History Headscratchers / GameOfThrones

19th Jun '17 7:51:01 AM dustyham
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** Seriously? It's clearly a geometric compass Tyrion just picked up off the desk. In the DVDCommentary, Bryan Cogman even remarks on Peter Dinklage's skill at using random props because he totally ad-libbed picking it up and using it for a [[GroinAttack Freudian threat]].
25th May '17 11:48:06 PM 6
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*** Thank you. Onscreen, it still looks like a cross, but I found some screencaps that make it clear.
29th Apr '17 7:39:49 PM Fireblood
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** As a matter of fact, the show as a whole makes a great job at explaining how complicated power is in a feudal society. When the Seven Kingdoms were established, the Iron Throne was a force to be reckoned with and had absolute power because the royal family had dragons to directly deal with any inconvenience. Nowadays, the only true power boils down to field military power, and the King, while being the ruler, has very limited one only the Crownlands, with relatively little vassal houses, are under his direct rule, and only the Golden Cloaks report directly to him. The core of the military power lies in the hands of the Great Houses, and a good king should keep them on his side through politics. This is egregiously shown in the Battle of Blackwater, where [[spoiler:King's Landing only repels an attack from Stannis' troops thanks to the armies of the Westerlands and the Reach, headed by Houses Lannister and Tyrell respectively]]. True, the King can have any treacherous High Lord executed for treason, but good luck carrying the sentence out without any other High Lord backing him. And High Lords themselves are in a somewhat precarious position, as the core of their troops are under their Bannermen's direct control, so the High Lords have to keep on their good side, too: once the Starks lose all their prestige, [[spoiler:it gets pretty hard for Jon and Sansa to recruit troops for their attack on Winterfell, even though their vassals should be obliged to help them]]. As of Season 6, [[spoiler:due to disastrous politics, the Iron Throne has power only on paper, as pretty much all of the Great Houses and their respective armies are either seceding or actively revolting against the Crown. Even discounting the impending Targaryen invasion, Cersei's reign is precarious at best]]. So, in a nutshell, even though every House is sworn to the higher tier up to the Crown, the power of the one sitting on the Iron Throne is only as good as their ability to make allies out of the nobles in Westeros.[[/folder]]

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** As a matter of fact, the show as a whole makes a great job at explaining how complicated power is in a feudal society. When the Seven Kingdoms were established, the Iron Throne was a force to be reckoned with and had absolute power because the royal family had dragons to directly deal with any inconvenience. Nowadays, the only true power boils down to field military power, and the King, while being the ruler, has a very limited one only the Crownlands, with relatively little vassal houses, are under his direct rule, and only the Golden Gold Cloaks report directly to him. The core of the military power lies in the hands of the Great Houses, and a good king should keep them on his side through politics. This is egregiously shown in the Battle of Blackwater, where [[spoiler:King's Landing only repels an attack from Stannis' troops thanks to the armies of the Westerlands and the Reach, headed by Houses Lannister and Tyrell respectively]]. True, the King can have any treacherous High Lord executed for treason, but good luck carrying the sentence out without any other High Lord backing him. And High Lords themselves are in a somewhat precarious position, as the core of their troops are under their Bannermen's direct control, so the High Lords have to keep on their good side, too: once the Starks lose all their prestige, [[spoiler:it gets pretty hard for Jon and Sansa to recruit troops for their attack on Winterfell, even though their vassals should be obliged to help them]]. As of Season 6, [[spoiler:due to disastrous politics, the Iron Throne has power only on paper, as pretty much all of the Great Houses and their respective armies are either seceding or actively revolting against the Crown. Even discounting the impending Targaryen invasion, Cersei's reign is precarious at best]]. So, in a nutshell, even though every House is sworn to the higher tier up to the Crown, the power of the one sitting on the Iron Throne is only as good as their ability to make allies out of the nobles in Westeros.[[/folder]]
29th Apr '17 7:29:22 PM GothicNarcissus
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** As a matter of fact, the show as a whole makes a great job at explaining how complicated power is in a feudal society. The only true power boils down to military power, and the King, while being the ruler, has very limited one only the Crownlands, with relatively little vassal houses, are under his direct rule, and only the Golden Cloaks report directly to him. The core of the military power lies in the hand of the Great Houses, and a good king should keep them on his side through politics. This is egregiously shown in the Battle of Blackwater, where [[spoiler:King's Landing only repels an attack from Stannis' troops thanks to the armies of the Westerlands and the Reach, headed by Houses Lannister and Tyrell respectively]]. True, the King can have any treacherous High Lord executed for treason, but good luck carrying the sentence out without any other High Lord backing him. And High Lords themselves are in a somewhat precarious position, as the core of their troops are under their Bannermen's direct control, so the High Lords have to keep on their good side, too: once the Starks lose all their prestige, [[spoiler:it gets pretty hard for Jon and Sansa to recruit troops for their attack on Winterfell, even though their vassals should be obliged to help them]]. As of Season 6, [[spoiler:due to disastrous politics, the Iron Throne has power only on paper, as pretty much all of the Great Houses and their respective armies are either seceding or actively revolting against the Crown. Even discounting the impending Targaryen invasion, Cersei's reign is precarious at best]]. So, in a nutshell, even though every House is sworn to the higher tier up to the Crown, the power of the one sitting on the Iron Throne is only as good as their ability to make allies out of the nobles in Westeros.[[/folder]]

to:

** As a matter of fact, the show as a whole makes a great job at explaining how complicated power is in a feudal society. The When the Seven Kingdoms were established, the Iron Throne was a force to be reckoned with and had absolute power because the royal family had dragons to directly deal with any inconvenience. Nowadays, the only true power boils down to field military power, and the King, while being the ruler, has very limited one only the Crownlands, with relatively little vassal houses, are under his direct rule, and only the Golden Cloaks report directly to him. The core of the military power lies in the hand hands of the Great Houses, and a good king should keep them on his side through politics. This is egregiously shown in the Battle of Blackwater, where [[spoiler:King's Landing only repels an attack from Stannis' troops thanks to the armies of the Westerlands and the Reach, headed by Houses Lannister and Tyrell respectively]]. True, the King can have any treacherous High Lord executed for treason, but good luck carrying the sentence out without any other High Lord backing him. And High Lords themselves are in a somewhat precarious position, as the core of their troops are under their Bannermen's direct control, so the High Lords have to keep on their good side, too: once the Starks lose all their prestige, [[spoiler:it gets pretty hard for Jon and Sansa to recruit troops for their attack on Winterfell, even though their vassals should be obliged to help them]]. As of Season 6, [[spoiler:due to disastrous politics, the Iron Throne has power only on paper, as pretty much all of the Great Houses and their respective armies are either seceding or actively revolting against the Crown. Even discounting the impending Targaryen invasion, Cersei's reign is precarious at best]]. So, in a nutshell, even though every House is sworn to the higher tier up to the Crown, the power of the one sitting on the Iron Throne is only as good as their ability to make allies out of the nobles in Westeros.[[/folder]]
29th Apr '17 7:24:53 PM GothicNarcissus
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** As a matter of fact, the show as a whole makes a great job at explaining how complicated power is in a feudal society. The only true power boils down to military power, and the King, while being the ruler, has very limited one only the Crownlands, with relatively little vassal houses, are under his direct rule, and only the Golden Cloaks report directly to him. The core of the military power lies in the hand of the Great Houses, and a good king should keep them on his side through politics. This is egregiously shown in the Battle of Blackwater, where [[spoiler:King's Landing only repels an attack from Stannis' troops thanks to the armies of the Westerlands and the Reach, headed by Houses Lannister and Tyrell respectively]]. True, the King can have any treacherous High Lord executed for treason, but good luck carrying the sentence out without any other High Lord backing him. And High Lords themselves are in a somewhat precarious position, as the core of their troops are under their Bannermen's direct control, so the High Lords have to keep on their good side, too: once the Starks lose all their prestige, [[spoiler:it gets pretty hard for Jon and Sansa to recruit troops for their attack on Winterfell, even though their vassals should be obliged to help them]]. As of Season 6, [[spoiler:due to disastrous politics, the Iron Throne has power only on paper, as pretty much all of the Great Houses and their respective troops are either seceding or actively revolting against the Crown. Cerse's reign is precarious at best.]][[/folder]]

to:

** As a matter of fact, the show as a whole makes a great job at explaining how complicated power is in a feudal society. The only true power boils down to military power, and the King, while being the ruler, has very limited one only the Crownlands, with relatively little vassal houses, are under his direct rule, and only the Golden Cloaks report directly to him. The core of the military power lies in the hand of the Great Houses, and a good king should keep them on his side through politics. This is egregiously shown in the Battle of Blackwater, where [[spoiler:King's Landing only repels an attack from Stannis' troops thanks to the armies of the Westerlands and the Reach, headed by Houses Lannister and Tyrell respectively]]. True, the King can have any treacherous High Lord executed for treason, but good luck carrying the sentence out without any other High Lord backing him. And High Lords themselves are in a somewhat precarious position, as the core of their troops are under their Bannermen's direct control, so the High Lords have to keep on their good side, too: once the Starks lose all their prestige, [[spoiler:it gets pretty hard for Jon and Sansa to recruit troops for their attack on Winterfell, even though their vassals should be obliged to help them]]. As of Season 6, [[spoiler:due to disastrous politics, the Iron Throne has power only on paper, as pretty much all of the Great Houses and their respective troops armies are either seceding or actively revolting against the Crown. Cerse's Even discounting the impending Targaryen invasion, Cersei's reign is precarious at best.]][[/folder]]
best]]. So, in a nutshell, even though every House is sworn to the higher tier up to the Crown, the power of the one sitting on the Iron Throne is only as good as their ability to make allies out of the nobles in Westeros.[[/folder]]
29th Apr '17 7:21:12 PM GothicNarcissus
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** Bottom line is: first there are the peasants. Nobody cares about them. Peasants have to obey all Lords, even the most minor. Minor lords sometimes have castles of their own and their own banners, but they are all "bannermen" to one of the Seven Lords of the Seven Kingdoms (i.e.: Houses Baratheon, Lannister, Stark, Tyrell, Tully, Arryn and Martell) each of which has a reasonable big castle as their seat of power and some land that is under their command. But ALL of the Seven Lords have to obey the King on the Iron Throne, as well as the people that obey the Seven Lords. [[/folder]]

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** Bottom line is: first there are the peasants. Nobody cares about them. Peasants have to obey all Lords, even the most minor. Minor lords sometimes have castles of their own and their own banners, but they are all "bannermen" to one of the Seven Lords of the Seven Kingdoms (i.e.: Houses Baratheon, Lannister, Stark, Tyrell, Tully, Arryn and Martell) each of which has a reasonable big castle as their seat of power and some land that is under their command. But ALL of the Seven Lords have to obey the King on the Iron Throne, as well as the people that obey the Seven Lords. [[/folder]]\n
** As a matter of fact, the show as a whole makes a great job at explaining how complicated power is in a feudal society. The only true power boils down to military power, and the King, while being the ruler, has very limited one only the Crownlands, with relatively little vassal houses, are under his direct rule, and only the Golden Cloaks report directly to him. The core of the military power lies in the hand of the Great Houses, and a good king should keep them on his side through politics. This is egregiously shown in the Battle of Blackwater, where [[spoiler:King's Landing only repels an attack from Stannis' troops thanks to the armies of the Westerlands and the Reach, headed by Houses Lannister and Tyrell respectively]]. True, the King can have any treacherous High Lord executed for treason, but good luck carrying the sentence out without any other High Lord backing him. And High Lords themselves are in a somewhat precarious position, as the core of their troops are under their Bannermen's direct control, so the High Lords have to keep on their good side, too: once the Starks lose all their prestige, [[spoiler:it gets pretty hard for Jon and Sansa to recruit troops for their attack on Winterfell, even though their vassals should be obliged to help them]]. As of Season 6, [[spoiler:due to disastrous politics, the Iron Throne has power only on paper, as pretty much all of the Great Houses and their respective troops are either seceding or actively revolting against the Crown. Cerse's reign is precarious at best.]][[/folder]]
25th Apr '17 4:23:08 PM CockroachCharlie
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*** Actually, you can resign for just about any reason you want. Don't think there won't be repercussions however.
20th Apr '17 12:15:39 PM kundoo
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* It's not a T or a cross, it's a dragonfly. She wears this necklace in several scenes with different dressed.

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* ** It's not a T or a cross, it's a dragonfly. Look closely. She wears this necklace in several scenes with different dressed.dresses.
20th Apr '17 12:14:21 PM kundoo
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* It's not a T or a cross, it's a dragonfly. She wears this necklace in several scenes with different dressed.
20th Apr '17 11:54:39 AM kundoo
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** Queen is a word that exists in our world, while Khaleesi is made up. We don't call Cersei just Queen, because there are many other women both fictional and real that we associate with this title. Khaleesis however only exist whithin Got or ASOIAF universe and only one of them is a prominent character so that makes her ''the'' Khaleesi in the minds of the viewers/readers.

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** Queen is a word that exists in our world, while Khaleesi is made up. We don't call Cersei just Queen, because there are many other women both fictional and real that we associate with this title. Khaleesis however only exist whithin Got GOT or ASOIAF universe and only one of them is a prominent character so that makes her ''the'' Khaleesi in the minds of the viewers/readers.
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