
** The Ironborn Kingsmoot is much shorter and simpler than in the books, where there were several more candidates, most notably Balon and Euron's younger brother Victarion. Parts of Victarion's Iron Fleet subplot were given to Yara and Theon, but the Shield Islands subplot was omitted entirely.
** The Meereenese plot is extremely abbreviated. The books have more councillors, more killings, more suitors, more intrigues, and a second war that engulfs Slaver's Bay involving macro politics and economics, bloody sieges, naval blockades, hostage exchanges, treacherous sellswords, a plague of dysentery, and a plot to steal a dragon. The show distills all this down to a domestic struggle between Daenerys' abolitionists and the Sons of the Harpy.
** In the books, Tyrion and Jorah are bought by one of the Yunkish patricians besieging Meereen but escape by striking a deal with a devious mercenary captain while Barristan establishes a military junta to break the siege before the Volantene fleet arrives. In the show there is no Yunkish siege or Volantene fleet and Barristan is assassinated, leaving Tyrion to run the city while Jorah and Daario go looking for Dany.
** The show omits Daenerys' VisionQuest in the Dothraki Sea. In the books, she accidentally poisons herself with berries, bringing on delirious visions featuring Jorah, Viserys, and Quaithe all urging her to be a true Targaryen and fulfill her destiny, which seems to have a marked effect on her confidence and decisiveness.
** Hardhome takes place entirely off-stage via laconic reports in the books. The show's Hardhome arc is actually a loose amalgam of three separate events: Cotter Pyke's naval expedition sent by Jon to rescue the starving wildlings besieged by the Others at Hardhome; Jon's discovery of a struggling group of wildling men, women and children just outside of the Wall when he escorts a group of new recruits to swear their vows and Jon brings the group of wildlings south of the Wall to shelter; and Jon's negotiations to allow Tormund's band through the Wall. The show takes the Hardhome context and applies it to successfully, bringing thousands of wildlings and giants through the Wall, with a BigBadassBattleSequence for good measure.
** In the books, Sam vehemently protests Jon's command that he become a maester and since Mance's son has become a CompositeCharacter with Gilly's son (Little Sam, Gilly's son in the show), there is no babyswitch storyline in the show, wherein Jon forces Gilly to swap babies so he can both save Mance's son from being burned alive by Melisandre for his king's blood and keep Gilly's son safe (who has no king's blood) under his protection at Castle Black. In the show, Sam requests to become a maester and departs with Gilly and her son, Little Sam.
** The Stannis vs. Bolton story arc is vastly simplified from the book version. Stannis' capture of the Ironborn at Deepwood Motte and alliance with the Mormonts and mountain clans is removed, as are House Bolton's Frey allies and reluctant bannerman. Davos is never sent to find Rickon Stark in exchange for House Manderly's alliance, but rather gets sent back to Castle Black to get Jon Snow to send more aid. The delicate and tense balance of power in the North hasn't been touched on, and the Stannis' military strategy is reduced to a single, straightforward, all-out attack.
** The show keeps all of Stannis' faction together when he marches directly on Winterfell, whereas in the books, Melisandre, Selyse, and Shireen remain at the Wall and Davos is dispatched to seek allies in White Harbor while Stannis rallies the northern mountain clans by liberating Deepwood Motte from the Ironborn.
** The books are packed with prophecies and dreams, but the show demythifies most of the storylines, leaving only Bran and Jojen's dreams, a few of Melisandre's visions, and Maggy's prophecy about Cersei. This leads to characters like Moqorro and the Ghost of High Heart being AdaptedOut, Quaithe of Asshai playing a much more limited role, and occasional oddities like the showrunners describing Daenerys' adoration outside Yunkai as a "revelation from a prophecy" even though the show's revision of the House of the Undying meant no such prophecy was established.
** The many complex relationships between noble families are generally either simplified or omitted. House Frey is a good example since despite their secondary importance in the books they are part of multiple succession disputes and broken into several factions (particularly the rivalry between Edwyn and Black Walder), all of which the show ignores since sifting through that huge family tree could be a show unto itself.
21st Jun '17 8:02:18 AM bleach246
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* ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'': In the manga, Annie became Eren's mentor, to which the two grew a mutual respect and admiration for each other. This is removed from the anime and causes Eren's hesitation to [[spoiler:accept Annie as an enemy]] to come a little out of nowhere. An upcoming ''Attack on Titan'' compilation film titled "Wings of Freedom" will include more of Eren and Annie's interactions from the manga however.

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* ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'': ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'':
**
In the manga, Annie became Eren's mentor, to which the two grew a mutual respect and admiration for each other. This is removed from the anime and causes Eren's hesitation to [[spoiler:accept Annie as an enemy]] to come a little out of nowhere. An upcoming ''Attack on Titan'' The compilation film titled "Wings of Freedom" will include included more of Eren and Annie's interactions from the manga however.and the second season likewise followed suit.
This list shows the last 10 events of 316. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AdaptationDistillation