History IdiotBall / LiveActionTV

26th Jul '17 9:53:53 PM maarvarq
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** "Recap/DoctorWhoS36E2Smile":

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** "Recap/DoctorWhoS36E2Smile":"[[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E2Smile Smile]]":
26th Jul '17 9:52:22 PM maarvarq
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Added DiffLines:

** "Recap/DoctorWhoS36E2Smile":
*** The emoji-bots, which are supposed to be interfaces, grant no control of the micro-bots whatsoever.
*** The Doctor's immediate reaction to the situation [[spoiler: is to blow everything up]].
*** The Doctor then wilfully keeps other characters in the dark when one might have been able to say "Oh yeah, the master override for the bots is right here" (or alternatively, the designers for not having such a control).
20th Jul '17 8:31:52 PM ShorinBJ
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** "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E16QWho}} Q Who]]": Q flings the Enterprise to an uncharted region of space, specifically as a response to the assertion by Picard and Riker that they can handle whatever they find. Knowing Guinan knows the region, they ask her about it. She warns them to get out while they still can. They decide it would be grand to poke around to satisfy their curiosity, which leads to meeting the Borg. Guinan then tells Picard that this enemy destroyed her home planet, and warns him, "Protect yourself, Captain, or they'll destroy you." Picard attempts to have a nice chat with one.
** The episode "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS5E8Unification2}} Unification, Part 2]]". So, the villainous Romulan Sela has revealed her plan to invade and occupy Vulcan, but it's critical that Starfleet not be warned ahead of time. Across from her is seated Captain Jean Luc Picard, Lt. Commander Data, and Ambassador fuckin' Spock-three of the smartest and most badass characters in all of Star Trek - whom she has managed to capture. So what does she do now? Leave the three of them in her office. Unattended. And with access to her computer. Geez, it's like she wasn't even trying.

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** "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E16QWho}} Q Who]]": Q flings the Enterprise to an uncharted region of space, specifically as a response to the assertion by Picard and Riker that they can handle whatever they find. Knowing Guinan knows the region, they ask her about it. She warns them to get out while they still can. They decide it would be grand to poke around to satisfy their curiosity, which leads to meeting the Borg. Guinan then tells Picard that this enemy destroyed her home planet, and warns him, "Protect yourself, Captain, or they'll destroy you." Picard attempts to have a nice chat with one.
one while it ignores him and gathers sensitive information from Engineering.
** The episode "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS5E8Unification2}} Unification, Part 2]]". So, the villainous Romulan Sela has revealed her plan to invade and occupy Vulcan, but it's critical that Starfleet not be warned ahead of time. Across from her is seated Captain Jean Luc Jean-Luc Picard, Lt. Commander Data, and Ambassador fuckin' Spock-three Spock -- three of the smartest and most badass characters in all of Star Trek - -- whom she has managed to capture. So what does she do now? Leave the three of them in her office. Unattended. And with access to her computer. Geez, it's like she wasn't even trying.



** There's also Tasha Yar in "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS1E12Datalore}} Datalore]]". [[IdiotPlot The rest of the crew didn't do much better]], but special mention must go to the chief of security for failing to recognize that a perfect twin of the second officer might possibly represent a security risk.
*** She DID recognize this, and she DID voice her concerns to the bridge crew. Captain Picard pooh-poohed her concerns, saying that he trusts Data implicitly, suggesting that in his mind the biggest risk was that Lore would lure Data to the dark side rather than the more reasonable risk of him impersonating Data. Lore does impersonate Data--badly--and only Wesley recognizes this. Hate Wesley if you want, but he does deserve the credit for saving the ship this time.

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** There's also Tasha Yar in In "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS1E12Datalore}} Datalore]]". [[IdiotPlot The rest of the crew didn't do much better]], but special mention must go to Datalore]]", the chief of security for failing to recognize points out that a perfect twin of the second officer might possibly represent a security risk.
*** She DID recognize this, and she DID voice her concerns to the bridge crew.
risk. Captain Picard pooh-poohed her concerns, saying that he trusts Data implicitly, suggesting that in his mind the biggest risk was that Lore would lure Data to the dark side rather than the more reasonable risk of him impersonating Data. Lore does impersonate Data--badly--and only Wesley recognizes this. Hate Wesley if you want, but he does deserve the credit for saving the ship this time.



** Captain Picard takes the lead in "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS6E24S7E1Descent}} Descent]]". Desperate to find Data and the Borg he orders most of the crew to a planet to look for them leaving a skeleton crew led by Crusher, and apparently mostly consisting of ensigns, to look after the ship. Most people, when deciding how to split their resources, would go with using their highly experienced officers to operate the ship; leaving wandering about looking behind bushes to the lesser lights.
** It was Riker's turn to hold the Idiot Ball in "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E17SamaritanSnare}} Samaritan Snare]]". Riker sends [=LaForge=] over to a Pakled ship (the crew of which seems exceptionally slow) to do some requested repairs. Worf objects to sending them the Enterprise's chief engineer, but Riker blows it off. Troi tells him directly that she's suspicious and feels that [=LaForge=] is in danger. Riker blows if off again. Then Geordi gets captured because Worf and Troi were right and Riker ignored them. Scriptwriter Dennis Russell Bailey, who wrote the screenplay for "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS3E20TinMan}} Tin Man]]" in the following season said, "The point at which we became serious about trying to write a script for the show was about five minutes after watching 'Samaritan Snare,' which in my personal opinion was the most abysmal piece of Star Trek ever filmed. My objections to it were that it always resorted to idiot plotting to make the story work, and that offended me a great deal worse than some of the awful shows which were done on the original series. I thought the way in which it was plotted and the way it was dealt with was an insult to the intelligence of the people who watched the show and the actors and characters in the show. None of the plot could have happened if all of the characters hadn't suddenly became morons that week."
** The entire episode of "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS3E12TheHighGround}} The High Ground]]" is the result of Dr. Crusher holding the IdiotBall. In the opening, a terrorist bomb explodes nearby the cast and injures several citzens of the planet the crew is on, so Dr. Crusher recklessly goes over to administer medical attention without any security or other means of protection, as she is prone to do, and a couple minutes later one of the terrorists warps in, grabs Crusher and warps out, kidnapping her. The entire episode is spent trying to locate and rescue her. However, the viewer will probably notice the IdiotBall moment when the viewer realizes that Crusher could have immediately pressed her combadge and said the 7 words she says practically every episode where Crusher is with a patient somewhere off of the Enterprise: "Enterprise, (insert number of patients plus Dr. Crusher here) to beam directly to sickbay" just about immediately after the bomb blast, avoiding being kidnapped and thus avoiding the entire plot of the episode.
* ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'': Captain Janeway practically ''is'' an Idiot Ball, and the members of her crew toss her around for exercise in each episode. In one episode, Janeway contracts a fatal illness that gets suppressed on a certain planet, and the crew is faced with a choice... leave her on a planet where she can comfortably live the rest of her life, or make a deal with the Vidiians, a race with a documented history of hijacking star ships and harvesting the organs of everyone inside. One unusually rational member of the crew makes it clear that negotiating with the Vidiians is a recipe for disaster, only to be ignored with the expected results. Winning decisions like this are made throughout the series, making you wonder if the [=HoloDoc=] is there to remind them to breathe every five seconds.

to:

** Captain Picard takes the lead in "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS6E24S7E1Descent}} Descent]]". Desperate to find Data and the Borg Borg, he orders most of the crew to a planet to look for them them, leaving a skeleton crew led by Crusher, and apparently mostly consisting of ensigns, to look after the ship. Most people, when deciding how to split their resources, would go with using their highly experienced officers to operate the ship; ship, leaving wandering about looking behind bushes to the lesser lights.
** It was Riker's turn to hold the Idiot Ball in "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E17SamaritanSnare}} Samaritan Snare]]". Riker sends [=LaForge=] over to a Pakled ship (the crew of which seems exceptionally slow) to do some requested repairs. Worf objects to sending them the Enterprise's chief engineer, but Riker blows it off. Troi tells him directly that she's suspicious and feels that [=LaForge=] La Forge is in danger. Riker blows if off again. Then Geordi gets captured because Worf and Troi were right and Riker ignored them. Scriptwriter Dennis Russell Bailey, who wrote the screenplay for "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS3E20TinMan}} Tin Man]]" in the following season said, "The point at which we became serious about trying to write a script for the show was about five minutes after watching 'Samaritan Snare,' which in my personal opinion was the most abysmal piece of Star Trek ever filmed. My objections to it were that it always resorted to idiot plotting to make the story work, and that offended me a great deal worse than some of the awful shows which were done on the original series. I thought the way in which it was plotted and the way it was dealt with was an insult to the intelligence of the people who watched the show and the actors and characters in the show. None of the plot could have happened if all of the characters hadn't suddenly became morons that week."
** The entire episode of "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS3E12TheHighGround}} The High Ground]]" is the result of Dr. Crusher holding the IdiotBall. In the opening, a terrorist bomb explodes nearby the cast and injures several citzens of the planet the crew is on, so Dr. Crusher recklessly goes over to administer medical attention without any security or other means of protection, as she is prone to do, and a couple minutes later one of the terrorists warps in, grabs Crusher Crusher, and warps out, kidnapping her. The entire episode is spent trying to locate and rescue her. However, the viewer will probably notice the IdiotBall moment when the viewer realizes that Crusher could have immediately pressed her combadge and said the 7 seven words she says practically every episode where Crusher is with a patient somewhere off of the Enterprise: "Enterprise, (insert number of patients plus Dr. Crusher here) to beam directly to sickbay" Sickbay" just about immediately after the bomb blast, avoiding being kidnapped and thus avoiding the entire plot of the episode.
* ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'': Captain Janeway practically ''is'' an Idiot Ball, and the members of her crew toss her around for exercise in each episode. In one episode, Janeway contracts a fatal illness that gets suppressed on a certain planet, and the crew is faced with a choice... leave choice: Leave her on a planet where she can comfortably live the rest of her life, or make a deal with the Vidiians, a race with a documented history of hijacking star ships and harvesting the organs of everyone inside. One unusually rational member of the crew makes it clear that negotiating with the Vidiians is a recipe for disaster, only to be ignored with the expected results. Winning decisions like this are made throughout the series, making you wonder if the [=HoloDoc=] is there to remind them to breathe every five seconds.
20th Jul '17 7:36:39 PM ShorinBJ
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** This trope appears where a string of increasingly hand-bangingly moronic decisions on the part of Marshall and Lily ends with them buying an apartment they don't need to own located near a sewage plant they never bothered to find out about with a slanted floor they never inspected for and a mortgage they can't afford due to debt they could have avoided. Future!Ted, narrating from the year 2030 and gifted with 20/20 hindsight, lampshades every idiotic decision by showing them saying something level-headed and mature, [[LemonyNarrator interjecting with "... is what he/she/we SHOULD have said"]], and then showing the stupid thing they ''actually'' did. Basically, a cautionary tale to his kids showing them how even people who should know better do really stupid things sometimes, so that they won't repeat their Aunt and Uncle's mistakes.
** When Marshall shaves a streak of his hair on his wedding day, Ted and Barney come up with many ideas to make the situation better because they honestly don't know what to do. Barney even suggests wearing a Native American (AKA American Indian) headdress which is close to the real, and simple, solution that Lilly comes up with. Just wear a hat.

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** This trope appears where a string of increasingly hand-bangingly moronic decisions on the part of Marshall and Lily ends with them buying an apartment they don't need to own located near a sewage plant they never bothered to find out about with a slanted floor they never inspected for and a mortgage they can't afford due to debt they could have avoided. Future!Ted, narrating from the year 2030 and gifted with 20/20 hindsight, lampshades every idiotic decision by showing them saying something level-headed and mature, [[LemonyNarrator interjecting with "... is what he/she/we SHOULD have said"]], and then showing the stupid thing they ''actually'' did. Basically, a cautionary tale to his kids showing them how even people who should know better do really stupid things sometimes, so that they won't repeat their Aunt aunt and Uncle's uncle's mistakes.
** When Marshall shaves a streak of his hair on his wedding day, Ted and Barney come up with many ideas to make the situation better because they honestly don't know what to do. Barney even suggests wearing a Native American (AKA American Indian) headdress which is close to the real, and simple, solution that Lilly Lily comes up with. Just wear a hat.
12th Jun '17 7:13:29 AM ApeAccount
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** The worst in the entire series may be Xander in "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS6E7OnceMoreWithFeeling}} Once More, With Feeling]]". It turns out that the whole reason people are stuck acting like they're in a musical, and worse, people are literally dancing themselves to death, is because Xander found Sweet's talisman and decided that what his emotional friends needed was a demon to come to town and force everyone to sing and dance. Xander summoned a demon to make everyone happy. This is probably the worst example, because while not only is it stupid, it is entirely out of character and is painfully obvious that it happened only because the writer (Joss) needed someone to do it.

to:

** The worst in the entire series may be Xander in "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS6E7OnceMoreWithFeeling}} Once More, With Feeling]]". It turns out that the whole reason people are stuck acting like they're in a musical, and worse, people are literally dancing themselves to death, is because Xander found Sweet's talisman and decided that what his emotional friends needed was a demon to come to town and force everyone to sing and dance. Xander summoned a demon to make everyone happy. This is probably the worst example, because while not only is it stupid, it is entirely out of character and is painfully obvious that it happened only because the writer (Joss) needed someone to do it. Popular fanon has it Dawn actually did the summoning and Xander merely took credit to protect her from the demon who wanted to take the summoner as his queen.
30th May '17 4:01:30 AM SorPepita
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* Several characters in ''Series/TheFlash2014'' do that, especially Barry. Being able to move faster than the eye can see should give him the ultimate advantage in any fight, and yet there are plenty of times his enemies are able to put up quite a fight, mainly to avoid making Barry seem like an invincible force. It's lampshaded several times, especially by [[Series/{{Arrow}} Oliver]], that Barry tends to rush into situations without thinking, despite the fact that he has plenty of time to analyze the situation and prevent the bad guys from getting the drop on him. That still doesn't excuse him being occasionally punched by the bad guys despite the fact that, to him, it should all be happening in slow motion, so he should be able to easily dodge any strike.
** There's also Cisco, who designs a deadly weapon in case Barry turned out to be crazy or evil. Instead of putting it somewhere secure, he keeps it in a locker that gets robbed almost immediately. Not only that, but he doesn't tell his boss and his colleague about the weapon until after it's gone. And now one of the Flash's smartest and most ruthless enemies has a weapon he can use to freeze pretty much anything.



* Appears repeatedly in ''Series/JessicaJones2015;'' there are many times where the mind-controlling villain Kilgrave gets incapacitated or captured, but escapes to cause more trouble only because someone gets a plot-convenient dose of stupidity. Lampshaded when Jessica's allies ask [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim why she doesn't just kill him,]] and her reasons get weaker as Kilgrave's body count rises.
** Not to mention that Jessica is utterly dismissive of Malcolm when he suggests that they learn more about how Kilgrave's power works, despite the fact that it is obviously a good idea, and the only plans she's made that have been even slightly successful have been based on information about how Kilgrave's power works.



* Several characters in ''Series/TheFlash2014'' do that, especially Barry. Being able to move faster than the eye can see should give him the ultimate advantage in any fight, and yet there are plenty of times his enemies are able to put up quite a fight, mainly to avoid making Barry seem like an invincible force. It's lampshaded several times, especially by [[Series/{{Arrow}} Oliver]], that Barry tends to rush into situations without thinking, despite the fact that he has plenty of time to analyze the situation and prevent the bad guys from getting the drop on him. That still doesn't excuse him being occasionally punched by the bad guys despite the fact that, to him, it should all be happening in slow motion, so he should be able to easily dodge any strike.
** There's also Cisco, who designs a deadly weapon in case Barry turned out to be crazy or evil. Instead of putting it somewhere secure, he keeps it in a locker that gets robbed almost immediately. Not only that, but he doesn't tell his boss and his colleague about the weapon until after it's gone. And now one of the Flash's smartest and most ruthless enemies has a weapon he can use to freeze pretty much anything.
* Appears repeatedly in ''Series/JessicaJones2015;'' there are many times where the mind-controlling villain Kilgrave gets incapacitated or captured, but escapes to cause more trouble only because someone gets a plot-convenient dose of stupidity. Lampshaded when Jessica's allies ask [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim why she doesn't just kill him,]] and her reasons gets weaker as Kilgrave's body count rises.
** Not to mention that Jessica is utterly dismissive of Malcolm when he suggests that they learn more about how Kilgrave's power works, despite the fact that it is obviously a good idea, and the only plans she's made that have been even slightly successful have been based on information about how Kilgrave's power works.
30th May '17 3:58:07 AM SorPepita
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*** As of Season 6, the idiot balls now seem to be superglued to the Winchester brothers' hands. Most of their wangst--and the survival of so many individuals--could have been prevented if not for their incredibly dumb decisions.

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*** As of Season 6, the idiot balls now seem to be superglued to the Winchester brothers' hands. Most of their wangst--and the survival deaths of so many individuals--could have been prevented if not for their incredibly dumb decisions.



** Every main character in the first two series has been directly responsible for at least one of the crises they've had to face - Gwen in "[[{{Recap/TorchwoodS1E2DayOne}} Day One]]", Ianto in "[[{{Recap/TorchwoodS1E4Cyberwoman}} Cyberwoman]]", Toshiko in "[[spoiler:[[{{Recap/TorchwoodS1E7GreeksBearingGifts}} Greeks Bearing Gifts]]" and Owen in "[[spoiler:[[{{Recap/TorchwoodS1E13EndOfDays}} End of Days]]]]". People also chalk Ianto's up to the fact that [[LoveMakesYouDumb his love for Lisa has blinded him to the fact that]], no, that isn't Lisa anymore (even though it looks like her)

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** Every main character in the first two series has been directly responsible for at least one of the crises they've had to face - Gwen in "[[{{Recap/TorchwoodS1E2DayOne}} Day One]]", Ianto in "[[{{Recap/TorchwoodS1E4Cyberwoman}} Cyberwoman]]", Toshiko in "[[spoiler:[[{{Recap/TorchwoodS1E7GreeksBearingGifts}} Greeks Bearing Gifts]]" Gifts]]]]" and Owen in "[[spoiler:[[{{Recap/TorchwoodS1E13EndOfDays}} End of Days]]]]". People also chalk Ianto's up to the fact that [[LoveMakesYouDumb his love for Lisa has blinded him to the fact that]], no, that isn't Lisa anymore (even though it looks like her)
30th May '17 3:54:36 AM SorPepita
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** And then Dean in "[[Recap/SupernaturalS05E12SwapMeat Swap Meat]]". They live in a world full of demons and shape-shifters (granted, the tattoos block out the demons) and [[spoiler:have angels hounding them to say yes to being possessed by Lucifer, in Sam's case]], and yet Dean goes almost the entire episode without realizing that ''[[spoiler: Sam is not Sam]].'' Particularly glaring when Sam noticed Dean wasn't Dean in "Skin" ''immediately'' from a miniscule hint.

to:

** And then Dean in "[[Recap/SupernaturalS05E12SwapMeat Swap Meat]]". They live in a world full of demons and shape-shifters (granted, the tattoos block out the demons) and [[spoiler:have angels hounding them to say yes to being possessed by Lucifer, in Sam's case]], and yet Dean goes almost the entire episode without realizing that ''[[spoiler: Sam is not Sam]].'' Particularly glaring when Sam noticed Dean wasn't Dean in "Skin" ''immediately'' from a miniscule minuscule hint.
30th May '17 3:41:40 AM SorPepita
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** The Xindi believe that humans are going to destroy their people in the future, so they build a PlanetBuster to destroy Earth before that happens. They've got their working prototype, and decide to give it its first test run. Not by using it on some uninhabited planet, but by attacking Earth. Who were never aware that the Xindi existed, or that they were planning on destroying the planet.

to:

** The Xindi believe that humans are going to destroy their people in the future, so they build a PlanetBuster Planet Buster to destroy Earth before that happens. They've got their working prototype, and decide to give it its first test run. Not by using it on some uninhabited planet, but by attacking Earth. Who were never aware that the Xindi existed, or that they were planning on destroying the planet.
30th May '17 3:40:05 AM SorPepita
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* ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'': Sarah Jane Smith in the story "[[Recap/TheSarahJaneAdventuresS2E9E10TheTemptationOfSarahJaneSmith The Temptation of Sarah Jane Smith]]", and her temptation to stop her parents' death, with numerous lampshade hangings. Thankfully, she's a good actor, and it's built up.

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* ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'': Sarah Jane Smith in the story "[[Recap/TheSarahJaneAdventuresS2E9E10TheTemptationOfSarahJaneSmith The Temptation of Sarah Jane Smith]]", and her temptation to stop her parents' death, with numerous lampshade hangings. Thankfully, she's a good actor, actress, and it's built up.
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