History Literature / DonCamillo

5th Mar '16 7:57:30 AM DoctorCooper
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

Also, there is a Colombian series, which changes the setting to Colombia in the fifties.
27th Jan '16 8:28:56 AM LordGro
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ChristianityIsCatholic: Did we mention the series is set in Italy? Don Camillo for instance at most elections tends to align with the ''Democrazia Cristiana'', the party of political Catholicism.
27th Jan '16 1:09:03 AM Menshevik
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ChristianityIsCatholic: Did we mention the series is set in Italy?

to:

* ChristianityIsCatholic: Did we mention the series is set in Italy?Italy? Don Camillo for instance at most elections tends to align with the ''Democrazia Cristiana'', the party of political Catholicism.
27th Jan '16 1:06:12 AM Menshevik
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ChristianityIsCatholic: Did we mention the series is set in Italy?



** Peppone himself counts as one. ''Peppone'' is augmentative, i.e. "large form" of his first name Giuseppe in Italian, meaning literally "Big Joe". There's only one instance of anyone calling him "Giuseppe" in the 368 short stories, although he does sometimes sign as "Giuseppe Bottazzi" and out-of-towner communists tend to call him "Comrade Bottazzi".

to:

** Peppone himself counts as one. ''Peppone'' is augmentative, i.e. "large form" of his first name Giuseppe in Italian, meaning literally "Big Joe". There's only one instance of anyone calling him "Giuseppe" in the 368 short stories, although he does sometimes sign e. g. proclamations as "Giuseppe Bottazzi" and out-of-towner communists tend to call him "Comrade Bottazzi".or "Giuseppe Bottazzi, called Peppone".
27th Jan '16 12:56:30 AM Menshevik
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BadassPreacher: Don Camillo is the quintessential example in European fiction. He has no problems clobbering a dozen comrades or throwing a table at them for mocking him, nor does he have any problem threatening the communist mayor and his gang with a submachine gun to obtain funding for his garden city project.

to:

* BadassPreacher: Don Camillo is the quintessential example in European fiction. He has no problems clobbering a dozen comrades or throwing a table at them for mocking him, nor does he have any problem threatening the communist mayor and his gang with a submachine gun to obtain funding for his garden city kindergarten project.



** Peppone himself counts as one. ''Peppone'' is augmentative, i.e. "large form" of his first name Giuseppe in Italian, meaning literally "Big Joe". There's only one instance of anyone calling him "Giuseppe" in the 368 short stories.
** Even YOU didn't know Don Camillo's and Peppone's family names [[TvTropesWillEnhanceYourLife before visiting TVTropes]], right? Even if 'Tarocci' is just the surname used by Don Camillo to pose as a communist, and it belongs to an actual comrade, like his passport.

to:

** Peppone himself counts as one. ''Peppone'' is augmentative, i.e. "large form" of his first name Giuseppe in Italian, meaning literally "Big Joe". There's only one instance of anyone calling him "Giuseppe" in the 368 short stories.
stories, although he does sometimes sign as "Giuseppe Bottazzi" and out-of-towner communists tend to call him "Comrade Bottazzi".
** Even YOU didn't know Don Camillo's and Peppone's family names name [[TvTropesWillEnhanceYourLife before visiting TVTropes]], right? Even if 'Tarocci' is just the surname used by Don Camillo to pose as a communist, and it belongs to an actual comrade, like his passport.
21st Jan '16 3:26:22 AM Belphegor
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Don Camillo and Peppone go back a long time, and they obviously don't like each other, and be it only for political reasons. On the other hand, neither of them actually can live without the other. When Camillo is ReassignedToAntarctica at the end of the first movie, Peppone tries to get him back. Even if Peppone would never admit to that.

to:

Don Camillo and Peppone go back a long time, and they obviously don't like each other, and be it only for political reasons. On the other hand, neither of them actually can live without the other. When don Camillo is ReassignedToAntarctica at the end of the first movie, Peppone tries to get him back. Even if Peppone would never admit to that.



A sixth film, fr. ''Don Camillo et les contestataires''/ it. ''Don Camillo e i giovani d'oggi'' (''Don Camillo and the Red-Haired Girl''), was in the making in 1971 when Fernandel collapsed while shooting. He died a month later, the movie unfinished. Out of respect for him, the studio completely remade the movie with another actor instead of showing the unfinished movie. The resulting film is considered an absolute failure.

to:

A sixth film, fr. ''Don Camillo et les contestataires''/ it. ''Don Camillo e i giovani d'oggi'' (''Don Camillo and the Red-Haired Girl''), was in the making in 1971 when Fernandel collapsed while shooting. He died a month later, the movie unfinished. Out of respect for him, the studio completely remade the movie with another actor different actors (Gino Cervi refused to make a ''Don Camillo'' film without Fernandel) instead of showing the unfinished movie. The resulting film is considered an absolute failure.



A comic-book adaptation authorized by Guareschi's children was launched in 2011. It is notable that every album also adapts a couple of the ''Mondo piccolo'' stories that do not contain Don Camillo or Peppone and that -- not least for copyright reasons -- the two main protagonists are not based on Fernandel and Gino Cervi, but on the author: Don Camillo was visually based on photographs of Guareschi as a clean-shaven young man, Peppone on the older, mustachioed Guareschi.

to:

A comic-book adaptation authorized by Guareschi's children was launched in 2011. It is notable that every album also adapts a couple of the ''Mondo piccolo'' stories that do not contain Don Camillo or Peppone and that -- not least for copyright reasons -- the two main protagonists are not based on Fernandel and Gino Cervi, but on the author: Don Camillo was visually based on photographs of Guareschi as a clean-shaven young man, Peppone on the older, mustachioed moustachioed Guareschi.



* [[TheAllegedCar The Alleged Bicycle]]: Guareschi in a number of stories describes with great fondness the dilapidated kind of bicycles used in Italy between the wars and after 1945, at one point scoffing the lighter and more technologically advanced models used by city folk. For the narrator of the stories, a proper bicycle has to be heavy and dispense with such superfluous luxuries like complete pedals or fancy disc brakes. To get their bicyle to stop, users will often simply slide off the saddle and either sit on the fenderless back wheel or try to catch it between their knees.

to:

* [[TheAllegedCar The Alleged Bicycle]]: Guareschi in a number of stories describes with great fondness the dilapidated kind of bicycles used in Italy between the wars and after 1945, at one point scoffing the lighter and more technologically advanced models used by city folk. For the narrator of the stories, a proper bicycle has to be heavy and dispense with such superfluous luxuries like complete pedals or fancy disc brakes. To get their bicyle bicycle to stop, users will often simply slide off the saddle and either sit on the fenderless back wheel or try to catch it between their knees.knees.
** At some point in the books Peppone does have an [[TheAllegedCar alleged car]]: the narrator describes it as "the most broken-down Balilla of the Po valley, salvaged from the most rusty bunch of scraps of a junkyard and converted into a pick-up truck." People call it "the Sputnik".



* BackToSchool: In the third movie, there is one arc where Peppone has to take the primary school finals because he missed them/never made it past third grade. He's so nervous he almost fails. Don Camillo trades the correct solutions for political concessions.

to:

* BackToSchool: In the third movie, there is one arc where Peppone has to take the primary school finals because he missed them/never made it past third grade.grade (equivalent to fifth grade in US schools). He's so nervous he almost fails. Don Camillo trades the correct solutions for political concessions.



* BrickJoke: early on in the third movie, Don Camillo uses a fake 5000 Lire bill to buy one of Pepone's communist news papers. The bill is forgotten about afterwards until, at the end of the movie, Peppone hands it back to Don Camillo as 'payment' for Don Camillo helping him carry his suitcases.

to:

* BrickJoke: early Early on in the third movie, Don Camillo uses a fake 5000 Lire bill to buy one of Pepone's Peppone's communist news papers. The bill is forgotten about afterwards until, at the end of the movie, Peppone hands it back to Don Camillo as 'payment' for Don Camillo helping him carry his suitcases.suitcase.



* TheCoatsAreOff: Every time characters settle things with their fists, i.e. often.

to:

* TheCoatsAreOff: Every time characters settle things with their fists, i.e. often. They also roll up their sleeves.



* DownerEnding: A few of the short stories have these, e. g. that of one inhabitant of the town who was deported to Germany during the war and there fell in love a German girl who had lost her entire family in an air raid. However, because the German forces in Italy had shot one of the boy's brothers, the family would never accept a German daughter-in-law. In the end the girl poisons herself and all Don Camillo can do is to make sure that the child of the "unknown" dead woman is adopted by the boy's family.

to:

* DownerEnding: A few of the short stories have these, e. g. that of one inhabitant of the town who was deported to Germany during the war and there fell in love a German girl who had lost her entire family in an air raid. However, because the German forces in Italy had shot one two of the boy's brothers, the family would never accept a German daughter-in-law. In the end the girl poisons herself and all Don Camillo can do is to make sure that the child of the "unknown" dead woman is adopted by the boy's family.



** Peppone also resorts to this every now and then, especially when one of his men has done something stupid.



** A number of stories were based on real-life news stories, such as "The Baptism" by a one about a priest who refused to baptize a child "Lenin", and "The Egg and the Hen" by reports of an egg showing a relief image of a sacred host. Worldwide historical events like the Atlantic Pact, the 1956 Hungarian Revolution or the Sputnik launch also loom large in the context of some stories.

to:

** A number of stories were based on real-life news stories, such as "The Baptism" by a one about (after a priest who refused to baptize a child "Lenin", "Lenin"), and "The Egg and the Hen" by (after reports of an egg showing a relief image of a sacred host.host). Worldwide historical events like the Atlantic Pact, the 1956 Hungarian Revolution or the Sputnik launch also loom large in the context of some stories.



* TankGoodness: In the third movie, in a scene adapted from one of the stories. Don Camillo and Peppone find out that a peasant is hiding an American M24 Chaffee tank from World War II in his barn. While manoeuvring it, Peppone comments on how good its mechanics were, just before [[spoiler:[[OhCrap accidentally firing the tank's gun]], destroying his peace dove statue in the process]].

to:

* TankGoodness: In the third movie, in a scene adapted from one of the stories. Don Camillo and Peppone find out that a peasant is hiding an American M24 Chaffee tank from World War II in his barn.barn (and wants to get rid of it). While manoeuvring it, Peppone comments on how good its mechanics were, just before [[spoiler:[[OhCrap accidentally firing the tank's gun]], destroying his peace dove statue in the process]].
18th Jan '16 4:51:51 AM Belphegor
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* RecycledPremise: In the story ''Giulietta e Romeo'', in which ultra-Catholic Gina Filotti and communist Mariano Ciro fall in love, Guareschi takes a break to lampshade the trope and explain that while in the cities people are obsessed with living original lives that are different from the way things used to be, people in the country don't give a hoot if they happen to find themselves living as characters in a rehash of ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'' or ''Literature/TheBetrothed'' or ''Cavalleria Rusticana''.

to:

* RecycledPremise: In the story ''Giulietta e Romeo'', in which ultra-Catholic Gina Filotti and communist Mariano Ciro Mariolino from the Bruciata fall in love, Guareschi takes a break to lampshade the trope and explain that while in the cities people are obsessed with living original lives that are different from the way things used to be, people in the country don't give a hoot if they happen to find themselves living as characters in a rehash of ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'' or ''Literature/TheBetrothed'' or ''Cavalleria Rusticana''.
18th Jan '16 4:46:17 AM Belphegor
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* OneSteveLimit: Averted in the books (in the original Italian) with Fulmine, aka Ful, don Camillo's dog, and Antenore Cabazza, also called Fulmine (which means "lightning"), who is one of Peppone's men. The narrator lampshades it and points out that, out of the two, the one with the most brains is the dog. On the other hand, the English version enforces the trope by calling the dog "Thunder" and the man "Thunderer".
1st Jan '16 11:31:52 AM Belphegor
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Peppone himself counts as one. ''Peppone'' is augmentative, i.e. "large form" of his first name Giuseppe in Italian, meaning literally "Big Joe".

to:

** Peppone himself counts as one. ''Peppone'' is augmentative, i.e. "large form" of his first name Giuseppe in Italian, meaning literally "Big Joe". There's only one instance of anyone calling him "Giuseppe" in the 368 short stories.



* ObfuscatingStupidity: Peppone falls between this and CrouchingMoronHiddenBadass. Although at the start of the series he is barely literate and generally appears intellectually inferior to Don Camillo, he outsmarts him on occasion and proves a competent mayor. Guareschi points out in his narrative that Peppone was a son of a farmhand and had to go to work early in his life to support his family. He also was [[{{conscription}} conscripted]] to UsefulNotes/FirstWorldWar, effectively denying him the chance of an education. At one point, after a particularly effective election campaign by the Christian Democrats, it seems that he is going to be ousted from power, but he turns the tables with an honest and deceptively simple speech that sounds almost like a concession of defeat, asking voters to treat the election as a verdict on how good a job he and his comrades did. On hearing this, even Don Camillo votes for him and he is re-elected by a huge margin. In his private life Peppone also proves very adaptable: originally a blacksmith, he becomes a highly skilled car mechanic in the 1930s and by ''Don Camillo e i giovani d'oggi'' his business has expanded into a big emporium selling everything from cars to refrigerators (partly thanks to convincing his comrades to become stockholders in his company).

to:

* ObfuscatingStupidity: Peppone falls between this and CrouchingMoronHiddenBadass. Although at the start of the series he is barely literate and generally appears intellectually inferior to Don Camillo, he outsmarts him on occasion and proves a competent mayor.mayor (to the point that he's re-elected four times - his last re-election is in 1966). Guareschi points out in his narrative that Peppone was a son of a farmhand and had to go to work early in his life to support his family. He also was [[{{conscription}} conscripted]] to UsefulNotes/FirstWorldWar, effectively denying him the chance of an education. At one point, after a particularly effective election campaign by the Christian Democrats, it seems that he is going to be ousted from power, but he turns the tables with an honest and deceptively simple speech that sounds almost like a concession of defeat, asking voters to treat the election as a verdict on how good a job he and his comrades did. On hearing this, even Don Camillo votes for him and he is re-elected by a huge margin. In his private life Peppone also proves very adaptable: originally a blacksmith, he becomes a highly skilled car mechanic in the 1930s and by ''Don Camillo e i giovani d'oggi'' his business has expanded into a big emporium selling everything from cars to refrigerators (partly thanks to convincing his comrades to become stockholders in his company).



** In the books, Don Camillo wasn't exactly a partisan, although he did hide people from the Germans and celebrated Mass for the partisans in the mountains (and kept a lot of weapons and ammunition). Guareschi also does not romanticize the ''Guerra Clandestina'' - some ex-partisans are shown to have used the war as a pretext to settle private scores, to steal and even murder. However Peppone and his group are portrayed as having behaved honorably (apart from stealing a coopful of chickens to celebrate victory). For instance, they did get their hands on a treasure stolen by the Germans (on the rationale that otherwise the British soldiers in the area would have taken it), but used it entirely to build the House of the People and Don Camillo's kindergarten for the good of the entire town. Granted, they used the treasure to build Don Camillo's kindergarten under the threat of a sub-machine gun only, but otherwise they would have used all of the money for the House of the People, not for themselves.

to:

** In the books, Don Camillo wasn't exactly a partisan, although he did hide people from the Germans and celebrated Mass for the partisans in the mountains (and kept a lot of weapons and ammunition). Guareschi also does not romanticize the ''Guerra Clandestina'' - some ex-partisans are shown to have used the war as a pretext to settle private scores, to steal and even murder. However Peppone and his group are portrayed as having behaved honorably (apart from stealing a coopful of chickens to celebrate victory). For instance, they did get their hands on a treasure stolen by the Germans (on the rationale that otherwise the British soldiers in the area would have taken it), but used it entirely to build the House of the People and Don Camillo's kindergarten for the good of the entire town. Granted, they only used the treasure to build Don Camillo's kindergarten under the threat of a sub-machine gun only, gun, but otherwise they would have used all of the money for the House of the People, not for themselves.



** A number of stories were based on real-life news stories, such as "The Baptism" by a one about a priest who refused to baptize a child "Lenin", and "The Egg and the Hen" by reports of an egg showing a relief image of a sacred host.

to:

** A number of stories were based on real-life news stories, such as "The Baptism" by a one about a priest who refused to baptize a child "Lenin", and "The Egg and the Hen" by reports of an egg showing a relief image of a sacred host. Worldwide historical events like the Atlantic Pact, the 1956 Hungarian Revolution or the Sputnik launch also loom large in the context of some stories.
25th Dec '15 7:51:13 AM Menshevik
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* [[TheAllegedCar The Alleged Bicycle]]: Guareschi in a number of stories describes with great fondness the dilapidated kind of bicycles used in Italy between the wars and after 1945, at one point scoffing the lighter and more technologically advanced models used by city folk. For the narrator of the stories, a proper bicycle has to be heavy and dispense with such superfluous luxuries like complete pedals or fancy disc brakes. To get their bicyle to stop, users will often simply slide off the saddle and either sit on the fenderless back wheel or try to catch it between their knees.
This list shows the last 10 events of 67. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.DonCamillo