History Literature / Rebecca

18th Jan '17 12:58:07 PM Reymma
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A 1938 novel written by Daphne du Maurier (who also wrote ''JamaicaInn'', and the story that became ''Film/TheBirds''). In 1940, Creator/AlfredHitchcock directed the film version, his first American project, which starred Creator/JoanFontaine and Creator/LaurenceOlivier. It won the [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Oscar]] for Best Picture. It was the only Hitchcock film to win Best Picture, and Hitchcock didn't win Best Director--he never did, in fact, and had to settle for a lifetime achievement Oscar late in life. A musical version debuted in Vienna, Austria in 2006.

to:

A 1938 novel written by Daphne du Maurier (who also wrote ''JamaicaInn'', ''Literature/JamaicaInn'', and the story that became ''Film/TheBirds''). In 1940, Creator/AlfredHitchcock directed the film version, his first American project, which starred Creator/JoanFontaine and Creator/LaurenceOlivier. It won the [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Oscar]] for Best Picture. It was the only Hitchcock film to win Best Picture, and Hitchcock didn't win Best Director--he never did, in fact, and had to settle for a lifetime achievement Oscar late in life. A musical version debuted in Vienna, Austria in 2006.



* AccidentalMurder: In the film, Maxim accidentally killed Rebecca; he got angry and pushed her, and she fell and struck her head. In the original novel, he shot her, very much on purpose. She rather had it coming, to the point of taunting him into doing it.

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* AccidentalMurder: In the Hitchcock film, Maxim [[spoiler:Maxim accidentally killed Rebecca; he got angry and pushed her, and she fell and struck her head. head.]] In the original novel, he [[spoiler:he shot her, very much on purpose. She rather had it coming, to the point of taunting him into doing it.]]



* LiteraryNecrophillia: The book got a sequel in Susan Hill's ''Mrs. De Winter''.
* TheLostLenore: Played with. Rebecca ''seems'' to be this to her widowed husband Maxim, [[spoiler: but it turns out that she was an utterly despicable woman whom he later murdered, and his haunted behavior regarding her death was caused by the strain of having to maintain a facade of devoted mourning and the knowledge that he was unable to be good enough for his innocent young second wife because of this.]] On the other hand, Rebecca ''is'' this trope in LesYay fashion to her onetime nanny and later housekeeper Mrs. Danvers.

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* LiteraryNecrophillia: LiteraryNecrophilia: The book got a sequel in Susan Hill's ''Mrs. De Winter''.
* TheLostLenore: Played with. Rebecca ''seems'' to be this to her widowed husband Maxim, [[spoiler: but it turns out that she was an utterly despicable woman whom he later murdered, and his haunted behavior regarding her death was caused by the strain of having to maintain a facade of devoted mourning and the knowledge that he was unable to be good enough for his innocent young second wife because of this.]] On the other hand, Rebecca ''is'' this trope in LesYay lesbian fashion to her onetime nanny and later housekeeper Mrs. Danvers.



* NothingIsScarier

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* %%* NothingIsScarier



* ReplacementGoldfish: Inverted. The second Mrs. de Winter spends most of the book failing to live up to the memory of Rebecca, her husband's first wife, who had drowned accidentally. She is explicitly told, often, that she doesn't measure up, by Mrs. Danvers, Rebecca's personal maid. The second Mrs. de Winter becomes more and more desperate in her attempts to live up to Rebecca's memory, because Mrs. Danvers has her convinced that that is what Maxim, her husband, wants. Just when the second Mrs. De Winter (she is never given a first name, and the book is a first person narrative) is near a breakdown, and Mrs. Danvers suggests that she throw herself out of a window, it is revealed that [[spoiler: Maxim never really loved Rebecca, and in fact, came to hate her, because she was cruel, cold, manipulative, and unfaithful. Not only that, she had taunted him one night until he murdered her, by telling him she was pregnant with another man's child, which she intended that he would support.]] It doesn't end there, and [[spoiler: Maxim is vindicated,]] so they can go on with their lives together.

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* ReplacementGoldfish: Inverted.The main source of tension. The second Mrs. de Winter spends most of the book failing to live up to the memory of Rebecca, her husband's first wife, who had drowned accidentally. She is explicitly told, often, that she doesn't measure up, by Mrs. Danvers, Rebecca's personal maid. The second Mrs. de Winter becomes more and more desperate in her attempts to live up to Rebecca's memory, because Mrs. Danvers has her convinced that that is what Maxim, her husband, wants. Just when the second Mrs. De Winter (she is never given a first name, and the book is a first person narrative) is near a breakdown, and Mrs. Danvers suggests that she throw herself out of a window, it is revealed that [[spoiler: Maxim never really loved Rebecca, and in fact, came to hate her, because she was cruel, cold, manipulative, and unfaithful. Not only that, she had taunted him one night until he murdered her, by telling him she was pregnant with another man's child, which she intended that he would support.]] It doesn't end there, and [[spoiler: Maxim is vindicated,]] so they can go on with their lives together.



* TheUnfairSex: Massive subversion; Rebecca was a sociopathic bitch who cheated on Maxim with a series of lovers, and wasn't even loyal to them either. Our young heroine, who had earlier aspired to be just like her predecessor, is glad that she's dead.
* UnknownCharacter:

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* TheUnfairSex: Massive [[spoiler:Massive subversion; Rebecca was a sociopathic bitch who cheated on Maxim with a series of lovers, and wasn't even loyal to them either. Our young heroine, who had earlier aspired to be just like her predecessor, is glad that she's dead.
dead.]]
* UnknownCharacter: UnknownCharacter:
15th Jan '17 11:30:45 AM CumbersomeTercel
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* AccidentalMurder: In the film, Maxim accidentally killed Rebecca; he got angry and pushed her, and she fell and struck her head. In the original novel, he shot her, very much on purpose. She rather had it coming, to the point of taunting him into doing it.



* AdaptationalKarma: In the book, Mrs Danvers escapes Manderly after she burns it to the ground. The film - by order of the Hays Code - shows her dying in the fire.



* ArchEnemy: Mrs. Danvers to 'Maxim' de Winter and the second Mrs. de Winter.



* BigBad: Mrs. Danvers.



* CanNotSpitItOut: [[spoiler:The heroine is convinced that she's a complete failure compared to Rebecca, her husband's first (dead) wife, until she finds out that Rebecca was evil and the husband never loved her and murdered her. Which cheers her up immensely.]]



* TheDiseaseThatShallNotBeNamed: Rebecca was revealed to be dying of [[spoiler:a tumor in her ovaries]], which mean that she [[spoiler:couldn't have children]].



* FaceOfAnAngelMindOfADemon: [[spoiler:The title character is described by everyone as being incredibly beautiful, intelligent, cultured, loving, and basically the perfect wife. The end has Maxim reveal that she was actually a BitchInSheepsClothing, who was excellent at getting people to adore her, and delighted in emotionally tormenting him]].



* GoodAdulteryBadAdultery: [[spoiler:The titular Rebecca was, rather than the lovely and kind-hearted perfect wife her successor assumed her to be, a lying, manipulative, cruel sociopath who cheated on her husband Maxim with a series of lovers- and was not even really in love with them either. Maxim, meanwhile, is shown putting up with this until Rebecca actually ''intentionally provokes him into shooting her'' (because she has cancer and no way of treating it, and is apparently too afraid of committing actual suicide; as well as the fact that this makes him a murderer: her ultimate attack on him). She is, in fact, so awful that the heroine, Maxim's second wife, is ''glad'' he shot Rebecca, and the reader's sympathies are directed toward Maxim in spite of the murder]]. We also find out that [[spoiler:Rebecca seduced Giles, Maxim's brother-in-law. Giles' wife (Maxim's sister) Beatrice either knows or strongly suspects this and avoids further visits with her brother for that reason. She and Giles still seem to get along well though, and the second wife at one point feels inferior because the two have a "good marriage".]]



* ImpracticallyFancyOutfit: Played with in the film. The heroine, having just married [[TroubledButCute former widower]] [[IdleRich Maxim]], is desperate to prove herself a ProperLady (and not an InadequateInheritor to the titular [[PosthumousCharacter Rebecca]]). Hoping to [[ErmineCapeEffect appear elegant and tasteful]], she buys a [[PimpedOutDress fancy party dress]] from a fashion magazine... but quickly learns that it's completely out of place for a quiet evening at home, BigFancyHouse and FictionFiveHundred-status be damned.
* InnocentInaccurate: Mrs. de Winter thinks that her husband, Max, is cold with her because he is still in love with his late wife, Rebecca. She feels that she cannot measure up to Rebecca in Max's eyes. The truth turns out to be quite different.



* LiteraryNecrophillia: The book got a sequel in Susan Hill's ''Mrs. De Winter''.
* TheLostLenore: Played with. Rebecca ''seems'' to be this to her widowed husband Maxim, [[spoiler: but it turns out that she was an utterly despicable woman whom he later murdered, and his haunted behavior regarding her death was caused by the strain of having to maintain a facade of devoted mourning and the knowledge that he was unable to be good enough for his innocent young second wife because of this.]] On the other hand, Rebecca ''is'' this trope in LesYay fashion to her onetime nanny and later housekeeper Mrs. Danvers.



* NamelessNarrative: The central character is never named. Her very namelessness is a defining aspect of her character.



* PosthumousCharacter: Rebecca.

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* PosthumousCharacter: Rebecca. When the story opens, she has been dead for a year already but even in her absence, her presence is inescapable, as her memory casts its shadow over the entire story.
* PresentAbsence: Rebecca is dead, yet she influences everything and everyone around her.



* RavenHairIvorySkin: Rebecca is described as having had a cloud of dark hair and very white skin. Frank also describes her as the most beautiful creature he had seen.



* RavenHairIvorySkin: Rebecca is described as having had a cloud of dark hair and very white skin. Frank also describes her as the most beautiful creature he had seen.
* SaveTheVillain: In the 1997 TV series, Maxim runs upstairs to save Mrs. Danvers from the fire.

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* RavenHairIvorySkin: Rebecca is described as having had a cloud of dark hair and very white skin. Frank also describes her as the ReplacementGoldfish: Inverted. The second Mrs. de Winter spends most beautiful creature he of the book failing to live up to the memory of Rebecca, her husband's first wife, who had seen.
* SaveTheVillain: In the 1997 TV series, Maxim runs upstairs
drowned accidentally. She is explicitly told, often, that she doesn't measure up, by Mrs. Danvers, Rebecca's personal maid. The second Mrs. de Winter becomes more and more desperate in her attempts to save live up to Rebecca's memory, because Mrs. Danvers from has her convinced that that is what Maxim, her husband, wants. Just when the fire. second Mrs. De Winter (she is never given a first name, and the book is a first person narrative) is near a breakdown, and Mrs. Danvers suggests that she throw herself out of a window, it is revealed that [[spoiler: Maxim never really loved Rebecca, and in fact, came to hate her, because she was cruel, cold, manipulative, and unfaithful. Not only that, she had taunted him one night until he murdered her, by telling him she was pregnant with another man's child, which she intended that he would support.]] It doesn't end there, and [[spoiler: Maxim is vindicated,]] so they can go on with their lives together.


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* SaveTheVillain: In the 1997 TV series, Maxim runs upstairs to save Mrs. Danvers from the fire.


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* SecondaryCharacterTitle: The protagonist is the second Mrs. de Winter (whose first name is never given). Rebecca herself is a PosthumousCharacter.


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* TableSpace: In the film, the table isn't quite as oversized as some examples, but they do sit on opposite ends.


Added DiffLines:

* UnknownCharacter:
** The main character is the second wife of the eponymous Rebecca's husband. She's compared unfavorably to Rebecca without ever being told anything about her by his staff. Nothing is revealed abut her as they figure she doesn't need to know, except that she died. In the end the protagonist learns more about Rebecca and [[spoiler:gains the respect of the inhabitants by saving them from a fire]].
** In the film adaptation, [[spoiler:the housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers, refuses to accept her and stays behind to die in the fire.]]
15th Dec '16 1:19:11 PM Zerbinetta
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* IAmSong: "I'm an American Woman" (which, aside from the title line, is entirely in German). Also, "Mrs. de Winter bin ich!" ("Mrs. de Winter am I!"), a duet between the heroine and Mrs. Danvers.

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* IAmSong: "I'm an American Woman" (which, aside from the title line, is entirely in German). Also, "Mrs. de Winter bin ich!" ("Mrs. de Winter am I!"), is me!"), a duet between the heroine and Mrs. Danvers.



** Rebecca, as it turns out.

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** [[spoiler: Rebecca, as it turns out.]]



* WhamLine: Maxim's "I ''hated'' her!".

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* WhamLine: [[spoiler: Maxim's "I ''hated'' her!".]]
15th Dec '16 1:16:14 PM Zerbinetta
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* CounterpointDuet: "Mrs de Winter Bin Ich!" (Mrs de Winter am I!) is a duet between, as you might have guessed, the new Mrs de Winter and Mrs Danvers. The former is busy ridding the house of any traces of Rebecca about which Mrs Danvers is less than happy.

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* CounterpointDuet: "Mrs de Winter Bin Ich!" (Mrs de Winter am I!) is me!) is a duet between, as you might have guessed, the new Mrs de Winter and Mrs Danvers. The former is busy ridding the house of any traces of Rebecca about which Mrs Danvers is less than happy.
25th Nov '16 4:45:13 PM nombretomado
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A 1938 novel written by Daphne du Maurier (who also wrote ''JamaicaInn'', and the story that became ''TheBirds''). In 1940, Creator/AlfredHitchcock directed the film version, his first American project, which starred Creator/JoanFontaine and Creator/LaurenceOlivier. It won the [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Oscar]] for Best Picture. It was the only Hitchcock film to win Best Picture, and Hitchcock didn't win Best Director--he never did, in fact, and had to settle for a lifetime achievement Oscar late in life. A musical version debuted in Vienna, Austria in 2006.

to:

A 1938 novel written by Daphne du Maurier (who also wrote ''JamaicaInn'', and the story that became ''TheBirds'').''Film/TheBirds''). In 1940, Creator/AlfredHitchcock directed the film version, his first American project, which starred Creator/JoanFontaine and Creator/LaurenceOlivier. It won the [[UsefulNotes/AcademyAward Oscar]] for Best Picture. It was the only Hitchcock film to win Best Picture, and Hitchcock didn't win Best Director--he never did, in fact, and had to settle for a lifetime achievement Oscar late in life. A musical version debuted in Vienna, Austria in 2006.
18th Nov '16 9:30:50 PM captainpat
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* WomanInBlack: Mrs. Danvers, [[CreepyHousekeeper ominous and creepy as she is]] fittingly wears a long, heavy, black dress all the time.
4th Nov '16 3:56:37 PM EfficaciousPantheress
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Added DiffLines:

* CheshireCatGrin: After what happened at the ball, the narrator gets freaked out by Mrs. Danvers, who sports a rather creepy smile.
4th Nov '16 3:32:08 PM fearlessnikki
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* AllGirlsWantBadBoys: The second Mrs. de Winter becomes even more passionately in love with Maxim once he admits that he killed Rebecca. Justified because the second Mrs. de Winter's greatest fear was that Maxim still loved Rebecca. When he confesses to killing her, it proves that he doesn't and never did.
** However, the novel repeatedly hints that Maxim is actually rather weak-willed (as demonstrated by Rebecca's successful SuicideByCop). Moreover, when the novel opens, Maxim's bad boy days are long gone. However, see FridgeLogic.

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* AffectionateNickname: Both Rebecca and Favell called Mrs Danvers 'Danny' affectionately.
* AllGirlsWantBadBoys: The second Mrs. de Winter becomes even more passionately in love with Maxim once [[spoiler: he admits that he killed Rebecca. Justified because the second Mrs. de Winter's greatest fear was that Maxim still loved Rebecca. When he confesses to killing her, her]], it proves that he doesn't and never did.
**
did. However, the novel repeatedly hints that Maxim is actually rather weak-willed (as ([[spoiler:as demonstrated by Rebecca's successful SuicideByCop).SuicideByCop]]). Moreover, when the novel opens, Maxim's bad boy days are long gone. However, see FridgeLogic.



** Rebecca to the people she was openly nasty to.

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** [[spoiler: Rebecca to the people she was openly nasty to.]]



* AntagonistTitle: Arguably.

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* AntagonistTitle: Arguably.Arguably, since the heroine's main conflict (at first anyway) is that she can't live up to Rebecca's legacy.



* TheBadGuyWins: Discussed throughout the novel, with the narrator always thinking that Rebecca is conquering from beyond the grave. In the end, Rebecca loses her power to hurt the new couple, but Mrs. Danvers destroys Manderley and causes the bleak ending described in the prologue right when the couple were happy for the first time.

to:

* TheBadGuyWins: Discussed throughout the novel, with the narrator always thinking that Rebecca is conquering from beyond the grave. In the end, [[spoiler: Rebecca loses her power to hurt the new couple, but Mrs. Danvers destroys Manderley and causes the bleak ending described in the prologue right when the couple were happy for the first time.time]].



* BitchInSheepsClothing: The widely adored Rebecca was an utter selfish bitch who was nice to people on their faces but laughed and jeered behind their backs.

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* BitchInSheepsClothing: [[spoiler: The widely adored Rebecca was an utter selfish bitch who was nice to people on their faces but laughed and jeered behind their backs.backs]].



* {{Blackmail}}: Favell attempts to blackmail Maxim with his note from Rebecca, which suggests that Rebecca did not actually suicide, implicating Maxim himself.

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* {{Blackmail}}: [[spoiler: Favell attempts to blackmail Maxim with his note from Rebecca, which suggests that Rebecca did not actually suicide, implicating Maxim himself.himself]].
* BrickJoke: During one of their early dates, the heroine confesses that she wishes she were thirty-six years old, wearing black satin and white pearls. Maxim makes her promise never to wear pearls or black satin. Later she attempts BeautifulAllAlong - in a black dress with white pearls. Maxim is understandably put-off.



* TheCharmer: Rebecca.

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* TheCharmer: Rebecca.Rebecca managed to charm whoever she met.



* DeathByAdaptation: Mrs. Danvers, in the film.
* DeathByFallingOver: Rebecca, in the film version and TheMusical; she stumbled and hit her head. This would be because of the [[MoralGuardians Hays Code]]. In the book, she goads Maxim into shooting her.

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* DeathByAdaptation: [[spoiler: Mrs. Danvers, Danvers in the film.
film. In the novel she escaped the burning house, but the Hays Code wouldn't allow her to survive. The musical takes this further and shows that this is a suicide]].
* DeathByFallingOver: DeathByFallingOver:[[spoiler: Rebecca, in the film version and TheMusical; she stumbled and hit her head. This would be because of the [[MoralGuardians Hays Code]]. In the book, she goads Maxim into shooting her.]]



* EtTuBrute: The new version of "Ich hör dich singen" (I can hear you sing) shows Mrs. Danvers being deeply shaken by Rebecca's [[spoiler: betrayal (i.e. her not telling Mrs. Danvers of her illness)]], and she states that nothing shall stay the way it was. Sure enough...


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* GenreBlind: Mrs Danvers is suddenly being nice to the second Mrs de Winter? Nope, don't find anything suspicious about her behaviour and do as she asks.
4th Nov '16 3:26:08 PM EfficaciousPantheress
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Added DiffLines:

* EtTuBrute: The new version of "Ich hör dich singen" (I can hear you sing) shows Mrs. Danvers being deeply shaken by Rebecca's [[spoiler: betrayal (i.e. her not telling Mrs. Danvers of her illness)]], and she states that nothing shall stay the way it was. Sure enough...
29th Sep '16 1:51:28 AM EfficaciousPantheress
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* BrutalHonesty: Beatrice is famous for never sugarcoating her opinions and to tell people face-on she doesn't like them. Fortunately she takes an immediate liking to the second Mrs. de Winter.



* EeriePaleSkinnedBrunette: Mrs. Danvers is described as being very pale with a deathlike appearance and usually has dark hair (sometimes with grey streaks).



* OnlySaneWoman: The second Mrs. de Winter becomes this, as everyone around her slowly starts to lose it.



* WomanInBlack: The narrator wishes she was this during Maxim's courtship of her. Maxim quickly shoots the idea down; he likes her youth and innocence.
* WomanInWhite: Both Mrs. de Winters for the fancy dress ball.

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* WomanInBlack: The narrator wishes Mrs. Danvers, [[CreepyHousekeeper ominous and creepy as she was this during Maxim's courtship of her. Maxim quickly shoots is]] fittingly wears a long, heavy, black dress all the idea down; he likes her youth and innocence.
time.
* WomanInWhite: Both Mrs. de Winters dress up as one for the fancy dress ball.
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