History Main / AMillionIsAStatistic

10th Oct '17 10:19:40 AM 309216364
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'', due to a food crisis, the government sent 250,000 people to [[BlatantLies reclaim Wall Maria]] with only less than 100 returning. One of the casualties is Armin's grandfather who handed him his hat before leaving. Another happens in episode 25 where the large number of civilian deaths are all represented by a bloodied little girl crying and stumbling in the streets over several corpses.

to:

* In ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'', due to a food crisis, the government sent 250,000 people to [[BlatantLies reclaim Wall Maria]] with only less than 100 200 returning. One of the casualties is Armin's grandfather who handed him his hat before leaving. Another happens in episode 25 where the large number of civilian deaths are all represented by a bloodied little girl crying and stumbling in the streets over several corpses.
27th Sep '17 1:38:59 PM Njein
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Franchise/JamesBond'': Most of the villains 007 faces are cunning but incredibly insane and homicidal sociopaths to begin with, as while they claim that they're {{Well Intentioned Extremist}}s to begin with, but are only motivated by {{Greed}} while maintaining a superficial charm, and some are even [[OmnicidalManiac willing to kill or maim countless innocents]] for [[ItsAllAboutMe their own selfish gain]], all without a shred of guilt or remorse. [[Film/{{Goldfinger}} Goldfinger]], [[Film/{{Moonraker}} Hugo Drax]], [[Film/AViewToAKill Max Zorin]], [[Film/LicenceToKill Franz Sanchez]], [[Film/GoldenEye Xenia]] [[FemmeFatale Onatopp]], [[Film/{{Spectre}} Max Denbigh/C]], [[Film/TomorrowNeverDies Elliot Carver]] and [[Film/QuantumOfSolace Dominic Greene]] are some good examples.
** Ernst Stavro Blofeld, the nefarious leader of SPECTRE and 007's biggest ArchEnemy in all of his incarnations, is quite an insane and ruthless megalomaniac and this enables him to be the perfect example of a DiabolicalMastermind. He doesn't care for all the misery he fomented as the only thing that matters is how much he's profiting from his {{Evil Plan}}s. Everything else can rot in hell. If minions or millions are killed, so be it. They're just as expendable. [[BadBoss If his minions fail to please him]], it's an automatic death sentence. And who gives a damn about the deaths he caused so far?
17th Sep '17 8:27:14 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* PlayedForLaughs (yes, really) in Music/TomLehrer's ''We Will All Go Together When We Go'', which notes that soon no one will have to be sad about funerals and contemplating their own mortality anymore - when nuclear war will kill everyone at the same time!
-->We will all bake together, when we bake
-->There'll be nobody present at the wake
-->With complete participation
-->In this grand incineration
-->[[TheFifties Nearly three billion]] hunks of well-done steak!

to:

* PlayedForLaughs (yes, really) in Music/TomLehrer's ''We "[[Music/AnEveningWastedWithTomLehrer We Will All Go Together When We Go'', Go]]", which notes that soon no one will have to be sad about funerals and contemplating their own mortality anymore - -- when nuclear war will kill everyone at the same time!
-->We -->''We will all bake together, when we bake
-->There'll
bake\\
There'll
be nobody present at the wake
-->With
wake\\
With
complete participation
-->In
participation\\
In
this grand incineration
-->[[TheFifties
incineration\\
[[TheFifties
Nearly three billion]] hunks of well-done steak!steak!''
4th Sep '17 7:51:22 AM Peteman
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In general though, the Universal Century averts this hard by often pointing out that every soldier is human in and of themselves, have emotions, dreams and an identity of their own, and that every soldier that dies is another life lost pointlessly in war (in fact, in ''Zeta Gundam'', when protagonist Kamille Bidan gets angry at resident PsychoForHire Yazan Gable, he is quite obviously angry that Yazan treats war like a game and that people on all sides are dying not just on his side).

to:

** In general though, the Universal Century averts this hard by often pointing out that every soldier is human in and of themselves, have emotions, dreams and an identity of their own, and that every soldier that dies is another life lost pointlessly in war (in fact, in ''Zeta Gundam'', when protagonist Kamille Bidan gets angry at resident PsychoForHire Yazan Gable, he is quite obviously angry that Yazan treats war like a game and that people on all sides are dying not just on his side).
14th Jul '17 10:21:07 AM Silverblade2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Massively averted by the Doctor in regards to the destruction of Gallifrey in the New Series. That event weighs on his conscience harder than anything else. He was asked just before he pushed The Button how many children were on Gallifrey at that moment, and were about to die by his hand. He didn't know at the time, but he later counted (2.47 billion). [[spoiler:Of course with his other incarnations he ends up saving Gallifrey in a TrickedOutTime gambit, but due to the time lines being out of sync doesn't remember this so the point stands.]]

to:

** Massively averted Defied by the Doctor in regards to the destruction of Gallifrey in the New Series. That event weighs on his conscience harder than anything else. He was asked just before he pushed The Button how many children were on Gallifrey at that moment, and were about to die by his hand. He didn't know at the time, but he later counted (2.47 billion). [[spoiler:Of course with his other incarnations he ends up saving Gallifrey in a TrickedOutTime gambit, but due to the time lines being out of sync doesn't remember this so the point stands.]]
30th May '17 1:13:17 PM LadyJaneGrey
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In ''Fanfic/ShadowchasersConspiracy'', a disturbing discussion of this comes up as Francis tries to reason with Sheeva, or so he wants her to believe. He challenges her claims of being an honorable fighter by mentioning the long lifespan of the Shokkan and asking how many deaths such a warrior who has lived so long must is ''personally'' responsible for if such battles to the death are commonplace among them. He suggests Sheeva must have killed ''thousands'' (even one victim every two months would do so) also mentioning how many families she must have torn apart, even suggesting that some of her opponents may have been children of previous ones, seeking revenge. (Of course, he's playing on Sheeva's confusion resulting from being yanked into a setting where [[WrongGenreSavvy the rules of her own reality]] don't apply.)
29th May '17 4:02:16 PM billybobfred
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Jeff Foxworthy did a bit once where he related that he'd been watching the news, and the top story was 80 people dying in a bus crash. Foxworthy said "the only thing I could think was 'How on earth did they get 80 people on a bus?'....once it becomes a physics problem, it takes the emotional sting out of it."

to:

* Jeff Foxworthy did a bit once where he related that he'd been watching the news, and the top story was 80 people dying in a bus crash. Foxworthy said "the only thing I could think was 'How on earth did they [[ClownCar get 80 people on a bus?'....bus]]?'....once it becomes a physics problem, it takes the emotional sting out of it."
22nd Apr '17 1:09:10 PM Connacht
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** When you meet Grunt, however, the trope might be purely represented. Depending on your previous choices, [[spoiler:you meet a rachni queen that is friendly to you. You must fight a lot of enemies in order to rescue her, while Grunt and his company of elite troopers are fighting in another location. However, both your team and Grunt's company are overrun by enemy. You have to either go rescue Grunt, which leaves the rachni queen to enemy hands, or call Grunt to fall back and assist you. Grunt will leave his position just to help you, but without his lead his companions are doomed to death. Then Grunt might die as well while covering your reatreat, or can survive, in both cases bearing a lot of emotion in the cutscenes and for the plot. His company results utterly decimated, but no tear is dropped for those soldiers, who play the role of masked nameless strong mooks. Only the life of Grunts play an emotional role. His death is a tragedy; their death is almost unnoticed.]]
15th Apr '17 1:06:57 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* An in-universe example: In SMStirling's {{Emberverse}}, most of Earth's population died following the Change, which rendered guns and most forms of power generation inoperable. Twenty-plus years later, most of those born since the Change take living in such a death-ridden world for granted; some of the young protagonists even ridicule most pre-Change humans for being so incompetent at survival skills. While exploring Toronto's CN Tower, however, they discover the skeletons of a woman (apparently a Change-time suicide) and her cat, and are deeply moved by the evidence of these particular deaths.

to:

* An in-universe example: In SMStirling's Creator/SMStirling's {{Emberverse}}, most of Earth's population died following the Change, which rendered guns and most forms of power generation inoperable. Twenty-plus years later, most of those born since the Change take living in such a death-ridden world for granted; some of the young protagonists even ridicule most pre-Change humans for being so incompetent at survival skills. While exploring Toronto's CN Tower, however, they discover the skeletons of a woman (apparently a Change-time suicide) and her cat, and are deeply moved by the evidence of these particular deaths.
10th Apr '17 1:49:17 PM MarsJenkar
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'': The episode "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS3E3TheSurvivors The Survivors]]" calls on this trope. A god-like being settles down with a human wife and becomes a pacifist - but then a hostile race attacks their planet, and the being's wife is killed defending the planet. This angers the being into destroying the hostile race - the entire race of fifty billion. This is where Picard finds him, alone on the blighted planet with a simulacrum of his wife.
-->'''Kevin Uxbridge''': "I saw her broken body... I went insane. My hatred exploded. And in an instant of grief... I destroyed the Husnock! ...No, no, no, no, you don't understand the scope of my crime. I didn't kill just one Husnock, or a hundred, or a thousand. I killed them all. All Husnock, everywhere."
-->'''Picard''': "We are not qualified to be your judges. We have no law to fit your crime. You're free to return to the planet, and to make Rishon live again. ...We leave behind a being of extraordinary power... and conscience. I am not certain if he should be praised or condemned. Only that he should be left alone."
*** Though really, what could they have done? This guy wiped out 50 billion sentients in a single fit of rage, so any attempt to level punishment would be an exercise in futility, since he could only be punished if he wanted to be punished. Self-imposed exile to an empty planet is as good a punishment as any they could levy given what they're dealing with.

to:

** ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'': The episode "[[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS3E3TheSurvivors The Survivors]]" calls on plays with this trope. A god-like being settles down with a human wife and becomes a pacifist - but then a hostile race attacks their planet, and the being's wife is killed defending the planet. This angers the being into destroying the hostile race - the entire race of fifty billion. This is where Picard finds him, alone on the blighted planet with a simulacrum of his wife.
-->'''Kevin Uxbridge''': "I saw her broken body... I went insane. My hatred exploded. And in an instant of grief... I destroyed the Husnock! ...No, no, no, no, you don't understand the scope of my crime. I didn't kill just one Husnock, or a hundred, or a thousand. [[FinalSolution I killed them all. All Husnock, everywhere."
-->'''Picard''':
]]"\\
'''Picard''':
"We are not qualified to be your judges. We have no law to fit your crime. You're free to return to the planet, and to make Rishon live again. ...[[note]]Left unstated were several ''practical'' reasons not to pursue justice further, including the fact that the Federation lacked the ''capability'' of levying stronger punishment on such a powerful being. Kevin's self-imposed exile on the ruined world with the simulacrum of Rishon to keep him company--and remind him of his misdeed--was as effective a punishment as any the Federation could impose.[[/note]] ...We leave behind a being of extraordinary power... and conscience. I am not certain if he should be praised or condemned. Only that he should be left alone."
*** Though really, what could they have done? This guy wiped out 50 billion sentients in a single fit of rage, so any attempt to level punishment would be an exercise in futility, since he could only be punished if he wanted to be punished. Self-imposed exile to an empty planet is as good a punishment as any they could levy given what they're dealing with.
"
This list shows the last 10 events of 609. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AMillionIsAStatistic