History Literature / PrideAndPrejudice

1st Jul '16 2:22:45 AM Ciara25
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** Lydia also, at first, appears to count as one of these. She gets away with a lot of bad behaviour, including her elopement with Wickham, scot-free, and doesn't even realise that she's done anything wrong at all. There is, however, a slight subversion at the end, as actually ''being'' Lydia, and living with Wickham, with nothing in her head but a list of fashion items, is probably a punishment in itself. The fact that she is exiled far away enough that Jane and Elizabeth don't have to see much of her is such a victory for them that the fact that she doesn't get her comeuppance matters surprisingly little. It could be that Lydia is a lot like Peg Bundy and [[Series/MarriedWithChildren the Bundy Curse]]; she's actually ''part'' of Wickham's punishment, therefore it's not all that important if she herself gets punished. Also, Lydia and Wickham pretty much lose all affection for each other fairly quickly, so they're ''both'' stuck in a loveless marriage where neither of them can like or respect each other.

to:

** Lydia also, at first, appears to count as one of these. She gets away with a lot of bad behaviour, including her elopement with Wickham, scot-free, and doesn't even realise that she's done anything wrong at all. There is, however, a slight subversion at the end, as actually ''being'' Lydia, and living with Wickham, with nothing in her head but a list of fashion items, is probably a punishment in itself. The fact that she is exiled far away enough that Jane and Elizabeth don't have to see much of her is such a victory for them that the fact that she doesn't get her comeuppance matters surprisingly little. It could be that Lydia is a lot like Peg Bundy and [[Series/MarriedWithChildren the Bundy Curse]]; she's actually ''part'' of Wickham's punishment, therefore it's not all that important if she herself gets punished. Also, Additionally, Lydia and Wickham pretty much lose all affection for each other fairly quickly, so they're ''both'' stuck in a loveless marriage where neither of them can like or respect each other.other, and with a family on her side who barely tolerate them.
14th Jun '16 1:00:57 AM PaulA
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* TheNounAndTheNoun
12th Jun '16 7:55:37 PM k410ren
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* TheSnarkKnight: Lizzy; also the narrator, on occasion. Mr. Bennet as well and it's clear where Lizzy gets it from.

to:

* TheSnarkKnight: Lizzy; also the narrator, on occasion. Mr. Bennet as well and it's pretty clear where Lizzy gets it from.
12th Jun '16 7:54:58 PM k410ren
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* TheSnarkKnight: Lizzy; also the narrator, on occasion.

to:

* TheSnarkKnight: Lizzy; also the narrator, on occasion. Mr. Bennet as well and it's clear where Lizzy gets it from.
12th Jun '16 2:08:52 PM Tarlonniel
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*** I wouldn't call it scot-free at all; [[IncrediblyLamePun Scotland is right nearby]].
24th May '16 6:20:41 PM lexicon
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* FourTemperamentEnsemble: Bennet family: Lydia (choleric), Mrs Bennet (choleric/melancholic), Mary (melancholic), Mr Bennet (phlegmatic), Jane (phlegmatic/sanguine), Kitty (sanguine), and Elizabeth (leukine).
** The men: Mr Darcy (choleric/melancholic), Mr Collins (phlegmatic), Mr Bingley (sanguine), and Mr Wickham (leukine).
15th May '16 6:01:37 PM nombretomado
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** Lydia also, at first, appears to count as one of these. She gets away with a lot of bad behaviour, including her elopement with Wickham, scot-free, and doesn't even realise that she's done anything wrong at all. There is, however, a slight subversion at the end, as actually ''being'' Lydia, and living with Wickham, with nothing in her head but a list of fashion items, is probably a punishment in itself. The fact that she is exiled far away enough that Jane and Elizabeth don't have to see much of her is such a victory for them that the fact that she doesn't get her comeuppance matters surprisingly little. It could be that Lydia is a lot like Peg Bundy and [[MarriedWithChildren the Bundy Curse]]; she's actually ''part'' of Wickham's punishment, therefore it's not all that important if she herself gets punished. Also, Lydia and Wickham pretty much lose all affection for each other fairly quickly, so they're ''both'' stuck in a loveless marriage where neither of them can like or respect each other.

to:

** Lydia also, at first, appears to count as one of these. She gets away with a lot of bad behaviour, including her elopement with Wickham, scot-free, and doesn't even realise that she's done anything wrong at all. There is, however, a slight subversion at the end, as actually ''being'' Lydia, and living with Wickham, with nothing in her head but a list of fashion items, is probably a punishment in itself. The fact that she is exiled far away enough that Jane and Elizabeth don't have to see much of her is such a victory for them that the fact that she doesn't get her comeuppance matters surprisingly little. It could be that Lydia is a lot like Peg Bundy and [[MarriedWithChildren [[Series/MarriedWithChildren the Bundy Curse]]; she's actually ''part'' of Wickham's punishment, therefore it's not all that important if she herself gets punished. Also, Lydia and Wickham pretty much lose all affection for each other fairly quickly, so they're ''both'' stuck in a loveless marriage where neither of them can like or respect each other.
15th May '16 10:23:50 AM jadmire
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** All this is TruthInTelevision, since in the early 19th century (as had been the case for centuries), marriages in the middle and upper classes had been contracted more for economic (and, among royalty and the upper nobility, political) reasons than for romantic ones. The ability of a prospective husband to provide for his wife and potential children, and the amount of the dowry that a bride could bring into her marriage, were crucial concerns.
4th May '16 7:05:07 AM Morgenthaler
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As a famous public domain novel, it was subjected to [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot nerd-ification]] in 2009 with the publishing of ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudiceAndZombies''. Many modern writers have picked up where Austen left off, trying their hand at publishing {{continuation}} stories about Darcy and Elizabeth as well as some of the minor characters; one notable example is the 2011 unofficial sequel ''DeathComesToPemberley'' by P.D. James. In 2013, Jo Baker wrote a version of the story from the perspective of the servants, ''{{Longbourn}}''.

to:

As a famous public domain novel, it was subjected to [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot nerd-ification]] in 2009 with the publishing of ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudiceAndZombies''. Many modern writers have picked up where Austen left off, trying their hand at publishing {{continuation}} stories about Darcy and Elizabeth as well as some of the minor characters; one notable example is the 2011 unofficial sequel ''DeathComesToPemberley'' ''Literature/DeathComesToPemberley'' by P.D. James. In 2013, Jo Baker wrote a version of the story from the perspective of the servants, ''{{Longbourn}}''.
''Literature/{{Longbourn}}''.
3rd May '16 8:58:24 AM BobTanaka
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* SpoiledSweet: Sir William Lucas's elevation to knighthood inspired him, not to look down on others, but to "be civil to all the world." He's a pompous idiot, but a very genial and good-natured one.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.PrideAndPrejudice