History Literature / AmericanPsycho

23rd Apr '17 2:29:59 PM SeanMurrayI
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*** In various places, Patrick keeps hearing various versions of the production soundtrack, which repeatedly sparks light conversation at social gatherings over whether it's the "American or British" cast recording being played. In one instance, Patrick hears a "muzak version" of the soundtrack.

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*** In various places, Patrick keeps hearing various versions of music from the production soundtrack, which repeatedly sparks light conversation at social gatherings over whether it's the "American or British" cast recording being played. In one instance, Patrick hears a "muzak version" of the soundtrack.
22nd Apr '17 11:06:48 PM SeanMurrayI
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*** At different restaurants, and during separate dinner conversations, Patrick keeps hearing the production soundtrack, which repeatedly sparks discussions over whether it's the "American or British" cast recording.

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*** At different restaurants, and during separate dinner conversations, In various places, Patrick keeps hearing various versions of the production soundtrack, which repeatedly sparks discussions light conversation at social gatherings over whether it's the "American or British" cast recording.recording being played. In one instance, Patrick hears a "muzak version" of the soundtrack.
22nd Apr '17 1:51:07 PM SeanMurrayI
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* MistakenIdentity:Throughout the book and the movie, characters address each other by the wrong name. Bateman himself is called Marcus Halberstam, [=MacLoy=], Davis, Smith and Paul Owen/Allen, among others. Craig [=McDermott=] is addressed as Baxter at one point. This is a part of the social commentary in the story; these yuppies are so self-centered they can't even remember each others' names. Or, more to the point, they all look exactly like one another and engage in the exact same activities to a point where everyone is interchangeable, no one else can tell anybody apart from anybody else, and no one can even realize when one of their own associates and so-called "friends" is murdered...maybe.

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* MistakenIdentity:Throughout MistakenIdentity: Throughout the book and the movie, story, characters address each other by the wrong name. Bateman himself is called Marcus Halberstam, [=MacLoy=], Davis, Smith and Paul Owen/Allen, among others. Craig [=McDermott=] is addressed as Baxter at one point. This is a part of the social commentary in the story; these yuppies are so self-centered they can't even remember each others' names. Or, more to the point, they all look exactly like one another and engage in the exact same activities to a point where everyone is interchangeable, no one else can tell anybody apart from anybody else, and no one can even realize when one of their own associates and so-called "friends" is murdered...maybe.
22nd Apr '17 1:48:33 PM SeanMurrayI
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* AllJustADream: All adaptations allow for the possibility that all the murders only took place inside Bateman's head. {{Word of God}} for the movie version has it, on a DVD commentary track, that when the two co-writers were writing the film they thought of it as having every single murder in the story really taking place in some fashion or other [[UnreliableNarrator but never in exactly the way Bateman hallucinates/lies about/misremembers it.]]
** The business card scene is another example of how it may all be in Patrick's head. Everyone has the same phone number on their business card, "Acquisitions" is misspelled ''the exact same way'' on everyone's card, and Patrick's has an error on his (no space between the & and Pierce). None of this is significant in and of itself, but taken together the impact grows. The entire scene also has a dreamlike feel to it, especially when they produce the cards or exchange them.

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* AllJustADream: [[spoiler: All adaptations allow for the possibility that all the murders and other events recounted by Bateman only took take place inside Bateman's his head. {{Word of God}} for the movie version has it, on According to a DVD commentary track, that track for the movie version, when the two co-writers were writing the film they thought of it as having every single murder in the story really taking place in some fashion or other [[UnreliableNarrator but never in exactly the way Bateman hallucinates/lies about/misremembers it.]]
** The business card scene is another example of how it may all be in Patrick's head. Everyone has the same phone number on their business card, "Acquisitions" is misspelled ''the exact same way'' on everyone's card, and Patrick's has an error on his (no space between the & and Pierce). None of this is significant in and of itself, but taken together the impact grows. The entire scene also has a dreamlike feel to it, especially when they produce the cards or exchange them.
]]]]
12th Apr '17 8:28:30 AM Taskmaster123
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Added DiffLines:

** The business card scene is another example of how it may all be in Patrick's head. Everyone has the same phone number on their business card, "Acquisitions" is misspelled ''the exact same way'' on everyone's card, and Patrick's has an error on his (no space between the & and Pierce). None of this is significant in and of itself, but taken together the impact grows. The entire scene also has a dreamlike feel to it, especially when they produce the cards or exchange them.
12th Mar '17 11:23:55 PM WillBGood
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** It's revealed to Patrick by the conclusion that his brother Sean could get a reservation at Dorsia at any time because, Sean explains, the restaurant maître d' was his roommate at college--a subtle reference to Bertrand, the French exchange student, in Bret Easton Ellis' ''Literature/TheRulesOfAttraction'' where Sean Bateman was originally a principle character.

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** It's revealed to Patrick by the conclusion that his brother Sean could get a reservation at Dorsia at any time because, Sean explains, the restaurant maître d' was his roommate at college--a subtle reference to Bertrand, the French exchange student, in Bret Easton Ellis' ''Literature/TheRulesOfAttraction'' where Sean Bateman was originally a principle principal character.
12th Mar '17 10:49:55 PM WillBGood
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* BerserkButton: Anything that gives Bateman [[InferioritySuperiorityComplex the idea that he has/gets less than the absolute best or that there is someone in his social circles that might be better than him]]. For instance, the very thought that Patrick will not get a good table at a restaurant is enough to put him "on the verge of tears". Also, as much as he despises Luis, it's the fact that Luis had business cards that Patrick thinks are better than his own that drives him to [[spoiler: attempt to]] murder Luis almost immediately.

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* BerserkButton: Anything that gives Bateman [[InferioritySuperiorityComplex the idea that he has/gets less than the absolute best or that there is someone in his social circles that might be better than him]]. For instance, the very thought that Patrick will not get a good table at a restaurant is enough to put him "on the verge of tears". Also, Also (in the movie), as much as he despises Luis, it's the fact that Luis had business cards that Patrick thinks are better than his own that drives him to [[spoiler: attempt to]] murder Luis almost immediately.
5th Mar '17 9:42:00 AM SeanMurrayI
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*** In the book, as Bateman lays this all out, he even tries to openly support both sides of divisive social issues, such as stressing a need to "change abortion laws to protect the life of the unborn while also maintaining a woman's right to choose," which is further contradicted later in the book in separate scenes where Bateman forces women who he sleeps with to get a abortions [[spoiler: even performing several of them himself against their will.]]

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*** In the book, as Bateman lays this all out, he even tries to openly support both sides of divisive social issues, such as stressing a need to "change abortion laws to protect the life of the unborn while also maintaining a woman's right to choose," which is further contradicted later in the book in separate scenes where Bateman forces women who he sleeps with to get a abortions [[spoiler: even performing several of them himself against their will.]]
4th Feb '17 12:52:44 AM Aquila89
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* DamnedByAFoolsPraise: Bateman considers Donald Trump his idol.

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* DamnedByAFoolsPraise: Bateman considers Donald Trump his idol. The music he talks about is also an example of this. Ellis didn't like any of the music Bateman liked; he used it because "it seemed to reflect a certain kind of mass-taste" Bateman wanted to be a part of. He [[http://www.billboard.com/articles/6296671/bret-easton-ellis-regrets-linking-huey-lewis-and-the-news-to-american-psycho later came to regret]] associating Huey Lewis and the News with Bateman.
4th Feb '17 12:29:47 AM Aquila89
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* SelfPlagiarism: A couple of passages from ''Literature/TheRulesOfAttraction'' show up almost exactly word-for-word in ''American Psycho''.

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* SelfPlagiarism: A couple of passages from ''Literature/TheRulesOfAttraction'' ''Literature/LessThanZero'' show up almost exactly word-for-word in ''American Psycho''.
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