History Literature / PrideAndPrejudice

15th May '17 7:19:36 AM XFllo
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* EsotericHappyEnding: Invoked by Elizabeth when Lydia and Wickham marry. Everyone else is celebrating because it means her reputation (and, by extension, the family's) is saved. Elizabeth's internal monologue points out that Wickham is no prize either as a husband or a brother-in-law, and that it's terrible circumstances indeed that make this seem like a "happy" ending. Indeed, in the WhereAreTheyNow sum up at the end, Wickham quickly loses whatever regard he had for his wife and vice versa, leaving them stuck in a loveless marriage they can't get out of.

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* EsotericHappyEnding: Invoked by How Elizabeth when views Lydia and Wickham marry.Wickham's marriage. Everyone else is celebrating because it means her reputation (and, by extension, the family's) is saved. Elizabeth's internal monologue points out that Wickham is no prize either as a husband or a brother-in-law, and that it's terrible circumstances indeed that make this seem like a "happy" ending. Indeed, in the WhereAreTheyNow sum up at the end, Wickham quickly loses whatever regard he had for his wife and vice versa, leaving them stuck in a loveless marriage they can't get out of.
15th May '17 7:18:01 AM XFllo
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* NoAccountingForTaste: Mr and Mrs Bennet; Mr Collins and Charlotte (although Charlotte's choice is clearly shown as "[[OldMaid I'm 27, I don't have any money]], [[IAmNotPretty and I'm not beautiful]], [[OldMaid so I have to take who I can get]]").

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* NoAccountingForTaste: NoAccountingForTaste:
**
Mr and Mrs Bennet; Mr Collins Bennet. The author and the characters acknowledge how unfitted these two are, so they serve as a warning to marry wisely. The narrator notes that a young Mr Bennet misstook youth and beauty for a winning personality. Also Mrs Bennet married for security and Mr Bennet not only can't provide it (as his estate is entailed and must be passed in the male line, and the marriage produced five daughters); he also actively sabotages her attempts to warn her daughters that they face a choice between financial security and marriage or being poor but independent.
** Elizabeth is horrified when her best friend
Charlotte (although Lucas decides to marry the insufferable Mr. Collins in cold blood for the sake of a home and a secure future. Charlotte's choice is clearly shown as "[[OldMaid I'm 27, 27]], I don't have any money]], [[IAmNotPretty money, [[PlainJane and I'm not beautiful]], [[OldMaid so I have to take who I can get]]").get". When we see her again after her marriage, however, she is coping very nicely with her spouse, having carefully arranged their lives so they spend as little time together as possible. Unlike the Bennets, the Collinses are quite happily content in their loveless marriage, mostly thanks to the fact that Charlotte knew exactly what she was getting into and Collins is too much of an idiot to know better.
14th Apr '17 9:55:35 AM priestessofdan
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* EsotericHappyEnding: Invoked by Lizzie when Lydia and Wickham marry. Everyone else is celebrating because it means her reputation (and, by extension, the family's) is saved. Lizzie's internal monologue points out that Wickham is no prize either as a husband or a brother-in-law, and that it's terrible circumstances indeed that make this seem like a "happy" ending. Indeed, in the WhereAreTheyNow sum up at the end, Wickham quickly loses whatever regard he had for his wife and vice versa, leaving them stuck in a loveless marriage they can't get out of.

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* EsotericHappyEnding: Invoked by Lizzie Elizabeth when Lydia and Wickham marry. Everyone else is celebrating because it means her reputation (and, by extension, the family's) is saved. Lizzie's Elizabeth's internal monologue points out that Wickham is no prize either as a husband or a brother-in-law, and that it's terrible circumstances indeed that make this seem like a "happy" ending. Indeed, in the WhereAreTheyNow sum up at the end, Wickham quickly loses whatever regard he had for his wife and vice versa, leaving them stuck in a loveless marriage they can't get out of.
30th Mar '17 5:53:15 PM BobTanaka
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Added DiffLines:

** Near the end, Jane reveals that she and Bingley had been quietly shipping Elizabeth and Darcy.
28th Mar '17 6:59:20 PM freyalorelei
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It has been adapted into several movies and TV series; the 1940 adaptation stars Creator/GreerGarson and Creator/LaurenceOlivier, the 1995 [[Creator/TheBBC BBC]] serial will forever see generations of women swoon over Creator/ColinFirth as the most romantic man alive whether he particularly wants them to or not, and the 2005 movie saw Keira Knightley star as Elizabeth and Matthew Macfadyen as Darcy. In 2009, Marvel Illustrated produced a ComicBookAdaptation, script by Nancy Butler, pencils by Hugo Petrus and covers by Sonny Liew.

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It has been adapted into several movies and TV series; the 1940 adaptation stars Creator/GreerGarson and Creator/LaurenceOlivier, the 1995 [[Creator/TheBBC BBC]] serial will forever see generations of women swoon over Creator/ColinFirth as the most romantic man alive whether he particularly wants them to or not, and the 2005 movie saw Keira Knightley Creator/KeiraKnightley star as Elizabeth and Matthew Macfadyen as Darcy. In 2009, Marvel Illustrated produced a ComicBookAdaptation, script by Nancy Butler, pencils by Hugo Petrus and covers by Sonny Liew.



* AdultsAreUseless: Played with when it comes to the Bennet parents. Mrs Bennet doesn't have a subtle bone in her body and suffers from a dire lack of common sense, taking to her bed when things go wrong, while Mr Bennet is far more calm and sensible. If you think about it, though, Mr Bennet is really just as bad as his wife. While her motives are admittedly partly out of self-interest, at least she's ''trying'' to make sure their daughters are provided for. Meanwhile, back in the early days of his marriage, Mr Bennet arrogantly assumed he'd ''naturally'' father a son to take over the estate, and didn't bother saving in case the desired male heir didn't come along ... meaning his five daughters are left with pretty pathetic dowries. In addition, while Mrs Bennet indulges (or ignores) her younger daughters, their father doesn't ever seem to pay much attention to/discipline them either -- even by the standards of the time -- with disastrous consequences. When Lydia elopes with Wickham, Mr Bennet even admits how foolishly he behaved to Elizabeth, saying he wishes he could have taken better care of them all.

to:

* AdultsAreUseless: Played with when it comes to the Bennet parents. Mrs Bennet doesn't have a subtle bone in her body and suffers from a dire lack of common sense, taking to her bed when things go wrong, while Mr Bennet is far more calm and sensible. If you think about it, though, Mr Bennet is really just as bad as his wife. While her motives are admittedly partly out of self-interest, at least she's ''trying'' to make sure their daughters are provided for. Meanwhile, back in the early days of his marriage, Mr Bennet arrogantly assumed he'd ''naturally'' father a son to take over the estate, and didn't bother saving in case the desired male heir didn't come along ... along...meaning his five daughters are left with pretty pathetic dowries. In addition, while Mrs Bennet indulges (or ignores) her younger daughters, their father doesn't ever seem to pay much attention to/discipline them either -- even by the standards of the time -- with disastrous consequences. When Lydia elopes with Wickham, Mr Bennet even admits how foolishly he behaved to Elizabeth, saying he wishes he could have taken better care of them all.



** Or rather than a common euphemism, it's probably one jokingly invented by Mr. Bennett in reference to Mr. Collins' first letter, wherein he begs them not to reject his proffered olive branch.

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** Or rather than a common euphemism, it's probably one jokingly invented by Mr. Mr Bennett in reference to Mr. Mr Collins' first letter, wherein he begs them not to reject his proffered olive branch.



* BlueBlood: The de Bourghs. Though all of the important characters are from land-owning families and thus considered "gentry," only one is titled. Sir William's title is not of the hereditary sort, so of the cast only Lady Catherine is an actual aristocrat. (Her father was an earl, and her brother -- Colonel Fitzwilliam's father - now holds the title.)

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* BlueBlood: The de Bourghs. Though all of the important characters are from land-owning families and thus considered "gentry," only one is titled. Sir William's title is not of the hereditary sort, so of the cast only Lady Catherine is an actual aristocrat. (Her father was an earl, and her brother -- - Colonel Fitzwilliam's father - now holds the title.)



* ChildMarriageVeto: Elizabeth flat-out refuses to marry Mr. Collins, against the wishes of her mother, who is not a little displeased and attempts to get her father to make her marry him, threatening never to see her again if she does not. [[spoiler: Mr. Bennet, perhaps wanting to help Elizabeth, declares that ''he'' will never see her again if she ''does''. Her mother persists in her pressure, but this effectively settles the matter.]]

to:

* ChildMarriageVeto: Elizabeth flat-out refuses to marry Mr. Collins, against the wishes of her mother, who is not a little displeased and attempts to get her father to make her marry him, threatening never to see her again if she does not. [[spoiler: Mr. Mr Bennet, perhaps wanting to help Elizabeth, declares that ''he'' will never see her again if she ''does''. Her mother persists in her pressure, but this effectively settles the matter.]]



* ControlFreak: There is only one way to do absolutely anything, and that is Lady Catherine de Bourgh's way... in her mind, at least. This leads to tension when she eventually meets Elizabeth Bennet, who isn't particularly inclined to let Lady Catherine or anyone bully her about.

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* ControlFreak: There is only one way to do absolutely anything, and that is Lady Catherine de Bourgh's way... in her mind, at least. This leads to tension when she eventually meets Elizabeth Bennet, who isn't particularly inclined to let Lady Catherine or anyone bully her about.



** Towards the end of the novel, the news of Jane and Bingley's engagement, by the time it reaches Lady Catherine via the Lucases and the Collinses, has gained the (untrue) additional detail that Lizzy is to marry Mr Darcy...

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** Towards the end of the novel, the news of Jane and Bingley's engagement, by the time it reaches Lady Catherine via the Lucases and the Collinses, has gained the (untrue) additional detail that Lizzy is to marry Mr Darcy...Darcy....



* IWantMyBelovedToBeHappy: Aside from his own feelings of responsibility for not speaking out against Mr Wickham, the main reason Mr Darcy goes to the trouble of making Wickham marry Lydia Bennet -- which requires him to pay off Wickham's debts and buy a military commission for him even though he justifiably can't stand the man and previously refused to support him any further -- is to make Elizabeth happy.

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* IWantMyBelovedToBeHappy: Aside from his own feelings of responsibility for not speaking out against Mr Wickham, the main reason Mr Darcy goes to the trouble of making Wickham marry Lydia Bennet -- - which requires him to pay off Wickham's debts and buy a military commission for him even though he justifiably can't stand the man and previously refused to support him any further -- - is to make Elizabeth happy.



** Wickham -- Austen's HappilyEverAfter endings always seem to be tempered by at least one of these, if you consider being married to [[TheDitz Lydia]] and being all but exiled to [[AcceptableTargets northern England]] as getting away scot-free...

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** Wickham -- Austen's HappilyEverAfter endings always seem to be tempered by at least one of these, if you consider being married to [[TheDitz Lydia]] and being all but exiled to [[AcceptableTargets northern England]] as getting away scot-free...scot-free....



* LastNameBasis: Darcy's Christian name is mentioned twice in the book, and it's ''[[EmbarrassingFirstName Fitzwilliam]]''. (On an educational note, Fitzwilliam is his mother's maiden name. At the time, it was very common for eldest sons to be given their mother's maiden name as a first name, especially if their mother was a woman of some prominence -- which Lady Anne was.)

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* LastNameBasis: Darcy's Christian name is mentioned twice in the book, and it's ''[[EmbarrassingFirstName Fitzwilliam]]''. (On an educational note, Fitzwilliam is his mother's maiden name. At the time, it was very common for eldest sons to be given their mother's maiden name as a first name, especially if their mother was a woman of some prominence -- - which Lady Anne was.)



** Mr Bennet copes with his ill-matched marriage by finding refuge in his books and [[DeadpanSnarker sarcasm]]. He is indifferent to the fact that this exposes his wife to the ridicule of their children, and their family to the ridicule of the world. By the end of the novel, though, [[CharacterDevelopment he accepts responsibility for his daughter's mistakes]] and furthermore, takes measures to instil some sense in his two unmarried daughters.

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** Mr Bennet copes with his ill-matched marriage by finding refuge in his books and [[DeadpanSnarker sarcasm]]. He is indifferent to the fact that this exposes his wife to the ridicule of their children, and their family to the ridicule of the world. By the end of the novel, though, [[CharacterDevelopment he accepts responsibility for his daughter's mistakes]] and furthermore, takes measures to instil instill some sense in his two unmarried daughters.



* RealityEnsues: Mr. and Mrs. Bennet show what can happen when you marry someone purely on the basis of physical attractiveness and sexual appeal. It's not the ''worst'' set up ever, but it's telling that Mr. Bennet keeps himself closeted away from his wife and younger daughters as much as possible.

to:

* RealityEnsues: Mr. Mr and Mrs. Mrs Bennet show what can happen when you marry someone purely on the basis of physical attractiveness and sexual appeal. It's not the ''worst'' set up ever, but it's telling that Mr. Mr Bennet keeps himself closeted away from his wife and younger daughters as much as possible.



* ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney: Referred to obliquely by Mr. Bennett. He thinks that if only he had put away an inheritance for his children, his daughter would not have to "prevail on the most worthless man in the county" to marry her--suggesting that even Lydia's living with a man for a time could have been overlooked if she'd had any kind of a dowry.
* ScrewThisImOuttaHere: After several increasingly emphatic attempts to convince Mr. Collins that she is ''not'' going to marry him, Elizabeth resorts to just getting up and walking out of the room. It still takes him a while to get it.
** Mr. Collins himself does this at the very end of the book, deciding that he and his wife would be better off in a different county until Lady Catherine gets over her fury regarding [[spoiler: Darcy's marriage to Elizabeth.]]

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* ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney: Referred to obliquely by Mr. Mr Bennett. He thinks that if only he had put away an inheritance for his children, his daughter would not have to "prevail on the most worthless man in the county" to marry her--suggesting her - suggesting that even Lydia's living with a man for a time could have been overlooked if she'd had any kind of a dowry.
* ScrewThisImOuttaHere: After several increasingly emphatic attempts to convince Mr. Mr Collins that she is ''not'' going to marry him, Elizabeth resorts to just getting up and walking out of the room. It still takes him a while to get it.
** Mr. Mr Collins himself does this at the very end of the book, deciding that he and his wife would be better off in a different county until Lady Catherine gets over her fury regarding [[spoiler: Darcy's marriage to Elizabeth.]]



* StatuesqueStunner: Lydia in the book -- at least, she considers herself to be tall and attractive. Early in the book, on the prospect of whether or not Bingley will dance with her, Lydia remarks, "Oh, I am not afraid, for though I ''am'' the youngest, I'm the tallest!".

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* StatuesqueStunner: Lydia in the book -- - at least, she considers herself to be tall and attractive. Early in the book, on the prospect of whether or not Bingley will dance with her, Lydia remarks, "Oh, I am not afraid, for though I ''am'' the youngest, I'm the tallest!".



* TakeThat: Many hilarious jabs that Mr Darcy takes against Caroline whenever she feels like belittling Elizabeth. The best are when Caroline accuses Elizabeth of deliberately walking to Netherfield in order to make a scene and asks Darcy if he would want his sister to make such an exibition, to which Darcy replies "Certainly not."; and when she hints that perhaps the walk has lessened Darcy's estimation of Elizabeth's "fine eyes", he casually replies, "Not at all, they were brightened by the exercise." Also parodied [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gTchxR4suto here]].

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* TakeThat: Many hilarious jabs that Mr Darcy takes against Caroline whenever she feels like belittling Elizabeth. The best are when Caroline accuses Elizabeth of deliberately walking to Netherfield in order to make a scene and asks Darcy if he would want his sister to make such an exibition, exhibition, to which Darcy replies "Certainly not."; and when she hints that perhaps the walk has lessened Darcy's estimation of Elizabeth's "fine eyes", he casually replies, "Not at all, they were brightened by the exercise." Also parodied [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gTchxR4suto here]].



** Mrs Bennet remains silly, but luckily Mr Bennet still finds her amusing. However, he misses Elizabeth so much that he actually travels to Pemberley -- often without warning her, because he loves to surprise her with his arrival.

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** Mrs Bennet remains silly, but luckily Mr Bennet still finds her amusing. However, he misses Elizabeth so much that he actually travels to Pemberley -- - often without warning her, because he loves to surprise her with his arrival.
3rd Mar '17 3:45:30 PM XFllo
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* ComicBookAdaptation: Got one courtesy of Marvel. The novel was also adapted into a Japanese manga.



** Mr Collins

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** Mr CollinsCollins sounds always pompous.



** Meanwhile, Charlotte ships Elizabeth/Darcy almost from the beginning.

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** Meanwhile, Charlotte ships Elizabeth/Darcy almost from the beginning.beginning. She encourages Lizzy to dance with Darcy when he asked her, and thinks he might really like her when they all meet again at Hunsford and Rosings.



** Pretty much everyone in Mereton ships Jane/Bingley.
* ShippingTorpedo: Plenty of this as well

to:

** Pretty much everyone in Mereton ships Jane/Bingley.
Meryton wants Bingley to marry Jane Bennet.
* ShippingTorpedo: Plenty of this as wellShippingTorpedo:



* ShrinkingViolet: Georgiana Darcy. Mary Bennet too, preferring books to balls. Jane is this in a way too. She's friendly and outgoing but also very shy - to the degree that Mr Darcy suspects her of being a GoldDigger.

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%% * ShrinkingViolet: ShrinkingViolet:
%% **
Georgiana Darcy. Darcy.
%% **
Mary Bennet too, preferring books to balls. Jane is this in a way too. She's friendly and outgoing but also very shy - to the degree that Mr Darcy suspects her of being a GoldDigger.balls.



* SpiritedYoungLady: Lizzy again. She's probably the TropeCodifier.
* SpoiledSweet: Sir William Lucas's elevation to knighthood inspired him, not to look down on others, but to "be civil to all the world." He's a pompous idiot, but a very genial and good-natured one.
* StalkerWithACrush: Darcy, temporarily.
* StatuesqueStunner: Lydia in the book -- at least, she considers herself to be this. Early in the book, on the prospect of whether or not Bingley will dance with her, Lydia remarks, "Oh, I am not afraid, for though I ''am'' the youngest, I'm the tallest!".

to:

* SpiritedYoungLady: Lizzy again. Bennet. She's probably intelligent, witty and lively, but dutiful to her parents and loyal to her friends. She knows the rules of society, and is distinguished by her good manners, but she isn't afraid to break rules that strike her as obsolete or to say what she thinks. Probably the TropeCodifier.
* SpoiledSweet: Sir William Lucas's elevation to knighthood inspired him, not to look down on others, but to "be civil to all the world." He's a pompous idiot, but a very genial and good-natured one.
%% * StalkerWithACrush: Darcy, temporarily.
* StatuesqueStunner: Lydia in the book -- at least, she considers herself to be this.tall and attractive. Early in the book, on the prospect of whether or not Bingley will dance with her, Lydia remarks, "Oh, I am not afraid, for though I ''am'' the youngest, I'm the tallest!".



* TallDarkAndSnarky: Mr Darcy, by dint of being tall, dark [[DontExplainTheJoke and snarky]].

to:

%% * TallDarkAndSnarky: Mr Darcy, by dint of being tall, dark [[DontExplainTheJoke and snarky]].



* TomboyAndGirlyGirl: Elizabeth and Jane, respectively.



** Wickham with Elizabeth. When he starts paying attentions to a heiress, her aunt objects, and Elizabeth points out that it's unreasonable to criticise him both for wooing a poor woman he can't marry and for wooing a rich woman he can.

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** Wickham with Elizabeth. When he starts paying attentions to a an heiress, her aunt objects, and Elizabeth points out that it's unreasonable to criticise him both for wooing a poor woman he can't marry and for wooing a rich woman he can.



* TheVamp: Wickham is a male version of this trope.



* WellExcuseMePrincess: Elizabeth.

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%% * WellExcuseMePrincess: Elizabeth.
3rd Mar '17 3:57:59 AM KateB
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* BabiesEverAfter: In the letter where Mr Collins warns Mr Bennet that Lady Catherine disapproves of Elizabeth marrying Darcy, he mentions that Charlotte is "expecting an olive branch," which might be a euphemism for pregnancy.

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* BabiesEverAfter: In the letter where Mr Collins warns Mr Bennet that Lady Catherine disapproves of Elizabeth marrying Darcy, he mentions that Charlotte is "expecting an olive branch," which might be a euphemism for pregnancy.reference to Psalm 128 v.4 (Book of Common Prayer version) 'Thy children like the olive-branches round about thy table'.
28th Feb '17 10:55:04 PM Ciara25
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* RealityEnsues: Mr. and Mrs. Bennet show what can happen when you marry someone purely on the basis of attractiveness and sexual appeal. It's not the ''worst'' set up ever, but it's telling that Mr. Bennet keeps himself closeted away from his wife and younger daughters as much as possible.

to:

* RealityEnsues: Mr. and Mrs. Bennet show what can happen when you marry someone purely on the basis of physical attractiveness and sexual appeal. It's not the ''worst'' set up ever, but it's telling that Mr. Bennet keeps himself closeted away from his wife and younger daughters as much as possible.
28th Feb '17 10:54:06 PM Ciara25
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* AdultsAreUseless: Played with when it comes to the Bennet parents. Mrs Bennet doesn't have a subtle bone in her body and suffers from a dire lack of common sense, taking to her bed when things go wrong, while Mr Bennet is far more calm and sensible. If you think about it, though, Mr Bennet is really just as bad as his wife. While her motives are admittedly partly out of self-interest, at least she's ''trying'' to make sure their daughters are provided for. Meanwhile, back in the early days of his marriage, Mr Bennet arrogantly assumed he'd father a son to take over the estate, and didn't bother saving in case the desired male heir didn't come along - meaning his daughters are left with pretty pathetic dowries. In addition, while Mrs Bennet indulges (or ignores) her younger daughters, their father doesn't ever seem to pay much attention to/discipline them either, with disastrous consequences. When Lydia elopes with Wickham, Mr Bennet even admits how foolishly he behaved to Elizabeth.

to:

* AdultsAreUseless: Played with when it comes to the Bennet parents. Mrs Bennet doesn't have a subtle bone in her body and suffers from a dire lack of common sense, taking to her bed when things go wrong, while Mr Bennet is far more calm and sensible. If you think about it, though, Mr Bennet is really just as bad as his wife. While her motives are admittedly partly out of self-interest, at least she's ''trying'' to make sure their daughters are provided for. Meanwhile, back in the early days of his marriage, Mr Bennet arrogantly assumed he'd ''naturally'' father a son to take over the estate, and didn't bother saving in case the desired male heir didn't come along - along ... meaning his five daughters are left with pretty pathetic dowries. In addition, while Mrs Bennet indulges (or ignores) her younger daughters, their father doesn't ever seem to pay much attention to/discipline them either, either -- even by the standards of the time -- with disastrous consequences. When Lydia elopes with Wickham, Mr Bennet even admits how foolishly he behaved to Elizabeth.Elizabeth, saying he wishes he could have taken better care of them all.
15th Feb '17 4:31:03 PM erracht
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* ChildMarriageVeto: Elizabeth flat-out refuses to marry Mr. Collins, against the wishes of her mother, who is not a little displeased and attempts to get her father to make her marry him, threatening never to see her again if she does not. [[spoiler: Mr. Bennet, perhaps wanting to help Elizabeth, declares that he will he will never see her again if she ''does''. Her mother persists in her pressure, but this effectively settles the matter.]]

to:

* ChildMarriageVeto: Elizabeth flat-out refuses to marry Mr. Collins, against the wishes of her mother, who is not a little displeased and attempts to get her father to make her marry him, threatening never to see her again if she does not. [[spoiler: Mr. Bennet, perhaps wanting to help Elizabeth, declares that he will he ''he'' will never see her again if she ''does''. Her mother persists in her pressure, but this effectively settles the matter.]]
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