History Literature / NineteenEightyFour

21st Sep '17 1:36:46 AM Uyyy
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* NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast: The BlindIdiotTranslation of Eastasia's governing philosophy (mentioned in Goldstein's book): "''Death-Worship.''" Its proper translation ("[[AssimilationPlot Obliteration of the Self]]") isn't much more comforting.
21st Sep '17 1:24:53 AM Uyyy
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* TheUnfettered: Part of the oath [[LaResistance The Brotherhood]] makes new members swear is that they will do anything, ''absolutely anything'' - even, say, [[WouldHurtAChild throw acid in a baby's face]] - if it becomes necessary to overthrow the Party. [[spoiler: TheReveal that they're actually Party sting-ops turns it into a {{Deconstruction}} - when Winston attempts to assert moral superiority over O'Brien and the Party, the latter just plays a tape of Winston swearing his oath, specifically the "acid in a baby's face" part.]]
5th Sep '17 5:29:07 PM HawkbitAlpha
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After reading Yevgeny Zamyatin's dystopian thriller ''Literature/{{We}}'', Creator/GeorgeOrwell wrote ''Nineteen Eighty-Four'' as a PragmaticAdaptation of the novel for non-Russian audiences, with the addition of the then-new technology of television. Finished in 1948 [[note]]Orwell merely reversed the last two digits of that year to devise the title[[/note]] and published the next year, it became one of the most iconic stories in the English language, and introduced the phrases "BigBrotherIsWatching You," "{{thoughtcrime}}," "Thought Police," "Newspeak," and "doublethink" into the English lexicon ([[BeamMeUpScotty but not "doublespeak"]]).

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After reading Yevgeny Zamyatin's dystopian thriller ''Literature/{{We}}'', Creator/GeorgeOrwell wrote ''Nineteen Eighty-Four'' as a PragmaticAdaptation of the novel for non-Russian audiences, with the addition of the then-new technology of television. Finished in 1948 [[note]]Orwell merely reversed the last two digits of that year to devise the title[[/note]] and published the next year, it became one of the most iconic stories in the English language, and introduced the phrases "BigBrotherIsWatching You," "{{thoughtcrime}}," "Thought Police," "Newspeak," "[[NewSpeak Newspeak]]," and "doublethink" into the English lexicon ([[BeamMeUpScotty but not "doublespeak"]]).
25th Aug '17 6:48:09 PM nombretomado
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* SpaceFillingEmpire: The whole world has been split into three superpowers: Oceania (North and South America, Great Britain, South Africa and Australia), Eurasia (the [[SovietRussiaUkraineAndSoOn Soviet Union]], mainland Europe and North Africa), and Eastasia (China and surrounding Asian nations, down to UsefulNotes/{{India}} and the Pacific Islands).

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* SpaceFillingEmpire: The whole world has been split into three superpowers: Oceania (North and South America, Great Britain, South Africa and Australia), Eurasia (the [[SovietRussiaUkraineAndSoOn [[UsefulNotes/SovietRussiaUkraineAndSoOn Soviet Union]], mainland Europe and North Africa), and Eastasia (China and surrounding Asian nations, down to UsefulNotes/{{India}} and the Pacific Islands).
24th Aug '17 8:20:20 AM StevieGoldstein9
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* AntiHero: Winston himself; he's suspicious, bitter, cowardly and, initially at least, demonstrates few outward desires besides basic gratification. But given that he's the product of a society that instils those qualities in its citizenry ''on purpose'', the mere fact that he contemplates rising above them makes him a hero, of sorts.

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* AntiHero: Winston himself; himself, a ClassicalAntiHero, to be exact; he's suspicious, bitter, cowardly and, initially at least, demonstrates few outward desires besides basic gratification. But given that he's the product of a society that instils those qualities in its citizenry ''on purpose'', the mere fact that he contemplates rising above them makes him a hero, of sorts.
23rd Aug '17 12:20:05 PM Psyclone
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** The Ministry of Truth (rewriting the past), the Ministry of Peace (the armed forces), the Ministry of Plenty (rationing to maintain PerpetualPoverty) and the Ministry of Love (torture and brainwashing).

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** The Ministry of Truth (rewriting the past), past and spreading propaganda), the Ministry of Peace (the armed forces), the Ministry of Plenty (rationing to maintain PerpetualPoverty) and the Ministry of Love (torture and brainwashing).
23rd Aug '17 12:19:11 PM Psyclone
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The book is set in London, the capital of AirstripOne and part of the superpower of Oceania. Life ''[[CrapsackWorld sucks]]''. Oceania is ruled by the totalitarian regime of "the Party", personified by the omnipresent figure of "Big Brother". Standards of living are low due to the ForeverWar Oceania is engaged in alongside their ally Eurasia against Eastasia (or is it the other way around?). Sex is banned except for procreation purposes. Media, entertainment, and art are all heavily controlled and censored by the Party. And most importantly, SinisterSurveillance is omnipresent: nearly every space has some sort of monitoring device and it's impossible to tell whether you are being watched or listened to at any time. The novel's protagonist is Winston Smith, a member of the "Outer Party" (read, middle-class) who lives a dismal existence working for the state, secretly nursing thoughts of rebellion. Until one day, a chance encounter with a woman might prompt him to do something about it...

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The book is set in London, the capital of AirstripOne and part of the superpower of Oceania. Life ''[[CrapsackWorld sucks]]''. Oceania is ruled by the totalitarian regime of "the Party", personified by the omnipresent figure of "Big Brother". Standards of living are low due to the ForeverWar Oceania is engaged in alongside their ally Eurasia against Eastasia (or is it the other way around?). Sex is banned except for procreation purposes. Media, entertainment, and art are all heavily controlled and censored by the Party. And most importantly, SinisterSurveillance is omnipresent: nearly every space has some sort of monitoring device and it's impossible to tell whether you are being watched or listened to at any time. The novel's protagonist is Winston Smith, a member of the middle-class "Outer Party" (read, middle-class) who lives a dismal existence working for the state, Party's PropagandaMachine, secretly nursing thoughts of rebellion. Until one day, a chance encounter with a woman might prompt him to do something about it...
23rd Aug '17 12:17:16 PM Psyclone
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The book is set in London, the capital of AirstripOne and part of the superpower of Oceania. Life ''[[CrapsackWorld sucks]]'': Oceania is ruled by the totalitarian regime of "the Party", personified by the omnipresent figure of "Big Brother". Standards of living are low due to the ForeverWar Oceania is engaged in alongside their ally Eurasia against Eastasia (or is it the other way around?). Sex is banned except for procreation purposes. Media, entertainment, and art are all heavily controlled and censored by the Party. And most importantly, SinisterSurveillance is omnipresent: nearly every space has some sort of monitoring device and it's impossible to tell whether you are being watched or listened to at any time. The novel's protagonist is Winston Smith, a member of the "Outer Party" (read, middle-class) who lives a dismal existence working for the state, secretly nursing thoughts of rebellion. Until one day, a chance encounter with a woman might prompt him to do something about it...

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The book is set in London, the capital of AirstripOne and part of the superpower of Oceania. Life ''[[CrapsackWorld sucks]]'': sucks]]''. Oceania is ruled by the totalitarian regime of "the Party", personified by the omnipresent figure of "Big Brother". Standards of living are low due to the ForeverWar Oceania is engaged in alongside their ally Eurasia against Eastasia (or is it the other way around?). Sex is banned except for procreation purposes. Media, entertainment, and art are all heavily controlled and censored by the Party. And most importantly, SinisterSurveillance is omnipresent: nearly every space has some sort of monitoring device and it's impossible to tell whether you are being watched or listened to at any time. The novel's protagonist is Winston Smith, a member of the "Outer Party" (read, middle-class) who lives a dismal existence working for the state, secretly nursing thoughts of rebellion. Until one day, a chance encounter with a woman might prompt him to do something about it...
21st Aug '17 4:24:40 PM KingClark
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* DisappearedDad / MissingMom: Both of Winston's parents disappeared; his mother when he was around 11, his father much earlier. He has many memories about his mother, but remembers little about his father. He knows nothing of their fate; they might have been executed or sent to a forced labor camp.

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* DisappearedDad / MissingMom: DisappearedDad[=/=]MissingMom: Both of Winston's parents disappeared; his mother when he was around 11, his father much earlier. He has many memories about his mother, but remembers little about his father. He knows nothing of their fate; they might have been executed or sent to a forced labor camp.



* DownerEnding: After his "rehabilitation" in the Ministry of Love and betraying Julia to his own FateWorseThanDeath, Winston callously and casually assists the Party's war department by allowing them to use his tactical mind through the medium of self-versed chess to economically distribute Oceania's forces in Africa more effectively. His love for Julia is nonexistent, and she reciprocates. After reading reports that the attacks he coordinated have succeeded, he forsakes his first and earliest childhood memory and replaces it with pure hot-blooded devotion to the truly-proved-meaningless cause of war on the Party's behalf. He ends his life in stupid ecstasy, confessing to crimes he did not commit in order to alleviate guilt from the Party (the same lie of which others partook at the start of the novel being the incitement of his intellectual rebellion), and finally professing unconditional love for Big Brother as he's shot through the back of the head.
** The Michael Radford movie has a bleak ending, foregoing the execution and instead having Winston look at the image of Big Brother, then thinking, "I love you."
** Perhaps the worst part of the ending is the fact that Winston's re-education is so successful that he actually mistakes it for a happy ending.

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* DownerEnding: DownerEnding:
** Good '''God'''.
After his "rehabilitation" in the Ministry of Love and betraying Julia to his own FateWorseThanDeath, Winston callously and casually assists the Party's war department by allowing them to use his tactical mind through the medium of self-versed chess to economically distribute Oceania's forces in Africa more effectively. His love for Julia is nonexistent, and she reciprocates. After reading reports that the attacks he coordinated have succeeded, he forsakes his first and earliest childhood memory and replaces it with pure hot-blooded devotion to the truly-proved-meaningless cause of war on the Party's behalf. He ends his life -- or imagines the end of his life -- in stupid ecstasy, after confessing to crimes he did not commit in order to alleviate guilt from the Party (the same lie of which others partook at the start of the novel being the incitement of his intellectual rebellion), and he finally professing professes unconditional love for Big Brother as he's shot through the back of the head.
** The Michael Radford movie has a bleak ending, foregoing the execution and instead having Winston look at the image of Big Brother, then thinking, "I love you."
**
head. Perhaps the worst part of the ending is the fact that Winston's re-education is so successful that he actually mistakes it for a happy ending.''happy'' ending.
** The Michael Radford movie has a similarly bleak ending, foregoing the execution and instead having Winston look at the image of Big Brother, then thinking, "I love you."
21st Aug '17 10:49:55 AM weezact7
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** While O'Brien is the only visible Big Bad, he outright states that even the Inner Party are slaves (at least to a certain degree) to the nebulous idea of Big Brother. He implies that the only real difference between the Inner and Outer Party is that the Inner Party has accepted losing their freedom and identity and thus can be fully trusted.
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