History KickTheDog / Literature

15th Sep '17 1:36:01 AM PaulA
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* Squire Hardman in "Sweet Ermengarde" by Creator/HPLovecraft kicks an "unquestionably innocent" cat while twirling his moustache. The story is a send-up of hack romance stories, so Squire Hardman is pretty much every ObviouslyEvil villain cliche.

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* Squire Hardman in "Sweet Ermengarde" "Literature/SweetErmengarde" by Creator/HPLovecraft kicks an "unquestionably innocent" cat while twirling his moustache. The story is a send-up of hack romance stories, so Squire Hardman is pretty much every ObviouslyEvil villain cliche.
4th Jul '17 9:23:14 PM Scraggle
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* Maybe [[ValuesDissonance the cultural standard is a little different]], or perhaps it's at least partly for shock value, but this editor has read a number of horror shorts (most by [[Creator/RumikoTakahashi Takahashi Rumiko]]) in which the villain's first evil act is killing a dog. Sometimes eviscerating it.
** A girl and her pregnant dog go too close to an evil place, and end up having to spend the night there (I think she got knocked out); the evil goes into the dog, destroys it and the babies, and emerges in the form of a horrible fleshless sort of puppy that the hero later has to defeat.
** A boy in high school finds out that the girl he was betrothed to as a child is coming to see him. He scoffs at the custom, since he has a girlfriend and all. His fiancée takes it a little more seriously. She can control little shapeless monsters who eat things, and has already murdered at least two people and a dog (it barked at her, so she poisoned it to feed her new pets). Then, to frighten her fiancé's girlfriend into staying away, she kills the girlfriend's dog.
** There's a series in which... demons? vampire spirits?... take over bodies shortly after death. One little boy dies and gets possessed this way, and his mother can't bring herself to destroy him, so she hides him. Brings him animals to kill and eat. However, despite the numerous pets who go missing and the eviscerated corpses that show up all over the place, the fact that he's killing animals and not people works against Kick the Dog, seeing as (a) the boy lives, (b) he's victim more than villain, and (c) the killing of pets was the lesser of two evils.
** Pet standards differ by culture. Whatever is the pet norm is the one thing you would never even consider eating. For Americans, it's dogs and cats. For those in India, it's cows. We have no problem eating beef, and we joke about how Asians might serve dogs and cats in restaurants (There's a Cat in the Kettle at the Peking Moon). Some people eat horseflesh... and right now there's some little kid out there realizing that their breakfast sausage was made from Wilbur.
*** And Finns eat reindeer. Goodbye, Rudolph! We hardly knew you!
** Standards also change with the times, notably before spaying and neutering became the norm. In ''Emily of New Moon'', Emily is on vacation when she receives a letter saying her cat has had kittens. She matter-of-factly hopes she'll get to see them before they're drowned; her relatives only spare one. On the other hand, there are actual Kick the Dog moments in the book, when we learn that Teddy's pathologically jealous mother has drowned and poisoned various cats because she thought he loved them more than her.
5th Feb '17 6:25:38 PM Pichu-kun
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* Terror from ''Literature/{{Survivors}}'' literally beat up a smaller dog who tries speaking with him. Even Lucky wonders what kind of alpha mauled their own packmates.

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* Terror from ''Literature/{{Survivors}}'' ''Literature/SurvivorDogs'' literally beat up a smaller dog who tries speaking with him. Even Lucky wonders what kind of alpha mauled mauls their own packmates.
20th Jan '17 5:53:43 AM SimiOfDoom
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* Falk of ''Literature/TheDinosaurLords'' cements his status as a villain by trying to rape Melodía while drunk. Worse even - he later doesn't fret about the fact that he tried to rape a teenage girl, but that this makes the next parts of his plan problematic.

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* Falk of ''Literature/TheDinosaurLords'' cements his status as a villain by trying to rape Melodía while drunk. Worse even - he later doesn't fret about the fact that he tried to rape a teenage girl, but that this makes the next parts of his plan problematic.problematic.
* In ''Literature/MalazanBookOfTheFallen'' the Crippled God's penchant for making lopsided deals and preference of 'broken' individuals means that his followers don't have the best of time in his service. The worst example being the teen-aged [[spoiler: Rhulad Sengar, who gets to experience thousands of deaths to become a stronger champion]].
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2nd Jan '17 2:38:31 PM Dawnwing
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* Clear Sky in ''Literature/WarriorCats'' does a couple of these in ''Thunder Rising''. He bullies Jagged Peak when he was suffering from self-esteem problems, embarrasses one of his cats to make Thunder look good, beats up Nightheart's brother when he was already defeated, [[spoiler:sends Frost out to die even though he can still hunt]], and [[spoiler:throws his own son into the path of an attacking fox]].
** Tigerstar did plenty of this with Ravenpaw and other while in [=ThunderClan=], but things take a turn for the worse when he makes the Bonehill.

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* ''Literature/WarriorCats'':
**
Clear Sky in ''Literature/WarriorCats'' does a couple of these in ''Thunder Rising''. He bullies Jagged Peak when he was suffering from self-esteem problems, embarrasses one of his cats to make Thunder look good, beats up Nightheart's brother when he was already defeated, [[spoiler:sends Frost out to die even though he can still hunt]], and [[spoiler:throws his own son into the path of an attacking fox]].
** Tigerstar did plenty of this with Ravenpaw There's one cat that ''The Last Hope'' really wants you to know is an evil bastard, and other while in [=ThunderClan=], it's not Brokenstar or Tigerstar. It's not even Shredtail. It's Hawkfrost. Sure, Brokenstar murdered Beetlewhisker, but things take a turn for the worse Hawkfrost made it personal when he makes kicked the Bonehill.corpse and smugly mocked Beetlewhisker. Then, he goes on to nearly kill fan-favourite Ivypool, and actually succeeds in killing Hollyleaf, another fan-favourite (admittedly without Ivypool's absurd levels of popularity). Then, he spends the rest of his screentime rubbing it in to Ivypool and Brambleclaw that he killed Hollyleaf. He really has his death coming.
7th Dec '16 2:33:02 PM lucy24
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* In ''Literature/OliverTwist'', Bill Sikes seems likable, if rough, at first. Then when we see him alone, he does kick a dog, and we know he's not only a villain but a cunning one.
7th Dec '16 2:30:47 PM lucy24
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* It was this reader's feeling that the novel ''Children of Men'' [[spoiler:has its VillainWithGoodPublicity do several such moments within the last chapter, (with the implication that he's done more like them)]] simply to avoid any MoralDissonance for the heroes, or risk them not having an adequate excuse to [[spoiler:get him out of there when they'll]] try and build a better world.

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* It was this reader's feeling that the The novel ''Children of Men'' [[spoiler:has its VillainWithGoodPublicity do several such moments within the last chapter, (with the implication that he's done more like them)]] simply to avoid any MoralDissonance for the heroes, or risk them not having an adequate excuse to [[spoiler:get him out of there when they'll]] try and build a better world.
8th Nov '16 7:36:52 PM Javertshark13
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* [[KnightTemplar Javert]] in Victor Hugo's ''Literature/LesMiserables'' gets a Kick the Dog moment when he taunts Fantine ''in her dying moments.'' Tellingly, the adapters of [[Theatre/LesMiserables the musical]], who needed the audience not to write the character off as a monster (at least, not quite that early in the show), have him arrive on the scene ''after'' Fantine has already died.

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* [[KnightTemplar Javert]] The Thénardiers in Victor Hugo's ''Literature/LesMiserables'' do this in just about every scene they're in. Javert also gets a Kick the Dog moment one when he taunts frightens Fantine ''in to death (albeit unintentionally) by telling her dying moments.'' Tellingly, the adapters mayor is a convict. Notably, this is one of [[Theatre/LesMiserables the musical]], who needed the audience not to write the character off as a monster (at least, not quite that early in the show), have him arrive on the scene ''after'' Fantine has already died.only moments where Valjean [[BerserkButton briefly loses his cool.]]
17th Aug '16 1:28:09 AM PaulA
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* In Lois [=McMaster=] Bujold's Literature/VorkosiganSaga, we have all-around winner Lord Richars, who drowns his twelve year-old cousin Donna's puppy after she fights off his rape attempt. Many years later, when she has a sex-change operation (going from from Donna to Dono) and challenges his claim to her/his late brother's title, he tries to [[spoiler:have Dono castrated. In the back of a van, without anesthetic]].

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* In Lois [=McMaster=] Bujold's Literature/VorkosiganSaga, ''Literature/ACivilCampaign'', we have all-around winner Lord Richars, who drowns his twelve year-old cousin Donna's puppy after she fights off his rape attempt. Many years later, when she has a sex-change operation (going from from Donna to Dono) and challenges his claim to her/his late brother's title, he tries to [[spoiler:have Dono castrated. In the back of a van, without anesthetic]].
10th Aug '16 8:51:34 PM nombretomado
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* In ''[[{{Deryni}} The King's Deryni]]'', when Bishop Oliver deNore sees young Alaric Morgan has been touching his horse (the boy calmed the animal for a short journey by sea), he orders the animal slaughtered and summons a butcher to see the deed done on the spot. The bishop arrogantly points out the horse is his property, suggests he's motivated by a desire to feed the poor, and refuses all offers to purchase the horse. While deNore nurtures a particular grudge aginst Alaric due to the role the boy's mother played in the conviction and execution of his brother, he is also well-known for persecuting Deryni generally. His promotion to Archbishop of Valoret is looked upon with dread by Alaric and others

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* In ''[[{{Deryni}} ''[[Literature/{{Deryni}} The King's Deryni]]'', when Bishop Oliver deNore sees young Alaric Morgan has been touching his horse (the boy calmed the animal for a short journey by sea), he orders the animal slaughtered and summons a butcher to see the deed done on the spot. The bishop arrogantly points out the horse is his property, suggests he's motivated by a desire to feed the poor, and refuses all offers to purchase the horse. While deNore nurtures a particular grudge aginst Alaric due to the role the boy's mother played in the conviction and execution of his brother, he is also well-known for persecuting Deryni generally. His promotion to Archbishop of Valoret is looked upon with dread by Alaric and others
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