History Literature / ArseneLupin

27th Sep '16 8:23:33 AM Saveelich
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Maurice Leblanc's 'GentlemanThief' who is part crime-solving (and crime-committing) [[GreatDetective mastermind]], part [[LoveableRogue prince of romance]], first appearing in novels and short stories, starting in 1905. The Lupin stories were meant as a reversal of the [[Literature/SherlockHolmes detective]] [[Creator/AgathaChristie stories]] that were massively popular at the time - Lupin is instead the criminal. Stories tend to vary from following various detectives in their attempts to stop Lupin or figure out what he did, to Lupin facing other villains. Other stories even have Lupin looking for lost treasures. Part of the books' success is due to Lupin's status as a MasterOfDisguise: When opening a book, one is never sure WHO is Lupin in this story. Is he the [[RedHerring victim's guest]]? The [[TheMole Detective's assistant]]? [[NarratorAllAlong The narrator himself]]? Lupin's status as a criminal is balanced by his trademark gentlemanly behavior, allowing him to come off as heroic rather than a villain, though his actions do often earn him a fair share of WhatTheHellHero.

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Maurice Leblanc's 'GentlemanThief' who is part crime-solving (and crime-committing) [[GreatDetective mastermind]], part [[LoveableRogue prince of romance]], romance]] and the TropeCodifier of PhantomThief, first appearing in novels and short stories, starting in 1905. The Lupin stories were meant as a reversal of the [[Literature/SherlockHolmes detective]] [[Creator/AgathaChristie stories]] that were massively popular at the time - Lupin is instead the criminal. Stories tend to vary from following various detectives in their attempts to stop Lupin or figure out what he did, to Lupin facing other villains. Other stories even have Lupin looking for lost treasures. Part of the books' success is due to Lupin's status as a MasterOfDisguise: When opening a book, one is never sure WHO is Lupin in this story. Is he the [[RedHerring victim's guest]]? The [[TheMole Detective's assistant]]? [[NarratorAllAlong The narrator himself]]? Lupin's status as a criminal is balanced by his trademark gentlemanly behavior, allowing him to come off as heroic rather than a villain, though his actions do often earn him a fair share of WhatTheHellHero.
18th Jul '16 3:35:50 PM Lightice
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* Jean le Flambeur from ''Literature/TheQuantumThief'', a transhuman GentlemanThief who consciously modelled himself after Arséne Lupin, and continuously makes references to Leblanc's stories.

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* Jean le Flambeur from ''Literature/TheQuantumThief'', a transhuman GentlemanThief who consciously modelled himself after Arséne Arsène Lupin, and continuously makes references to Leblanc's stories.
18th Jul '16 3:35:16 PM Lightice
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Added DiffLines:

* Jean le Flambeur from ''Literature/TheQuantumThief'', a transhuman GentlemanThief who consciously modelled himself after Arséne Lupin, and continuously makes references to Leblanc's stories.
16th Jul '16 2:30:30 PM Doug86
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* BetterToDieThanBeKilled: One story has two of Lupin's hired thieves in prison awaiting execution. One of them is a remoreseless murderer, but the other retains audience sympathy. Despite his best efforts, Lupin is unable to save them until the day of the execution, when [[spoiler: the murderer and executioner are both shot by an unseen sniper, allowing the other prisoner to be smuggled away by Lupin's men. As he gets shot, the murderer even thanks Lupin for ending him this way.]]

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* BetterToDieThanBeKilled: One story has two of Lupin's hired thieves in prison awaiting execution. One of them is a remoreseless remorseless murderer, but the other retains audience sympathy. Despite his best efforts, Lupin is unable to save them until the day of the execution, when [[spoiler: the murderer and executioner are both shot by an unseen sniper, allowing the other prisoner to be smuggled away by Lupin's men. As he gets shot, the murderer even thanks Lupin for ending him this way.]]



** The Queen's Necklace, the subject of a mysterious affair involving MarieAntoinette. It appears in ''The Queen's Necklace'' as the target of Lupin's first theft as a young boy.

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** The Queen's Necklace, the subject of a mysterious affair involving MarieAntoinette.UsefulNotes/MarieAntoinette. It appears in ''The Queen's Necklace'' as the target of Lupin's first theft as a young boy.



* ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight: Invoked often because Lupin still has a consience and morals, and never condones murder, extortion or other things he himself will never do.

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* ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight: Invoked often because Lupin still has a consience conscience and morals, and never condones murder, extortion or other things he himself will never do.



* TheZerothLawOfTropeExamples: Hilariously used in the TV series: Sholmès quotes the philosopher Sophocles, but misattributes it to Shakespeare. When Wilson corrects him, Sholmès tells him "Everything is from Shakespeare, even [[CharlesDickens Dickens]]."

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* TheZerothLawOfTropeExamples: Hilariously used in the TV series: Sholmès quotes the philosopher Sophocles, but misattributes it to Shakespeare. When Wilson corrects him, Sholmès tells him "Everything is from Shakespeare, even [[CharlesDickens [[Creator/CharlesDickens Dickens]]."
31st May '16 8:21:22 AM Doug86
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* ''The Shell Shard'' (1916). A war novel set in UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne. Lupin himself has a cameo.
* ''The Golden Triangle'' (1918). Novel set in the aftermath of UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne. Lupin serves as a supporting character.

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* ''The Shell Shard'' (1916). A war novel set in UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne.UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. Lupin himself has a cameo.
* ''The Golden Triangle'' (1918). Novel set in the aftermath of UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne.UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. Lupin serves as a supporting character.



* UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne

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* UsefulNotes/WorldWarOneUsefulNotes/WorldWarI
14th Apr '16 4:32:00 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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* RuleOfCool: [[spoiler: Hiding behind the camera]], being a complete MartyStu at every turn... such things would normally be annoying and lame, but Lupin makes it work because somehow he is Just That Awesome.

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%% * RuleOfCool: [[spoiler: Hiding behind the camera]], being a complete MartyStu at every turn... such things would normally be annoying and lame, but Lupin makes it work because somehow he is Just That Awesome.
11th Feb '16 11:14:12 AM narm00
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Maurice Leblanc's 'GentlemanThief' who is part crime-solving (and crime-committing) [[GreatDetective mastermind]], part [[LoveableRogue prince of romance]]. First appeared in novels and short stories, starting in 1905. The Lupin stories were meant as a reversal of the [[Literature/SherlockHolmes detective]] [[Creator/AgathaChristie stories]] who were massively popular at the time. Lupin is instead the criminal. Stories tend to vary from following various detectives in their attempts to stop Lupin or figure out what he did, or to Lupin facing other villains. Other stories even have Lupin looking for lost treasures. Part of the books successes is due to Lupin's status as a MasterOfDisguise: When opening a book, one is never sure WHO is Lupin in this story. Is he the [[RedHerring victim's guest]]? The [[TheMole Detective's assistant]]? [[NarratorAllAlong The narrator himself]]? Lupin's status as a criminal is balanced by his trademark gentlemanly behavior, allowing him to come off as heroic rather than a villain, though his actions do often earn him a fair share of WhatTheHellHero.

to:

Maurice Leblanc's 'GentlemanThief' who is part crime-solving (and crime-committing) [[GreatDetective mastermind]], part [[LoveableRogue prince of romance]]. First appeared romance]], first appearing in novels and short stories, starting in 1905. The Lupin stories were meant as a reversal of the [[Literature/SherlockHolmes detective]] [[Creator/AgathaChristie stories]] who that were massively popular at the time. time - Lupin is instead the criminal. Stories tend to vary from following various detectives in their attempts to stop Lupin or figure out what he did, or to Lupin facing other villains. Other stories even have Lupin looking for lost treasures. Part of the books successes books' success is due to Lupin's status as a MasterOfDisguise: When opening a book, one is never sure WHO is Lupin in this story. Is he the [[RedHerring victim's guest]]? The [[TheMole Detective's assistant]]? [[NarratorAllAlong The narrator himself]]? Lupin's status as a criminal is balanced by his trademark gentlemanly behavior, allowing him to come off as heroic rather than a villain, though his actions do often earn him a fair share of WhatTheHellHero.



* ''Literature/{{Fantomas}}'', who starred in a series of novels and was an evil version of Lupin. Later it was adapted into a Mexican Comicbook and went through many layers of adaptation to become more and more Like the original version of Lupin. Years of AdaptationDisplacement later, he is still remembered in some regions as more like the likable Lupin than his original, more psychopathic version.

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* ''Literature/{{Fantomas}}'', who starred in a series of novels and was an evil version of Lupin. Later it was adapted into a Mexican Comicbook and went through many layers of adaptation to become more and more Like like the original version of Lupin. Years of AdaptationDisplacement later, he is still remembered in some regions as more like the likable Lupin than his original, more psychopathic version.



* CallingCard : As seen in the page quote, Lupin is not above sending his calling card ''before'' the crime, to convince his victims to send him the loot, save him the trouble of taking it.
* CallToAgriculture: in ''813'', Lupin plans to retire to a peaceful life as a gardener... while secretly controlling the German throne.

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* CallingCard : CallingCard: As seen in the page quote, Lupin is not above sending his calling card ''before'' the crime, to convince his victims to send him the loot, loot and save him the trouble of taking it.
* CallToAgriculture: in In ''813'', Lupin plans to retire to a peaceful life as a gardener... while secretly controlling the German throne.



* DyingAlone: A recurring theme in some of the novels (such as ''813'' and ''The Revenge Of The Countess Of Cagliostro''), that Lupin's life is such that it is almost impossible for him to keep those he truly loves near him, because he'd put them in danger and the stress involved. [[spoiler:This includes his own children, to whom he decides to never tell who exactly their father is.]]

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* DyingAlone: A recurring theme in some of the novels (such as ''813'' and ''The Revenge Of The Countess Of Cagliostro''), Cagliostro'') is that Lupin's life is such that it is almost impossible for him to keep those he truly loves near him, because he'd put them in danger and the stress involved. [[spoiler:This includes his own children, to whom he decides to never tell who exactly their father is.]]



* IconicOutfit: The monocle, top hat and cloak are traditional depiction of the attire, but generally Lupin dresses pragmatically, wearing what is suitable for the disguise of the day, or the task at hand.

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* IconicOutfit: The monocle, top hat and cloak are traditional depiction of the attire, how he's traditionally depicted, but generally Lupin dresses pragmatically, wearing what is suitable for the disguise of the day, or the task at hand.



* IntercontinuityCrossover: With Sherlock Holmes, called Holmlock Shears or Herlock Sholmes for copyright reasons (Watson was * renamed Wilson). Canonical as far as Lupin goes. One of the earliest examples.
* ItsAllAboutMe: Lupin gets called out about putting his desires ahead of the wellbeing of the people he's supposed to have sworn to protect. His former nanny calls him on this during ''813'' when Lupin considers revealing who he is to [[spoiler:His daughter]] and drag her in his adventures, shattering her peaceful, happy life.

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* IntercontinuityCrossover: With Sherlock Holmes, called Holmlock Shears or Herlock Sholmes for copyright reasons (Watson was * renamed Wilson). Canonical as far as Lupin goes. One of the earliest examples.
* ItsAllAboutMe: Lupin gets called out about putting his desires ahead of the wellbeing of the people he's supposed to have sworn to protect. His former nanny calls him on this during ''813'' when Lupin considers revealing who he is to [[spoiler:His [[spoiler:his daughter]] and drag her in into his adventures, shattering her peaceful, happy life.



* MasterOfDisguise. Leblanc, the in-universe narrator of this stories, admits that every time he meets with Lupin is like meeting him for first time. In all the stories only Sherlock Holmes (or his CaptainErsatz, at least) seems to be able to see through his multiple disguises (something which Lupin referred to as looking through his soul).

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* MasterOfDisguise. Leblanc, the in-universe narrator of this these stories, admits that every time he meets with Lupin is like meeting him for the first time. In all the stories only Sherlock Holmes (or his CaptainErsatz, at least) seems to be able to see through his multiple disguises (something which Lupin referred to as looking through his soul).



** A ''WesternAnimation/NightHood''-only version is Sergeant Folenfant, whose name means "Crazy[[note]]"Folle Enfant" means crazy child, but crazy as in zany, naive or hyperactive. Not "Insane" or "Mad"[[/note]] child". He usually tends to live up to it. The Folenfant from the books, however, is a very, very minor character who appears in one or two stories and never utters a line.

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** A ''WesternAnimation/NightHood''-only version is Sergeant Folenfant, whose name means "Crazy[[note]]"Folle Enfant" means crazy child, but crazy as in zany, naive or hyperactive. Not "Insane" or "Mad"[[/note]] "mad"[[/note]] child". He usually tends to live up to it. The Folenfant from the books, however, is a very, very minor character who appears in one or two stories and never utters a line.



* MoleInCharge: Lupin as head of the Parisian police force in ''813''.

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* MoleInCharge: Lupin [[spoiler:Lupin as head of the Parisian police force force]] in ''813''.



* ParentalAbandonment: [[spoiler: Neither of Lupin's children, son or daughter, know he is their father. In the later, the son was taken from Lupin and used in an eventual BatmanGambit to have his life destroyed to get back at Lupin himself. His daughter he abandoned, only coming back when her mother died to deliver her to her foster parents, and to do the same once more when her foster parents died too, delivering her to his former nursemaid. At the end of ''813'' in desperation he intends to tell her of their relation, but his nursemaid forbids dragging his daughter into the kind of life he lives, and he himself can't bring himself to do it.]]

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* ParentalAbandonment: [[spoiler: Neither of Lupin's children, son or daughter, know he is their father. In the later, the His son was taken from Lupin and used in an eventual BatmanGambit to have his life destroyed to get back at Lupin himself. His daughter he abandoned, only coming back when her mother died to deliver her to her foster parents, and to do the same once more when her foster parents died too, delivering her to his former nursemaid. At the end of ''813'' in desperation he intends to tell her of their relation, but his nursemaid forbids dragging his daughter into the kind of life he lives, and he himself can't bring himself to do it.]]



* RoleCalled: The first book, ''Arsène Lupin: Gentleman Burglar''.



** Some of his plans hinge on this trope, or the reputation he has for employing it. Such as being liberated from jail by promising he'd never get to trial, using the time in jail and the solitary confinement his threat earned him to alter his appearance by changing weight and mannerism so at trial he spin a yarn about being a poor homeless plucked by Lupin's gang to occupy his cell as the real Lupin's busted out. Even the arresting officer falls for it. And as Lupin himself puts it "The deception was so shallow that if anyone had approached it and my disguise from the point of the view that it can't be true, I'd have been finished, the disguise was so shallow it wouldn't hold". But since Lupin's reputation for doing the impossible is so great, no one did and they accepted the tale that Lupin had escaped. So he was let out, and in such... never made it to trial.
** Where does Lupin hide his secret correspondence in prison, you may ask? Why, in the drawer of his desk, ofcourse. The guards kept searching the most improbable hiding places due to Lupin's reputation while completely forgetting the obvious solution.

to:

** Some of his plans hinge on this trope, or the reputation he has for employing it. Such as being liberated from jail by promising he'd never get to trial, using the time in jail and the solitary confinement his threat earned him to alter his appearance by changing weight and mannerism so at trial he spin a yarn about being a poor homeless plucked by Lupin's gang to occupy his cell as the real Lupin's Lupin busted out. Even the arresting officer falls for it. And as Lupin himself puts it "The deception was so shallow that if anyone had approached it and my disguise from the point of the view that it can't be true, I'd have been finished, the disguise was so shallow it wouldn't hold". But since Lupin's reputation for doing the impossible is so great, no one did and they accepted the tale that Lupin had escaped. So he was let out, and in such... never made it to trial.
** Where does Lupin hide his secret correspondence in prison, you may ask? Why, in the drawer of his desk, ofcourse.of course. The guards kept searching the most improbable hiding places due to Lupin's reputation while completely forgetting the obvious solution.
* RoleCalled: The first book, ''Arsène Lupin: Gentleman Burglar''.



* SignificantAnagram: Some of Lupin's aliases are these, such as Paul Sernine and Luis Perenna.



** MetaphoricallyTrue: Often used by him when someone calls him on a lie. IE: Lupin says he will find the treasure and give it to someone in 2 days if they let him live. Later the person realized Lupin doesn't know where the treasure is, Lupin replies he expects he'll have figured it out by the 2 day limit.
* SympatheticInspectorAntagonist: Ganimard. Lupin himself admits that even though Ganimard dosen't have his or Holmes' intellect, he made up on pure tenacity and determination. Not that Lupin ever had any qualms on making him look like a fool though.

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** MetaphoricallyTrue: Often used by him when someone calls him on a lie. IE: Lupin says he will find the treasure and give it to someone in 2 days if they let him live. Later the person realized realizes Lupin doesn't know where the treasure is, Lupin replies he expects he'll have figured it out by the 2 day limit.
* SignificantAnagram: Some of Lupin's aliases are these, such as Paul Sernine and Luis Perenna.
* SympatheticInspectorAntagonist: Ganimard. Lupin himself admits that even though Ganimard dosen't have his or Holmes' intellect, he made makes up on for it with pure tenacity and determination. Not that Lupin ever had any qualms on making him look like a fool though.



* UnreliableNarrator: If I haven't spoiled it already, [[spoiler: Lupin has been known to hide behind the proverbial camera]], indeed [[spoiler: spends the whole first story doing it, leading to a twist ending]].

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* UnreliableNarrator: If I haven't it hasn't been spoiled it already, [[spoiler: Lupin has been known to hide behind the proverbial camera]], indeed [[spoiler: he spends the whole first story doing it, leading to a twist ending]].
11th Jan '16 12:12:19 PM crazysamaritan
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* ImpossibleThief: Stealing things in the French countryside while locked up in a Paris prison.

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* ImpossibleThief: ImpossibleTheft: Stealing things in the French countryside while locked up in a Paris prison.
18th Dec '15 10:55:18 AM tropesinreadiness
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->''There is, in the gallery which unites your two living rooms, a picture of Philippe de Champaigne of great appearance which pleases me immensely. Your Rubens also attract my eyes, as well as your smallest Watteau painting. For this time, I shall content myself with these objects which will be, I think, of easy concealment and resale. I ask you therefore to make them properly wrap and to send them to my name (paid harbourd), in railway station of Batignolles, before eight days. If you fail to satisfy this request in time, I shall proceed their move at night from Wednesday, 27 till Thursday, September 28th.''
-->-- ''Classical letter from Arsène Lupin. Calling police after reading is heavily disadvised.[[note]]Not that it'd matter, odds are [[CriminalMindGames he sent them a copy of the letter]][[/note]].''

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->''There is, in the gallery which unites that connects your two living rooms, living-rooms, a picture of by Philippe de Champaigne of great appearance which pleases me immensely. Your Rubens also attract my eyes, as well as your smallest smaller Watteau painting. For this time, I shall content myself with these objects which will be, I think, of easy concealment and resale. I ask you therefore to make have them properly wrap packed and to send them to my name (paid harbourd), in railway station of (carriage paid), at the Gare de Batignolles, before within eight days. If you fail to satisfy this request in time, I shall proceed with their move at removal on the night from of Wednesday, 27 till Thursday, September 28th.the 27th of September.''
-->-- ''Classical Classic letter from Arsène Lupin. Calling police after reading is heavily disadvised.[[note]]Not that it'd matter, odds it would matter. Odds are [[CriminalMindGames he sent them a copy of the letter]][[/note]].''
letter]].[[/note]]
29th Aug '15 10:04:50 AM Lightice
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Added DiffLines:

** Where does Lupin hide his secret correspondence in prison, you may ask? Why, in the drawer of his desk, ofcourse. The guards kept searching the most improbable hiding places due to Lupin's reputation while completely forgetting the obvious solution.
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