History Main / AKA47

17th Aug '17 1:20:24 PM Rotpar
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* ''{{VideoGame/Foxhole}}'' uses generic names for its weapons, like the SMG, pistol, rifle, etc. However the storm rifle is an advanced 7.92mm rifle capable of selective semi- and full-automatic fire—aka, the famous Sturmgewehr 44 assault rifle.
29th Jul '17 1:56:18 PM Kadorhal
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** The follow up game, ''007 Legends'', uses the same naming scheme as the ''[=GoldenEye=]'' remake - the P99, [=WA2000=], and AK retain their names, all the guns returning from ''[=GoldenEye=]'' keep the fake names they had their, while all the new guns - even Walther's older PPK - have new fake names like the "STK-21 Commando" (AUG), "Tec-Fire [=RF30=]" (Kel-Tec PMR-30), "Faroh M55" (M14), and, as a CallBack to classic ''GoldenEye'', the "KL-033 Mk2" (Skorpion).
* ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'' mostly avoided this by using made-up weapons from the future ([[ShoutOut one of which]] is Franchise/RoboCop's sidearm under a different name), with only a few recognizable real-world weapons like the Colt Double Eagle (as the Falcon 2) and the Steyr TMP (as the CMP-150). Confusingly, one CheatCode let you use weapons from its spiritual precursor ''[=GoldenEye=]'', which had their names changed ''again'' for legal reasons.
** ''Perfect Dark Zero'' flips things around, with fewer totally-fictional sci-fi guns and more real-world ones with new names, such as the P9-P (Walther P99), DW-P5 (H&K [=MP5=]), the new (old?) Superdragon (modified H&K [=G36K=] with an [=AG36=] grenade launcher), and FAC-16 (Colt Model 727 with M203 grenade launcher). Oddly, the M60 machine gun keeps its real-life name (alongside [[AbnormalAmmo the ability to launch caltrops]]).
* ''VideoGame/SoldierOfFortune'' used lots of obvious real-world guns that were given either flatly descriptive names (such as calling what is clearly a SPAS-12 simply the "shotgun") or fake ones, such as "Silver Talon" in lieu of Desert Eagle.

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** The follow up game, ''007 Legends'', uses the same naming scheme as the ''[=GoldenEye=]'' remake - the P99, [=WA2000=], and AK retain their names, all the guns returning from ''[=GoldenEye=]'' keep the fake names they had their, there, while all the new guns - even Walther's older PPK PPK, which is now the "Bennetti [=TC32=]" - have new fake names like the "STK-21 Commando" (AUG), "Tec-Fire [=RF30=]" (Kel-Tec PMR-30), "Faroh M55" (M14), and, as a CallBack to classic ''GoldenEye'', the "KL-033 Mk2" [=Mk2=]" (Skorpion).
* ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'' mostly avoided this by using made-up weapons from the future that at best only vaguely resemble existing weapons ([[ShoutOut one of which]] is including]] Franchise/RoboCop's sidearm under a different name), with only a few recognizable unmodified real-world weapons like the Colt Double Eagle (as the Falcon 2) and the Steyr TMP (as the CMP-150). Confusingly, one CheatCode let you use weapons from its spiritual precursor ''[=GoldenEye=]'', which had their names changed ''again'' for legal reasons.
** ''Perfect Dark Zero'' flips things around, with fewer totally-fictional sci-fi guns and more real-world ones with new names, such as the P9-P (Walther P99), DW-P5 (H&K [=MP5=]), the new (old?) Superdragon (modified H&K [=G36K=] with an [=AG36=] grenade launcher), and FAC-16 (Colt Model 727 with M203 grenade launcher).launcher); even its Plasma Rifle looks like a FAMAS G1 with a few [=LEDs=] stuck on it. Oddly, the M60 machine gun keeps its real-life name (alongside [[AbnormalAmmo the ability to launch caltrops]]).
* ''VideoGame/SoldierOfFortune'' used lots of obvious real-world guns that were given either flatly descriptive names (such as calling what is clearly a SPAS-12 simply the "shotgun") or fake ones, such as "Silver Talon" in lieu of Desert Eagle.Eagle and "Black Panther" for some variety of Glock.



** ''Soldier of Fortune: Payback'' uses a mix of real names, calibers, and fake names for its guns. For example, the M16 is referred to as such, but the Desert Eagle is simply a ".50AE", and the FN [=SCARs=] are now the TCW-L and TCW-H.

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** ''Soldier of Fortune: Payback'' uses a mix of real names, calibers, names and fake or generic names for its guns. For example, the M16 is referred to as such, but the Desert Eagle is simply a ".50AE", and the FN [=SCARs=] are now the TCW-L and TCW-H.



* ''VideoGame/NoOneLivesForever'' uses this, with the exception of M79 grenade launcher and AK-47. What's most puzzling, the Dragunov sniper rifle is referred to as the "Geldmacher SVD", where just "SVD" would suffice (like in the "Klobb" case for ''[=GoldenEye=]'', it was named after a dev team member). Same goes for the sequel.

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* The ''VideoGame/NoOneLivesForever'' series uses this, with the exception of the M79 grenade launcher in the first game and the AK-47. What's most puzzling, the Dragunov sniper rifle is referred to as the "Geldmacher SVD", where just "SVD" would suffice (like in the "Klobb" case for ''[=GoldenEye=]'', it was named after a dev team member). Same goes for the sequel.



** The original game zigzags with this trope. About half the weapons in the game avert this - the [=MP5=], P90, OICW and Jackhammer go by their real names. Others go for generic names - the Accuracy International is simply the "Sniper Rifle", the M249 the "Machine Gun", and the fictional, M202-inspired rocket launcher is the "Rocket Launcher" (in the ''Classic'' UpdatedRerelease, the rocket launcher is instead the "RLX-9157", after text printed on the original game's model). A few more go for ''almost''-correct names, such as the Colt Model 727 referred to as the newer M4, and the G36 with [=AG36=] grenade launcher named after the launcher rather than the rifle. The only fictional name is the Desert Eagle, here called the "Falcon 357".

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** The original game zigzags with this trope. About half the weapons in the game avert this - the [=MP5=], P90, OICW and Jackhammer go by their real names. Others go for generic names - the Accuracy International is simply the "Sniper Rifle", the M249 the "Machine Gun", and the fictional, M202-inspired rocket launcher is the "Rocket Launcher" (in the ''Classic'' UpdatedRerelease, the rocket launcher is instead the "RLX-9157", after text printed on the original game's model). A few more go for ''almost''-correct names, such as the Colt Model 727 referred to as the newer M4, and the G36 with [=AG36=] grenade launcher named after the launcher rather than the rifle. The only fictional name in the original release is the Desert Eagle, here called the "Falcon 357".357".
*** The console versions, however, go more for this. ''Instincts'' in particular goes for generic names for all the guns, with "Handgun" applying to both the Desert Eagle and the Beretta 92, the "Carbine" being a tricked-out M4, etc., alongside an "Assault Rifle" that is some sort of [[MixAndMatchWeapon bizarre mishmash of parts from several different designs]] that vaguely resembles a full-size M16.


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** ''VideoGame/FarCry3BloodDragon'', on the ''other'' other hand, goes full-out for fake names, naming most of them [[ShoutOutThemeNaming in reference to something else.]] The standard pistol is a copy of the Auto-9 from ''Film/RoboCop1987'' named as the "A.J.M. 9" (named for Alex J. Murphy, the name of the character who became [=RoboCop=]), the shotgun is a sawed-down Winchester 1887 named the "Galleria 1991" (named for a location from and the release year of the gun's most famous appearance in ''Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay''), and the Barrett is the "Kobracon" (another ''[=RoboCop=]'' reference, being mocked up to resemble that film's Barrett-inspired "Cobra Assault Cannon").
29th Jul '17 1:11:37 PM Kadorhal
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** Interesting variation in ''Quantum of Solace'': The Walther guns, the P99 and [=WA2000=], keep their original names due to an endorsement deal between Walther Arms and the Bond films, as does the M14 for some reason. Most of the rest of the guns in the game are named in the form of {{Continuity Nod}}s to previous Bond films - the Glocks are the [[Film/GoldFinger GF17/GF18]], the M1911 is the [[Film/CasinoRoyale2006 CR1911]], the M4 is the [[Film/TomorrowNeverDies TND-16]], the AKS-74U is the [[Film/FromRussiaWithLove FRWL]], and the M60 is the [[Film/Octopussy 8-CAT]]. And, strangely enough, the Dragunov is called the [[Film/AViewToAKill V-TAK]] in singleplayer, but in multiplayer is referred to as the [=WA2000=]. [[http://www.imfdb.org/index.php/007:_Quantum_of_Solace_(VG) More here.]]

to:

** Interesting variation in ''Quantum of Solace'': The Walther guns, the P99 and [=WA2000=], keep their original names due to an endorsement deal between Walther Arms and the Bond films, as does the M14 for some reason. Most of the rest of the guns in the game are named in the form of {{Continuity Nod}}s to previous Bond films - the Glocks are the [[Film/GoldFinger GF17/GF18]], the M1911 is the [[Film/CasinoRoyale2006 CR1911]], the M4 is the [[Film/TomorrowNeverDies TND-16]], the AKS-74U is the [[Film/FromRussiaWithLove FRWL]], and the M60 is the [[Film/Octopussy [[Film/{{Octopussy}} 8-CAT]]. And, strangely enough, the Dragunov is called the [[Film/AViewToAKill V-TAK]] in singleplayer, but in multiplayer is referred to as the [=WA2000=]. [[http://www.imfdb.org/index.php/007:_Quantum_of_Solace_(VG) More here.]]
22nd Jul '17 4:43:44 PM Kadorhal
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** ''ARMA 3'' goes for half this trope and half futurized variants of existing weapons. The standard enemy pistol is an unmodified MP-443 called the "Rook 40", while their standard assault rifle is the "Katiba 6.5mm" series, somewhat based on the Iranian [=KH2002=], with a lower carrying handle resembling that of the [=G36C=] and a smaller magazine; interestingly, some weapons do go by their real name, like the Gepard [=GM6=] Lynx for CSAT's anti-materiel rifle, the 3GL grenade launcher attached under the otherwise totally fictional "MX 6.5mm" rifle used by BLUFOR, and the various [=AKs=] used by the Syndikat faction in the "Apex" DLC. The Marksmen DLC inverts this for the "Mk 14", which is an original M14 with a rail for optics attached; an actual Mk 14 is already in the base game as the "Mk 18".

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** ''ARMA 3'' goes for half this trope and half futurized variants of existing weapons. The standard enemy OPFOR pistol is an unmodified MP-443 called the "Rook 40", while their standard assault rifle is the "Katiba 6.5mm" series, somewhat based on the Iranian [=KH2002=], [=KH2002=] with a lower carrying handle resembling that of the [=G36C=] and a smaller magazine; interestingly, magazine. BLUFOR likewise uses an unmodified Walther P99, renamed the "P07", as their sidearm, while their standard weapon is a fictional conglomerate of parts from various weapons like the Remington ACR called the "MX 6.5mm", with suffixes like C for the compact version, SW for the [[MoreDakka support version]], and M for the marksman one. Interestingly, some weapons do go by their real name, like the Gepard [=GM6=] Lynx for CSAT's anti-materiel rifle, the Metal Storm 3GL grenade launcher attached under available for the otherwise totally fictional "MX 6.5mm" rifle used by BLUFOR, standard MX rifle, and the various [=AKs=] used by the Syndikat faction in the "Apex" DLC. The Marksmen DLC inverts this for the "Mk 14", which is an original M14 with a rail for optics attached; an actual Mk 14 is already in the base game as the "Mk 18".
18th Jul '17 2:08:16 PM Kadorhal
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** ''ARMA 3'' goes for half this trope and half futurized variants of existing weapons. The standard enemy pistol is an unmodified MP-443 called the "Rook 40", while their standard assault rifle is the "Katiba 6.5mm" series, somewhat based on the Iranian [=KH2002=], with a lower carrying handle resembling that of the [=G36C=] and a smaller magazine; interestingly, some weapons do go by their real name, like the Gepard [=GM6=] Lynx for the enemy's anti-materiel rifle, the 3GL grenade launcher attached under the otherwise totally fictional "MX 6.5mm" rifle used by BLUFOR, and the [[RareGuns AK-12]] added in the "Apex" DLC. The Marksmen DLC inverts this for the "Mk 14", which is an original M14 with a rail for optics attached; an actual Mk 14 is already in the game as the "Mk 18".
* Every Heckler & Koch weapon in ''VideoGame/{{SWAT 4}}'' is given a generic label ("9mm submachinegun" for the [=MP5A4=]) or a changed name ("Gb36" instead of G36). However, every firearm manufactured by Colt and Benelli is licensed (complete with small-print legalese), and therefore correctly named.

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** ''ARMA 3'' goes for half this trope and half futurized variants of existing weapons. The standard enemy pistol is an unmodified MP-443 called the "Rook 40", while their standard assault rifle is the "Katiba 6.5mm" series, somewhat based on the Iranian [=KH2002=], with a lower carrying handle resembling that of the [=G36C=] and a smaller magazine; interestingly, some weapons do go by their real name, like the Gepard [=GM6=] Lynx for the enemy's CSAT's anti-materiel rifle, the 3GL grenade launcher attached under the otherwise totally fictional "MX 6.5mm" rifle used by BLUFOR, and the [[RareGuns AK-12]] added various [=AKs=] used by the Syndikat faction in the "Apex" DLC. The Marksmen DLC inverts this for the "Mk 14", which is an original M14 with a rail for optics attached; an actual Mk 14 is already in the base game as the "Mk 18".
* Every Heckler & Koch weapon in ''VideoGame/{{SWAT 4}}'' is given a generic label ("9mm submachinegun" for the [=MP5A4=]) or a changed name ("Gb36" ("[=Gb36=]" instead of G36). However, every firearm manufactured by Colt and Benelli is licensed (complete with small-print legalese), and therefore correctly named.



** All of the weapons in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVThePhantomPain'' are similarly fictional but with a resemblance to real world weapons, such as the "AM Rifle Type 69", which looks very close to a mix of the M16 with the SAR 80, or the "UN-ARC" (a cross between the FN FAL and H&K G3). This extends to even to vehicles, with the Blackfoot and Krokodil helicopters standing in for the Blackhawk and Hind. This causes a major retcon and continuity inconsistency because the flavor text indicate that those fictional military hardwares are standard issue for their respective nations while real, authentic military hardwares are blatantly name-called ever since the first MSX game.

to:

** All of the weapons in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVThePhantomPain'' are similarly fictional but with a resemblance to real world weapons, such as the "AM Rifle Type 69", which looks very close to a mix of the M16 with the SAR 80, or the "UN-ARC" (a cross between the FN FAL and H&K G3). This extends to even to vehicles, with the Blackfoot and Krokodil helicopters standing in for the Blackhawk and Hind. This causes a major retcon and continuity inconsistency because the flavor text indicate indicates that those this fictional military hardwares are hardware is standard issue for their respective nations while real, authentic military hardwares are blatantly name-called ever since [[VideoGame/MetalGear1 the first MSX game.game]].
18th Jul '17 1:56:22 PM Kadorhal
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* The ''VideoGame/{{Hitman}}'' series initially inverted this in the original ''[[VideoGame/HitmanCodename47 Codename 47]]'', with all weapons except for an older pepperbox-style revolver (called simply the "Derringer") going by their real names. The original demo for the follow-up game ''[[VideoGame/Hitman2SilentAssassin Silent Assassin]]'' continued using real names for the guns, but these were changed to generic/false names for the full game, a trend which every following game has continued. Perhaps weapons producers don't like their weapons to be associated with ''bad'' killings, as if there are 'good' killings. This is played interestingly with the AMT Hardballer, as its rename to the "Silverballer" in the second game also came with an extensive redesign of the in-game model, making it clear that the Silverballers are meant to be Agent 47's [[AceCustom custom design]].

to:

* The ''VideoGame/{{Hitman}}'' series initially inverted this in the original ''[[VideoGame/HitmanCodename47 Codename 47]]'', with all weapons except for an older pepperbox-style revolver (called simply the "Derringer") going by their real names. names, and even including the manufacturer's names in the menu. The original demo for the follow-up game ''[[VideoGame/Hitman2SilentAssassin Silent Assassin]]'' continued using real names for the guns, but these were changed to generic/false names for the full game, a trend which every following game has continued. Perhaps weapons producers don't like their weapons to be associated with ''bad'' killings, as if there are 'good' killings. This is played interestingly with the AMT Hardballer, as its rename to the "Silverballer" in the second game also came with an extensive redesign of the in-game model, making it clear that the Silverballers are meant to be Agent 47's [[AceCustom custom design]].
17th Jul '17 11:52:21 PM Kadorhal
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[[quoteright:350:[[VideoGame/GetEven http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ge_cg.jpeg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:350:[[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial Don't worry, that's definitely not the CornerShot made in Israel.]]]]



** All of the weapons in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVThePhantomPain'' are similarly fictional but with a resemblance to real world weapons, such as the "AM Rifle Type 69", which looks very close to a mix of the M16 with the SAR 80, or the "UN-ARC" (a cross between the FN FAL and H&K G3). This extends to even to vehicles, with the Blackfoot and Krokodil helicopters standing in for the Blackhawk and Hind. This causes a major retcon and continuity inconsistency because the flavor text indicate that those fictional military hardwares are standard issue for their respective nations while real, authentic military hardwares are blatantly name-called ever since the first MSX game. (although the developers could get away with the inconsistency by referring them as manufactured copies of actual weapons because of the isolated setting, but they don't).
* The original demo for ''VideoGame/Hitman2SilentAssassin'' used real names for firearms such as the 9mm Beretta, but these were changed to generic/false names for the full game. Perhaps weapons producers don't like their weapons to be associated with ''bad'' killings, as if there are 'good' killings. He has since come to use a pair of AMT Hardballers, never referred to as such. Instead, they use the poor cover name Silverballers.
** Although the Hardballer in the ''[[VideoGame/HitmanCodename47 Codename 47]]'' ''was'' referred to as such, curiously. 47's Silverballers are a custom design, which may explain the different name.
** For a literal example, in ''Silent Assassin'', the rifles used by the Russian police and various guards are simply referred to as "AK"s.
** ''VideoGame/HitmanAbsolution'' continues the tradition, by using "Bland Names" like "Aries Charging Ram" (for the Taurus Raging Bull revolver), "JAGD [=P22G=]" (for SIG [=P226=]) and "Swiss 3000" (for Sphinx 3000 pistol).

to:

** All of the weapons in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVThePhantomPain'' are similarly fictional but with a resemblance to real world weapons, such as the "AM Rifle Type 69", which looks very close to a mix of the M16 with the SAR 80, or the "UN-ARC" (a cross between the FN FAL and H&K G3). This extends to even to vehicles, with the Blackfoot and Krokodil helicopters standing in for the Blackhawk and Hind. This causes a major retcon and continuity inconsistency because the flavor text indicate that those fictional military hardwares are standard issue for their respective nations while real, authentic military hardwares are blatantly name-called ever since the first MSX game. (although game.
* The ''VideoGame/{{Hitman}}'' series initially inverted this in
the developers could get away original ''[[VideoGame/HitmanCodename47 Codename 47]]'', with the inconsistency by referring them as manufactured copies of actual all weapons because of except for an older pepperbox-style revolver (called simply the isolated setting, but they don't).
*
"Derringer") going by their real names. The original demo for ''VideoGame/Hitman2SilentAssassin'' used the follow-up game ''[[VideoGame/Hitman2SilentAssassin Silent Assassin]]'' continued using real names for firearms such as the 9mm Beretta, guns, but these were changed to generic/false names for the full game.game, a trend which every following game has continued. Perhaps weapons producers don't like their weapons to be associated with ''bad'' killings, as if there are 'good' killings. He has since come to use a pair of This is played interestingly with the AMT Hardballers, never referred Hardballer, as its rename to as such. Instead, they use the poor cover name Silverballers.
** Although the Hardballer
"Silverballer" in the ''[[VideoGame/HitmanCodename47 Codename 47]]'' ''was'' referred to as such, curiously. 47's second game also came with an extensive redesign of the in-game model, making it clear that the Silverballers are a meant to be Agent 47's [[AceCustom custom design, which may explain the different name.
** For a literal example, in ''Silent Assassin'', the rifles used by the Russian police and various guards are simply referred to as "AK"s.
** ''VideoGame/HitmanAbsolution'' continues the tradition, by using "Bland Names" like "Aries Charging Ram" (for the Taurus Raging Bull revolver), "JAGD [=P22G=]" (for SIG [=P226=]) and "Swiss 3000" (for Sphinx 3000 pistol).
design]].



** ''[[VideoGame/SplinterCellConviction Conviction]]'' use real names for most guns, including the Five-seveN, but the F2000 is now called SC-3000; given that it is redesigned to load magazines based on those of the [[RareGuns never-produced MR-C]], it's very likely meant to be Third Echelon's custom model.

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** ''[[VideoGame/SplinterCellConviction Conviction]]'' ''Conviction'' use real names for most guns, including the Five-seveN, but the F2000 is now called SC-3000; given that it is redesigned to load magazines based on those of the [[RareGuns never-produced MR-C]], it's very likely meant to be Third Echelon's custom model.
13th Jul '17 9:22:18 PM Kadorhal
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The reason appears to be avoiding potential lawsuits from the manufacturers of said firearms; it's a lot easier to prove a trademark infringement over a name than over the unique likeness of a weapon, and many companies haven't trademarked the latter anyway. There's also the issue of editorial control; much as car companies used to dictate that vehicles in videogames could not be shown crashing or being damaged (they just hit things and stopped), gun companies could potentially demand their weapons only be shown in certain situations as a requirement for inclusion of their trademarks. Oddly, often happens even with guns old enough that trademark issues wouldn't be relevant.

to:

The reason appears to be avoiding potential lawsuits from the manufacturers of said firearms; it's a lot easier to prove a trademark infringement over a name than over the unique likeness of a weapon, and many companies haven't trademarked the latter anyway. There's also the issue of editorial control; much as car companies used to dictate that vehicles in videogames could not be shown crashing or being damaged (they just hit things and stopped), gun companies could potentially demand their weapons only be shown in certain situations as a requirement for inclusion of their trademarks. Oddly, this often happens even with guns old enough that with which trademark issues wouldn't be relevant.
relevant, whether because they're so old that trademarks have lapsed or because their developers went out of business.



** Interesting variation in ''Quantum of Solace'': While the Walther guns and, for some reason, the M14 are referred to by their actual names, a good deal of the rest are named in the form of {{Continuity Nod}}s to previous Bond films. The Glocks are the [[Film/GoldFinger GF17/GF18]], the M1911 is the [[Film/CasinoRoyale2006 CR1911]], the M4 is the [[Film/TomorrowNeverDies TND-16]], and the AKS-74U is the [[Film/FromRussiaWithLove FRWL]]. And, strangely enough, the Dragunov is called the [[Film/AViewToAKill V-TAK]] in singleplayer, but in multiplayer is referred to as the [=WA2000=]. [[http://www.imfdb.org/index.php/007:_Quantum_of_Solace_(VG) More here.]]
** ''VideoGame/GoldenEyeWii'' kinda zigzags with this trope; the P99 and WA 2000 (both made by Walther, who has some sort of endorsement deal with the Bond films), as well as the AK-47, are all called by their real names, but every single other gun has almost entirely made up name (for example, the SCAR-H is called the "Kallos-[=TT9=]", and the M4 is the "Terralite III").
** The follow up game, ''007 Legends'', uses the same naming scheme as the ''[=GoldenEye=]'' remake (the P99 and AK-47 retain their authentic names, the rest of the weapons use the fictional names like the "Sigmus 9" for the [=MP5=]). So it seems Walther is the only weapon manufacturer with the same name in both the real world and the game universe; [[ProductPlacement you can probably guess why]].
* ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'' mostly avoided this by using made-up weapons from the future ([[ShoutOut one of which]] is Franchise/RoboCop's sidearm under a different name), but one CheatCode let you use weapons from its spiritual precursor ''[=GoldenEye=]'' that had their names changed ''again'' for legal reasons. It got a bit confusing.
** ''Perfect Dark Zero'', in addition to a few futuristic weapons, uses renamed versions of real guns, such as the P9-P (Walther P99), DW-P5 (H&K [=MP5=]), the new (old?) Superdragon (modified H&K [=G36K=] with an [=AG36=] grenade launcher), and FAC-16 (Colt Model 727 with M203 grenade launcher). Oddly, the M60 machine gun keeps its real-life name (alongside [[AbnormalAmmo the ability to launch caltrops]]).

to:

** Interesting variation in ''Quantum of Solace'': While the The Walther guns and, guns, the P99 and [=WA2000=], keep their original names due to an endorsement deal between Walther Arms and the Bond films, as does the M14 for some reason, the M14 are referred to by their actual names, a good deal reason. Most of the rest of the guns in the game are named in the form of {{Continuity Nod}}s to previous Bond films. The films - the Glocks are the [[Film/GoldFinger GF17/GF18]], the M1911 is the [[Film/CasinoRoyale2006 CR1911]], the M4 is the [[Film/TomorrowNeverDies TND-16]], and the AKS-74U is the [[Film/FromRussiaWithLove FRWL]].FRWL]], and the M60 is the [[Film/Octopussy 8-CAT]]. And, strangely enough, the Dragunov is called the [[Film/AViewToAKill V-TAK]] in singleplayer, but in multiplayer is referred to as the [=WA2000=]. [[http://www.imfdb.org/index.php/007:_Quantum_of_Solace_(VG) More here.]]
** ''VideoGame/GoldenEyeWii'' kinda zigzags with this trope; as with the above, the P99 and WA 2000 (both made by Walther, who has some sort of endorsement deal with the Bond films), as well as the AK-47, are all called by [=WA2000=] keep their real names, as does the AK-47, but every single other gun has almost entirely made up name (for example, names, like the SCAR-H is called SCAR being the "Kallos-[=TT9=]", and the M4 is as the "Terralite III").
III", the [=MP5=] and [=MP5k=] being respectively the "Sigmus 9" and "Sigmus", the USAS-12 being the "Masterton M-557", etc.
** The follow up game, ''007 Legends'', uses the same naming scheme as the ''[=GoldenEye=]'' remake (the P99 - the P99, [=WA2000=], and AK-47 AK retain their authentic names, all the rest of guns returning from ''[=GoldenEye=]'' keep the weapons use fake names they had their, while all the fictional new guns - even Walther's older PPK - have new fake names like the "Sigmus 9" for "STK-21 Commando" (AUG), "Tec-Fire [=RF30=]" (Kel-Tec PMR-30), "Faroh M55" (M14), and, as a CallBack to classic ''GoldenEye'', the [=MP5=]). So it seems Walther is the only weapon manufacturer with the same name in both the real world and the game universe; [[ProductPlacement you can probably guess why]].
"KL-033 Mk2" (Skorpion).
* ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'' mostly avoided this by using made-up weapons from the future ([[ShoutOut one of which]] is Franchise/RoboCop's sidearm under a different name), but with only a few recognizable real-world weapons like the Colt Double Eagle (as the Falcon 2) and the Steyr TMP (as the CMP-150). Confusingly, one CheatCode let you use weapons from its spiritual precursor ''[=GoldenEye=]'' that ''[=GoldenEye=]'', which had their names changed ''again'' for legal reasons. It got a bit confusing.
reasons.
** ''Perfect Dark Zero'', in addition to a few futuristic weapons, uses renamed versions of real guns, Zero'' flips things around, with fewer totally-fictional sci-fi guns and more real-world ones with new names, such as the P9-P (Walther P99), DW-P5 (H&K [=MP5=]), the new (old?) Superdragon (modified H&K [=G36K=] with an [=AG36=] grenade launcher), and FAC-16 (Colt Model 727 with M203 grenade launcher). Oddly, the M60 machine gun keeps its real-life name (alongside [[AbnormalAmmo the ability to launch caltrops]]).
12th Jul '17 11:11:19 AM Caps-luna
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[[folder:Real Life]]
* Back in the day, there were licensed and unlicensed copies of every successful small arm each featuring a new name. Companies didn't want copies of their arms to bare the company name, so foreign manufactures often had to change the name in order to get a manufacturing license. Ironically the gun that reversed this trend was the TropeNamer, the AK-47. Since the AK was made by a communist country, they didn't care what manufactures called their guns and even encouraged them to use the Red Army's designations.
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22nd Jun '17 7:27:33 AM Ominae
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[[quoteright:350:[[VideoGame/GetEven http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ge_cg.jpeg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:350:[[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial Don't worry, that's definitely not the CornerShot made in Israel.]]]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AKA47