History Literature / TheScarletPimpernel

27th May '17 4:46:56 PM PaulA
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* JerkassHasAPoint: While the author can hardly be accused of being too favourably disposed to the French revolutionaries, there are several passages where the narration does acknowledge that the aristocracy could be needlessly cruel and oppressive. In particular, both Marguerite and her brother Armand are committed (albeit more moderate) Republicans who are nevertheless treated sympathetically, and their backstory involves a nobleman who ordered the low-born Armand viciously beaten after he dared express romantic interest in one of the nobleman's daughters. The point is clear that it's not exactly a mystery while the French lower classes had enough and decided to rebel, even if they took it a bit too far.

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* JerkassHasAPoint: While the author can hardly be accused of being too favourably disposed to the French revolutionaries, there are several passages where the narration does acknowledge that the aristocracy could be needlessly cruel and oppressive. In particular, both Marguerite and her brother Armand are committed (albeit more moderate) Republicans who are nevertheless treated sympathetically, and their backstory involves a nobleman who ordered the low-born Armand viciously beaten after he dared express romantic interest in one of the nobleman's daughters. The point is clear that it's not exactly a mystery while why the French lower classes had enough and decided to rebel, even if they took it a bit too far. far.
27th May '17 2:07:30 AM DoctorNemesis
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* JerkassHasAPoint: While the author can hardly be accused of being too favourably disposed to the French revolutionaries, there are several passages where the narration does acknowledge that the aristocracy could be needlessly cruel and oppressive. In particular, both Marguerite and her brother Armand are committed (albeit more moderate) Republicans who are nevertheless treated sympathetically, and their backstory involves a nobleman who ordered the low-born Armand viciously beaten after he dared express romantic interest in one of the nobleman's daughters. The point is clear that it's not exactly a mystery while the French lower classes had enough and decided to rebel, even if they took it a bit too far.
1st May '17 4:00:57 AM Laevatein
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* In ''ComicStrip/FootrotFlats'', The Dog sometimes adopts the persona "The Scarlet Manuka" and attempts to rescue abused {{Cricket}} balls.
29th Mar '17 5:39:40 AM john_e
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* BadGuyBar: The Cabaret de la Liberté in the short story of the same name. Sir Percy, in his persona of Citizen Rateau, is a frequent drinker there.


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* YouGotSpunk: Citizen Merri in the short story ''The Cabaret de la Liberté'' likes a wench with spirit.
10th Nov '16 4:15:56 PM john_e
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* PoorCommunicationKills: In ''The Elusive Pimpernel'', Marguerite bids Sir Percy a tearful farewell as he heads to France on his latest mission. Despite ample opportunity, she neglects to mention the important conversation she's just had with Desiree Candeille, and therefore falls straight into Chauvelin's latest trap.
10th Nov '16 5:58:21 AM john_e
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* RedOniBlueOni: Chauvelin, a coldly intellectual patriot, often has to team up with a passionate revolutionary such as Collot d'Herbois or Martin-Roget. [[WeAreStrugglingTogether They invariably can't stand each other]].


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* SlobsVersusSnobs: On a national level: Scruffy revolutionary France against well-ordered, aristocratic England. There's also an element of it among the French government:
--> Martin-Roget was the personification of sans-culottism, of rough manners and foul speech -- he chafed against the conventions which forced him to wear decent clothes and boots on his feet -- he would gladly have seen every one go about the streets half-naked, unwashed, a living sign of that downward levelling of castes which he and his friends stood for, and for which they had fought and striven and committed every crime which human passions let loose could invent. Chauvelin, on the other hand, was one of those who wore fine linen and buckled shoes and whose hands were delicately washed and perfumed whilst they signed decrees which sent hundreds of women and children to a violent and cruel death.
7th Nov '16 2:51:16 PM john_e
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* CassandraTruth: In ''The Triumph of the Scarlet Pimpernel'', Theresia has the vanishingly rare ability to recognise Sir Percy when he is disguised. She spots him while being dragged away by Chauvelin's men, and points him out as the Pimpernel. Nobody believes her.
3rd Nov '16 5:33:38 PM john_e
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* {{Blackmail}}: The McGuffin of ''The Way of the Scarlet Pimpernel'' is a packet of letters, the publication of which would compromise three of Danton's political allies. Various characters attempt to use them for blackmailing purposes.



* NotMyDriver: In ''The Way of the Scarlet Pimpernel'' -- the substitute driver is, of course, the Pimpernel.



* ThatsWhatIWouldDo: In ''The Way of the Scarlet Pimpernel'', Sir Percy and Chauvelin both come up with the idea of making a copy of the McGuffin and substituting it for the original (Sir Percy's version includes his signature rhyme, of course). Sir Percy notes the similarity:
-->In fact, you will observe, Sir, that my process was identical to the one employed by our mutual friend Chambertin when he stole what he thought was the precious packet of letters from little Josette Gravier and substituted for it another contrived by himself to look exactly similar. I am very fond really of Monsieur Chambertin; for a clever man he is sometimes such a silly fool, what?



* YouHaveFailedMe: Robespierre gives Chauvelin this ultimatum in ''The Elusive Pimpernel''.

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* YouHaveFailedMe: YouHaveFailedMe:
**
Robespierre gives Chauvelin this ultimatum in ''The Elusive Pimpernel''.Pimpernel''.
** Inverted at the end of ''The Way of the Scarlet Pimpernel''. Chauvelin is theoretically under Citizen Chabot's command, but by the end it's Chauvelin who has Chabot sent to the guillotine for his bungling.
3rd Nov '16 6:58:22 AM john_e
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* CallBack: In ''The Way of the Scarlet Pimpernel'', Josette Gravier is eating at an inn, with Chauvelin at another table. Then, to her bewilderment, a tall sailor wanders over to Chauvelin and offers him a pot of pepper. She's astonished at Chauvelin's horrified reaction; but then, she doesn't know it's a reference to the PepperSneeze by which Sir Percy escaped from Chauvelin in the first book.
1st Nov '16 6:35:50 AM john_e
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* TheCoronerDothProtestTooMuch: In ''The Way of the Scarlet Pimpernel'', Bastien de Croissy is found dead in his ransacked office, an iron bar lying beside his body. Since no money is missing, and the police chief doesn't want to consider any political motive, he closes the case as an obvious suicide.


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* PoliceAreUseless: The Paris police in ''The Way of the Scarlet Pimpernel'' -- see TheCoronerDothProtestTooMuch.
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