History Literature / Mahabharata

13th Dec '16 4:26:01 PM karstovich2
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The Epic starts with King Shantanu, the ancestor of the Kurus falling in LoveAtFirstSight with (unknown to him) River Goddess Ganga whose condition for marrying him is that he should refrain [[ThePromise from questioning her about anything that she does]]. Ganga however appears to be a JerkAss and [[OffingtheOffspring drowns every single child she begets as soon as they were born]]. Shantanu finally asks her to stop, only to find out that her sons are holy souls that, who, due to a crime of vandalism that they had committed, were forced to be born as mortal humans, and that [[BlueAndOrangeMorality by drowning them, she's letting them go back to the place where souls go after having transcended the cycle of rebirth]]. Ganga leaves and her son, Devavrata, becomes the apparent heir. Shantanu finds his SecondLove, a young fisherwoman named Satyavati whom he cannot marry due to ParentalMarriageVeto. TheWisePrince Devavrata promises to step away from the throne and to remain celibate for the rest of his life so that Satyavati's children can inherit the throne. Satyavati is allowed to marry Shantanu. Devavrata is hence called Bhishma or the 'one with a terrible vow'.

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The Epic starts with King Shantanu, the ancestor of the Kurus falling in LoveAtFirstSight with (unknown to him) River Goddess Ganga whose condition for marrying him is that he should refrain [[ThePromise from questioning her about anything that she does]]. Ganga however appears to be a JerkAss and [[OffingtheOffspring drowns every single child she begets bears as soon as they were are born]]. Shantanu finally asks her to stop, only to find out that her sons are holy souls that, who, due to a crime of vandalism that they had committed, were forced to be born as mortal humans, and that [[BlueAndOrangeMorality by drowning them, she's letting them go back to the place where souls go after having transcended the cycle of rebirth]]. Ganga leaves and her son, Devavrata, becomes the apparent heir. Shantanu finds his SecondLove, a young fisherwoman named Satyavati whom he cannot marry due to ParentalMarriageVeto. TheWisePrince Devavrata promises to step away from the throne and to remain celibate for the rest of his life so that Satyavati's children can inherit the throne. Satyavati is allowed to marry Shantanu. Devavrata is hence called Bhishma or the 'one with a terrible vow'.
13th Dec '16 9:07:41 AM NightOracle
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* BadassDriver: [[{{God}} Krishna]], who decides to be Arjuna's charioteer.



* BadassDriver: [[{{God}} Krishna]], who decides to be Arjuna's charioteer/
13th Dec '16 9:05:46 AM NightOracle
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** BadassGrandpa: Bhishma is one of the best examples in Hindu mythology. He was absolutely invincible on the battlefield and the Pandavas had to ask '''him''' for advice on how to defeat him. ( He promised them that they could always meet him for advice after sunset, and he ''kept'' his promises. ) Even after being impaled on a ''bed of arrows'' he had the grace to choose the time of his death, and he lay there for days to wait for time which was considered holy(the start of the period when the length of nights start reducing and length of days start increasing i.e around middle of January) before he finally decided to leave the world.

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** * BadassGrandpa: Bhishma is one of the best examples in Hindu mythology. He was absolutely invincible on the battlefield and the Pandavas had to ask '''him''' for advice on how to defeat him. ( He promised them that they could always meet him for advice after sunset, and he ''kept'' his promises. ) Even after being impaled on a ''bed of arrows'' he had the grace to choose the time of his death, and he lay there for days to wait for time which was considered holy(the start of the period when the length of nights start reducing and length of days start increasing i.e around middle of January) before he finally decided to leave the world.



** Of course, who can forget Arjuna and Karna?
*** The rivalry of Arjuna and Karna has parallels with the rivalry of Surya (the Sun god) and Indra (the god who wields thunder and the supreme god) in Hindu mythology. Indra triumphs just like Arjuna does. But at the same time, the masses revere and love Surya (who is also the god of physicians and a god of learning) and Karna (the most generous man in Hindu mythology and often considered to be the main hero, despite it focusing on the Pandavas) than Indra, who is more often feared, and Arjuna, who to be honest, is a Jerkass for most of the story. Basically, AlternateCharacterInterpretation folks.
6th Nov '16 4:51:37 PM dlchen145
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* BadAss: Almost all the Pandavas. Jarasandh. Krishna was Badass as well. Karna is perhaps one of the greatest examples of this within not just the epic, but also all of Myth/HinduMythology, managing to steamroll a vast majority of the heroes until his downfall (which would've also been a steamroll if not for a multitude of curses, divine intervention and a myriad of other things).



** Arjuna's mentor Drona is insulted by his childhood friend, King Drupad so he asks Arjuna to teach the JerkAss a lesson. Drupad is humiliated in a BadAss manner and wants revenge. He gets a son Dhristadyuma to kill Drona and a daughter Draupadi to marry Arjuna.

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** Arjuna's mentor Drona is insulted by his childhood friend, King Drupad so he asks Arjuna to teach the JerkAss a lesson. Drupad is humiliated in a BadAss badass manner and wants revenge. He gets a son Dhristadyuma to kill Drona and a daughter Draupadi to marry Arjuna.



* WholesomeCrossdresser: Arjuna dresses as a female in his thirteenth year in disguise. This is not treated as something unnatural mostly because Arjuna is BadAss.

to:

* WholesomeCrossdresser: Arjuna dresses as a female in his thirteenth year in disguise. This is not treated as something unnatural mostly because Arjuna is BadAss.badass.
15th Sep '16 12:13:27 PM NightOracle
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*** The rivalry of Arjuna and Karna has parallels with the rivalry of Surya (the Sun god) and Indra (the god who wields thunder and the supreme god) in Hindu mythology. Indra triumphs just like Arjuna does.

to:

*** The rivalry of Arjuna and Karna has parallels with the rivalry of Surya (the Sun god) and Indra (the god who wields thunder and the supreme god) in Hindu mythology. Indra triumphs just like Arjuna does. But at the same time, the masses revere and love Surya (who is also the god of physicians and a god of learning) and Karna (the most generous man in Hindu mythology and often considered to be the main hero, despite it focusing on the Pandavas) than Indra, who is more often feared, and Arjuna, who to be honest, is a Jerkass for most of the story. Basically, AlternateCharacterInterpretation folks.
15th Sep '16 11:58:52 AM NightOracle
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** There's a story that Karna was playing a game once with Duryodhana's wife, and she was losing badly. When she saw her husband coming, she stood up to greet him. Thinking she was running away to avoid admitting defeat, he playfully grabbed her and they ended up wrestling into a very... awkward position, with her necklace of pearls snapping and flying everywhere. Instead of thinking the worst or flying into a temper as others would have, he simply asked, "Do you want to me to just pick up the pearls, or should I string them together as well?" He trustem both of them to know nothing happenned
** Another example (twofold actually) was after Karna's death. Duryodhana had not shed a single tear upon the deaths of his brothers and sons but broke down completely when he learned Karna had been killed. And he said that had he known that Karna was not just his best friend, [[ spoiler: but his older brother]], he would have happily given the throne to him and served him faithfully, something that he would never have done for Yuddhistra.

to:

** There's a story that Karna was playing a game once with Duryodhana's wife, and she was losing badly. When she saw her husband coming, she stood up to greet him. Thinking she was running away to avoid admitting defeat, he playfully grabbed her and they ended up wrestling into a very... awkward position, with her necklace of pearls snapping and flying everywhere. Instead of thinking the worst or flying into a temper as others would have, he simply asked, "Do you want to me to just pick up the pearls, or should I string them together as well?" He trustem trusted both of them to know nothing happenned
** Another example (twofold actually) was after Karna's death. Duryodhana had not shed a single tear upon the deaths of his brothers and sons but broke down completely when he learned Karna had been killed. And he said that had he known that Karna was not just his best friend, [[ spoiler: [[spoiler: but his older brother]], he would have happily given the throne to him and served him faithfully, something that he would never have done for Yuddhistra.
15th Sep '16 11:57:25 AM NightOracle
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** There's a story that Karna was playing a game once with Duryodhana's wife, and she was losing badly. When she saw her husband coming, she stood up to greet him. Thinking she was running away to avoid admitting defeat, he playfully grabbed her and they ended up wrestling into a very... awkward position, with her necklace of pearls snapping and flying everywhere. Instead of thinking the worst or flying into a temper as others would have, he simply asked, "Do you want to me to just pick up the pearls, or should I string them together as well?"
** Another example (twofold actually) was after Karna's death. Duryodhana had not shed a single tear upon the deaths of his brothers and sons but broke down completely when he learned Karna had been killed. And he said that had he known that Karna was not just his best friend, but his older brother, he would have happily given the throne to him and served him faithfully, something that he would never have done for Yuddhistra.

to:

** There's a story that Karna was playing a game once with Duryodhana's wife, and she was losing badly. When she saw her husband coming, she stood up to greet him. Thinking she was running away to avoid admitting defeat, he playfully grabbed her and they ended up wrestling into a very... awkward position, with her necklace of pearls snapping and flying everywhere. Instead of thinking the worst or flying into a temper as others would have, he simply asked, "Do you want to me to just pick up the pearls, or should I string them together as well?"
well?" He trustem both of them to know nothing happenned
** Another example (twofold actually) was after Karna's death. Duryodhana had not shed a single tear upon the deaths of his brothers and sons but broke down completely when he learned Karna had been killed. And he said that had he known that Karna was not just his best friend, [[ spoiler: but his older brother, brother]], he would have happily given the throne to him and served him faithfully, something that he would never have done for Yuddhistra.
15th Sep '16 11:53:45 AM NightOracle
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* Undying Loyalty: Karna ought to be the saint of this trope. Even after being told the Pandavas are his brothers, being offered the throne and every other birthright he had been denied, and knowing that much of what Duryodhana does is wrong, Karna still supports him because Duryodhana stood by his side when no one else did. This isn't a one way street either:

to:

* Undying Loyalty: UndyingLoyalty: Karna ought to be the saint of this trope. Even after being told the Pandavas are his brothers, being offered the throne and every other birthright he had been denied, and knowing that much of what Duryodhana does is wrong, Karna still supports him because Duryodhana stood by his side when no one else did. This isn't a one way street either:
15th Sep '16 11:52:18 AM NightOracle
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Added DiffLines:

* Undying Loyalty: Karna ought to be the saint of this trope. Even after being told the Pandavas are his brothers, being offered the throne and every other birthright he had been denied, and knowing that much of what Duryodhana does is wrong, Karna still supports him because Duryodhana stood by his side when no one else did. This isn't a one way street either:
** There's a story that Karna was playing a game once with Duryodhana's wife, and she was losing badly. When she saw her husband coming, she stood up to greet him. Thinking she was running away to avoid admitting defeat, he playfully grabbed her and they ended up wrestling into a very... awkward position, with her necklace of pearls snapping and flying everywhere. Instead of thinking the worst or flying into a temper as others would have, he simply asked, "Do you want to me to just pick up the pearls, or should I string them together as well?"
** Another example (twofold actually) was after Karna's death. Duryodhana had not shed a single tear upon the deaths of his brothers and sons but broke down completely when he learned Karna had been killed. And he said that had he known that Karna was not just his best friend, but his older brother, he would have happily given the throne to him and served him faithfully, something that he would never have done for Yuddhistra.
10th Sep '16 1:49:34 AM Morgenthaler
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* {{Bowdlerization}}: The [[UsefulNotes/{{Indonesia}} Javanese]] version removes some of the more {{squick}}tastic elements of the original, such as Draupadi being the wife of all five Pandavas. In it, she is Yudhisthira's (and only Yudhisthira's) wife. Probably something to do with the spread of {{Islam}}.

to:

* {{Bowdlerization}}: The [[UsefulNotes/{{Indonesia}} Javanese]] version removes some of the more {{squick}}tastic elements of the original, such as Draupadi being the wife of all five Pandavas. In it, she is Yudhisthira's (and only Yudhisthira's) wife. Probably something to do with the spread of {{Islam}}.UsefulNotes/{{Islam}}.
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