History Literature / WutheringHeights

28th Aug '16 6:21:34 AM k410ren
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[spoiler: Hindley]] in the 1970 adaptation.

to:

** [[spoiler: Hindley]] in the 1970 adaptation. He even gets to kill [[spoiler:Heathcliff.]]



* WhamLine: In the 2009 version, Cathy (II) finds a portrait of her mother at Wuthering Heights and asks Linton about it.

to:

* WhamLine: In Early in the 2009 version, Cathy (II) finds a portrait of her mother at Wuthering Heights and asks Linton about it.
28th Aug '16 6:18:04 AM k410ren
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* LetMeTellYouAStory

to:

* LetMeTellYouAStoryLetMeTellYouAStory: Lockwood is told Heathcliff's story by Nelly.
** In the 2009 version, Catherine (II) is told the story by Nelly while the two are trapped by Heathcliff at Wuthering Heights.


Added DiffLines:

* OhCrap: Cathy (II) in the 2009 version when she finds that all of the doors are locked and Linton reveals Heathcliff's plan.


Added DiffLines:

* WhamLine: In the 2009 version, Cathy (II) finds a portrait of her mother at Wuthering Heights and asks Linton about it.
-->'''Cathy (II)''': Why would Mr. Heathcliff keep a portrait of my mother? Why? Why would he do that?
-->'''Linton''': Because he loved her. Because he loved her before your father did. And she loved him too.
15th Jul '16 4:50:03 AM Solle
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''Wuthering Heights'' (1847) was the only novel written by Creator/EmilyBronte (of 'the Brontë sisters'), and an archetypal example of a Gothic Romance. Has been filmed several times, most notably the 1939 version starring LaurenceOlivier as Heathcliff, while a younger, pre-''Film/JamesBond'' Creator/TimothyDalton played Heathcliff in the 1970 film version. Also inspired the 1979 Music/KateBush song of the same name ("Heathcliff, it's me, I'm Cathy, I've come home...") as well as an [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqiUGjghlzU adaptation]] in ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'', Music/{{Genesis}}' album ''Wind and Wuthering'', which used a quotation from the book's ending for two of its song titles, Creator/{{MTV}}'s adaptation of their own with Heathcliff as a guitar-strumming song-writer pitted against classic cello-playing Edgar. And finally, let's not forget Music/DeathCabForCutie's "Cath...", which is fairly transparently based on ''Wuthering Heights'', but in their own style.

It is 1801. The foppish gentleman Mr. Lockwood has moved to Thrushcross Grange, a manor house in the windswept and desolate Yorkshire Moors, where he introduces himself to Heathcliff, his surly, ill-mannered and unwelcoming landlord and master of the nearby Wuthering Heights. Forced to stay at Wuthering Heights overnight, Lockwood suffers a nightmare about the ghost of a young woman desperately pleading to be let back into the house; intrigued, Lockwood asks his housekeeper Nelly Dean to [[FramingDevice tell him the story of Heathcliff and Wuthering Heights]].

Dean's story is one of a terrible, unchecked, all-consuming passion -- that between Heathcliff, an orphaned foundling brought to Wuthering Heights as a child by the then-owner, and Catherine Earnshaw, his spoilt, flighty and wild foster sister, who became inseparable friends as children and later fell in love. Their love, though passionate, was cruelly thwarted, however, both by Hindley, Catherine's brother and Heathcliff's sworn enemy, who resented Heathcliff as an interloper in his father's affections and, upon inheriting the estate, spitefully turned Heathcliff into a downtrodden slave, and by Catherine's own desires for social mobility and class, which saw her marry the decent but seemingly weak Edgar Linton even as she insists that her one true love is and always will be Heathcliff.

Missing Catherine's declaration of eternal love, however, Heathcliff leaves Wuthering Heights in bitterness, only to return several years later having made his fortune elsewhere and determined to crush entirely those who thwarted his one chance at happiness. This includes swindling control of Wuthering Heights away from the now-drunken and embittered Hindley, seducing Edgar's sister Isabella and then treating her in a cruel, abusive fashion once married, and generally scheming to take control of everything that belongs to Edgar and Hindley. Unfortunately, a tragedy occurs not long after that only spurs Heathcliff on to further depths of bitterness, as he determines to extend his vendetta and not only destroy his rivals, but their children...

to:

''Wuthering Heights'' (1847) was the only novel written by Creator/EmilyBronte (of 'the Brontë sisters'), and an archetypal example of a Gothic Romance. Romance, and deals primarily with the cycle of abuse across generations.

It is 1801. The foppish gentleman Mr. Lockwood has moved to Thrushcross Grange, a manor house in the windswept and desolate Yorkshire Moors. He introduces himself to Heathcliff, his surly, ill-mannered and unwelcoming landlord and master of the nearby Wuthering Heights. Forced to stay at Wuthering Heights overnight, Lockwood suffers a nightmare about the ghost of a young woman named Cathy desperately pleading to be let back into the house; intrigued, Lockwood asks his housekeeper Nelly Dean to [[FramingDevice tell him the story of Heathcliff and Wuthering Heights]].

Dean's story is one of a terrible, unchecked, all-consuming passion -- that between Heathcliff, an orphaned foundling brought to Wuthering Heights as a child by the then-owner, and Catherine Earnshaw, his spoilt, flighty and wild foster sister. The two became inseparable friends as children and later fell in love. Their love, though passionate, was cruelly thwarted by Hindley, Catherine's brother and Heathcliff's sworn enemy, who resented Heathcliff as an interloper in his father's affections and, upon inheriting the estate, spitefully turned Heathcliff into a downtrodden slave. Catherine's own desires for social mobility and class see her marry the decent but seemingly weak neighbour Edgar Linton even as she insists that her one true love is and always will be Heathcliff. Heathcliff leaves Wuthering Heights in bitterness, only to return several years later, having made his fortune elsewhere and determined to crush entirely those who thwarted his one chance at happiness -- as well as all their relations.

Has been filmed several times, most notably the 1939 version starring LaurenceOlivier as Heathcliff, while a younger, pre-''Film/JamesBond'' Creator/TimothyDalton played Heathcliff in the 1970 film version. Also inspired the 1979 Music/KateBush song of the same name ("Heathcliff, it's me, I'm Cathy, I've come home...") as well as an [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqiUGjghlzU adaptation]] in ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'', Music/{{Genesis}}' album ''Wind and Wuthering'', which used a quotation from the book's ending for two of its song titles, Creator/{{MTV}}'s adaptation of their own with Heathcliff as a guitar-strumming song-writer pitted against classic cello-playing Edgar. And finally, let's not forget Music/DeathCabForCutie's "Cath...", which is fairly transparently based on ''Wuthering Heights'', but in their own style.

It is 1801. The foppish gentleman Mr. Lockwood has moved to Thrushcross Grange, a manor house in the windswept and desolate Yorkshire Moors, where he introduces himself to Heathcliff, his surly, ill-mannered and unwelcoming landlord and master of the nearby Wuthering Heights. Forced to stay at Wuthering Heights overnight, Lockwood suffers a nightmare about the ghost of a young woman desperately pleading to be let back into the house; intrigued, Lockwood asks his housekeeper Nelly Dean to [[FramingDevice tell him the story of Heathcliff and Wuthering Heights]].

Dean's story is one of a terrible, unchecked, all-consuming passion -- that between Heathcliff, an orphaned foundling brought to Wuthering Heights as a child by the then-owner, and Catherine Earnshaw, his spoilt, flighty and wild foster sister, who became inseparable friends as children and later fell in love. Their love, though passionate, was cruelly thwarted, however, both by Hindley, Catherine's brother and Heathcliff's sworn enemy, who resented Heathcliff as an interloper in his father's affections and, upon inheriting the estate, spitefully turned Heathcliff into a downtrodden slave, and by Catherine's own desires for social mobility and class, which saw her marry the decent but seemingly weak Edgar Linton even as she insists that her one true love is and always will be Heathcliff.

Missing Catherine's declaration of eternal love, however, Heathcliff leaves Wuthering Heights in bitterness, only to return several years later having made his fortune elsewhere and determined to crush entirely those who thwarted his one chance at happiness. This includes swindling control of Wuthering Heights away from the now-drunken and embittered Hindley, seducing Edgar's sister Isabella and then treating her in a cruel, abusive fashion once married, and generally scheming to take control of everything that belongs to Edgar and Hindley. Unfortunately, a tragedy occurs not long after that only spurs Heathcliff on to further depths of bitterness, as he determines to extend his vendetta and not only destroy his rivals, but their children...
style.
3rd May '16 9:24:46 AM TheOneWhoTropes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* MosesInTheBullrushes: Heathcliff is discovered by the Earnshaws as a homeless youth and comforted as a child by Nelly telling him he is a lost prince. In hindsight, this might not have been such a good idea.

to:

* MosesInTheBullrushes: MosesInTheBulrushes: Heathcliff is discovered by the Earnshaws as a homeless youth and comforted as a child by Nelly telling him he is a lost prince. In hindsight, this might not have been such a good idea.
10th Apr '16 2:39:22 PM k410ren
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** From the 2009 version:
-->'''Heathcliff''': What are you two doing in here?!
-->'''Catherine(II)''': I wanted to feel close to what is left of my family. I'm the only person to blame, Hareton stayed with me at my insistence.
-->'''Heathcliff'''(speaking to Hareton): And who the ''devil'' gave you the leave to set one foot in HERE?! And WHO ordered you to obey her?
-->'''Catherine (II)''': You shouldn't grudge me one room when you have taken everything from me!
-->'''Heathcliff'''(practically hissing): You insolent slut! You never had anything.
-->'''Catherine (II)'''(glaring up at Heathcliff): If you strike me, Hareton will strike you!
-->'''Heathcliff''': And if Hareton doesn't turn you out of this room, I will strike him back to Hell!
-->(at this point, Hareton puts himself between Catherine (II) and Heathcliff)
-->'''Heathcliff'''(after glancing at Catherine's portrait): Take her, Hareton. Take her and leave me. All of you leave me now.
9th Apr '16 12:56:02 PM k410ren
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ItIsDehumanizing: Heathcliff (2009) refers to Linton as "it" and his "property".
9th Apr '16 11:26:01 AM k410ren
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* [[AndNowYouMustMarryMe And Now You Must Marry My Son]]: Heathcliff forces Catherine (II) to marry his son Linton.
-->'''Heathcliff (2009)''': By this time tomorrow, I ''shall'' be your father. So you had ''better'' get used to appeasing me.
5th Apr '16 6:40:43 AM k410ren
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HowWeGotHere: The story typically begins with most of the events already taken place.
** The 1970 film opens with Catherine (I)'s funeral, as Heatchliff watches from afar.
** The 2009 film opens first with Heathcliff haunted by Catherine (I) in his sleep, then as Linton is brought to Wuthering Heights by Edgar.



* KubrickStare: Heathcliff gives one to Catherine (II) when he returns to Wuthering Heights after digging up her mother's grave. It leads directly into the flashback.

to:

* KubrickStare: Heathcliff gives one to Catherine (II) when he returns to Wuthering Heights after digging up her mother's grave.grave in the 2009 version. It leads directly into the flashback.
31st Mar '16 9:25:47 AM aye_amber
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''Wuthering Heights'' (1847) was the only novel written by Creator/EmilyBronte (of 'the Brontë sisters'), and an archetypal example of a Gothic Romance. Has been filmed several times, most notably the 1939 version starring LaurenceOlivier as Heathcliff, while a younger, pre-''Film/JamesBond'' Creator/TimothyDalton played Heathcliff in the 1970 film version. Also inspired the 1979 KateBush song of the same name ("Heathcliff, it's me, I'm Cathy, I've come home...") as well as an [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqiUGjghlzU adaptation]] in ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'', Music/{{Genesis}}' album ''Wind and Wuthering'', which used a quotation from the book's ending for two of its song titles, {{MTV}}'s adaptation of their own with Heathcliff as a guitar-strumming song-writer pitted against classic cello-playing Edgar. And finally, let's not forget Music/DeathCabForCutie's "Cath...", which is fairly transparently based on ''Wuthering Heights'', but in their own style.

to:

''Wuthering Heights'' (1847) was the only novel written by Creator/EmilyBronte (of 'the Brontë sisters'), and an archetypal example of a Gothic Romance. Has been filmed several times, most notably the 1939 version starring LaurenceOlivier as Heathcliff, while a younger, pre-''Film/JamesBond'' Creator/TimothyDalton played Heathcliff in the 1970 film version. Also inspired the 1979 KateBush Music/KateBush song of the same name ("Heathcliff, it's me, I'm Cathy, I've come home...") as well as an [[http://www.[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqiUGjghlzU adaptation]] in ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'', Music/{{Genesis}}' album ''Wind and Wuthering'', which used a quotation from the book's ending for two of its song titles, {{MTV}}'s Creator/{{MTV}}'s adaptation of their own with Heathcliff as a guitar-strumming song-writer pitted against classic cello-playing Edgar. And finally, let's not forget Music/DeathCabForCutie's "Cath...", which is fairly transparently based on ''Wuthering Heights'', but in their own style.



* JerkAss: Oh so many: Joseph, Hindley Earnshaw, Heathcliff, Catherine, Linton...

to:

* JerkAss: {{Jerkass}}: Oh so many: Joseph, Hindley Earnshaw, Heathcliff, Catherine, Linton...
14th Feb '16 6:12:23 PM Ciara25
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* PyrrhicVillainy: [[spoiler: After Heathcliff's rivals have all died and he's ruined his and their children's lives, he finds he has no satisfaction.]]

to:

* PyrrhicVillainy: [[spoiler: After Heathcliff's rivals have all died and he's ruined his and their children's lives, he finds he has no satisfaction. What's more, when Catherine (II) and Hareton begin to break free from his restraint and fall in love with each other, he goes into a VillainousBreakdown.]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 82. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.WutheringHeights