History Main / ActuallyADoombot

14th Feb '17 2:54:49 PM ILikeRobots
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** The ''VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea'' subseries does this twice. In the first game, BigBad Gharnef creates two clones of himself during his chapter. Stat-wise, the clones look identical to the real Gharnef, and the game ''acts'' as though they're immune to non-starlight damage, but they really aren't. The real one could be any of the three (it's random, and changes every time), but you'll know a clone when you kill it because they don't have death quotes. They also all appear to be carrying the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Falchion]], but two of them are fakes... which, interestingly enough, also follow this trope: their stats show up the same as the real one, but when dropped they turn out to be just an ordinary Steel Sword.
** In ''New Mystery'', the Roro you fight as the boss of Chapter 6x turns out to be just a clone. You won't fight the ''real'' Roro until 12x... where he's accompanied by [[UpToEleven an entire army of Roros]]. There are three 'boss' Roros with slightly higher stats, and a whole bunch of {{Mook}} Roros. The {{Mooks}} spawn constantly until you kill the real one, which could be any of the three 'boss' versions. (like Gharnef, it's random) This trope is also discussed in-story, it's implied Roro has taken this to such extremes even ''he'' doesn't know which of his clones is the real one anymore.

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** The ''VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea'' subseries does this twice. ** In the first game, ''Videogame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight,'' BigBad Gharnef creates two clones of himself during his chapter. Stat-wise, the clones look identical to the real Gharnef, and the game ''acts'' as though they're immune to non-starlight damage, but they really aren't. The real one could be any of the three (it's random, and changes every time), but you'll know a clone when you kill it because they don't have death quotes. They also all appear to be carrying the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Falchion]], but two of them are fakes... which, interestingly enough, also follow this trope: their stats show up the same as the real one, but when dropped they turn out to be just an ordinary Steel Sword.
** In ''New Mystery'', ''[[Videogame/FireEmblemMysteryOfTheEmblem New Mystery]]'', the Roro you fight as the boss of Chapter 6x turns out to be just a clone. You won't fight the ''real'' Roro until 12x... where he's accompanied by [[UpToEleven an entire army of Roros]]. There are three 'boss' Roros with slightly higher stats, and a whole bunch of {{Mook}} Roros. The {{Mooks}} spawn constantly until you kill the real one, which could be any of the three 'boss' versions. (like Gharnef, it's random) This trope is also discussed in-story, it's implied Roro has taken this to such extremes even ''he'' doesn't know which of his clones is the real one anymore.



** The Japanese version of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]'' also says that [[spoiler:The Black Knight]] that Ike defeated in ''Path of Radiance'' was a "ghost" created by malfunctioning warp powder. The English localization, however, thinking that was ridiculous, changed it to an instance of ILetYouWin using existing canon and characterization.

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** The Japanese version of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblemRadiantDawn'' also says that [[spoiler:The Black Knight]] that Ike defeated in ''Path of Radiance'' ''Videogame/FireEmblemPathOfRadiance'' was a "ghost" created by malfunctioning warp powder. The English localization, however, thinking that was ridiculous, changed it to an instance of ILetYouWin using existing canon and characterization.
14th Feb '17 1:41:30 PM ILikeRobots
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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia'' does this twice. In the first game, BigBad Gharnef creates two clones of himself during his chapter. Stat-wise, the clones look identical to the real Gharnef, and the game ''acts'' as though they're immune to non-starlight damage, but they really aren't. The real one could be any of the three (it's random, and changes every time), but you'll know a clone when you kill it because they don't have death quotes. They also all appear to be carrying the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Falchion]], but two of them are fakes... which, interestingly enough, also follow this trope: their stats show up the same as the real one, but when dropped they turn out to be just an ordinary Steel Sword.

to:

* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblem:''
** The ''VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea'' subseries
does this twice. In the first game, BigBad Gharnef creates two clones of himself during his chapter. Stat-wise, the clones look identical to the real Gharnef, and the game ''acts'' as though they're immune to non-starlight damage, but they really aren't. The real one could be any of the three (it's random, and changes every time), but you'll know a clone when you kill it because they don't have death quotes. They also all appear to be carrying the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Falchion]], but two of them are fakes... which, interestingly enough, also follow this trope: their stats show up the same as the real one, but when dropped they turn out to be just an ordinary Steel Sword.



** ''Fire Emblem Gaiden'' also uses this, but in the "HandWave for the player winning what's supposed to be a HopelessBossFight" form. Dozer, the game's StarterVillain, appears on the map in an early chapter with stats normally too high for you to beat at that point. If you somehow ''do'' manage to defeat him, his NumberTwo reveals he was actually a BodyDouble. [[SchrodingersGun It's likely this is only true if you beat him]], since the body double isn't mentioned anywhere else.

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** ''Fire Emblem Gaiden'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblemGaiden'' also uses this, but in the "HandWave for the player winning what's supposed to be a HopelessBossFight" form. Dozer, the game's StarterVillain, appears on the map in an early chapter with stats normally too high for you to beat at that point. If you somehow ''do'' manage to defeat him, his NumberTwo reveals he was actually a BodyDouble. [[SchrodingersGun It's likely this is only true if you beat him]], since the body double isn't mentioned anywhere else.
26th Jan '17 1:59:36 AM rafi
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* Marvel's Mephisto has sometimes been impersonated by lesser demons who imitate his form. Such demons are defeated far more easily than the virtually invincible Mephisto.

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* Marvel's Mephisto ComicBook/{{Mephisto}} has sometimes been impersonated by lesser demons who imitate his form. Such demons are defeated far more easily than the virtually invincible Mephisto.



* This is revealed to be the case during ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'' for the ComicBook/NewGods and {{ComicBook/Darkseid}}. All that Earth has ever seen is somewhat limited projections of the real gods which operate on a higher plane of reality.

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* This is revealed to be the case during ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'' for the ComicBook/NewGods and {{ComicBook/Darkseid}}.ComicBook/{{Darkseid}}. All that Earth has ever seen is somewhat limited projections of the real gods which operate on a higher plane of reality.
11th Jan '17 7:45:53 PM NineballCirno
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** ''Challenge Of The Superfriends'' had another example of good guys using this trick. The Legion of Doom found out about a sealed away weapon that could act as a lethal death ray to the heroes and tricked Superman into breaking the vault open. (That's right, this episode suspended the show's NeverSayDie policy.) The Legion of Doom were apparently then able to decimate the heroes mercilessly, often in front of terrified citizens. When it seemed all the heroes had perished and the villains had achieved complete victory, Luthor saw no further need for the thing, and casually threw it away. A ''terrible'' mistake. A day later, the Superfriends reappeared, and after pulping the villains, revealed that they had been hiding in their satellite base (presumably a sort of precursor to the Watchtower) while using android duplicates created by Superman in the Fortress of Solitude to make the Legion believe they had been killed. Once Luthor threw it away, the Apache Chief went into the sewer in protective clothing and destroyed it, permanently. (Of course, [[FridgeLogic when you think about it]], the Legion of Doom should have been suspicious when they seemed to win so easily...)



* ''WesternAnimation/ChallengeOfTheSuperfriends'' had another example of good guys using this trick. The Legion of Doom found out about a sealed away weapon that could act as a lethal death ray to the heroes and tricked Superman into breaking the vault open. (That's right, this episode suspended the show's NeverSayDie policy.) The Legion of Doom were apparently then able to decimate the heroes mercilessly, often in front of terrified citizens. When it seemed all the heroes had perished and the villains had achieved complete victory, Luthor saw no further need for the thing, and casually threw it away. A ''terrible'' mistake. A day later, the Superfriends reappeared, and after pulping the villains, revealed that they had been hiding in their satellite base (presumably a sort of precursor to the Watchtower) while using android duplicates created by Superman in the Fortress of Solitude to make the Legion believe they had been killed. Once Luthor threw it away, the Apache Chief went into the sewer in protective clothing and destroyed it, permanently. (Of course, [[FridgeLogic when you think about it]], the Legion of Doom should have been suspicious when they seemed to win so easily...)
8th Jan '17 6:36:14 PM nombretomado
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* In Roleplay/DinoAttackRPG, [[LEGOAlphaTeam Ogel]] was killed [[RuleOfThree three times]] during the FinalBattle and yet ''still'' managed to survive. Wondering how? [[spoiler:Each time Ogel apparently died, it was actually one of his Skeleton Drones in disguise, as a reference to the March/April 2001 issue of LEGO Mania.]]

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* In Roleplay/DinoAttackRPG, [[LEGOAlphaTeam [[Toys/LEGOAlphaTeam Ogel]] was killed [[RuleOfThree three times]] during the FinalBattle and yet ''still'' managed to survive. Wondering how? [[spoiler:Each time Ogel apparently died, it was actually one of his Skeleton Drones in disguise, as a reference to the March/April 2001 issue of LEGO Mania.]]
29th Dec '16 9:24:00 AM Trooper924
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Added DiffLines:

**The above speech references a rather bizarre invocation of this trope in the early eighties. During a meeting between Arcade and Doom in Uncanny X-Men #146, the former lights a match by striking it against the latter's armor. This upset John Byrne, the Fantastic Four writer at the time, who felt that Doom would've never let anyone get away with such a disrespectful action towards his person. Thus in Fantastic Four #258, he revealed that the Doom at the meeting was a Doombot and then had the real Doom destroy it for failing to punish Arcade.
28th Dec '16 2:59:08 AM sayaleviathan
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Anime/PsychoPass'', [[spoiler:Chief Kasei]] had an array of cyborg body doubles as it was first revealed at the end of episode 16. Whenever it gets damaged or destroyed, there would always be another one. But the brain residing that body does not. In [[Anime/PsychoPassTheMovie the movie]], [[spoiler:it turns out that the SEAUn chairman is a body double because the real one was assassinated by mercenaries hired by the Sibyl system themselves]].
27th Dec '16 11:15:34 PM Tron80
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** Geoff Johns invoked this ''very same trope'' the ''very next issue of'' ''ComicBook/ActionComics'' where every single appearance by ComicBook/{{Brainiac}} in the ComicBook/PostCrisis DCU, prior to Johns' "Brainiac" storyline was actually a "Brainiac probe". Even Milton Fine wasn't possessed by Vil Dox's disembodied intelligence, but by nanoprobes.

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** Geoff Johns invoked this ''very same trope'' the ''very next issue of'' ''ComicBook/ActionComics'' where every single appearance by ComicBook/{{Brainiac}} in the ComicBook/PostCrisis DCU, prior to Johns' "Brainiac" ''Comicbook/SupermanBrainiac'' storyline was actually a "Brainiac probe". Even Milton Fine wasn't possessed by Vil Dox's disembodied intelligence, but by nanoprobes.
26th Dec '16 5:37:05 PM PaulA
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* In the first season finale to Creator/{{Filmation}}'s ''WesternAnimation/FlashGordon'', Ming appears to die, but the corpse is revealed as a Ming-bot, and the real Ming flies away cackling that he will regain his throne and have revenge. The implication, at least, is that it was the real Ming who had lost a fight with Flash a few minutes earlier, but that he had pulled the switch when he and Flash were briefly separated.

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* In the first season finale to Creator/{{Filmation}}'s ''WesternAnimation/FlashGordon'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Flash Gordon|1979}}'', Ming appears to die, but the corpse is revealed as a Ming-bot, and the real Ming flies away cackling that he will regain his throne and have revenge. The implication, at least, is that it was the real Ming who had lost a fight with Flash a few minutes earlier, but that he had pulled the switch when he and Flash were briefly separated.
14th Oct '16 9:53:41 AM Tron80
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* Doctor Doom

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* Doctor DoomComicbook/DoctorDoom:



* ComicBook/SpiderMan's enemy Mysterio uses this trick a lot too. Seeing as Mysterio is also fond of holograms and illusions, Spider-Man often cannot tell if he facing the real Mysterio, an illusion, or a robot, and even worse, the same often goes for a lot of other stuff he has to fight when the villain is involved.

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* ComicBook/SpiderMan's Franchise/SpiderMan:
** Spider-Man's
enemy Mysterio uses this trick a lot too. Seeing as Mysterio is also fond of holograms and illusions, Spider-Man often cannot tell if he facing the real Mysterio, an illusion, or a robot, and even worse, the same often goes for a lot of other stuff he has to fight when the villain is involved.



* Perhaps the most infamous usage of this trick in Spider-Man history is the first "death" of Aunt May. She peacefully died of old age in a realistic and tasteful manner; Peter and the other characters mourned her and eventually moved on. However, later editor-in-chief Bob Harras ''demanded'' that she be brought back to life. So, Aunt May was found alive and it was revealed that ComicBook/NormanOsborn had hired an actress to impersonate Aunt May perfectly, and kept up the charade even on her deathbed, meaning Peter (and the readers) cried over a total stranger.

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* ** Perhaps the most infamous usage of this trick in Spider-Man history is the first "death" of Aunt May. She peacefully died of old age in a realistic and tasteful manner; Peter and the other characters mourned her and eventually moved on. However, later editor-in-chief Bob Harras ''demanded'' that she be brought back to life. So, Aunt May was found alive and it was revealed that ComicBook/NormanOsborn had hired an actress to impersonate Aunt May perfectly, and kept up the charade even on her deathbed, meaning Peter (and the readers) cried over a total stranger.



* This is revealed to be the case during ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'' for the ComicBook/NewGods and {{ComicBook/Darkseid}}. All that earth has ever seen is somewhat limited projections of the real gods which operate on a higher plane of reality.
* And then there's Prometheus, a DC villain who was created to be a sort of anti-Batman who was so intelligent and well-trained he could almost take out the entire Justice League on his own. Except that he had long since fallen prey to VillainDecay and had been reduced to just another generic baddie who gets his butt kicked by whatever hero happens to be around. The [[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League]] miniseries ''[[Comicbook/JusticeLeagueCryForJustice Cry for Justice]]'' attempted to fix this by revealing that the real Prometheus had been in hiding since he almost killed the JLA, and the loser who kept getting kicked around all these years was an impostor, who Prometheus had killed. But now the real deal was back, ready and able to...get killed off in short order by ComicBook/GreenArrow. It was quite a waste, but not nearly the worst thing about that series.

to:

* This is revealed to be the case during ''ComicBook/FinalCrisis'' for the ComicBook/NewGods and {{ComicBook/Darkseid}}. All that earth Earth has ever seen is somewhat limited projections of the real gods which operate on a higher plane of reality.
* And then there's Prometheus, a DC villain who was created to be a sort of anti-Batman who was so intelligent and well-trained he could almost take out the entire Justice League on his own. Except that he had long since fallen prey to VillainDecay and had been reduced to just another generic baddie who gets his butt kicked by whatever hero happens to be around. The [[Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica Justice League]] miniseries ''[[Comicbook/JusticeLeagueCryForJustice Cry for Justice]]'' ''Comicbook/JusticeLeagueCryForJustice'' attempted to fix this by revealing that the real Prometheus had been in hiding since he almost killed the JLA, and the loser who kept getting kicked around all these years was an impostor, who Prometheus had killed. But now the real deal was back, ready and able to... get killed off in short order by ComicBook/GreenArrow. It was quite a waste, but not nearly the worst thing about that series.



* InvertedTrope: By Creator/GeoffJohns was the revelation in ''ComicBook/ActionComics'' that AxCrazy Toyman was a robot designed to fool even Superman, and the real Toyman was still a HarmlessVillain. (A HarmlessVillain who was still ''indirectly'' responsible for Adam Grant's death, but still...). Also, every other previous incarnation deviating too much from Johns' Toyman? a robot did it...
* Geoff Johns invoked this ''very same trope'' the ''very next issue of'' ''ComicBook/ActionComics'' where every single appearance by ComicBook/{{Brainiac}} in the ComicBook/PostCrisis DCU, prior to Johns' "Brainiac" storyline was actually a "Brainiac probe". Even Milton Fine wasn't possessed by Vil Dox's disembodied intelligence, but by nanoprobes. It seems no trope was too overused in Johns' quest to bring back the Silver Age into the Superman saga.

to:

* Franchise/{{Superman}}:
**
InvertedTrope: By Creator/GeoffJohns was the revelation in ''ComicBook/ActionComics'' that AxCrazy Toyman was a robot designed to fool even Superman, and the real Toyman was still a HarmlessVillain. (A HarmlessVillain who was still ''indirectly'' responsible for Adam Grant's death, but still...). Also, every other previous incarnation deviating too much from Johns' Toyman? a robot did it...
* ** Geoff Johns invoked this ''very same trope'' the ''very next issue of'' ''ComicBook/ActionComics'' where every single appearance by ComicBook/{{Brainiac}} in the ComicBook/PostCrisis DCU, prior to Johns' "Brainiac" storyline was actually a "Brainiac probe". Even Milton Fine wasn't possessed by Vil Dox's disembodied intelligence, but by nanoprobes. It seems no nanoprobes.
* Comicbook/{{Supergirl}}:
** Super-villain Toyman's robots look like real human beings, and they are capable of deceive even Kara's XRayVision. In "Day of the Dollmaker" Kara invokes the
trope was too overused in Johns' quest when she warns Toyman that he will answer her questions lest she believes he is actually a robot and tears him apart to bring back verify it.
--->'''Supergirl:''' And how do we know you're even
the Silver Age into real Winslow Schott? I've seen one of your robots before -- no, two of them. One here in Gotham, the Superman saga.other on New Krypton. And that one had a part in my world's destruction. A small part, sure, but an important one. Your work is very well made. Impossible to tell apart from real, live human beings, even with my X-Ray vision. So please. Answer Ms. Grant's questions, or else another outburst like that will lead me to believe you're one of Schott's automatons... and I'll start probing to make sure you're real.
** In ''Comicbook/SupergirlRebirth #2'', Kara fights Cyborg Superman. She wins, but she is disappointed when she discovers that it is only a drone.
--->'''Supergirl:''' Of course... Another lie. Another fake. A drone. It exploded but... I barely touched it.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ActuallyADoombot