History Literature / TheSorrowsOfYoungWerther

26th May '16 5:08:30 AM spacealien
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: [[Invoked]]. Goethe intended for this work to discourage people from killing themselves over matters of love. It backfired spectacularly.

to:

* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: [[Invoked]].[[invoked]]. Goethe intended for this work to discourage people from killing themselves over matters of love. It backfired spectacularly.
12th May '15 2:13:44 PM AlanPalgut
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* CreatorBreakdown: Goethe's work is LooselyBasedOnATrueStory.



* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: [[invoked]] Goethe intended for this work to discourage people from killing themselves over matters of love. It backfired spectacularly.

to:

* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: [[invoked]] [[Invoked]]. Goethe intended for this work to discourage people from killing themselves over matters of love. It backfired spectacularly.
8th May '15 5:34:47 AM bicufo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''The Sorrows of Young Werther'' was an immediate best-seller and made Goethe famous virtually overnight. The novel was one of the earliest works of literature to generate a recognizable fandom, creating a dress fashion. It was also one of the first to be blamed, not without cause, to have a negative effect on some of its readers; psychologists therefore continue to debate about the "Werther effect", meaning a work of art encouraging consumers to commit suicide. The "wave of suicides" following the novel was somewhat exaggerated, more recent studies indicate that there may only be about a dozen verifiable cases where the novel played a part. However, one of the was a friend of Goethe's, which probably was the reason why he published the revised edition of 1787. It also was one of the reasons why the novel was condemned not just by the usual [[MoralGuardian moral guardians]] affiliated with traditional religion, but also by proponents of the Enlightenment. For instance the scientist and aphorist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg acidly quipped: "The best part in ''Werther'' is when [[SuicideIsShameful he shoots the coward]]."

to:

''The Sorrows of Young Werther'' was an immediate best-seller and made Goethe famous virtually overnight. The novel was one of the earliest works of literature to generate a recognizable fandom, creating a dress fashion. It was also one of the first to be blamed, not without cause, to have a negative effect on some of its readers; psychologists therefore continue to debate about the "Werther effect", meaning a work of art encouraging consumers to commit suicide. The "wave of suicides" following the novel was somewhat exaggerated, more recent studies indicate that there may only be about a dozen verifiable cases where the novel played a part. However, one of the them was a friend of Goethe's, which probably was the reason why he published the revised edition of 1787. It also was one of the reasons why the novel was condemned not just by the usual [[MoralGuardian moral guardians]] affiliated with traditional religion, but also by proponents of the Enlightenment. For instance the scientist and aphorist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg acidly quipped: "The best part in ''Werther'' is when [[SuicideIsShameful he shoots the coward]]."
4th May '15 11:45:00 AM LordGro
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The final scene between Werther and Charlotte have them reading Ossian, James Macpherson's "rediscovered" Scottish epic. Ossian was a cult favorite among several philosophers and artists but was eventually exposed as a literary hoax. Today, most people learn of Ossian via Werther, when Goethe, without any irony, really did believe it was a Scottish Iliad and an example of an immortal folk tradition.

to:

** The final scene between Werther and Charlotte have them reading Ossian, James Macpherson's "rediscovered" Scottish epic. Ossian was The ''Lays of Ossian'' were a cult favorite among several philosophers and artists but was were eventually exposed as being mostly Macpherson's own creation, rather than a literary hoax. Today, translation of a 1,500-years-old epic. Like most people learn readers of Ossian via Werther, when Goethe, without any irony, really his time, Goethe did believe it was a Scottish Iliad and an example of an immortal folk tradition.
4th May '15 5:33:22 AM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* CreatorBacklash: Goethe's ''Theatre/{{Faust}}'' is in part an attack on philosophical trends associated with the ''Werther'' fandom.

to:

* CreatorBacklash: [[invoked]] Goethe's ''Theatre/{{Faust}}'' is in part an attack on philosophical trends associated with the ''Werther'' fandom.



* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: Goethe intended for this work to discourage people from killing themselves over matters of love. It backfired spectacularly.

to:

* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: [[invoked]] Goethe intended for this work to discourage people from killing themselves over matters of love. It backfired spectacularly.


Added DiffLines:

** The final scene between Werther and Charlotte have them reading Ossian, James Macpherson's "rediscovered" Scottish epic. Ossian was a cult favorite among several philosophers and artists but was eventually exposed as a literary hoax. Today, most people learn of Ossian via Werther, when Goethe, without any irony, really did believe it was a Scottish Iliad and an example of an immortal folk tradition.
4th May '15 4:47:21 AM Menshevik
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''The Sorrows of Young Werther'' was an immediate best-seller and made Goethe famous virtually overnight. The novel was one of the earliest works of literature to generate a recognizable fandom, creating a dress fashion. It was also one of the first to be blamed, not without cause, to have a negative effect on some of its readers; psychologists therefore continue to debate about the "Werther effect", meaning a work of art encouraging consumers to commit suicide. The "wave of suicides" following the novel was somewhat exaggerated, more recent studies indicate that there may only be about a dozen verifiable cases where the novel played a part. However, one of the was a friend of Goethe's, which probably was the reason why he published the revised edition of 1787. It also was one of the reasons why the novel was condemned not just by the usual [[MoralGuardian moral guardians]] affiliated with traditional religion, but also by proponents of the Enlightenment. For instance the scientist and aphorist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg acidly quipped: "The best part in ''Werther'' is [[SuicideIsShameful he shoots the coward]]."

to:

''The Sorrows of Young Werther'' was an immediate best-seller and made Goethe famous virtually overnight. The novel was one of the earliest works of literature to generate a recognizable fandom, creating a dress fashion. It was also one of the first to be blamed, not without cause, to have a negative effect on some of its readers; psychologists therefore continue to debate about the "Werther effect", meaning a work of art encouraging consumers to commit suicide. The "wave of suicides" following the novel was somewhat exaggerated, more recent studies indicate that there may only be about a dozen verifiable cases where the novel played a part. However, one of the was a friend of Goethe's, which probably was the reason why he published the revised edition of 1787. It also was one of the reasons why the novel was condemned not just by the usual [[MoralGuardian moral guardians]] affiliated with traditional religion, but also by proponents of the Enlightenment. For instance the scientist and aphorist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg acidly quipped: "The best part in ''Werther'' is when [[SuicideIsShameful he shoots the coward]]."
4th May '15 4:46:39 AM Menshevik
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''The Sorrows of Young Werther'' was an immediate best-seller and made Goethe famous virtually overnight. The novel was one of the earliest works of literature to generate a recognizable fandom, creating a dress fashion. It was also one of the first to be blamed, not without cause, to have a negative effect on some of its readers; psychologists therefore continue to debate about the "Werther effect", meaning a work of art encouraging consumers to commit suicide. ''Werther'' was later adapted into a popular opera (written 1887, first performed 1892) by the French composer Jules Massenet. The East German writer Ulrich Plenzdorf transferred the action into the contemporary GDR in the successful play ''Die neuen Leiden des jungen W.'' ("The New Sorrows of Young W.", 1972). Note that some of these tropes seem like they should be in YMMV, but even ''Goethe'' straight-out said that most of them applied; he was horrified, for example, that people were ''killing themselves'' in imitation of Werther.

to:

''The Sorrows of Young Werther'' was an immediate best-seller and made Goethe famous virtually overnight. The novel was one of the earliest works of literature to generate a recognizable fandom, creating a dress fashion. It was also one of the first to be blamed, not without cause, to have a negative effect on some of its readers; psychologists therefore continue to debate about the "Werther effect", meaning a work of art encouraging consumers to commit suicide. The "wave of suicides" following the novel was somewhat exaggerated, more recent studies indicate that there may only be about a dozen verifiable cases where the novel played a part. However, one of the was a friend of Goethe's, which probably was the reason why he published the revised edition of 1787. It also was one of the reasons why the novel was condemned not just by the usual [[MoralGuardian moral guardians]] affiliated with traditional religion, but also by proponents of the Enlightenment. For instance the scientist and aphorist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg acidly quipped: "The best part in ''Werther'' is [[SuicideIsShameful he shoots the coward]]."

The success soon extended beyond Germany, it was first published in French in 1776 and in English in 1779. At his meeting with Goethe, [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte Emperor Napoleon]] mentioned that he had read the book seven times.
''Werther'' was later adapted into a popular opera (written 1887, first performed 1892) by the French composer Jules Massenet. The East German writer Ulrich Plenzdorf transferred the action into the contemporary GDR in the successful play ''Die neuen Leiden des jungen W.'' ("The New Sorrows of Young W.", 1972).

Note that some of these tropes seem like they should be in YMMV, but even ''Goethe'' straight-out said that most of them applied; he was horrified, for example, that people were ''killing themselves'' in imitation of Werther.



* ShoutOut: The dying Werther is found with an opened copy of the tragedy ''Emilia Galotti'' by [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker Gotthold Ephraim Lessing]].

to:

* ShoutOut: The dying Werther is found with an opened copy of the tragedy ''Emilia Galotti'' by [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker Gotthold Ephraim Lessing]]. Lessing was taken aback and criticized the narration of the suicide scene in several respects.
4th May '15 4:27:49 AM Menshevik
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The novel was young Goethe's way of working out his platonic relationship towards Charlotte Buff (1753-1828), who went on to marry Johann Christian Kestner, who was on good terms with Goethe and became the model for Albert in the novel. After Kestner's death Charlotte once visited Goethe in Weimar in 1816, an event that was freely adapted into the novel ''Lotte in Weimar'' (1939) by Thomas Mann.

The novel was very popular in its day, for what were probably the wrong reasons. It was later adapted into a popular opera (written 1887, first performed 1892) by the French composer Jules Massenet. Note that some of these tropes seem like they should be in YMMV, but even ''Goethe'' straight-out said that most of them applied; he was horrified, for example, that people were ''killing themselves'' in imitation of Werther.

to:

The novel was young Goethe's way of working out his feelings over his platonic relationship towards with Charlotte Buff (1753-1828), who went on to marry Johann Christian Kestner, who was on good terms with Goethe and became served as the model for Albert in the novel. After Kestner's death Charlotte once visited Goethe in Weimar in 1816, an event that was freely adapted into the novel ''Lotte in Weimar'' (1939) by Thomas Mann.

''The Sorrows of Young Werther'' was an immediate best-seller and made Goethe famous virtually overnight. The novel was very popular in one of the earliest works of literature to generate a recognizable fandom, creating a dress fashion. It was also one of the first to be blamed, not without cause, to have a negative effect on some of its day, for what were probably readers; psychologists therefore continue to debate about the wrong reasons. It "Werther effect", meaning a work of art encouraging consumers to commit suicide. ''Werther'' was later adapted into a popular opera (written 1887, first performed 1892) by the French composer Jules Massenet.Massenet. The East German writer Ulrich Plenzdorf transferred the action into the contemporary GDR in the successful play ''Die neuen Leiden des jungen W.'' ("The New Sorrows of Young W.", 1972). Note that some of these tropes seem like they should be in YMMV, but even ''Goethe'' straight-out said that most of them applied; he was horrified, for example, that people were ''killing themselves'' in imitation of Werther.



* BoomHeadshot: The manner in which Werther chooses to go. Strangely, he lingers for several hours after the deed.

to:

* BoomHeadshot: The manner in which Werther chooses to go. Strangely, Unfortunately, as sometimes happens in real life, he lingers for several hours after the deed.


Added DiffLines:

* {{Romanticism}}: Literature historians generally see ''Werther'' as a work belonging to the ''Sturm und Drang'' period, the immediate predecessor of Romanticism.


Added DiffLines:

* ShoutOut: The dying Werther is found with an opened copy of the tragedy ''Emilia Galotti'' by [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker Gotthold Ephraim Lessing]].
4th May '15 3:48:09 AM Menshevik
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SignatureScene: As the page quote shows, what people tend to remember is the striking scene where Werther first meets Lotte as she is in the process of cutting bread and butter for her eight younger siblings.
4th May '15 3:47:30 AM Menshevik
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The novel was young Goethe's way of working out his platonic relationship towards Charlotte Buff (1753-1828), who went on to marry Johann Christian Kestner, who was on good terms with Goethe and became the model for Albert in the novel. After Kestner's death Charlotte once visited Goethe in Weimar in 1816, an event that was freely adapted into the novel ''Lotte in Weimar'' (1939) by Thomas Mann.






* MassiveNumberedSiblings: Charlotte has 8 siblings. This was normal at the time though.

to:

* MassiveNumberedSiblings: Charlotte has 8 siblings. This was normal at the time though. (Lotte's model Charlotte Buff actually was one of 16 siblings).


Added DiffLines:

* SignatureScene: As the page quote shows, what people tend to remember is the striking scene where Werther first meets Lotte as she is in the process of cutting bread and butter for her eight younger siblings.
This list shows the last 10 events of 27. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheSorrowsOfYoungWerther