History IdiotBall / LiveActionTV

26th Mar '17 9:58:58 AM nombretomado
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* ''NUMB3RS'': The entire FBI hauls around an idiot ball the size of the shop. While for the sake of the plot [[WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief it's all right]] that every case they meet requires advanced math to solve, it does not explain why the FBI is incapable of any police work. One of the more outrageous example concerns a fugitive whom the FBI has been after for months. They know the man is on the run, but has not left his home county. Even with that they still cannot find him, but even worse is the fact that the show's resident math genius uses advanced math to reveal to the FBI that the fugitive ''is regularly stopping at his old home to visit his wife''. Indeed, at no point in those long months has it ever occurred to any of the FBI's agents that the fugitive who's staying in his home county may be contacting his loved ones and that they could just catch him by putting up surveillance on the man's wife. The whole show is like this, featuring FBI agents whose only qualifications are that they are damn good at kicking down doors while shouting for people to drop their weapons.
* ''TheOffice'': In season 6, Jim takes the Idiot Ball and runs with it. Jim is often the voice of reason, or at least the one able to point out when someone is being foolish. However, when [[spoiler: he accepts a management job]] he suddenly becomes irrational and does stupid things like [[spoiler: sharing management responsibilities with Michael]] and [[spoiler: giving an unfair raise to the sales staff.]] Why he suddenly becomes an idiot after six years of relative sanity is unclear.

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* ''NUMB3RS'': ''{{Series/Numb3rs}}'': The entire FBI hauls around an idiot ball the size of the shop. While for the sake of the plot [[WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief it's all right]] that every case they meet requires advanced math to solve, it does not explain why the FBI is incapable of any police work. One of the more outrageous example concerns a fugitive whom the FBI has been after for months. They know the man is on the run, but has not left his home county. Even with that they still cannot find him, but even worse is the fact that the show's resident math genius uses advanced math to reveal to the FBI that the fugitive ''is regularly stopping at his old home to visit his wife''. Indeed, at no point in those long months has it ever occurred to any of the FBI's agents that the fugitive who's staying in his home county may be contacting his loved ones and that they could just catch him by putting up surveillance on the man's wife. The whole show is like this, featuring FBI agents whose only qualifications are that they are damn good at kicking down doors while shouting for people to drop their weapons.
* ''TheOffice'': ''Series/TheOfficeUS'': In season 6, Jim takes the Idiot Ball and runs with it. Jim is often the voice of reason, or at least the one able to point out when someone is being foolish. However, when [[spoiler: he accepts a management job]] he suddenly becomes irrational and does stupid things like [[spoiler: sharing management responsibilities with Michael]] and [[spoiler: giving an unfair raise to the sales staff.]] Why he suddenly becomes an idiot after six years of relative sanity is unclear.
19th Mar '17 7:33:57 PM andypoe
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*** She DID recognize this, and she DID voice her concerns to the bridge crew. Captain Picard pooh-poohed her concerns, saying that he trusts Data implicitly, suggesting that in his mind the biggest risk was that Lore would lure Data to the dark side rather than the more reasonable risk of him impersonating Data. Lore does impersonate Data--badly--and only Wesley recognizes this. Hate Wesley if you want, but he does deserve the credit for saving the ship this time.
15th Mar '17 6:43:37 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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** Tom Zarek and Lieutenant Gaeta also get this during their attempted coup. So, they are in control of ''Galactica's'' CIC, have Admiral Adama and the humanoid Cylons in custody, but Lee and Starbuck are still at large, there are unsecured/unguarded areas of the ship, and Laura Roslin is on the Rebel Basestar (which might be beat up, but still has its weapons). So, what do they do instead of consolidating their hold on ''Galactica'' and the fleet? They spend two hours putting Adama on trial for "betraying humanity and providing aid to the enemy", taking a break to [[MoralEventHorizon murder the entire Quorum of Twelve]]. At least Zarek was genre savvy enough to know that Adama was a liability as long as he was alive. Gaeta was the one who pushed to have him stand trial.

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** Tom Zarek and Lieutenant Gaeta also get this during their attempted coup. So, they are in control of ''Galactica's'' CIC, have Admiral Adama and the humanoid Cylons in custody, but Lee and Starbuck are still at large, there are unsecured/unguarded areas of the ship, and Laura Roslin is on the Rebel Basestar (which might be beat up, but still has its weapons). So, what do they do instead of consolidating their hold on ''Galactica'' and the fleet? They spend two hours putting Adama on trial for "betraying humanity and providing aid to the enemy", taking a break to [[MoralEventHorizon murder the entire Quorum of Twelve]]. At least Zarek was genre savvy enough to know knew that Adama was a liability as long as he was alive. Gaeta was the one who pushed to have him stand trial.



** After the first season, Blackadder [[GrowingTheBeard got a major upgrade]] and became the snarky, GenreSavvy OnlySaneMan that everyone knows and loves. This didn't stop him being handed a major IdiotBall in the Series 2 episode "Bells", where he cannot figure out that "Bob", his manservant, is really a girl. (She doesn't make any effort to disguise her face or voice -- it is obvious to every viewer from the moment Bob appears onscreen.) They have a rather sweet courtship anyway -- which ''in itself'' was an OutOfCharacterMoment for him.

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** After the first season, Blackadder [[GrowingTheBeard got a major upgrade]] and became the snarky, GenreSavvy snarky OnlySaneMan that everyone knows and loves. This didn't stop him being handed a major IdiotBall in the Series 2 episode "Bells", where he cannot figure out that "Bob", his manservant, is really a girl. (She doesn't make any effort to disguise her face or voice -- it is obvious to every viewer from the moment Bob appears onscreen.) They have a rather sweet courtship anyway -- which ''in itself'' was an OutOfCharacterMoment for him.



** The companions are regular recipients of the Idiot Ball, even if by that point they're shown to be relatively intelligent and GenreSavvy people.

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** The companions are regular recipients of the Idiot Ball, even if by that point they're shown to be relatively intelligent and GenreSavvy people.



** Gwaine and Guinevere had a moment of brilliance immediately followed by a moment of incompetence in the series finale. In an unexpectedly GenreSavvy move for the good guys, they manage to figure out that Gwaine's new crush is actually a spy working for Morgana. They [[FeedTheMole give her false information about the whereabouts of King Arthur]], and then arrest her once she's sent it to Morgana. Then it occurs to them that they have a golden opportunity to strike at Morgana when she attempts to follow up on the false lead. But rather than sending a few hundred men to deal with her, Gwaine decides to go after her alone, taking only one other knight (Percival) with him to battle a known sorceress and Camelot's most dangerous foe. This, of course, backfires, as Morgana easily defeats the two men, uses magic to force Arthur's true location out of them, and then [[spoiler: kills Gwaine]].

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** Gwaine and Guinevere had a moment of brilliance immediately followed by a moment of incompetence in the series finale. In an unexpectedly GenreSavvy move for the The good guys, they guys manage to figure out that Gwaine's new crush is actually a spy working for Morgana. They [[FeedTheMole give her false information about the whereabouts of King Arthur]], and then arrest her once she's sent it to Morgana. Then it occurs to them that they have a golden opportunity to strike at Morgana when she attempts to follow up on the false lead. But rather than sending a few hundred men to deal with her, Gwaine decides to go after her alone, taking only one other knight (Percival) with him to battle a known sorceress and Camelot's most dangerous foe. This, of course, backfires, as Morgana easily defeats the two men, uses magic to force Arthur's true location out of them, and then [[spoiler: kills Gwaine]].



* ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'': Sarah Jane Smith in the story ''The Temptation of Sarah Jane'', and her temptation to stop her parents' death, with numerous lampshade hangings. Thankfully, she's a good actor, and it's built up (she is also GenreSavvy enough to know how screwed she is).

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* ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'': Sarah Jane Smith in the story ''The Temptation of Sarah Jane'', and her temptation to stop her parents' death, with numerous lampshade hangings. Thankfully, she's a good actor, and it's built up (she is also GenreSavvy enough to know how screwed she is).up.
9th Mar '17 2:47:41 PM skidoo23
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** "Last Christmas" has a part where Clara is concerned about an apparently empty room, calls "Doctor?" and then heads into the room without pausing. Of course she gets attacked. This is a standard companion manoeuvre and wouldn't be notable had "Cold War" not gone out of its way to establish that Clara is the companion who ''doesn't'' wonder off.

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** "Last Christmas" has a part where Clara is concerned about an apparently empty room, calls "Doctor?" and then heads into the room without pausing. Of course she gets attacked. This is a standard companion manoeuvre and wouldn't be notable had "Cold War" not gone out of its way to establish that Clara is the companion who ''doesn't'' wonder off. Possibly forgiven however, since the episode ultimately reveals that much of what we see is a [[spoiler: shared dream]].
*** However, less forgivable is the small ball Clara tosses around in "Before the Flood" when she communicates with the Doctor via Facetime and proceeds to describe the actions of his apparent [[spoiler: ghost]], even though she's using a ''video phone'' and could simply turn the camera towards the entity and let the Doctor process information a lot quicker.
** In a rather tragic example, the Doctor runs with the ball through the Series 9 finale when he basically forgets every lesson he's ever learned about fixed points in time and being careful when changing history in order to [[spoiler: undo Clara's death]].
22nd Feb '17 10:05:48 PM ShorinBJ
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** The episode "Unification part 2." So, the villainous Romulan Sela has revealed her plan to invade and occupy Vulcan, but it's critical that Starfleet not be warned ahead of time. Across from her is seated Captain Jean Luc Picard, Lt. Commander Data, and Ambassador fuckin' Spock-three of the smartest and most bad ass characters in all of Star Trek - whom she has managed to capture. So what does she do now? Leave the three of them in her office. Unattended. And with access to her computer. Geez, it's like she wasn't even trying.

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** "Q Who?" Q flings the Enterprise to an uncharted region of space, specifically as a response to the assertion by Picard and Riker that they can handle whatever they find. Knowing Guinan knows the region, they ask her about it. She warns them to get out while they still can. They decide it would be grand to poke around to satisfy their curiosity, which leads to meeting the Borg. Guinan then tells Picard that this enemy destroyed her home planet, and warns him, "Protect yourself, Captain, or they'll destroy you." Picard attempts to have a nice chat with one.
** The episode "Unification part 2." So, the villainous Romulan Sela has revealed her plan to invade and occupy Vulcan, but it's critical that Starfleet not be warned ahead of time. Across from her is seated Captain Jean Luc Picard, Lt. Commander Data, and Ambassador fuckin' Spock-three of the smartest and most bad ass badass characters in all of Star Trek - whom she has managed to capture. So what does she do now? Leave the three of them in her office. Unattended. And with access to her computer. Geez, it's like she wasn't even trying.
15th Feb '17 2:44:49 PM DaibhidC
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*** I.e. the time they thought a patient had a tick but couldn't find it any where on they visible body, so they tested for other things... never thinking that maybe the tick was on the non-visible part of the body like '''underneath his thick head of hair.'''
*** That's an episode of ''Scrubs''. In the episode of House where a patient had a tick, [[spoiler:it was hiding inside her labia. It's partially understandable why they couldn't find it; genital exams are rarely required when searching for ticks.]]
27th Jan '17 12:33:53 PM gb00393
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'':
** The Astapori sell their entire elite slave army to Dany in "And Now His Watch Is Ended". They were likely blinded by the prospect of dragons, who have a history of defeating substantial armies.
** Tormund insists on killing the horse trader they capture in "The Rains of Castamere" to maintain secrecy, but simply ignores Orell's report of shouting rather than send a few men to check out the mill where Bran and company are hiding.
** When selecting an opponent for Meereen's champion, Daenerys dismisses Jorah, Barristan, and Grey Worm because they are too valuable as commanders and advisors but conveniently forgets that Daario commands 2,000 sellswords who only supported her because Daario seized control of them.
** To protect Gilly from rape at the hands of Castle Black's garrison, Sam hides her in the very brothel where the men of the garrison ''go to have sex'' and puts her directly in the path of the known party of wildling marauders looking to kill a few black brothers there.
** Littlefinger's plan to elude justice for Lysa's murder is uncharacteristicly shaky so Sansa can prove her growing worth by helping him. In the books, he frames Lysa's despised singer Marillion (who suffered an adaptational tongue amputation in Season 1 and has a plan for reconciling with the lords of the Vale.
7th Jan '17 11:05:10 AM nombretomado
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* ''LazyTown'':

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* ''LazyTown'':''Series/LazyTown'':
10th Dec '16 8:21:22 AM Morgenthaler
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** Wesley's actions during the latter part of Season 3 seem to consist of one-half Deathgrip on the Idiot Ball and one-half {{badass}}, stirred to taste and left to simmer. Why he [[spoiler: a) first went to Holtz instead of, how you say, ''one of his own goddamned friends'' and b) beat the everliving crap out of Lorne when Lorne got a partial reading of him while Wesley was singing instead of continuing to sing, letting Lorne carry on reading him and figuring out just ''why'' Wesley was abducting Connor]] is an abiding mystery, the answers of which are known only to ''Angel'''s writers.

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** Wesley's actions during the latter part of Season 3 seem to consist of one-half Deathgrip on the Idiot Ball and one-half {{badass}}, badass, stirred to taste and left to simmer. Why he [[spoiler: a) first went to Holtz instead of, how you say, ''one of his own goddamned friends'' and b) beat the everliving crap out of Lorne when Lorne got a partial reading of him while Wesley was singing instead of continuing to sing, letting Lorne carry on reading him and figuring out just ''why'' Wesley was abducting Connor]] is an abiding mystery, the answers of which are known only to ''Angel'''s writers.
18th Oct '16 6:47:53 PM nombretomado
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* ''ThreesCompany'':

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* ''ThreesCompany'':''Series/ThreesCompany'':



** ''{{Friends}}'' even had a TakeThat against the show in one episode, when they're all watching the show and Chandler says something to the effect of "Oh, this is the episode of ''Three's Company'' where there's some sort of misunderstanding." Phoebe replies "Then I've already seen this one," and switches the TV off. On the other hand, if it's constantly in play it's not the idiot ball: they may be just idiots in general.

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** ''{{Friends}}'' ''Series/{{Friends}}'' even had a TakeThat against the show in one episode, when they're all watching the show and Chandler says something to the effect of "Oh, this is the episode of ''Three's Company'' where there's some sort of misunderstanding." Phoebe replies "Then I've already seen this one," and switches the TV off. On the other hand, if it's constantly in play it's not the idiot ball: they may be just idiots in general.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=IdiotBall.LiveActionTV