History Literature / GoneGirl

2nd Jan '17 9:17:40 AM Silverblade2
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* DownerEnding: Hoo boy. [[spoiler:Amy gets away with her schemes at the end, having successfully planted the blame on Desi, and using her pregnancy to keep Nick under her heel for at ''least'' until the kid is eighteen. She's viewed as a hero, with only a few people knowing what a monster she really is, and Nick is stuck in an endless battle against a ruthless sociopath. Margo, the most sympathetic main character, has to live with the knowledge that her twin brother is married to said sociopath, and likely will be forever, and there's nothing she can do to help him. Basically the ''only'' consolation is that, with Nick being aware of what she is and always having an eye on her, it's unlikely Amy will ever be able to pull something like this again. And his very last words to her in the novel do genuinely get under her skin, meaning that he knows how to adequately fuck with her. Apparently, once he knows the rules to the game, Nick is just as good at it as she is.]] [[SarcasmMode Yeah, it's a real cheerful story.]]

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* DownerEnding: Hoo boy. [[spoiler:Amy gets away with her schemes at the end, having successfully planted the blame on Desi, and using her pregnancy to keep Nick under her heel for at ''least'' until the kid is eighteen. She's viewed as a hero, with only a few people knowing what a monster she really is, and Nick is stuck in an endless battle against a ruthless sociopath. Margo, the most sympathetic main character, has to live with the knowledge that her twin brother is married to said sociopath, and likely will be forever, and there's nothing she can do to help him. Basically the ''only'' consolation is that, with Nick being aware of what she is and always having an eye on her, it's unlikely Amy will ever be able to pull something like this again. And his very last words to her in the novel do genuinely get under her skin, meaning that he knows how to adequately fuck with her. Apparently, once he knows the rules to the game, Nick is just as good at it as she is.]] [[SarcasmMode Yeah, it's a real cheerful story.]]
15th Dec '16 6:53:08 PM AdelePotter
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* DownerEnding: Hoo boy. [[spoiler:Amy gets away with her schemes at the end, having successfully planted the blame on Desi, and using her pregnancy to keep Nick under her heel for at ''least'' until the kid is eighteen. She's viewed as a hero, with only a few people knowing what a monster she really is, and Nick is stuck in an endless battle against a ruthless sociopath. Margo, the most sympathetic main character, has to live with the knowledge that her twin brother is married to said sociopath, and likely will be forever, and there's nothing she can do to help him. Basically the ''only'' consolation is that, with Nick being aware of what she is and always having an eye on her, it's unlikely Amy will ever be able to pull something like this again. And his very last words to her in the novel do genuinely get under her skin, meaning that he knows how to adequately fuck with her. Apparently, once he knows the rules to the game, Nick is just as good at it as she is.]] [[SarcasmMode Yeah, it's a real cheerful story.]]


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* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism: Way, ''way'' over on the cynical end.
1st Dec '16 8:47:15 PM AdelePotter
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* WhamLine: Part Two's opening chapter opens with one to end them all. [[spoiler:"I'm so much happier now that I'm dead."]] Suddenly, the entire narrative, the entire story you ''thought'' you were reading, is turned on its head.
17th Oct '16 9:47:04 PM Andrew
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** Amy, although she looks down upon most people, singles out women, particularly, for being emotional, irrational, for making unreasonable, "dancing monkey" demands of their partners (an act that is more about the social clout than about the actual relationship), and for being "Cool Girls" - willing to mold their personalities to be attractive to men, when men never have to do that for women, whereas most know that men have just as many unreasonable expectations foisted upon them. Not to mention that a woman she looks down on for being a "Cool Girl" was actually with another woman, showing just how shallow her pseudo-intellectual assertions are.

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** Amy, although she looks down upon most people, singles out women, particularly, for being emotional, irrational, for making unreasonable, "dancing monkey" demands of their partners (an act that is more about the social clout than about the actual relationship), and for being "Cool Girls" - willing to mold their personalities to be attractive to men, when men never have to do that for women, whereas most know that men have just as many unreasonable expectations foisted upon them. Not to mention that a woman she Amy looks down on most people, but has special scorn for being a women, who she perceives to be emotional and irrational, constantly demanding dancing monkey behavior from their partners. Her famous "Cool Girl" was speech is both a prime example of her attitude toward women and the extent to which that attitude is unfounded- she rants about women molding their personality to suit men, citing a woman in another car as an example, when it turns out that the woman is actually hanging out with another woman, showing just how shallow her pseudo-intellectual assertions are.a female friend.


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* JerkAssHasAPoint: At the end of the book, Amy smugly tells Nick that as much as he might hate her, he'll never be satisfied with a "nice Midwestern girl" again. After all, Amy loved him so much she launched an elaborate revenge scheme when she found out he was cheating on her, and then ''killed'' to get back to him. Nick later admits that she's right- who can follow Amy?
6th Oct '16 8:47:07 AM Noraneko
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** Amy, although she looks down upon most people, singles out women, particularly, for being emotional, irrational, for making unreasonable, "dancing monkey" demands of their partners (an act that is more about the social clout than about the actual relationship), and for being "Cool Girls" - willing to mold their personalities to be attractive to men, when men never have to do that for women.

to:

** Amy, although she looks down upon most people, singles out women, particularly, for being emotional, irrational, for making unreasonable, "dancing monkey" demands of their partners (an act that is more about the social clout than about the actual relationship), and for being "Cool Girls" - willing to mold their personalities to be attractive to men, when men never have to do that for women. women, whereas most know that men have just as many unreasonable expectations foisted upon them. Not to mention that a woman she looks down on for being a "Cool Girl" was actually with another woman, showing just how shallow her pseudo-intellectual assertions are.
13th Aug '16 4:10:47 PM eroock
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%%* StartingANewLife: Amy's plans.
3rd Aug '16 11:36:20 AM vifetoile
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* AtLeastIAdmitIt: Amy heaps scorn upon "Cool Girls," women who pretend to be what men want in a woman. However, for herself, Amy enjoys the challenge of making new personas and trying them on. [[spoiler: When Desi has her trapped, becoming Desi's perfect version of Amy is a useful distraction tactic.]]



* {{Irony}}: [[spoiler: When she fakes her death, Amy rants about the "Cool Girl" and notes that she can finally be herself. However, she never really stops pretending - she puts up a masquerade of 'Nancy' while on the run, then once she gets robbed by Greta and Jeff and is forced to call Desi, she begins acting like ''Desi's'' version of "Cool Girl" in order to lull him into a false sense of security. Then when she comes back to Nick, she's still playing the part of "Cool Girl" to the general public. This may be why Nick tells Amy in the final lines of the book that, all things said and done, he feels ''sorry'' for her.]]
** [[spoiler: With Nick dedicated to "playing nice" and making his marriage with Amy work, even if that means rising to her level of madness, Amy actually now has a "Cool Guy" who will be whatever his woman wants her to be.]]

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* {{Irony}}: [[spoiler: When she fakes her death, Amy rants about the "Cool Girl" and notes that she can finally be herself. However, she never really stops pretending - she puts up a masquerade of 'Nancy' while on the run, then once she gets robbed by Greta and Jeff and is forced to call Desi, she begins acting like ''Desi's'' version of "Cool Girl" in order to lull him into a false sense of security. Then when she comes back to Nick, she's still playing the part of "Cool Girl" to the general public. This may be why Nick tells Amy in the final lines of the book that, all things said and done, he feels ''sorry'' for her.]]
**
{{Irony}}: [[spoiler: With Nick dedicated to "playing nice" and making his marriage with Amy work, even if that means rising to her level of madness, Amy actually now has a "Cool Guy" who will be whatever his woman wants her to be.]]
27th Jul '16 2:53:49 PM AdelePotter
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* HollywoodHomely: Go, as lampshaded by Nick. He describes her face as "strange faced" with a broad jaw, pretty nose, and "dark globe eyes" that may have been suitable for 1930s Screwball Comedy leading ladies rather than recieved well by a standard of beauty that favors "pixie-princesses".

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* HollywoodHomely: Go, as lampshaded Nick considers Go to be this InUniverse, pointing out that she's ''not'' ugly, but also isn't considered beautiful by Nick. society's current standards. He describes her face as "strange faced" with a broad jaw, pretty nose, and "dark globe eyes" that may have been suitable for 1930s Screwball Comedy screwball comedy leading ladies rather than recieved received well by a modern standard of beauty that favors "pixie-princesses".
25th Jul '16 8:20:24 AM AdelePotter
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** [[spoiler:Early on, Nick outright asks the police if they think it's possible Amy's disappearance is "some sort of runaway wife situation."]]



* {{Bookends}}: Both the first and last shots of the movie are of Nick stroking Amy's hair while giving a monologue about the "primal questions of marriage", before Amy turns to look right at the camera.

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* {{Bookends}}: Both the first and last shots of the movie are of Nick stroking Amy's hair while giving a monologue about the "primal questions of marriage", before Amy turns to look right at the camera. There is, however, one key difference between the two shots. [[spoiler:In the first, Amy looks surprised, innocent, and even vulnerable. In the last, her surprise quickly fades, and she simply ''smirks''.]]
25th Jul '16 8:09:43 AM BatmanKalEl
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* Foreshadowing: [[spoiler: "Any kids?" "Not yet!"]]

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* Foreshadowing: {{Foreshadowing}}: [[spoiler: "Any kids?" "Not yet!"]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.GoneGirl