History Literature / TheThreeMusketeers

16th Feb '18 5:54:23 PM Lymantria
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Though he loses the letter in an altercation with a mysterious man in a black cape with a [[GoodScarsEvilScars scar on his face]], d'Artagnan presses on and meets the titular three musketeers: [[TheHero leader]] and [[OlderAndWiser father-figure]] Athos, the vain and [[BigEater famously gluttonous]] [[TheBigGuy Big Guy]] Porthos, and TheCasanova and [[TheSmartGuy Smart Guy]] Aramis.

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Though he loses the letter in an altercation with a mysterious man in a black cape with a [[GoodScarsEvilScars scar on his face]], d'Artagnan presses on and meets the titular three musketeers: [[TheHero [[TheLeader leader]] and [[OlderAndWiser father-figure]] Athos, the vain and [[BigEater famously gluttonous]] [[TheBigGuy Big Guy]] Porthos, and TheCasanova and [[TheSmartGuy Smart Guy]] Aramis.
15th Feb '18 3:15:36 PM margdean56
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* DeathByAdaptation: Rochefort is usually killed in a climatic duel with d'Artagnan. In the book, he lives, and [[GoKartingWithBowser wind up friends with d'Artagnan]].

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* DeathByAdaptation: Rochefort is usually killed in a climatic duel with d'Artagnan. In the book, he lives, and [[GoKartingWithBowser wind winds up friends with d'Artagnan]].
15th Feb '18 3:13:53 PM margdean56
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* ReluctantRetiree: Mazarin sends d'Artagnan to recruit his predecessor's [[TheDragon dragon]] Rochefort. When he meets Richelieu's agent, he finds the man (who is in his 60s by this point) too old to work for him. Rochefort decides to join the anti-Mazarin Fronde rebellion rather than before forced back to retirement (and prison).

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* ReluctantRetiree: Mazarin sends d'Artagnan to recruit his predecessor's [[TheDragon dragon]] Rochefort. When he meets Richelieu's agent, he finds the man (who is in his 60s by this point) too old to work for him. Rochefort decides to join the anti-Mazarin Fronde rebellion rather than before be forced back to retirement (and prison).



* SpannerInTheWorks: d'Artagnan's plan to rescue Charles goes off without a hitch, having kidnapped or waylaid the city's executioner and his backup. Unfortunately, it turns out Charles was also on Mordaunt's hitlist, and volunteered for the job.

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* SpannerInTheWorks: d'Artagnan's plan to rescue Charles goes off without a hitch, having kidnapped or waylaid the city's executioner and his backup. Unfortunately, it turns out Charles was also on Mordaunt's hitlist, and he volunteered for the job.



* TrojanPrisoner: In "Twenty years after", Athos and Aramis are taken prisoners by Porthos and D'Artagnan.

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* TrojanPrisoner: In "Twenty years after", Athos and Aramis are taken prisoners prisoner by Porthos and D'Artagnan.



** Many members of the royal family, from minor or illegitimate branches, serve as commanders in the Fronde. Most side with the anti-Mazarin elements, while Conde works for Mazarin as he sees it as the way to support the king.

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** Many members of the royal family, from minor or illegitimate branches, serve as commanders in the Fronde. Most side with the anti-Mazarin elements, while Conde Condé works for Mazarin as he sees it as the way to support the king.
15th Feb '18 3:07:35 PM margdean56
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** The Duke of Beaufort and Grimaud. One's a malaproping, BunnyEarsLawyer member of the royal family, the other is a SilentSnarking, near-mute valet.

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** The Duke of Beaufort and Grimaud. One's a malaproping, BunnyEarsLawyer member of the royal family, the other is a SilentSnarking, [[SilentSnarker Silent Snarking]], near-mute valet.
15th Feb '18 3:05:50 PM margdean56
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* ManipulativeBitch: Milady, especially prominent when she manages to persuade John Felton, her ''jailer'', to kill the most powerful man in England, and a good friend of De Winter (Felton's beloved commander officer): the Lord of Buckingham.

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* ManipulativeBitch: Milady, especially prominent when she manages to persuade John Felton, her ''jailer'', to kill the most powerful man in England, and a good friend of De Winter (Felton's beloved commander officer): the Lord Duke of Buckingham.



** Multiple times. Most notably in the 'Louise de la Valliere' section of "Le Vicomte de Bragelonne" when the soap opera-esque romantic intrigues of the court are interrupted by de Guice and de Wardes' violent duel.

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** Multiple times. Most notably in the 'Louise de la Valliere' Vallière' section of "Le Vicomte de Bragelonne" when the soap opera-esque romantic intrigues of the court are interrupted by de Guice and de Wardes' violent duel.



* MookLieutenant: Jussac is an officer in the Cardinal's guard and attempts to arrest the musketeers at the covenant.
* MommasBoy: Monsieur, to a degree. He certainly goes complain to her on a regular basis, too bad he's also TheUnfavorite.

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* MookLieutenant: Jussac is an officer in the Cardinal's guard and attempts to arrest the musketeers at the covenant.
convent.
* MommasBoy: Monsieur, to a degree. He certainly goes does complain to her on a regular basis, too bad he's also TheUnfavorite.



* NotSoHarmlessVillain: De Wardes (the son of the minor antagonist of the first book) in "Le Vicomte de Bragelonne". After a bunch of petty insults in the first third of the book, he's beaten by Raoul, stabbed in a quick duel with Buckingham, and then [[spoiler:heavily wounds de Guice in a tense pistol duel]]. It takes d'Artagnan's intervention to prevent him from continuing to not be harmless.

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* NotSoHarmlessVillain: De Wardes (the son of the minor antagonist of the first book) in "Le ''Le Vicomte de Bragelonne".Bragelonne''. After a bunch of petty insults in the first third of the book, he's beaten by Raoul, stabbed in a quick duel with Buckingham, and then [[spoiler:heavily wounds de Guice in a tense pistol duel]]. It takes d'Artagnan's intervention to prevent him from continuing to not be harmless.
15th Feb '18 2:45:34 PM margdean56
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* ContemptCrossfire: During the Fronde, Mazarin is well aware that just about the only person who doesn't want him kicked out of France is the queen, whether they're opposing her or part of her faction. His one or two attempts at StillTheLeader in front of the prince of Conde get him looks reminding him that "if Conde was defending him, it was neither out of conviction nor enthusiasm".

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* ContemptCrossfire: During the Fronde, Mazarin is well aware that just about the only person who doesn't want him kicked out of France is the queen, whether they're opposing her or part of her faction. His one or two attempts at StillTheLeader in front of the prince of Conde Condé get him looks reminding him that "if Conde Condé was defending him, it was neither out of conviction nor enthusiasm".



* EvilChancellor: Richelieu, and [[DirtyCoward Mazarin]]. While they both are quite loyal to France, having a King deciding things is quite unnecessary, thank you very much. This trait is overplayed to the hilt with Richelieu in [[AdaptationalVillainy adaptations that turn him into the main villain]]. In the books, Mazarin develops something of an unfair reputation as this trope due to his foreign nationality, although he also embezzles large amounts of money and gets away with it. In the final book, Colbert takes this position, compared to the most cavalier Finance Minister Nicholas Fouquet, and uses his financial influence to turn the king against Fouquet. Subverted in that it is Colbert's policies which subsequently make the country rich, militarily powerful, and capable of waging a foreign war in which D'Artagnan finally gets to be promoted to Field Marshal, while Fouquet - likeable as he was - had been embezzling the national wealth and spending it on grandiosely ornamental but ultimately useless architecture such as the chateau of Vaux-le-Vicomte or the fortifications of Belle-Isle, and it has to be said that he has richly (quite literally) earned his downfall.

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* EvilChancellor: Richelieu, and [[DirtyCoward Mazarin]]. While they both are quite loyal to France, having a King deciding things is quite unnecessary, thank you very much. This trait is overplayed to the hilt with Richelieu in [[AdaptationalVillainy adaptations that turn him into the main villain]]. In the books, Mazarin develops something of an unfair reputation as this trope due to his foreign nationality, although he also embezzles large amounts of money and gets away with it. In the final book, Colbert takes this position, compared to the most cavalier Finance Minister Nicholas Fouquet, and uses his financial influence to turn the king against Fouquet. Subverted in that it is Colbert's policies which subsequently make the country rich, militarily powerful, and capable of waging a foreign war in which D'Artagnan finally gets to be promoted to Field Marshal, while Fouquet - likeable Fouquet--likeable as he was - had was--had been embezzling the national wealth and spending it on grandiosely ornamental but ultimately useless architecture such as the chateau of Vaux-le-Vicomte or the fortifications of Belle-Isle, and it has to be said that he has richly (quite literally) earned his downfall.



** Aramis in the final book (''The Man in the Iron Mask''), in which, ''not'' to be confused with the film, he alone (with Porthos tricked into it as dumb muscle) initiates the plot to [[spoiler:replace the King with his long-imprisoned twin brother]] - which is actually [[spoiler:foiled with D'Artagnan's assistance, although Fouquet takes the major credit and thus postpones his downfall by a few days]]. The point being that [[spoiler:it turns out the kingdom is best served by having the original Louis as king, Colbert as finance minister, and D'Artagnan in charge of the army, than it ever would have been served by his brother who, knowing nothing about the state of affairs but what Aramis told him, would have had to rely completely on Aramis and leave the likeable but corrupt Fouquet to embezzle and squander what was left of the treasury, and that D'Artagnan's loyalty to Louis ends up being the '''''right''''' choice, and Aramis's plot therefore makes him a traitor and a true Face Heel Turn since he betrays not only his King but also the whole Musketeers group by an act that he knew neither D'Artagnan nor Athos could be persuaded into, and Porthos only by trickery.]] And the irony being that [[spoiler:Fouquet plays a major role in saving Louis even though he knows Louis is working for his downfall, and it was in his interest to cooperate with the substitution: and Louis's first act after being saved is to dispose of Fouquet in favour of Colbert]].
** Part of the point of the book is that some of the older generation (like Athos) believe that a nobleman's duty is to [[MyMasterRightOrWrong serve the king no matter what]] (althouh he does add an escape clause in telling Raoul to serve royalty and not the king). [[spoiler:Aramis' actions violate this principle (and he manipulates Porthos into doing the same); d'Artagnan isn't sure what to think about this but ultimately lands on the side of the King]].

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** Aramis in the final book (''The Man in the Iron Mask''), in which, ''not'' to be confused with the film, he alone (with Porthos tricked into it as dumb muscle) initiates the plot to [[spoiler:replace the King with his long-imprisoned twin brother]] - which brother]]--which is actually [[spoiler:foiled with D'Artagnan's assistance, although Fouquet takes the major credit and thus postpones his downfall by a few days]]. The point being that [[spoiler:it turns out the kingdom is best served by having the original Louis as king, Colbert as finance minister, and D'Artagnan in charge of the army, than it ever would have been served by his brother who, knowing nothing about the state of affairs but what Aramis told him, would have had to rely completely on Aramis and leave the likeable but corrupt Fouquet to embezzle and squander what was left of the treasury, and that D'Artagnan's loyalty to Louis ends up being the '''''right''''' choice, and Aramis's plot therefore makes him a traitor and a true Face Heel Turn since he betrays not only his King but also the whole Musketeers group by an act that he knew neither D'Artagnan nor Athos could be persuaded into, and Porthos only by trickery.]] And the irony being that [[spoiler:Fouquet plays a major role in saving Louis even though he knows Louis is working for his downfall, and it was in his interest to cooperate with the substitution: and Louis's first act after being saved is to dispose of Fouquet in favour of Colbert]].
** Part of the point of the book is that some of the older generation (like Athos) believe that a nobleman's duty is to [[MyMasterRightOrWrong serve the king no matter what]] (althouh (although he does add an escape clause in telling Raoul to serve royalty and not the king). [[spoiler:Aramis' actions violate this principle (and he manipulates Porthos into doing the same); d'Artagnan isn't sure what to think about this but ultimately lands on the side of the King]].
9th Feb '18 3:27:18 PM PaulA
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* LawfulStupid: Nicolas Fouquet in the third novel, although it may be a case of HonorBeforeReason (since he [[spoiler:saves King Louis from the plot to replace him, knowing that this will mean his own downfall as Louis and Colbert work against him.]]) Also, Athos in the later books displays some elements of that and HonorBeforeReason. Even Aramis notes it, telling Athos he'd be a general who only fights by daylight and informs the enemy of the time of the attack.

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* LawfulStupid: LawfulStupid:
**
Nicolas Fouquet in the third novel, although it may be a case of HonorBeforeReason (since he [[spoiler:saves King Louis from the plot to replace him, knowing that this will mean his own downfall as Louis and Colbert work against him.]]) Also, ]])
**
Athos in the later books displays some elements of that and HonorBeforeReason. Even Aramis notes it, telling Athos he'd be a general who only fights by daylight and informs the enemy of the time of the attack.



* TimedMission: The Queen's diamonds must be brought back from England in time for that ball!

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* TimedMission: The Queen's diamonds must be brought back from England in time for that ball!the ball where Richelieu intends to publicly expose their absence.
9th Feb '18 7:58:02 AM Chabal2
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* ArtisticLicenseHistory: Dumas was never a man to let the facts interfere with a good story. Particularly notable is that the entire first novel of the series is an anachronism: the name of D'Artagnan first appears in the records of the musketeers in 1633, five years after the novel ends and nearly a decade after Dumas's hero presents himself to M. de Treville. (Speaking of whom, the real Treville was himself a new musketeer in 1625, and wasn't made captain of the musketeers until, again, after the first novel ends.) Of the three musketeers after whom the novel is named, suffice it to say that they are entirely fictional creations with real names attached, and if they are ever historically accurate it is only by accident.
* BadassBookworm: Aramis, despite being a thorough womanizer and elite soldier, is also an academic with a passion for the clergy.

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* ArtisticLicenseHistory: ArtisticLicenseHistory:
**
Dumas was never a man to let the facts interfere with a good story. Particularly notable is that the entire first novel of the series is an anachronism: the name of D'Artagnan first appears in the records of the musketeers in 1633, five years after the novel ends and nearly a decade after Dumas's hero presents himself to M. de Treville. (Speaking of whom, the real Treville was himself a new musketeer in 1625, and wasn't made captain of the musketeers until, again, after the first novel ends.) Of the three musketeers after whom the novel is named, suffice it to say that they are entirely fictional creations with real names attached, and if they are ever historically accurate it is only by accident.
** Most of the historical events such as Charles' execution are compressed for the sake of drama.
* BadassBookworm: Aramis, despite being a thorough womanizer and elite soldier, is also an academic with a passion for the clergy. Unfortunately, as he says himself when a soldier he feels a calling for the clergy and vice versa.



** The final book, ''Le Vicomte de Bragelonne'', is an outright [[DownerEnding crapsack ending]].

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** The final book, ''Le Vicomte de Bragelonne'', is an outright [[DownerEnding crapsack ending]]. [[spoiler:Aramis breaks up the fellowship for good, his plan backfires spectacularly and gets Porthos killed and him exiled, Raoul loses his girlfriend and his will to live, Athos dies shortly after he hears of Raoul's death, and D'Artagnan finally receives that promotion he's been waiting since decades... which arrives shortly before he dies of his wounds.]]



* ContemptCrossfire: During the Fronde, Mazarin is well aware that just about the only person who doesn't want him kicked out of France is the queen, whether they're opposing her or part of her faction. His one or two attempts at StillTheLeader in front of the prince of Conde get him looks reminding him that "if Conde was defending him, it was neither out of conviction nor enthusiasm".



** And, amusingly, how Athos meets another woman. [[spoiler:Through a bit of mistaken identity on both of their parts, Aramis' former mistress thinks Athos is a priest (Athos was a guest and the priest was out) and seduces him into a one-night stand. That leads to Raoul's birth.]]

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** And, amusingly, how Athos meets another woman. [[spoiler:Through a bit of mistaken identity on both of their parts, Aramis' former mistress thinks Athos is a priest (Athos was had asked the priest for a guest night's shelter and the priest was out) and seduces him into a one-night stand. That leads to Raoul's birth.]]



** Part of the point of the book is that some of the older generation (like Athos) believe that a nobleman's duty is to [[MyMasterRightOrWrong serve the king no matter what]]. [[spoiler:Aramis' actions violate this principle (and he manipulates Porthos into doing the same); d'Artagnan isn't sure what to think about this but ultimately lands on the side of the King]].

to:

** Part of the point of the book is that some of the older generation (like Athos) believe that a nobleman's duty is to [[MyMasterRightOrWrong serve the king no matter what]].what]] (althouh he does add an escape clause in telling Raoul to serve royalty and not the king). [[spoiler:Aramis' actions violate this principle (and he manipulates Porthos into doing the same); d'Artagnan isn't sure what to think about this but ultimately lands on the side of the King]].



* LawfulStupid: Nicolas Fouquet in the third novel, although it may be a case of HonorBeforeReason (since he [[spoiler:saves King Louis from the plot to replace him, knowing that this will mean his own downfall as Louis and Colbert work against him.]]) Also, Athos in the later books displays some elements of that and HonorBeforeReason.

to:

* LawfulStupid: Nicolas Fouquet in the third novel, although it may be a case of HonorBeforeReason (since he [[spoiler:saves King Louis from the plot to replace him, knowing that this will mean his own downfall as Louis and Colbert work against him.]]) Also, Athos in the later books displays some elements of that and HonorBeforeReason. Even Aramis notes it, telling Athos he'd be a general who only fights by daylight and informs the enemy of the time of the attack.



* LukeYouAreMyFather: It's hinted at but never confirmed in the second book that Athos is really the father of Mordaunt.

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* LukeYouAreMyFather: It's hinted at but never confirmed in the second book that Athos is really the father of Mordaunt.Mordaunt (on paper, his grudge against de Winter is that his father is de Winter's dead brother and thus he's been denied his inheritance, and against the king because he rejected Mordaunt's appeal).



* SilentSnarker: Grimaud becomes a master of this in the second book.

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* SilentSnarker: Grimaud becomes a master of this in the second book.book, despite Athos having long since lifted his ban on Grimaud speaking.



* TimeBomb: The Queen's diamonds must be brought back from England in time for that ball!

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* TimeBomb: TimedMission: The Queen's diamonds must be brought back from England in time for that ball!


Added DiffLines:

* UnwittingPawn: It's very unlikely Porthos would have gone along with Aramis' plans if he'd known exactly what they entailed.
31st Jan '18 1:22:06 AM jormis29
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** ''La Fille de d'Artagnan'' (1994) features, naturally enough, d'Artagnan's daughter Eloise, played by Sophie Marceau.

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** ''La Fille de d'Artagnan'' (1994) features, naturally enough, d'Artagnan's daughter Eloise, played by Sophie Marceau.Creator/SophieMarceau.
11th Jan '18 9:21:39 AM ClintEastwood
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Added DiffLines:

* FaceOfAnAngelMindOfADemon: There's an inversion of the good blonde and bad brunette, as the heroine, Constance, has dark hair, and Milady, the villain, is angelic looking.
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