History Literature / TheSorrowsOfYoungWerther

30th May '17 2:27:45 PM eroock
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Added DiffLines:

[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/the_sorrows_of_young_werther.jpg]]
30th May '17 9:58:38 AM eroock
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->''Werther had a love for Charlotte''\\

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->''Werther ->''"Werther had a love for Charlotte''\\



''Went on cutting bread and butter.''

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''Went on cutting bread and butter.''"''
21st Dec '16 2:50:05 PM Discar
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* AManIsNotAVirgin: Almost certainly averted by Werther.
2nd Dec '16 11:24:07 PM Xtifr
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'''''The Sorrows of Young Werther''''' (''Die Leiden des jungen Werthers'') is a 1774 novel (revised in 1787) by Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe about an emotional young man named Werther who falls madly in love with an young woman named Lotte, who is engaged to someone else. Werther gradually becomes more emotional and less mentally stable...

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'''''The ''The Sorrows of Young Werther''''' Werther'' (''Die Leiden des jungen Werthers'') is a 1774 novel (revised in 1787) by Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe about an emotional young man named Werther who falls madly in love with an young woman named Lotte, who is engaged to someone else. Werther gradually becomes more emotional and less mentally stable...
18th Sep '16 6:47:48 PM WillBGood
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* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: [[invoked]]. Goethe intended for this work to discourage people from killing themselves over matters of love. It backfired spectacularly.

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* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: [[invoked]].{{Invoked}}. Goethe intended for this work to discourage people from killing themselves over matters of love. It backfired spectacularly.



* FanDumb: [[invoked]] In the words of Werther: "[[CrossesTheLineTwice I need fans like these]] [[DudeNotFunny the way]] I need a hole [[FunnyAneurysmMoment in the head!]]"

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* FanDumb: [[invoked]] {{Invoked}}. In the words of Werther: "[[CrossesTheLineTwice I need fans like these]] [[DudeNotFunny the way]] I need a hole [[FunnyAneurysmMoment in the head!]]"



* MisaimedFandom: [[invoked]] Many 18th-century readers admired Werther. An alarming number admired him so much that they committed suicide too.

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* MisaimedFandom: [[invoked]] {{Invoked}}. Many 18th-century readers admired Werther. An alarming number admired him so much that they committed suicide too.
26th May '16 5:08:30 AM spacealien
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* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: [[Invoked]]. Goethe intended for this work to discourage people from killing themselves over matters of love. It backfired spectacularly.

to:

* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: [[Invoked]].[[invoked]]. Goethe intended for this work to discourage people from killing themselves over matters of love. It backfired spectacularly.
12th May '15 2:13:44 PM AlanPalgut
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* CreatorBreakdown: Goethe's work is LooselyBasedOnATrueStory.



* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: [[invoked]] Goethe intended for this work to discourage people from killing themselves over matters of love. It backfired spectacularly.

to:

* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: [[invoked]] [[Invoked]]. Goethe intended for this work to discourage people from killing themselves over matters of love. It backfired spectacularly.
8th May '15 5:34:47 AM bicufo
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''The Sorrows of Young Werther'' was an immediate best-seller and made Goethe famous virtually overnight. The novel was one of the earliest works of literature to generate a recognizable fandom, creating a dress fashion. It was also one of the first to be blamed, not without cause, to have a negative effect on some of its readers; psychologists therefore continue to debate about the "Werther effect", meaning a work of art encouraging consumers to commit suicide. The "wave of suicides" following the novel was somewhat exaggerated, more recent studies indicate that there may only be about a dozen verifiable cases where the novel played a part. However, one of the was a friend of Goethe's, which probably was the reason why he published the revised edition of 1787. It also was one of the reasons why the novel was condemned not just by the usual [[MoralGuardian moral guardians]] affiliated with traditional religion, but also by proponents of the Enlightenment. For instance the scientist and aphorist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg acidly quipped: "The best part in ''Werther'' is when [[SuicideIsShameful he shoots the coward]]."

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''The Sorrows of Young Werther'' was an immediate best-seller and made Goethe famous virtually overnight. The novel was one of the earliest works of literature to generate a recognizable fandom, creating a dress fashion. It was also one of the first to be blamed, not without cause, to have a negative effect on some of its readers; psychologists therefore continue to debate about the "Werther effect", meaning a work of art encouraging consumers to commit suicide. The "wave of suicides" following the novel was somewhat exaggerated, more recent studies indicate that there may only be about a dozen verifiable cases where the novel played a part. However, one of the them was a friend of Goethe's, which probably was the reason why he published the revised edition of 1787. It also was one of the reasons why the novel was condemned not just by the usual [[MoralGuardian moral guardians]] affiliated with traditional religion, but also by proponents of the Enlightenment. For instance the scientist and aphorist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg acidly quipped: "The best part in ''Werther'' is when [[SuicideIsShameful he shoots the coward]]."
4th May '15 11:45:00 AM LordGro
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** The final scene between Werther and Charlotte have them reading Ossian, James Macpherson's "rediscovered" Scottish epic. Ossian was a cult favorite among several philosophers and artists but was eventually exposed as a literary hoax. Today, most people learn of Ossian via Werther, when Goethe, without any irony, really did believe it was a Scottish Iliad and an example of an immortal folk tradition.

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** The final scene between Werther and Charlotte have them reading Ossian, James Macpherson's "rediscovered" Scottish epic. Ossian was The ''Lays of Ossian'' were a cult favorite among several philosophers and artists but was were eventually exposed as being mostly Macpherson's own creation, rather than a literary hoax. Today, translation of a 1,500-years-old epic. Like most people learn readers of Ossian via Werther, when Goethe, without any irony, really his time, Goethe did believe it was a Scottish Iliad and an example of an immortal folk tradition.
4th May '15 5:33:22 AM JulianLapostat
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* CreatorBacklash: Goethe's ''Theatre/{{Faust}}'' is in part an attack on philosophical trends associated with the ''Werther'' fandom.

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* CreatorBacklash: [[invoked]] Goethe's ''Theatre/{{Faust}}'' is in part an attack on philosophical trends associated with the ''Werther'' fandom.



* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: Goethe intended for this work to discourage people from killing themselves over matters of love. It backfired spectacularly.

to:

* DoNotDoThisCoolThing: [[invoked]] Goethe intended for this work to discourage people from killing themselves over matters of love. It backfired spectacularly.


Added DiffLines:

** The final scene between Werther and Charlotte have them reading Ossian, James Macpherson's "rediscovered" Scottish epic. Ossian was a cult favorite among several philosophers and artists but was eventually exposed as a literary hoax. Today, most people learn of Ossian via Werther, when Goethe, without any irony, really did believe it was a Scottish Iliad and an example of an immortal folk tradition.
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