History Literature / LittleRedRidingHood

21st Apr '16 1:04:47 PM rufusluciusivan
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* DisproportionateRetribution: Early versions that end happily for Red Riding Hood often show the Wolf's punishment being downright horrible. In one version, when the Huntsman cuts her free, then fills his stomach with rocks, he wakes up, then tries to flee, and the weight of the stones causes him to tear himself in half. In another version, he wanders off without noticing, simply thinking his meal isn't settling well, tries to take a drink at a stream, and then the weight causes him to fall in, and he drowns. Long story short, many versions show that Red and the Huntsman are without mercy.

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* DisproportionateRetribution: Early versions that end happily for Red Riding Hood often show the Wolf's punishment being downright horrible. In one version, when the Huntsman cuts her free, then fills his stomach with rocks, he wakes up, then tries to flee, and the weight of the stones causes him to tear himself in half. In another version, he wanders off without noticing, simply thinking his meal isn't settling well, tries to take a drink at a stream, and then the weight causes him to fall in, and he drowns. Long story short, many versions show that Red and the Huntsman are without mercy. It overlaps with PayEvilUntoEvil in the versions where the wolf still kills and eats the grandmother.


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* PayEvilUntoEvil: As mentioned in DisproportionateRetribution above, the Huntsman and the Red Riding Hood can be without mercy when they punish the wolf. However, since he killed and ate the grandmother, one could argue that the wolf got what he deserved.
4th Apr '16 7:42:03 AM Jeduthun
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* TwiceToldTale: The story has been told and retold (and [[FracturedFairyTale parodied]]) literally countless times. It's harder to find a collection of FairyTales that ''doesn't'' have this story in it somewhere.
28th Feb '16 3:34:54 PM MsChibi
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* ''Manga/AkazukinChaCha'' (although it's only ''very'' loosely based on it)
13th Jan '16 1:24:07 PM Jeduthun
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* IconicOutfit: A little girl in a red hooded cloak is ''immediately'' recognizable as coming from this story. To a lesser extent, the wolf in grandma's nightgown.
31st Oct '15 1:07:56 PM Silverblade2
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* BittersweetEnding: In some versions, the wolf eats the Grandma but the girl manages to escape.
25th Oct '15 9:55:48 AM MiinU
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The dialogue continues in this pattern (but omits GrandmaWhatMassiveHotnessYouHave) until she makes the comment:

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The dialogue continues in this pattern (but omits GrandmaWhatMassiveHotnessYouHave) pattern, until she makes the comment:
7th Oct '15 7:58:30 PM ChaoticNovelist
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* LittleDeadRidingHood: Almost certainly the TropeNamer and perhaps the origin.

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* LittleDeadRidingHood: Almost certainly the The Perrault version is TropeNamer and perhaps the origin.origin of the red hood meaning blood and death.



** Arguably, the reason why the ''Hoodwinked!'' version of Red ''doesn't'' buy the disguise is because she knows Granny's normal voice (as she makes two phone calls to Granny during the day - one from a payphone shortly before she discovers the break-in at Granny's store, and a second time through a telephone in Japeth's shack).

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** Arguably, the The reason why the ''Hoodwinked!'' version of Red ''doesn't'' buy the disguise is because she knows Granny's normal voice (as she makes two phone calls to Granny during the day - one from a payphone shortly before she discovers the break-in at Granny's store, and a second time through a telephone in Japeth's shack).



* PromotedToLoveInterest: In versions where the Wolf is turned into a werewolf, he's almost always this to an [[AgeLift Age-Lifted]] Red.

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* PromotedToLoveInterest: In versions where the Wolf is turned into a werewolf, he's almost always usually this to an [[AgeLift Age-Lifted]] Red.



* TooDumbToLive: The eponymous character, who can't tell the difference between a wild animal and her own granny. Some versions play with this by describing the wolf as a shapechanger or a werewolf, which might explain why it takes so long to realize the deception.

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* TooDumbToLive: The eponymous character, who can't tell the difference between a wild animal and her own granny.granny, which sometimes leads to her death. Some versions play with this by describing the wolf as a shapechanger or a werewolf, which might explain why it takes so long to realize the deception.



* AWolfInSheepsClothing: ...well, in Grandmother's clothing.

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* AWolfInSheepsClothing: ...well, in AWolfInSheepsClothing: In this cases, Grandmother's clothing.
1st Oct '15 8:59:32 AM LordGro
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* FantasticAesop: Don't talk to rapists or your grandmother will get eaten.
1st Oct '15 8:51:25 AM LordGro
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* RuleOfSymbolism: There are lots of possible underlying meanings to the story, mostly to do with growing up and/or [[FreudWasRight sex]]. The color of the girl's hood is usually given some significance -- even though subsequent collection of French folk tales found that it was a detail that Perrault added; the folk tales do not specify the color of the hood. A more likely symbol occurs in the regional variants that have her choose between a Path of Pins and a Path of Needles - girls learning to be young women were said to be "gathering pins," while needles had a definite sexual meaning (prostitutes would even indicate their profession by wearing needles in their sleeves).

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* RuleOfSymbolism: There are lots of possible underlying meanings to the story, mostly to do with growing up and/or [[FreudWasRight sex]].sex. The color of the girl's hood is usually given some significance -- even though subsequent collection of French folk tales found that it was a detail that Perrault added; the folk tales do not specify the color of the hood. A more likely symbol occurs in the regional variants that have her choose between a Path of Pins and a Path of Needles - girls learning to be young women were said to be "gathering pins," while needles had a definite sexual meaning (prostitutes would even indicate their profession by wearing needles in their sleeves).
30th Sep '15 4:51:01 PM LovePsychothefirst
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* In the ''Literature/ElementalMasters'' book ''Blood Red'' the first chapter (and the original short story that inspired it) is a retelling of this. The rest of the book is the main character all grown up and kicking monster ass.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.LittleRedRidingHood