History Literature / LittleRedRidingHood

2nd Dec '16 11:26:21 PM Xtifr
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'''"Little Red Riding Hood"''' ("Le Petit Chaperon Rouge") first appeared in print as a story by Creator/CharlesPerrault; another, more optimistic version ("Rotkäppchen" a.k.a. "Little Red Cap") was later published by Creator/TheBrothersGrimm, which has supplanted Perrault's in the collective consciousness. The story itself is much older, having been told orally centuries before that, [[OlderThanTheyThink possibly as far back as the 10th Century]].

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'''"Little "Little Red Riding Hood"''' Hood" ("Le Petit Chaperon Rouge") first appeared in print as a story by Creator/CharlesPerrault; another, more optimistic version ("Rotkäppchen" a.k.a. "Little Red Cap") was later published by Creator/TheBrothersGrimm, which has supplanted Perrault's in the collective consciousness. The story itself is much older, having been told orally centuries before that, [[OlderThanTheyThink possibly as far back as the 10th Century]].
10th Nov '16 7:29:10 AM Prinzenick
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* AdaptationalAlternateEnding: Depending on which adaptation of the story you're reading or watching, ''Little Red Riding Hood'' either ends with the wolf eating Red and ending on that to serve as a cautionary tale to young ladies to beware of "wolves", especially those who are "charming, quiet, unassuming, complacent, and sweet" (the original Creator/CharlesPerrault version of the story ends this way), or has the girl and her grandmother be rescued by a passing huntsman or other benefactor, whereupon they may take revenge upon the wolf (in "Rotkäppchen", they fill the wolf's belly with stones); as mentioned earlier, this alternate version may have come about from the influence of ''Literature/The WolfAndTheSevenYoungKids'' or similar tales.
6th Sep '16 8:39:33 PM Angeldeb82
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'''"Little Red Riding Hood"''' ("Le Petit Chaperon Rouge") first appeared in print as a story by Creator/CharlesPerrault; another, more optimistic version ("Rotkäppchen" a.k.a. "Little Red Cap") was later published by Creator/TheBrothersGrimm, which has supplanted Perrault's in the collective consciousness. The story itself is much older, having been told orally centuries before that, [[OlderThanTheyThink possibly as far back as the 10th Century.]]

to:

'''"Little Red Riding Hood"''' ("Le Petit Chaperon Rouge") first appeared in print as a story by Creator/CharlesPerrault; another, more optimistic version ("Rotkäppchen" a.k.a. "Little Red Cap") was later published by Creator/TheBrothersGrimm, which has supplanted Perrault's in the collective consciousness. The story itself is much older, having been told orally centuries before that, [[OlderThanTheyThink possibly as far back as the 10th Century.]]
Century]].



When the little girl arrives, the wolf has [[PaperThinDisguise dressed himself]] in the [[VillainousCrossdresser old woman's bedclothes]] and gotten into bed. Red Riding Hood, growing worried, remarks on how unusual her "grandmother" looks:

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When the little girl arrives, the wolf has [[PaperThinDisguise dressed himself]] in the [[VillainousCrossdresser [[CreepyCrossdresser old woman's bedclothes]] and gotten into bed. Red Riding Hood, growing worried, remarks on how unusual her "grandmother" looks:



[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Red_Hood They made a nice little video game based on the story]], [[ThePath a not so nice one,]], [[VideoGame/DarkParables and yet another one, which is very... different.]]

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[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Red_Hood They made a nice little video game based on the story]], story,]] [[ThePath a not so nice one,]], one,]] [[VideoGame/DarkParables and yet another one, which is very... different.]]



* ''{{Hoodwinked}}'' (a parody of the story)

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* ''{{Hoodwinked}}'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Hoodwinked}}'' (a parody of the story)



* ''RedHotRidingHood''

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* ''RedHotRidingHood''''WesternAnimation/RedHotRidingHood''



* TheBigBadWolf: The TropeMaker, and TropeNamer. This is the first instance of a cunning and villainous wolf that would be repeated in various stories.

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* TheBigBadWolf: The TropeMaker, {{Trope Maker|s}}, and TropeNamer.{{Trope Namer|s}}. This is the first instance of a cunning and villainous wolf that would be repeated in various stories.



* DamselInDistress: The various versions of Red have this trouble around the Wolf. Other versions get Red into this trouble with other things, [[{{Hoodwinked}} like evil rabbits and cable cars packed with dynamite]].

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* CreepyCrossdresser: Straight in most versions of the tale with the Wolf. ''Hoodwinked'' provides a different idea by having him wear a Granny Puckett apron costume.
* DamselInDistress: The various versions of Red have this trouble around the Wolf. Other versions get Red into this trouble with other things, [[{{Hoodwinked}} [[WesternAnimation/{{Hoodwinked}} like evil rabbits and cable cars packed with dynamite]].



* LittleDeadRidingHood: The Perrault version is TropeNamer and perhaps the origin of the red hood meaning blood and death.

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* LittleDeadRidingHood: The Perrault version is TropeNamer {{Trope Namer|s}} and perhaps the origin of the red hood meaning blood and death.



* PunchClockVillain: In ''TheHuckleberryHoundShow'', Red and Granny were so upset at Huckleberry for trying to get involved they got him [[spoiler:arrested for this]] and after that the Wolf proposed the three of them would resume their routine.

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* PunchClockVillain: In ''TheHuckleberryHoundShow'', ''WesternAnimation/TheHuckleberryHoundShow'', Red and Granny were so upset at Huckleberry for trying to get involved they got him [[spoiler:arrested for this]] and after that the Wolf proposed the three of them would resume their routine.



** Many versions of the story present an {{Aesop}} along the lines of "Always obey your parents" or "Don't talk to strangers"-- or you could be ''eaten by a wolf''.

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** Many versions of the story present an {{Aesop}} AnAesop along the lines of "Always obey your parents" or "Don't talk to strangers"-- or you could be ''eaten by a wolf''.



* UnexplainedRecovery: "Swallowed by a wolf eh? Well, you should both be fine. Just take it easy for a few days."
* VillainousCrossdresser: Straight in most versions of the tale with the Wolf. ''Hoodwinked'' provides a different idea by having him wear a Granny Puckett apron costume.

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* UnexplainedRecovery: "Swallowed by a wolf wolf, eh? Well, you should both be fine. Just take it easy for a few days."
* VillainousCrossdresser: Straight in most versions of the tale with the Wolf. ''Hoodwinked'' provides a different idea by having him wear a Granny Puckett apron costume.
"
2nd Aug '16 3:53:04 PM TheNewBig
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* DisproportionateRetribution: Early versions that end happily for Red Riding Hood often show the Wolf's punishment being downright horrible. In one version, when the Huntsman cuts her free, then fills his stomach with rocks, he wakes up, then tries to flee, and the weight of the stones causes him to tear himself in half. In another version, he wanders off without noticing, simply thinking his meal isn't settling well, tries to take a drink at a stream, and then the weight causes him to fall in, and he drowns. Long story short, many versions show that Red and the Huntsman are without mercy. It overlaps with PayEvilUntoEvil in the versions where the wolf still kills and eats the grandmother.



* PayEvilUntoEvil: As mentioned in DisproportionateRetribution above, the Huntsman and the Red Riding Hood can be without mercy when they punish the wolf. However, since he killed and ate the grandmother, one could argue that the wolf got what he deserved.

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* PayEvilUntoEvil: As mentioned in DisproportionateRetribution above, the The Huntsman and the Red Riding Hood can be without mercy pretty brutal when they punish the wolf. However, since Given he killed tried to, and ate in several versions ''succeeded'' in devouring an innocent old woman, and trying to do the grandmother, same to her granddaughter, one could argue that the wolf got what he hardly say it wasn't deserved.



** The original version (possibly) of the story is meant to be something like "Any stranger could be a pedophile and/or rapist".

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** The original version (possibly) of the story is meant to be something like "Any "A stranger could always be a pedophile and/or rapist".predator of some sort".
21st Jun '16 12:24:36 AM PaulA
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* {{Sequel}}: The GrimmBrothers included a second tale, in which she is once again approached by a wolf; she hurries off down the trail, and immediately tells her grandmother about it when she arrives, and her grandmother therefore has them bar the door. When they do not let it in, it climbs on the roof to pounce when she leaves. The grandmother gives Little Red Riding Hood water in which sausages had been cooked and has her pour it out the window into a trough. The wolf, smelling the sausages, leaned over so far that it fell into the trough and drowned. After that, she had no more problems with creatures in the woods.

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* {{Sequel}}: The GrimmBrothers Creator/TheBrothersGrimm included a second tale, in which she is once again approached by a wolf; she hurries off down the trail, and immediately tells her grandmother about it when she arrives, and her grandmother therefore has them bar the door. When they do not let it in, it climbs on the roof to pounce when she leaves. The grandmother gives Little Red Riding Hood water in which sausages had been cooked and has her pour it out the window into a trough. The wolf, smelling the sausages, leaned over so far that it fell into the trough and drowned. After that, she had no more problems with creatures in the woods.
7th Jun '16 10:56:04 AM Jeduthun
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* CharacterDeath: Some variations have Little Red escape but still bump off poor Granny.

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* CharacterDeath: Some variations have Little Red escape but still bump off poor Granny. In other versions, they both die. In still other versions, they both escape but the woodcutter kills the wolf.



** Played straight in the more modern Grimm version where the young girl is rescued via deus ex machina

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** Played straight in the more modern Grimm version where the young girl is rescued via deus ex machinaDeusExMachina.



* PaperThinDisguise: Even at close quarters, Red is at most merely suspicious of the wolf, even though he has not disguised himself further than putting on the old woman's clothes. Either Granmother was hairy, Red was blind, or both.

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* PaperThinDisguise: Even at close quarters, Red is at most merely suspicious of the wolf, even though he has not disguised himself further than putting on the old woman's clothes. Either Granmother Grandmother was hairy, Red was blind, or both.



* PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad: Spoofed in ''Literature/PoliticallyCorrectBedtimeStories'' when Red Riding Hood chastises the "Woodchopper-Person" for being sexist and speciesist for "assuming that womyn and wolves canít solve their own problems without a man's help!"



* TooSmartForStrangers: Nope, she wasn't. It's Often used as AnAesop.

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* TooSmartForStrangers: Nope, she wasn't. It's Often often used as AnAesop.
7th Jun '16 10:46:16 AM Jeduthun
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* TheBigBadWolf has his own trope, and likely helped to inspire names like the BigBad.

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* TheBigBadWolf has his own trope, and likely helped to inspire names like the BigBad.BigBad, BigBadFriend, and so on.
1st May '16 4:16:43 AM Homemaderat
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** [[OlderThanTheyThink Although some of these are more reconstructing older versions than fracturing in historical context.]]
21st Apr '16 1:04:47 PM rufusluciusivan
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* DisproportionateRetribution: Early versions that end happily for Red Riding Hood often show the Wolf's punishment being downright horrible. In one version, when the Huntsman cuts her free, then fills his stomach with rocks, he wakes up, then tries to flee, and the weight of the stones causes him to tear himself in half. In another version, he wanders off without noticing, simply thinking his meal isn't settling well, tries to take a drink at a stream, and then the weight causes him to fall in, and he drowns. Long story short, many versions show that Red and the Huntsman are without mercy.

to:

* DisproportionateRetribution: Early versions that end happily for Red Riding Hood often show the Wolf's punishment being downright horrible. In one version, when the Huntsman cuts her free, then fills his stomach with rocks, he wakes up, then tries to flee, and the weight of the stones causes him to tear himself in half. In another version, he wanders off without noticing, simply thinking his meal isn't settling well, tries to take a drink at a stream, and then the weight causes him to fall in, and he drowns. Long story short, many versions show that Red and the Huntsman are without mercy. It overlaps with PayEvilUntoEvil in the versions where the wolf still kills and eats the grandmother.


Added DiffLines:

* PayEvilUntoEvil: As mentioned in DisproportionateRetribution above, the Huntsman and the Red Riding Hood can be without mercy when they punish the wolf. However, since he killed and ate the grandmother, one could argue that the wolf got what he deserved.
4th Apr '16 7:42:03 AM Jeduthun
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* TwiceToldTale: The story has been told and retold (and [[FracturedFairyTale parodied]]) literally countless times. It's harder to find a collection of FairyTales that ''doesn't'' have this story in it somewhere.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.LittleRedRidingHood