History Literature / PrideAndPrejudice

10th Feb '16 1:44:39 PM Ciara25
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** While Darcy was rude and condescending in his initial proposal towards Elizabeth, and while it was cruel of him to convince BIngley to give up on Jane, he has a valid point - which Elizabeth begrudgingly agrees with - that the Bennet mother and younger sisters often behave ''completely'' inappropriately in public, while Mr Bennet does little or nothing to rein them in. What respectable Regency bachelor, who's only one generation away from trade himself in Bingley's case, and comes from an important and well established family in Darcy's, would want such embarrassing in-laws?
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** While Darcy was rude and condescending in his initial proposal towards Elizabeth, and while it was cruel of him to convince BIngley Bingley to give up on Jane, he has a valid point - which Elizabeth begrudgingly agrees with - that the Bennet mother and younger sisters often behave ''completely'' inappropriately in public, while Mr Bennet does little or nothing to rein them in. What respectable Regency bachelor, who's only one generation away from trade himself in Bingley's case, and comes from an important and well established family in Darcy's, would want such embarrassing in-laws?
10th Feb '16 5:30:04 AM Ciara25
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** While it was pretty nasty of Darcy to separate Bingley and Jane, he has a valid point - which Elizabeth begrudgingly agrees with - that the Bennet mother and younger sisters often behave ''completely'' inappropriately in public, and Mr Bennet does little or nothing to rein them in. What respectable Regency bachelor (who's only one generation away from trade himself in Bingley's case, and comes from an important and well established family in Darcy's) would want such embarrassing in-laws?
to:
** While Darcy was rude and condescending in his initial proposal towards Elizabeth, and while it was pretty nasty cruel of Darcy him to separate Bingley and convince BIngley to give up on Jane, he has a valid point - which Elizabeth begrudgingly agrees with - that the Bennet mother and younger sisters often behave ''completely'' inappropriately in public, and while Mr Bennet does little or nothing to rein them in. What respectable Regency bachelor (who's bachelor, who's only one generation away from trade himself in Bingley's case, and comes from an important and well established family in Darcy's) Darcy's, would want such embarrassing in-laws?
10th Feb '16 5:19:34 AM Ciara25
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* RealityEnsues: Mr. and Mrs. Bennet show what can happen when you marry someone purely on the basis of attractiveness and sexual appeal. It's not the ''worst'' set up ever, but it's telling that Mr. Bennet keeps himself closeted away from his wife and daughters as much as possible.
8th Feb '16 2:20:18 AM Ciara25
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** Lydia also, at first, appears to count as one of these. She gets away with a lot of bad behaviour, including her elopement with Wickham, scot-free, and doesn't even realise that she's done anything wrong at all. There is, however, a slight subversion at the end, as actually ''being'' Lydia, and living with Wickham, with nothing in her head but a list of fashion items, is probably a punishment in itself. The fact that she is exiled far away enough that Jane and Elizabeth don't have to see much of her is such a victory for them that the fact that she doesn't get her comeuppance matters surprisingly little. It could be that Lydia is a lot like Peg Bundy and [[MarriedWithChildren the Bundy Curse]]; she's actually ''part'' of Wickham's punishment, therefore it's not all that important if she herself gets punished. Also, they pretty much lose all affection for each other fairly shortly, so they're ''both'' stuck in a loveless marriage where neither of them can respect each other.
to:
** Lydia also, at first, appears to count as one of these. She gets away with a lot of bad behaviour, including her elopement with Wickham, scot-free, and doesn't even realise that she's done anything wrong at all. There is, however, a slight subversion at the end, as actually ''being'' Lydia, and living with Wickham, with nothing in her head but a list of fashion items, is probably a punishment in itself. The fact that she is exiled far away enough that Jane and Elizabeth don't have to see much of her is such a victory for them that the fact that she doesn't get her comeuppance matters surprisingly little. It could be that Lydia is a lot like Peg Bundy and [[MarriedWithChildren the Bundy Curse]]; she's actually ''part'' of Wickham's punishment, therefore it's not all that important if she herself gets punished. Also, they Lydia and Wickham pretty much lose all affection for each other fairly shortly, quickly, so they're ''both'' stuck in a loveless marriage where neither of them can like or respect each other.
25th Jan '16 2:23:03 AM K
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** Charlotte Lucas is twenty-seven and considered an Old Maid. Everyone is her family is beyond happy when she gets engaged out of the blue with Mr Collins. Charlotte knows he's stupid and obnoxious, but he will give her a respectable, comfortable position in society. And it's not like she hasn't had a lot of experience living with stupid and obnoxious at home.
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** Charlotte Lucas is twenty-seven and considered an Old Maid. Everyone is in her family is beyond happy when she gets engaged out of the blue with Mr Collins.Collins, especially her sisters, who are thrilled because now ''they'' can make their debuts in society and start finding husbands for themselves. Charlotte knows he's stupid and obnoxious, but he will give her a respectable, comfortable position in society. And it's not like she hasn't had a lot of experience living with stupid and obnoxious at home.
9th Jan '16 7:22:33 PM lihtox
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Comment on Double Standard
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** Also, Elizabeth finds Mr. Collins particularly odious, while Mary King is a "good sort of girl" with nothing particular against her.
7th Jan '16 1:09:28 PM callsignecho
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* ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney: Referred to obliquely by Mr. Bennett. He thinks that if only he had put away an inheritance for his children, his daughter would not have to "prevail on the most worthless man in the county" to marry her--suggesting that even Lydia's living with a man for a time could have been overlooked if she'd had any kind of a dowry.
14th Dec '15 11:14:05 AM roxana
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** It is generous, but he probably thought any of the five sisters would be grateful for his offer and say yes, so at the same time he had selfish motives.
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** It is generous, but he probably thought any of the five sisters would be grateful for his offer and say yes, so at the same time he had selfish motives. Of course he might also have genuinely felt badly about doing the Bennett women out of their home, the two motivations are not mutually exclusive.

** Charlotte Lucas is twenty-seven and considered an Old Maid. Everyone is her family is beyond happy when she gets engaged out of the blue with Mr Collins. Charlotte knows he's stupid and obnoxious, but he will give her a respectable, comfortable position in society.
to:
** Charlotte Lucas is twenty-seven and considered an Old Maid. Everyone is her family is beyond happy when she gets engaged out of the blue with Mr Collins. Charlotte knows he's stupid and obnoxious, but he will give her a respectable, comfortable position in society. And it's not like she hasn't had a lot of experience living with stupid and obnoxious at home.
18th Nov '15 3:35:55 PM Ciara25
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** Lydia also, at first, appears to count as one of these. She gets away with a lot of bad behaviour, including her elopement with Wickham, scot-free, and doesn't even realise that she's done anything wrong at all. There is, however, a slight subversion at the end, as actually ''being'' Lydia, and living with Wickham, with nothing in her head but a list of fashion items, is probably a punishment in itself. The fact that she is exiled far away enough that Jane and Elizabeth don't have to see much of her is such a victory for them that the fact that she doesn't get her comeuppance matters surprisingly little. It could be that Lydia is a lot like Peg Bundy and [[MarriedWithChildren the Bundy Curse]]; she's actually ''part'' of Wickham's punishment, therefore it's not all that important if she herself gets punished. Also, they pretty much lose all affection for each other fairly shortly after marriage, so they're ''both'' stuck in a loveless marriage where neither of them can respect each other.
to:
** Lydia also, at first, appears to count as one of these. She gets away with a lot of bad behaviour, including her elopement with Wickham, scot-free, and doesn't even realise that she's done anything wrong at all. There is, however, a slight subversion at the end, as actually ''being'' Lydia, and living with Wickham, with nothing in her head but a list of fashion items, is probably a punishment in itself. The fact that she is exiled far away enough that Jane and Elizabeth don't have to see much of her is such a victory for them that the fact that she doesn't get her comeuppance matters surprisingly little. It could be that Lydia is a lot like Peg Bundy and [[MarriedWithChildren the Bundy Curse]]; she's actually ''part'' of Wickham's punishment, therefore it's not all that important if she herself gets punished. Also, they pretty much lose all affection for each other fairly shortly after marriage, shortly, so they're ''both'' stuck in a loveless marriage where neither of them can respect each other.
20th Oct '15 9:05:49 AM Ciara25
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** Lydia also counts as one of these. She gets away with a lot of bad behaviour, including her elopement with Wickham, scot-free, and doesn't even realise that she's done anything wrong at all. There is, however, a slight subversion at the end, as actually ''being'' Lydia, and living with Wickham, with nothing in her head but a list of fashion items, is probably a punishment in itself. The fact that she is exiled far away enough that Jane and Elizabeth don't have to see much of her is such a victory for them that the fact that she doesn't get her comeuppance matters surprisingly little. It could be that Lydia is a lot like Peg Bundy and [[MarriedWithChildren the Bundy Curse]]; she's actually ''part'' of Wickham's punishment, therefore it's not all that important if she herself gets punished.
to:
** Lydia also counts also, at first, appears to count as one of these. She gets away with a lot of bad behaviour, including her elopement with Wickham, scot-free, and doesn't even realise that she's done anything wrong at all. There is, however, a slight subversion at the end, as actually ''being'' Lydia, and living with Wickham, with nothing in her head but a list of fashion items, is probably a punishment in itself. The fact that she is exiled far away enough that Jane and Elizabeth don't have to see much of her is such a victory for them that the fact that she doesn't get her comeuppance matters surprisingly little. It could be that Lydia is a lot like Peg Bundy and [[MarriedWithChildren the Bundy Curse]]; she's actually ''part'' of Wickham's punishment, therefore it's not all that important if she herself gets punished. Also, they pretty much lose all affection for each other fairly shortly after marriage, so they're ''both'' stuck in a loveless marriage where neither of them can respect each other.
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