History Literature / ARoseForEmily

26th Apr '16 10:50:42 AM Give1Take2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* IJustWantToBeLoved: According to Faulkner, Emily just wanted to "love and be loved and have a family of her own," but her father kept her isolated from the town until his death in her thirties. By then, the town considered her too much of an OldMaid and the LastOfHerKind.



* KarmaHoudini: Emily both gets away with murder and is the most prominent tax evader in town. She never suffers any real consequence for her crimes.

to:

* KarmaHoudini: Emily both gets [[spoiler:gets away with murder murder]] and is the most prominent tax evader in town. She never suffers any real consequence for her crimes.



* LastOfHisKind: The town considers Emily a last "relic" of Antebellum aristocratic culture that once dominated the South. Since she's the only person of her social station left for miles around, the town feels that if she can't marry within her station then she shouldn't marry at all.

to:

* LastOfHisKind: LastOfHerKind: The town considers Emily a last "relic" of Antebellum aristocratic culture that once dominated the South. Since she's the only person of her social station left for miles around, the town feels that if she can't marry within her station then she shouldn't marry at all.



* MadArtist:Emily may exhibit traits of this trope. It is mentioned early in the story that she used to give "china-painting lessons".

to:

* MadArtist:Emily MadArtist: Emily may exhibit traits of this trope. It is mentioned early in the story that she used to give "china-painting lessons".


Added DiffLines:

* RuleOfSymbolism: The decay of Emily's looks and estate [[spoiler:and sanity]] mirror the decay of the antebellum southern culture.
26th Apr '16 10:25:00 AM Give1Take2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* FreudianExcuse: According to WordOfGod, all Emily wanted was to "love and be loved and have a family of her own," but her tyrannical father chased off all potential suitors because he selfishly wanted to keep her as his housemaid. By the time he died in her thirties, the town considered her [[OldMaid too old]] and [[BlueBlood too rich]] for any of them to marry, and felt it would only be "proper" if she remained a spinster or committed suicide. No wonder she [[spoiler:latched onto the first man to show her the slightest interest, then cracked when he rejected her.]]



* GoMadFromTheIsolation: It's implied that a lifetime of isolation from the town by her father, followed by years of living alone in a decaying estate with only a sour black servant to keep her company, did not help Emily's sanity any.



* InherentInTheSystem: Emily could and would not have done the things she did had the town not ''expected'' her to strictly adhere to decayed social mores, and had not allowed her to dodge taxes and live alone in an impoverished and abandoned estate all her life just because they themselves wanted to uphold the last relic of the Antebellum South.



* LastOfHisKind: The town considers Emily a last "relic" of Antebellum aristocratic culture that once dominated the South. Since she's the only person of her social station left for miles around, the town feels that if she can't marry within her station then she shouldn't marry at all.



** One interpretation as to why the locals essentially allowed Emily to live off the grid and do whatever she wanted is because she was a link of sorts to the glory days of the pre-Civil War south. No matter how her old plantation manor decayed, they preferred it to the ramshackle shops that came up all over the town after the War.

to:

** One interpretation as to why the locals essentially allowed Emily to live off the grid and do whatever she wanted is because she was a link of sorts to the glory days of the pre-Civil War south.South. No matter how her old plantation manor decayed, they preferred it to the ramshackle shops that came up all over the town after the War.



* SmallTownBoredom: One explanation with the town's preoccupation and near obsession with Emily. For a woman who spend most of her life as a recluse, whenever Emily acts in any way the locals are there to discuss about it. As scholar Judith Fetterley observed the people of Jefferson are in turns "curious, jealous, spiteful, pitying, partisan, proud, disapproving, and admiring" of Emily. Soon after her death, her house is invaded by visitors who search for her secrets with a voyeur-like attitude. Perhaps they are that bored that they obsess over the little drama of her life?

to:

* SmallTownBoredom: One explanation with the town's preoccupation and near obsession with Emily. For a woman who spend most of her life as a recluse, whenever Emily acts in any way the locals are there to discuss about it. As scholar Judith Fetterley observed observed, the people of Jefferson are in turns "curious, jealous, spiteful, pitying, partisan, proud, disapproving, and admiring" of Emily. Soon after her death, her house is invaded by visitors who search for her secrets with a voyeur-like attitude. Perhaps they are that bored that they obsess over the little drama of her life?
20th Dec '15 2:11:24 AM SeptimusHeap
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* GossipyHens: Once Emily and Homer start spending time together, as the narrator puts it: "the whispering began".

to:

* GossipyHens: GossipyHens:
**
Once Emily and Homer start spending time together, as the narrator puts it: "the whispering began".
19th Dec '15 4:04:15 PM zachthelittlebear
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** The unnamed narrator, representing the townspeople of Jefferson, and relaying what is essentially local gossip to the reader, counts as well.
15th Mar '15 10:09:31 AM McJeff
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Pride}}: The locals find fault with the excessive pride of the Griersons, who reportedly "held themselves a little too high for what they really were".

to:

* {{Pride}}: The {{Pride}}:
**The
locals find fault with the excessive pride of the Griersons, who reportedly "held themselves a little too high for what they really were".were".
**One interpretation as to why the locals essentially allowed Emily to live off the grid and do whatever she wanted is because she was a link of sorts to the glory days of the pre-Civil War south. No matter how her old plantation manor decayed, they preferred it to the ramshackle shops that came up all over the town after the War.
15th Mar '15 10:03:53 AM McJeff
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TheBeard: Averted. Homer Barron is not that interested in maintaining the illusion of his heterosexuality, and his preferences become known in town. He is also unwilling to marry Emily to play this part.

to:

* TheBeard: Averted. AmbiguouslyGay: It's never made completely clear whether Homer Barron is not actually homosexual, or if he simply prefers having a good time at the bar with the guys every evening to getting married and settling down. Or for that interested in maintaining the illusion of his heterosexuality, matter, if he's bisexual and his preferences become known in town. He is also unwilling enjoys women enough to marry Emily date them but won't commit to play this part.a life-long relationship.
4th Dec '14 1:19:31 AM Vandegraff1
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Yandere}}: Of the possessive variety, the eponymous Emily Grier fell in love with Homer Barron, a workman far below her (perceived) class. One day, he went in Emily's house and was never seen leaving. When Emily eventually passes away, her house is searched and it turns out [[spoiler: she killed Homer with arsenic, dressed him in a suit, and kept the corpse on her bed.]]

to:

* {{Yandere}}: Of the possessive variety, the variety. The eponymous Emily Grier Grierson fell in love with Homer Barron, a workman far below her (perceived) class. One day, he went in into Emily's house and was never seen leaving. When Emily eventually passes away, her house is searched searched, and it turns out that [[spoiler: she killed Homer with arsenic, dressed him in a suit, and kept the corpse on her bed.]]
4th Dec '14 1:18:23 AM Vandegraff1
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SouthernGothic: Could well be the poster child of this trope. Emily Grierson's mansion, a symbol of better days long since past, is described in the most wretched terms of rot and decay -- and the house hides terrible secrets.

to:

* SouthernGothic: Could well be the poster child of this trope. Emily Grierson's mansion, a symbol of better days long since past, is described in the most wretched terms of rot and decay -- and decay--and the house hides terrible secrets.
4th Dec '14 1:18:04 AM Vandegraff1
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SouthernGothic: Could well be the poster child of this trope. Emily Grier's mansion, a symbol of better days long since past, is described in the most wretched terms of rot and decay -- and the house hides terrible secrets.

to:

* SouthernGothic: Could well be the poster child of this trope. Emily Grier's Grierson's mansion, a symbol of better days long since past, is described in the most wretched terms of rot and decay -- and the house hides terrible secrets.
4th Dec '14 1:17:14 AM Vandegraff1
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Notice also that Emily still relies more on the unwritten [[IGaveMyWord World of a Gentleman]], Colonel Sartoris, rather than the paperwork which the "modern" authorities cite to have her pay taxes. They are mentioned as being of a different generation and of a much different mentality than Sartoris.

to:

** Notice also that Emily still relies more on the unwritten [[IGaveMyWord World word of a Gentleman]], gentleman]], Colonel Sartoris, rather than the paperwork which the "modern" authorities cite to have her pay taxes. They are mentioned as being of a different generation and of a much different mentality than Sartoris.
This list shows the last 10 events of 90. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.ARoseForEmily