History GuideDangIt / Action

21st Feb '17 5:19:44 AM crazyrabbits
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series is usually very good at averting these - even the more obscure puzzles can be answered by your support team in-game if you can't figure them out. However, have fun trying to assemble a full team of special characters on ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps''. They range from OneGameForThePriceOfTwo bonuses (beat the game with ''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid'', ''AC!D[[superscript:2]]'' or ''Metal Gear Solid Digital Graphic Novel'' on your memory card to automatically pick up Zero and have a chance at picking up Teliko and Venus) to SelfImposedChallenge rewards (beat the game very quickly, get high medical stat and max out technical stat/beat the BossRush minigame to pick up Cunningham, Ursula/Elisa and Gene) to obscenely obscure rescue tasks which require going to totally unrelated areas at times you are usually not given an indication for. Raikov is the easiest, but he does necessitate dumping a spy unit in an area which has no plot importance at a time when you have other things to concentrate on, and to add insult to injury, in order to get him, you have to partake in the mission ''immediately'' after getting the spy report or else [[PermanentlyMissableContent the mission is labelled as a failure with no chance of ever attempting it before you even attempt the mission]]. Para-Medic requires you to return to the radio mast after completing the malaria sidequest, and then to complete all your spy jobs (even ones begging for you to collect useless items!) until she appears in the hospital. Sigint is a little easier, but requires you to have picked up Para-Medic, and you have to avoid the enemy or else the resulting alert will cause him to take evasive maneuvers. Sokolov requires an insane fetch-quest: For starters, around the same time you unlock the Raikov recruiting mission, you get a spy message requesting that you investigate Metal Gear parts, which ends with a phone call from Ghost. Fortunately, unlike the Raikov mission, there is no deadline, so you can accomplish this after the Raikov mission. Afterwards, after beating Cunningham, you need to interrogate some soldiers at the silo entrance, and then interrogate some soldiers at the power substation, and finally backtrack to the silo entrance. Finally, you get a spy report that mentions someone locked in the computer room and you get Sokolov. Absolute queen of the pile, though, is EVA. To pick her up, you need to interrogate random enemies, ''open an unmarked locker'' in a completely unrelated area which has a number written inside, refrain from capturing certain enemies which it is beneficial to capture, contact her, clear out the airport, wait an in-game week, go to the cell in the basement area of the Western Wilderness, and then she'll join you. You need her to recruit Ocelot, and, to add insult to injury, she's not an especially good character in terms of stats.
** Similarly, the guide for ''MPO'' does mention that there are attack dogs at the Hospital Claymore Mission. What it ''doesn't'' tell you is that those dogs only appear during Extreme mode.
** An inversion also occurs in the same game: The strategy guide details a spy mission regarding the Maintenance crew members where you need to recruit some and interrogate an officer. The problem is, such a mission isn't even found in the game.
** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker'' has dozens of hidden weapons and unlockable levels with no mention in game as to how to find them. This includes its own final boss fight, and many of these were also neglected to be mentioned in the manual.
*** Just to give you an idea, unlocking the final boss requires you to complete at least the bare minimum for your HumongousMecha, which can only be acquired from parts that RandomlyDrops from boss fights; go through six separate missions to locate an escaped prisoner ([[spoiler: Zadornov]]) with each only being activated after completing a few Extra Ops missions. Then the spoiler-tagged prisoner escapes a ''seventh'' time, but because he [[spoiler: figured out a way to remove his tracking device]] he doesn't have a dedicated mission; the game expects you to ''go to the target practice area'' and collect him from there. Furthermore, the prisoner won't even show up in said area unless you're playing as Snake, despite the other search missions allowing you to play as other recruits, and the player at this point has probably grown accustomed to using a particular recruit with superior stats.
** The NES version of ''[[VideoGame/MetalGear1 Metal Gear]]'' turns the Basement floor shared by Buildings No. 1 and No. 2 into a separate building with two entrances, both preceded by a [[TheMaze maze area]]. The correct path in both mazes is "west, west, north, west", but none of your radio contacts or any of the prisoners you'll save will ever tell you this. At the time the game came out, there was no internet, so anyone who wanted to look up the solution would have to search for it in a video game magazine (such as Magazine/NintendoPower) and find out which issue featured the correct path.
** ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'' for the MSX requires the player to either know Morse code or use the manual on two occasions to input frequency numbers required to proceed with the game. Also, the first time Campbell changes his frequency, he tells you to look at the back of the game's packaging. Unfortunately, Konami forgot to put this frequency in some versions of ''Metal Gear Solid 3: Subsistence''.
** The original ''VideoGame/MetalGear'' has many rooms hidden behind unhinted breakable walls. The only way to find these is to punch the wall until you find a spot that sounds different.
** ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance'' doesn't really have much of these when it comes to normal gameplay, but getting some of the Data Storages and making one of the enemies with a collectable left arm to spawn are pretty obscure: one of the former requires you to stay on a damaged elevator as long as possible since the last enemy you kill drops it and it's basically impossible to avoid dying after you get it, while the latter requires you to accomplish 2 out of 3 current objectives without getting detected when stealth is strictly optional everywhere else.[[note]]It hurts a bit deeper if you screw up and kill the enemy with the data arm without cutting it of. Or damaging the arm itself.[[/note]]
22nd Dec '16 4:49:55 AM Gosicrystal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** A notorious example would be the Blue Ghosts and Gold Mice. They drop a large amount of treasure when captured, so you need them for higher ranks at the end. But after becoming {{Permanently Missable|Content}}, they can be refound during the Blackout near the end of the game. Problem: The game only tells you to capture the ghost Uncle Grimmly and turn on the switch in the Breaker Room, so there's no indication they appear. Problem 2: About half ONLY appear during the blackout. When it's over, those are [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost forever]]. Problem 3: Luigi is being chased by an infinite hoarde of bloodthirsty ghosts during the blackout, hence exploring the far off rooms many of these ghosts are found in is near suicidal.

to:

** A notorious example would be the Blue Ghosts and Gold Mice. They drop a large amount of treasure when captured, so you need them for higher ranks at the end. But after becoming {{Permanently Missable|Content}}, being [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost forever]], they can be refound during the Blackout near the end of the game. Problem: The game only tells you to capture the ghost Uncle Grimmly and turn on the switch in the Breaker Room, so there's no indication they appear. Problem 2: About half ONLY appear during the blackout. When it's over, those are [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost forever]]. Problem 3: Luigi is being chased by an infinite hoarde of bloodthirsty ghosts during the blackout, hence exploring the far off rooms many of these ghosts are found in is near suicidal.
22nd Dec '16 4:47:50 AM Gosicrystal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** To get the InfinityPlusOneSword, you need to pick up three statuettes which can each be found in different chapters -- [[LostForever no going back]] once the chapter is over -- and are hard to find. In at least one case you can end the chapter by accident before visiting the statuette room, and never know you missed anything until hours later when you find that you can't locate the third statuette and resort to checking Website/GameFAQs.

to:

** To get the InfinityPlusOneSword, you need to pick up three statuettes which can each be found in different chapters -- [[LostForever [[PermanentlyMissableContent no going back]] once the chapter is over -- and are hard to find. In at least one case you can end the chapter by accident before visiting the statuette room, and never know you missed anything until hours later when you find that you can't locate the third statuette and resort to checking Website/GameFAQs.



* The ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series is usually very good at averting these - even the more obscure puzzles can be answered by your support team in-game if you can't figure them out. However, have fun trying to assemble a full team of special characters on ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps''. They range from OneGameForThePriceOfTwo bonuses (beat the game with ''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid'', ''AC!D[[superscript:2]]'' or ''Metal Gear Solid Digital Graphic Novel'' on your memory card to automatically pick up Zero and have a chance at picking up Teliko and Venus) to SelfImposedChallenge rewards (beat the game very quickly, get high medical stat and max out technical stat/beat the BossRush minigame to pick up Cunningham, Ursula/Elisa and Gene) to obscenely obscure rescue tasks which require going to totally unrelated areas at times you are usually not given an indication for. Raikov is the easiest, but he does necessitate dumping a spy unit in an area which has no plot importance at a time when you have other things to concentrate on, and to add insult to injury, in order to get him, you have to partake in the mission ''immediately'' after getting the spy report or else [[LostForever the mission is labelled as a failure with no chance of ever attempting it before you even attempt the mission]]. Para-Medic requires you to return to the radio mast after completing the malaria sidequest, and then to complete all your spy jobs (even ones begging for you to collect useless items!) until she appears in the hospital. Sigint is a little easier, but requires you to have picked up Para-Medic, and you have to avoid the enemy or else the resulting alert will cause him to take evasive maneuvers. Sokolov requires an insane fetch-quest: For starters, around the same time you unlock the Raikov recruiting mission, you get a spy message requesting that you investigate Metal Gear parts, which ends with a phone call from Ghost. Fortunately, unlike the Raikov mission, there is no deadline, so you can accomplish this after the Raikov mission. Afterwards, after beating Cunningham, you need to interrogate some soldiers at the silo entrance, and then interrogate some soldiers at the power substation, and finally backtrack to the silo entrance. Finally, you get a spy report that mentions someone locked in the computer room and you get Sokolov. Absolute queen of the pile, though, is EVA. To pick her up, you need to interrogate random enemies, ''open an unmarked locker'' in a completely unrelated area which has a number written inside, refrain from capturing certain enemies which it is beneficial to capture, contact her, clear out the airport, wait an in-game week, go to the cell in the basement area of the Western Wilderness, and then she'll join you. You need her to recruit Ocelot, and, to add insult to injury, she's not an especially good character in terms of stats.

to:

* The ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series is usually very good at averting these - even the more obscure puzzles can be answered by your support team in-game if you can't figure them out. However, have fun trying to assemble a full team of special characters on ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPortableOps''. They range from OneGameForThePriceOfTwo bonuses (beat the game with ''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid'', ''AC!D[[superscript:2]]'' or ''Metal Gear Solid Digital Graphic Novel'' on your memory card to automatically pick up Zero and have a chance at picking up Teliko and Venus) to SelfImposedChallenge rewards (beat the game very quickly, get high medical stat and max out technical stat/beat the BossRush minigame to pick up Cunningham, Ursula/Elisa and Gene) to obscenely obscure rescue tasks which require going to totally unrelated areas at times you are usually not given an indication for. Raikov is the easiest, but he does necessitate dumping a spy unit in an area which has no plot importance at a time when you have other things to concentrate on, and to add insult to injury, in order to get him, you have to partake in the mission ''immediately'' after getting the spy report or else [[LostForever [[PermanentlyMissableContent the mission is labelled as a failure with no chance of ever attempting it before you even attempt the mission]]. Para-Medic requires you to return to the radio mast after completing the malaria sidequest, and then to complete all your spy jobs (even ones begging for you to collect useless items!) until she appears in the hospital. Sigint is a little easier, but requires you to have picked up Para-Medic, and you have to avoid the enemy or else the resulting alert will cause him to take evasive maneuvers. Sokolov requires an insane fetch-quest: For starters, around the same time you unlock the Raikov recruiting mission, you get a spy message requesting that you investigate Metal Gear parts, which ends with a phone call from Ghost. Fortunately, unlike the Raikov mission, there is no deadline, so you can accomplish this after the Raikov mission. Afterwards, after beating Cunningham, you need to interrogate some soldiers at the silo entrance, and then interrogate some soldiers at the power substation, and finally backtrack to the silo entrance. Finally, you get a spy report that mentions someone locked in the computer room and you get Sokolov. Absolute queen of the pile, though, is EVA. To pick her up, you need to interrogate random enemies, ''open an unmarked locker'' in a completely unrelated area which has a number written inside, refrain from capturing certain enemies which it is beneficial to capture, contact her, clear out the airport, wait an in-game week, go to the cell in the basement area of the Western Wilderness, and then she'll join you. You need her to recruit Ocelot, and, to add insult to injury, she's not an especially good character in terms of stats.



** A notorious example would be the Blue Ghosts and Gold Mice. They drop a large amount of treasure when captured, so you need them for higher ranks at the end. But after being LostForever, they can be refound during the Blackout near the end of the game. Problem: The game only tells you to capture the ghost Uncle Grimmly and turn on the switch in the Breaker Room, so there's no indication they appear. Problem 2: About half ONLY appear during the blackout. When it's over, those are LostForever. Problem 3: Luigi is being chased by an infinite hoarde of bloodthirsty ghosts during the blackout, hence exploring the far off rooms many of these ghosts are found in is near suicidal.

to:

** A notorious example would be the Blue Ghosts and Gold Mice. They drop a large amount of treasure when captured, so you need them for higher ranks at the end. But after being LostForever, becoming {{Permanently Missable|Content}}, they can be refound during the Blackout near the end of the game. Problem: The game only tells you to capture the ghost Uncle Grimmly and turn on the switch in the Breaker Room, so there's no indication they appear. Problem 2: About half ONLY appear during the blackout. When it's over, those are LostForever.[[PermanentlyMissableContent lost forever]]. Problem 3: Luigi is being chased by an infinite hoarde of bloodthirsty ghosts during the blackout, hence exploring the far off rooms many of these ghosts are found in is near suicidal.



* ''VideoGame/{{Okamiden}}'' is even worse with this, since several things needed for 100% completion can be LostForever. Of course, the game doesn't bother telling you which items are missable or where there's a PointOfNoReturn.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Okamiden}}'' is even worse with this, since several things needed for 100% completion can be LostForever.{{Permanently Missable|Content}}. Of course, the game doesn't bother telling you which items are missable or where there's a PointOfNoReturn.



** Similarly, in Lud's Gate, you must kill a certain guard before he sees you, otherwise one of the secrets will be LostForever. The High Security Compound has two switches that both open a secret room much earlier in the level; if you throw both switches, it permanently closes.

to:

** Similarly, in In Lud's Gate, you must kill a certain guard before he sees you, otherwise one of the secrets will be LostForever.[[PermanentlyMissableContent lost forever]]. The High Security Compound has two switches that both open a secret room much earlier in the level; if you throw both switches, it permanently closes.
10th Dec '16 5:03:49 PM Emreld3000
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** What monster would a player expect Merman Meat to drop from? It's not a merman.
11th Nov '16 6:28:39 AM Midna
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/TraumaCenter: ''Under The Knife'': While most of the S-rank requirements are fairly straightforward, there's one in particular that requires you to get the subject's vitals (HP, basically) below a certain number. This is rather counter-intuitive, as any player's instinct would be to keep the vitals ''as high'' as possible. Plus, in this particular operation, it takes a while for the vitals to get low enough because not much goes on.

to:

* ''VideoGame/TraumaCenter: ''Under Under The Knife'': While most of the S-rank requirements are fairly straightforward, there's one in particular that requires you to get the subject's vitals (HP, basically) below a certain number. This is rather counter-intuitive, as any player's instinct would be to keep the vitals ''as high'' as possible. Plus, in this particular operation, it takes a while for the vitals to get low enough because not much goes on.
11th Nov '16 6:28:20 AM Midna
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** While many of the numerous secret doors in can be found just by 'rapping on the walls' with your weapon or puzzling out visible switches, one in particular must be opened by passing through a tunnel in one animal form, and then switching to another animal form to backtrack. There is no practical reason to do this, no hint included in the course of play, and the opening door isn't even visible from the tunnel's end. What most people don't know is that there's actually an extra step in releasing that door. The reason most people don't know about it, is that most do it without even realizing it. When you (in all likelihood) pass through the breakable rock tunnel at the very beginning of the game in your human form, you're actually activating the first part. The secret to unlock the Jewel Sword room is to pass through the tunnel in every form except Mist. In other words, if someone were to go through the game without passing through that tunnel in human form, even most guides wouldn't be enough.

to:

*** While many of the numerous secret doors in the game can be found just by 'rapping on the walls' with your weapon or puzzling out visible switches, one in particular must be opened by passing through a tunnel in one animal form, and then switching to another animal form to backtrack. There is no practical reason to do this, no hint included in the course of play, and the opening door isn't even visible from the tunnel's end. What most people don't know is that there's actually an extra step in releasing that door. The reason most people don't know about it, is that most do it without even realizing it. When you (in all likelihood) pass through the breakable rock tunnel at the very beginning of the game in your human form, you're actually activating the first part. The secret to unlock the Jewel Sword room is to pass through the tunnel in every form except Mist. In other words, if someone were to go through the game without passing through that tunnel in human form, even most guides wouldn't be enough.



In order to figure these sorts of things out, you have to find "clues to Dracula's riddle" in the form of books hidden in walls and floors; most of them in the mansions, however there are a few of them outside as well, and some even in the shops!. Apparently, this is how Konami decided to make the game NintendoHard, rather than via the [[GoddamnBats brutal]] [[DemonicSpiders enemies]] and [[MalevolentArchitecture environments]] of its surrounding titles. Subscribers of Nintendo Power at the time were given the distinct advantage of actually knowing how to progress through the game. WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd laments this in [[http://youtube.com/watch?v=V4we8iFk-fY his debut video]].

to:

In order to figure these sorts of things out, you have to find "clues to Dracula's riddle" in the form of books hidden in walls and floors; most of them are in the mansions, however but there are a few of them outside as well, and some even in the shops!. shops! Apparently, this is how Konami decided to make the game NintendoHard, rather than via the [[GoddamnBats brutal]] [[DemonicSpiders enemies]] and [[MalevolentArchitecture environments]] of its surrounding titles. Subscribers of Nintendo Power at the time were given the distinct advantage of actually knowing how to progress through the game. WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd laments this in [[http://youtube.com/watch?v=V4we8iFk-fY his debut video]].



** Defeating a boss will reward you with a new sword that deals double damage to a boss somewhere else. Unfortunately, unlike VideoGame/MegaManClassic, each sword completely replaces the previous one, so [[SequenceBreaking breaking the sequence]] forces you to battle at least the one that you were ''supposed'' to fight next at maximum [[NintendoHard Nintendo-hardness]], that the GameBreaker ice ball wasn't always able to overcome. Each sword was color-coded to match the [[PlotCoupon jewel]] that the next boss in the chain had, but to know the color of the jewel, ''you had to be able to defeat the boss in the first place.''
** Two of the levels were TheMaze, and while Germany could be figured out with some work, the first staircase in Africa was a textbook example of [[Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda The Lost Hills]]. Anyone who didn't know to go down one floor, then up two, would most likely be fumbling through the loop until they died. Also, other staircases in the level proper would lead to a different screen entirely if you went back the way you came. Even worse, one of the pits would drop you back at the beginning of the level, including the staircase!
** The puzzle at the end of the game wasn't too bad if you had collected most of the clues in the levels. However, said clues (as well as most other power-ups) were concealed inside random wall or floor tiles, some of which required skilled use of your [[CoolPet pet falcon]] to get to. Without the clues, placing the jewels for the first time turned into TrialAndErrorGameplay in its purest form.

to:

** Defeating a boss will reward you with a new sword that deals double damage to a boss somewhere else. Unfortunately, unlike VideoGame/MegaManClassic, each sword completely replaces the previous one, so [[SequenceBreaking breaking the sequence]] forces you to battle at least the one that you were ''supposed'' to fight next at maximum [[NintendoHard Nintendo-hardness]], that the GameBreaker ice ball wasn't always able to overcome. Each sword was is color-coded to match the [[PlotCoupon jewel]] that the next boss in the chain had, but to know the color of the jewel, ''you had have to be able to defeat the boss in the first place.''
** Two of the levels were are TheMaze, and while Germany could can be figured out with some work, the first staircase in Africa was is a textbook example of [[Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda The Lost Hills]]. Anyone who didn't doesn't know to go down one floor, then up two, would will most likely be fumbling fumble through the loop until they died. die. Also, other staircases in the level proper would will lead to a different screen entirely if you went go back the way you came. Even worse, one of the pits would will drop you back at the beginning of the level, including the staircase!
** The puzzle at the end of the game wasn't isn't too bad if you had you've collected most of the clues in the levels. However, said clues (as well as most other power-ups) were are concealed inside random wall or floor tiles, some of which required require skilled use of your [[CoolPet pet falcon]] to get to. Without the clues, placing the jewels for the first time turned turns into TrialAndErrorGameplay in its purest form.



* In the first part of ''EternalDarkness'', you are required to choose the BigBad which you will fight against for the remainder of the game by choosing a representative gem. The game makes it obvious that this choice is important, but what the game ''doesn't'' tell you is that this also affects the ''difficulty'' of the game too. Oh, you picked the red one on your first play? Sure sucks to be you, then, because not only will you have to wait a long while to use the Restore Health spell, but Chattur'gha's monsters are the toughest in the game, and you'll have to face them a ''lot''.
** Don't forget that the strongest magicks can only be obtained in one specific chapter by activating a few certain (albeit very visible) switches, and then going through a hole in a wall by using a spell which is only needed to be used ''twice'' in the game. And which you don't get until some time after you've given up on figuring out what to do with that damn hole, so you have to think of going back and using the spell once you have it.
** Also, to get the InfinityPlusOneSword, you need to pick up three statuettes which can each be found in different chapters -- [[LostForever no going back]] once the chapter is over -- and are hard to find. In at least one case you can end the chapter by accident before visiting the statuette room, and never know you missed anything until hours later when you find that you can't locate the third statuette and resort to checking Website/GameFAQs.

to:

* In the first part of ''EternalDarkness'', ''VideoGame/EternalDarkness'':
** Early on,
you are required to choose the BigBad which you will fight against for the remainder of the game by choosing a representative gem. The game makes it obvious that this choice is important, but what the game ''doesn't'' tell you is that this also affects the ''difficulty'' of the game too.game. Oh, you picked the red one on your first play? Sure sucks to be you, then, because not only will you have to wait a long while to use the Restore Health spell, but Chattur'gha's monsters are the toughest in the game, and you'll have to face them a ''lot''.
** Don't forget that the The strongest magicks can only be obtained in one specific chapter by activating a few certain (albeit very visible) switches, and then going through a hole in a wall by using a spell which is only needed to be used ''twice'' in the game. And which you don't get until some time after you've given up on figuring out what to do with that damn hole, so you have to think of going back and using the spell once you have it.
** Also, to To get the InfinityPlusOneSword, you need to pick up three statuettes which can each be found in different chapters -- [[LostForever no going back]] once the chapter is over -- and are hard to find. In at least one case you can end the chapter by accident before visiting the statuette room, and never know you missed anything until hours later when you find that you can't locate the third statuette and resort to checking Website/GameFAQs.



* ''Comicbook/XMen'' for the Sega Genesis had a level in the Danger Room where a countdown starts and Professor X tells you to "reset the computer". At no point do they tell you how to go about doing this. The solution most people discovered? '''[[NoFourthWall Hit the reset button on your Sega Genesis]]''', which causes the last level to load. People playing on a Nomad would be [[{{Unwinnable}} screwed]] at this point, as that system had no reset button. There is another solution they could use, mind you, but it's even more obscure.

to:

* ''Comicbook/XMen'' for the Sega Genesis had has a level in the Danger Room where a countdown starts and Professor X tells you to "reset the computer". At no point do they tell you how to go about doing this. The solution most people discovered? '''[[NoFourthWall Hit the reset button on your Sega Genesis]]''', which causes the last level to load. People playing on a Nomad would be [[{{Unwinnable}} screwed]] at this point, as that system had no reset button. There is another solution they could use, mind you, but it's even more obscure.



* Koei's flagship ''Warriors'' (''VideoGame/SamuraiWarriors'', et al.) series, when it comes to unlocking characters, special mounts and final weapons. The requirements can be so [[NintendoHard very stringent]] that even when you have all the details on how to obtain the sought after character or weapon, multiple attempts are almost unavoidable. Particularly when you are saddled with multiple tasks such as: defeat Enemy X in the first 1:30 of the stage, then save remarkably weak Ally Y on the OTHER SIDE of the battlefield 3 minutes after defeating Enemy X, THEN allow Ally Z to die, but only AFTER they kill Enemy A just before cutscene F, and all this without riding a horse or using a Musou Attack. Once you've completed that litany of nonsense, chase down the spy captain before he can escape... did we mention he's only a brisk 20 second run away from the exit? And did we forget to mention that this must all be done on Hard or Chaos mode? And to top it all off, this must also be done on 1 player mode half of the time! The sad part is, this is ''not'' a hyperbole. Though conversely, some are tremendous aversions, such as in the case of Lu Bu, who unlocks his final weapon by killing 1000 enemies (which is pretty easy), in one iteration of the series.
** Slight correction: most of the characters/mounts/weapons ''can'' be unlocked in co-op mode, however, Player 1 has to be the one to actually fulfill the requirements (killing enemy X, getting 1000 [=KOs=], collect all the treasures, etc). It still helps to have a Player 2 around to defend your base and do the mundane stuff. Also, unlocking special mounts and weapons is technically optional, and you can play through all the stages just fine without them; they're basically bonus challenges.
** Earlier games, the only in game hint that such things even existed were blank spots [[InterfaceSpoiler in the UI...]]

to:

* Koei's flagship ''Warriors'' (''VideoGame/SamuraiWarriors'', et al.) series, when it comes to unlocking characters, special mounts and final weapons. The requirements can be so [[NintendoHard very stringent]] that even when you have all the details on how to obtain the sought after character or weapon, multiple attempts are almost unavoidable. Particularly when you are saddled with multiple tasks such as: defeat Enemy X in the first 1:30 of the stage, then save remarkably weak Ally Y on the OTHER SIDE of the battlefield 3 minutes after defeating Enemy X, THEN allow Ally Z to die, but only AFTER they kill Enemy A just before cutscene F, and all this without riding a horse or using a Musou Attack. Once you've completed that litany of nonsense, chase down the spy captain before he can escape... did we mention he's only a brisk 20 second run away from the exit? And did we forget to mention that this must all be done on Hard or Chaos mode? And to top it all off, this must also be done on 1 player mode half (Most of the time! characters/mounts/weapons ''can'' be unlocked in co-op mode, but Player 1 has to be the one to actually fulfill the requirements.) The sad part is, this is ''not'' a hyperbole. Though conversely, some are tremendous aversions, such as in the case of Lu Bu, who unlocks his final weapon by killing 1000 enemies (which is pretty easy), in one iteration of the series.
** Slight correction: most of the characters/mounts/weapons ''can'' be unlocked in co-op mode, however, Player 1 has to be the one to actually fulfill the requirements (killing enemy X, getting 1000 [=KOs=], collect all the treasures, etc). It still helps to have a Player 2 around to defend your base and do the mundane stuff. Also, unlocking special mounts and weapons is technically optional, and you can play through all the stages just fine without them; they're basically bonus challenges.
** Earlier
In earlier games, the only in game hint that such things even existed were blank spots [[InterfaceSpoiler in the UI...]]



** It's actually notable that the MassiveMultiplayerCrossover series ''VideoGame/WarriorsOrochi'' averts a lot of this. While the method to unlock each character's "personal item" is severely arcane, they have no actual gameplay effect (unlocking gallery art and backstory material). Finding characters' final weapons is as simple as playing 3-star levels on Hard or any level on Chaos (and waiting for it to [[RandomDrop randomly drop]]), most characters are unlocked simply by completing levels, and the requirements for the rest are often easy to figure out (don't let any messengers escape, carry out the ambush successfully, etc.). The sequel even gets rid of that last thing.
*** Actually, Personal Items enhance a character's R1 ability.

to:

** It's actually notable that the MassiveMultiplayerCrossover series ''VideoGame/WarriorsOrochi'' averts a lot of this. While the method to unlock each character's "personal item" is severely arcane, they have no actual gameplay effect (unlocking gallery art and backstory material). Finding characters' final weapons is as simple as playing 3-star levels on Hard or any level on Chaos (and waiting for it to [[RandomDrop randomly drop]]), most characters are unlocked simply by completing levels, and the requirements for the rest are often easy to figure out (don't let any messengers escape, carry out the ambush successfully, etc.). The sequel even gets rid of that last thing.
*** Actually, Personal Items enhance a
thing. That said, the method to unlock each character's "personal item", which enhances their R1 ability. ability as well as unlocking gallery art and backstory material, is severely arcane.



** On the plus side, however, there was an official release made with a guidebook in the place of a manual, which either stated or properly hinted how to deal with this and other puzzles.

to:

** On the plus side, however, there was an official release made with a guidebook in the place of a manual, which either stated states or properly hinted hints how to deal with this and other puzzles.



* [[NintendoHard Pretty much all]] of the original ''VideoGame/{{Metroid|1}}''. There are places where to continue the game, you have to bomb blocks which look ''absolutely no different'' to any other blocks in the surrounding area. Add the fact that the games corridors [[CopyAndPasteEnvironments look pretty much identical to each other]], and there's no map, it's a recipe for tearing your hair out.
** To be fair, there's a pattern to destroyable walls that is pretty easy to figure out. Once you realize that you must bomb secret blocks away and understand how often you will be asked to do so, the games tendency to reuse the same rooms and block patterns so many times makes finding the secret holes much, much easier.
** You also have to realize that a lot of what made the first one so difficult was that a lot of exploration tricks that have since gone on to be series staples were just getting started. Things like bombing through the floor to find secret passageways are expected in Metroid games today, but back then were much more of a novelty.
* ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'' is mostly okay up until the very end. In the tradition of ''Super Metroid'', you get a super-weapon to beat the final boss with. But the boss can still knock you down for tons of damage -- and if you fail to guess that ''mashing the up button makes you stand up faster'', you've had it.
** Another example from ''Fusion'' is the maze just before the Level 4 security room. You have to roll through an invisible hole in one wall... which is the only kind of secret your Power Bombs won't reveal. It's possible to get here without having encountered such holes before, so trying the walls may not even enter your mind.
*** There is a slight hint. A fish patrols the path with the hole and if you watch it, it'll swim through the hole. Too bad if you killed it without noticing that little detail.
** Also, the early-game section in Sector 2. It seems like a simple job to get the bombs, then the SA-X blocks you in and you spend four hours dropping bombs everywhere, looking for that one block in the floor. It's a nightmare on your first playthrough.
* Several examples in ''VideoGame/MetroidOtherM''.
** And, oh boy, the final boss when [[spoiler:MB summons a horde of some never-before-seen monsters to attack. They assault you constantly, you're locked in FPS mode, can't recover, and missiles seem to damage them but you can never seem to kill them. The solution: point the cursor at MB with a charge shot ready, who's standing motionless waaaay back in the background, and the battle ends.]] Many players finish the fight not even knowing how they did it, and died many times getting there.
** Just before that we have the fight with [[spoiler:a Metroid Queen. The final phase requires you to use a powerbomb while inside her stomach. The problem is you are never told in any way you are able to use powerbombs. This is made much worse by the fact that just a little bit earlier in the game, Adam is no longer authorizing your equipment but when Samus makes the decision to authorize something herself, the menu opens up like always to indicate the part is unlocked. This does not happen against the Metroid Queen.]]

to:

* [[NintendoHard Pretty much all]] of the original ''VideoGame/{{Metroid|1}}''. There are places where to continue the game, you have to bomb blocks which look ''absolutely no different'' to any other blocks in the surrounding area. Add the fact that the games game's corridors [[CopyAndPasteEnvironments look pretty much identical to each other]], and there's no map, it's and you get a recipe for tearing your hair out.
** To be fair, there's
out. here is a pattern to destroyable walls that is pretty easy to figure out. out, though. Once you realize that you must bomb secret blocks away and understand how often you will be asked to do so, the games game's tendency to reuse the same rooms and block patterns so many times makes finding the secret holes much, much easier.
** You also have to realize that
easier. On top of that, a lot of what made the first one so difficult was that a lot of exploration tricks that have since gone on to be series staples were just getting started. Things like bombing through the floor to find secret passageways are expected in Metroid games today, but back then were much more of a novelty.
* ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'' is mostly okay up until the very end. ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'':
**
In the tradition of ''Super Metroid'', you get a super-weapon to beat the final boss with. But the boss can still knock you down for tons of damage -- and if you fail to guess that ''mashing the up button makes you stand up faster'', you've had it.
** Another example from ''Fusion'' is the The maze just before the Level 4 security room. You have to roll through an invisible hole in one wall... which is the only kind of secret your Power Bombs won't reveal. It's possible to get here without having encountered such holes before, so trying the walls may not even enter your mind.
***
mind. There is a slight hint. A hint: a fish patrols the path with the hole and if you watch it, it'll swim through the hole. Too bad if you killed it without noticing that little detail.
** Also, the The early-game section in Sector 2. It seems like a simple job to get the bombs, then the SA-X blocks you in and you spend four hours dropping bombs everywhere, looking for that one block in the floor. It's a nightmare on your first playthrough.
* Several examples in ''VideoGame/MetroidOtherM''.
''VideoGame/MetroidOtherM'':
** And, oh Oh boy, the final boss when [[spoiler:MB summons a horde of some never-before-seen monsters to attack. They assault you constantly, you're locked in FPS first-person mode, can't recover, and missiles seem to damage them but you can never seem to kill them. The solution: point the cursor at MB with a charge shot ready, who's standing motionless waaaay back in the background, and the battle ends.]] Many players finish the fight not even knowing how they did it, and died many times getting there.
** Just before that we have the fight with [[spoiler:a Metroid Queen. The final phase requires you to use a powerbomb power bomb while inside her stomach. The problem is you are never told in any way you are able to use powerbombs.power bombs. This is made much worse by the fact that just a little bit earlier in the game, Adam is no longer authorizing your equipment but when Samus makes the decision to authorize something herself, the menu opens up like always to indicate the part is unlocked. This does not happen against the Metroid Queen.]]



* On the subject of ''VideoGame/{{Metroid}}'', ''[[VideoGame/MetroidZeroMission Zero Mission]]'' assumes you know how to shinespark from playing ''Super Metroid'' beforehand. or to have seen the game's commercials. Nowhere in the instruction manual is it mentioned ''how'' to do it, and the only thing in the ''official strategy guide'' that can help you is one picture in the part about getting the energy tank you need to carry a speed charge from a previous room for.
* ''VideoGame/MaximoGhostsToGlory'' has a boss, a giant pirate ghost, who could only be harmed by attacking while crouching. At that point in the game there hasn't been much use for crouching, and most players had probably forgotten that there even is a crouch button by the time they reach him.
* Using a guide in ''VideoGame/{{Siren}}'' is extremely helpful, to the point of nearly being a necessity. It has a branching storyline... but certain branches require you to do something on another level first to perform them -- and this isn't always obvious until it's too late. Or ever. And it doesn't give an indication of which stage unlocks the branch. If you're on a stage that unlocks the alternate path for another stage you have unlocked, it will give you a hint about what you have to do, but these are extremely vague, especially considering the sometimes downright bizarre requirements. For an {{egregious}} example, "Search the Yoshimura house and well" means... find a radio in the house, then put it in the bucket in the well, to lure a wandering shibito over to the well, so that when you kill it, it will fall into the well.
** And there's one point where a guide is essentially necessary; when lighting the lanterns with Reiko Takato to get the good ending. The in-game hint tells you to watch the praying shibito... but it starts the level praying at the ''last'' lantern in the sequence, so listening to the game will probably lead to you failing.

to:

* On the subject of ''VideoGame/{{Metroid}}'', ''[[VideoGame/MetroidZeroMission Zero Mission]]'' assumes you know how to shinespark from playing ''Super Metroid'' beforehand. beforehand, or to have having seen the game's commercials. Nowhere in the instruction manual is it mentioned ''how'' to do it, and the only thing in the ''official strategy guide'' that can help you is one picture in the part about getting the energy tank you need to carry a speed charge from a previous room for.
* ''VideoGame/MaximoGhostsToGlory'' has a boss, a giant pirate ghost, who could can only be harmed by attacking while crouching. At that point in the game there hasn't been much use for crouching, and most players had have probably forgotten that there even is a crouch button by the time they reach him.
* ''VideoGame/{{Siren}}'':
**
Using a guide in ''VideoGame/{{Siren}}'' is extremely helpful, to the point of nearly being a necessity. It The game has a branching storyline... but certain branches require you to do something on another level first to perform them -- and this isn't always obvious until it's too late. Or ever. And it doesn't give an indication of which stage unlocks the branch. If you're on a stage that unlocks the alternate path for another stage you have unlocked, it will give you a hint about what you have to do, but these are extremely vague, especially considering the sometimes downright bizarre requirements. For an {{egregious}} example, "Search the Yoshimura house and well" means... find a radio in the house, then put it in the bucket in the well, to lure a wandering shibito over to the well, so that when you kill it, it will fall into the well.
** And there's There's one point where a guide is essentially necessary; when lighting the lanterns with Reiko Takato to get the good ending. The in-game hint tells you to watch the praying shibito... but it starts the level praying at the ''last'' lantern in the sequence, so listening to the game will probably lead to you failing.



* A well-known Guide Dang It from ''VideoGame/BeyondGoodAndEvil'' is the location of the ''Ignis ingifera,'' "The Animal Everyone Misses." It's tucked away in a secret room whose location is not immediately obvious (it lies in the complete opposite of the direction you normally need to go). While it makes sense once you know where you're going, it can be a head-scratcher. The location of the "shy amoebas" in the Black Isle is similarly puzzling (until you realize that a bridge you lowered in fact had something hidden behind it.)

to:

* A well-known Guide Dang It from ''VideoGame/BeyondGoodAndEvil'' is the location of the ''VideoGame/BeyondGoodAndEvil'':
** The
''Ignis ingifera,'' or "The Animal Everyone Misses." It's tucked away in a secret room whose location is not immediately obvious (it lies in the complete opposite of the direction you normally need to go). While it makes sense once you know where you're going, it can be a head-scratcher. The location of the "shy amoebas" in the Black Isle is similarly puzzling (until you realize that a bridge you lowered in fact had something hidden behind it.)



* ''[[VideoGame/WarioMasterOfDisguise Wario: Master of Disguise]]''. In the final level you come across a room with a blue door, some green mushrooms, and a blue mushroom. To open the blue door you have to turn it green, by stepping on all of the green mushrooms. The blue mushroom is not required and only serves to hinder you, by un-pressing all of the green mushrooms. But there's nothing to suggest this is the case. (And since you don't have to press the green mushrooms in order, you just have to have them all pressed, there's no real reason for that blue mushroom to even be that.) Even worse is when you realize that one of the green mushrooms is invisible and you need Genius Wario to step on it. Again, there's nothing to suggest this would be the case. But hey, at least they only make you do that puzzle in the one room.
** Biggest problem is that the locked door is marked with a symbol that seemingly indicates what order to press the mushrooms in. After taking forever trying different variations of the order, giving up, consulting a guide, and pressing the hidden mushroom, what does the symbol mean? Nothing at all. Purely stylistic.
* ''VideoGame/AstroBoyOmegaFactor'' makes getting to the end of the game much harder than it has to be. To begin, if you skip the credits after playing through the first go-round of the game, you miss one of the entries in the Omega Factor and screw yourself out of a power-up. One key event requires you to jet straight up four times (impossible without having maxed out your Jets or a full EX stock) to reach a hidden character, with no hint that there's anything up there. Another one requires you to destroy a specific door on a background object that gives no indication it's anything other than scenery (in an area filled with rolling statues that kill in a single hit), and ''another'' one necessitates you going left at the very start of the stage and destroying a trash can - in a stage that scrolls right, thus giving you no apparent reason to go left. Having maxed-out Sensors only partially helps, because Astro Boy will declare he senses a hidden character but doesn't tell you anything about how to ''find'' them.
** Fantastic game, but the order you have to go through the levels is also very unintuitive. You have to backtrack to several levels, upon which certain plot elements will resolve themselves. Those who skip the cutscenes (with their minor clues) are screwed.

to:

* ''[[VideoGame/WarioMasterOfDisguise Wario: Master of Disguise]]''. In the final level you come across a room with a blue door, some green mushrooms, and a blue mushroom. To open the blue door you have to turn it green, by stepping on all of the green mushrooms. The blue mushroom is not required and only serves to hinder you, by un-pressing all of the green mushrooms. But there's nothing to suggest this is the case. (And since you don't have to press the green mushrooms in order, you just have to have them all pressed, there's no real reason for that blue mushroom to even be that.) Even worse is when you realize that one of the green mushrooms is invisible and you need Genius Wario to step on it. Again, there's nothing to suggest this would be the case. But hey, at least they only make you do that puzzle in the one room.
** Biggest
room. The biggest problem is that the locked door is marked with a symbol that seemingly indicates what order to press the mushrooms in. After taking forever trying different variations of the order, giving up, consulting a guide, and pressing the hidden mushroom, what does the symbol mean? Nothing at all. Purely stylistic.
* ''VideoGame/AstroBoyOmegaFactor'' makes getting to the end of the game much harder than it has to be. To begin, if be:
** If
you skip the credits after playing through the first go-round of the game, you miss one of the entries in the Omega Factor and screw yourself out of a power-up. One key event requires you to jet straight up four times (impossible without having maxed out your Jets or a full EX stock) to reach a hidden character, with no hint that there's anything up there. Another one requires you to destroy a specific door on a background object that gives no indication it's anything other than scenery (in an area filled with rolling statues that kill in a single hit), and ''another'' one necessitates you going left at the very start of the stage and destroying a trash can - in a stage that scrolls right, thus giving you no apparent reason to go left. Having maxed-out Sensors only partially helps, because Astro Boy will declare he senses a hidden character but doesn't tell you anything about how to ''find'' them.
** Fantastic game, but the The order you have to go through the levels is also very unintuitive. You have to backtrack to several levels, upon which certain plot elements will resolve themselves. Those who skip the cutscenes (with their minor clues) are screwed.



* Unlocking [[spoiler:Liu Kang]] in ''VideoGame/MortalKombatDeception'' is next to impossible to do accidentally. In order to unlock him, you must be in a specific realm, during a specific hour on a specific day of the month, behind a tent that you seemingly never have any other reason to go to after you beat Jade. Even worse, the game gives you no indication that it's even possible to go around the tent. His alternate outfit is unlocked in very similar fashion, but fortunately in its case it is there for longer than an hour, lies in a more obvious location, and appears once a week instead of once a month.
** Also Raiden - in order to unlock him, you have to beat him in a fight in Seido only available once a week after beating Konquest Mode. It's in plain sight, but you can have the fight before finishing the game and get a different reward. For that matter, for this fight he uses his Deadly Alliance model (as do many non-unlockable characters in Konquest), which is completely different from his in-game one.

to:

* ''VideoGame/MortalKombatDeception'':
**
Unlocking [[spoiler:Liu Kang]] in ''VideoGame/MortalKombatDeception'' is next to impossible to do accidentally. In order to unlock him, you must be in a specific realm, during a specific hour on a specific day of the month, behind a tent that you seemingly never have any other reason to go to after you beat Jade. Even worse, the game gives you no indication that it's even possible to go around the tent. His alternate outfit is unlocked in a very similar fashion, but fortunately in its case it is there for longer than an hour, lies in a more obvious location, and appears once a week instead of once a month.
** Also Raiden - in order to unlock him, you have to beat him in a fight in Seido only available once a week after beating Konquest Mode. It's in plain sight, but you can have the fight before finishing the game and get a different reward. For that matter, for this fight he uses his Deadly Alliance model (as do many non-unlockable characters in Konquest), which is completely different from his in-game one.



* The NES version of ''[[VideoGame/MetalGear1 Metal Gear]]'' turned the Basement floor shared by Buildings No. 1 and No. 2 into a separate building with two entrances, both preceded by a [[TheMaze maze area]]. The correct path in both mazes is "west, west, north, west", but none of your radio contacts or any of the prisoners you'll save will ever tell you this. At the time the game came out, there was no internet, so anyone who wanted to look up the solution would have to search for it in a video game magazine (such as Magazine/NintendoPower) and find out which issue featured the correct path.
** ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'' for the MSX required the player to either know Morse code or use the manual on two occasions to input frequency numbers required to proceed with the game. Also, the first time Campbell changes his frequency, he tells you to look at the back of the game's packaging. Unfortunately, Konami forgot to put this frequency in some versions of ''Metal Gear Solid 3: Subsistence''.
** The original ''VideoGame/MetalGear'' had many rooms hidden behind unhinted breakable walls. The only way to find these is to punch the wall until you find a spot that sounds different.

to:

* ** The NES version of ''[[VideoGame/MetalGear1 Metal Gear]]'' turned turns the Basement floor shared by Buildings No. 1 and No. 2 into a separate building with two entrances, both preceded by a [[TheMaze maze area]]. The correct path in both mazes is "west, west, north, west", but none of your radio contacts or any of the prisoners you'll save will ever tell you this. At the time the game came out, there was no internet, so anyone who wanted to look up the solution would have to search for it in a video game magazine (such as Magazine/NintendoPower) and find out which issue featured the correct path.
** ''VideoGame/MetalGear2SolidSnake'' for the MSX required requires the player to either know Morse code or use the manual on two occasions to input frequency numbers required to proceed with the game. Also, the first time Campbell changes his frequency, he tells you to look at the back of the game's packaging. Unfortunately, Konami forgot to put this frequency in some versions of ''Metal Gear Solid 3: Subsistence''.
** The original ''VideoGame/MetalGear'' had has many rooms hidden behind unhinted breakable walls. The only way to find these is to punch the wall until you find a spot that sounds different.



* The Commodore 64 tie-in ''Film/{{Batman}}'' (of the film which featured Jack Nicholson as the Joker) has one of these right at the end of the game. The final boss, the Joker, climbs a ladder leading to an escape craft as soon as you arrive on the roof. If you've seen the film, you'll know what to do - fire the Batrope. If you ''haven't'', consider the fact that no other enemy in the game is hurt by the Batrope and the game gives you two seconds to figure out what to do before he escapes.
** The UsefulNotes/AmstradCPC port at least solved it: Since you could kill the mooks with the Batrope too.
* ''VideoGame/LuigisMansion'' has a pretty notorious example of this, in the Blue Ghosts and Gold Mice. They drop a large amount of treasure when captured, so you need them for higher ranks at the end. But after being LostForever, they can be refound during the Blackout near the end of the game. Problem: The game only tells you to capture the ghost Uncle Grimmly and turn on the switch in the Breaker Room, so there's no indication they appear. Problem 2: About half ONLY appear during the blackout. When it's over, those are LostForever. Problem 3: Luigi is being chased by an infinite hoarde of blood thirsty ghosts during the blackout, hence exploring the far off rooms many of these ghosts are found in is near suicidal.
** Another thing. The coin values required for an A rank were [[DifficultyByRegion raised significantly]] from about 100 000 000 to about 150 000 000 Gold in the PAL version. Hence to get an A rank there, you have to beat the [[NewGamePlus Hidden Mansion]], which itself is more difficult in said region. Possible other problem is this not being in many guides, due to the versions used for those having a far less difficult Hidden Mansion mode.
** In ''VideoGame/LuigisMansionDarkMoon'', Professor E. Gadd never tells you that, when sucking up a ghost with the Poltergust 5000, you can press "B" to make Luigi jump in the air... which is a very useful trick to know, since it helps Luigi dodge attacks by other ghosts. You'll need to [[VideoGame/HotelMario check out the enclosed instruction booklet]] if you want to know about this.
** There are also many of the gem locations in Luigi's Mansion Dark Moon, which range from 'fairly well hidden' to 'absolutely insanely out of the way'. The best known example is in Gloomy Manor, where one gem is gotten by examining a suit of armour to make its helmet fall off, then shooting it at a certain painting. The helmet only falls off in two missions; the third one and the secret one. The painting might only even appear in those two as well. Good luck figuring that out!
* ''VideoGame/EccoTheDolphin'', multiple times. Especially notable is battling the Asterite in [[{{Prehistoria}} the past]] - there's a specific way to beat it, but the game never tells you what this is or even gives any hints.

to:

* The Commodore 64 tie-in ''Film/{{Batman}}'' (of the film which featured Jack Nicholson as the Joker) has one of these right at the end of the game. The final boss, the Joker, climbs a ladder leading to an escape craft as soon as you arrive on the roof. If you've seen the film, you'll know what to do - fire the Batrope. If you ''haven't'', consider the fact that no other enemy in the game is hurt by the Batrope and the game gives you two seconds to figure out what to do before he escapes.
**
escapes. The UsefulNotes/AmstradCPC port at least solved it: Since it, since you could kill the mooks with the Batrope too.
* ''VideoGame/LuigisMansion'' has a pretty ''VideoGame/LuigisMansion'':
** A
notorious example of this, in would be the Blue Ghosts and Gold Mice. They drop a large amount of treasure when captured, so you need them for higher ranks at the end. But after being LostForever, they can be refound during the Blackout near the end of the game. Problem: The game only tells you to capture the ghost Uncle Grimmly and turn on the switch in the Breaker Room, so there's no indication they appear. Problem 2: About half ONLY appear during the blackout. When it's over, those are LostForever. Problem 3: Luigi is being chased by an infinite hoarde of blood thirsty bloodthirsty ghosts during the blackout, hence exploring the far off rooms many of these ghosts are found in is near suicidal.
** Another thing. The coin values required for an A rank were [[DifficultyByRegion raised significantly]] from about 100 000 000 100,000,000 to about 150 000 000 150,000,000 Gold in the PAL version. Hence to get an A rank there, you have to beat the [[NewGamePlus Hidden Mansion]], which itself is more difficult in said region. Possible other problem is this not being This wasn't in many most guides, due to the versions used for those having a far less difficult Hidden Mansion mode.
* ''VideoGame/LuigisMansionDarkMoon'':
** In ''VideoGame/LuigisMansionDarkMoon'', Professor E. Gadd never tells you that, when sucking up a ghost with the Poltergust 5000, you can press "B" to make Luigi jump in the air... which is a very useful trick to know, since it helps Luigi dodge attacks by other ghosts. You'll need to [[VideoGame/HotelMario check out the enclosed instruction booklet]] book]] if you want to know about this.
** There are also many of the gem locations in Luigi's Mansion Dark Moon, locations, which range from 'fairly well hidden' to 'absolutely insanely out of the way'. The best known example is in Gloomy Manor, where one gem is gotten by examining a suit of armour to make its helmet fall off, then shooting it at a certain painting. The helmet only falls off in two missions; the third one and the secret one. The painting might only even appear in those two as well. Good luck figuring that out!
* ''VideoGame/EccoTheDolphin'', multiple times. times.
**
Especially notable is battling the Asterite in [[{{Prehistoria}} the past]] - there's a specific way to beat it, but the game never tells you what this is or even gives any hints.



* ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'': In the ''Battle for Bikini Bottom'' and ''TheMovie'' games, socks and treasure chests are extremely hard to find without a guide. These items are required for a full 100%. And in ''TheMovie'', the last treasure chests are found while Shell City is dead ahead. Who the HELL would guess that hitting TOASTERS that appear to be BACKGROUND OBJECTS will give you a treasure chest? Even worse that you need to hit three toasters, and two of them are very hard to find and require the sonic wave guitar. Luckily you don't need all treasure chests for 100% so its more of a BraggingRightsReward.
* The final boss of ''[[VideoGame/StarTrekEliteForce Star Trek Voyager: Elite Force]]'' manages to be both an example and subversion at the same time. The boss itself requires no special puzzles and you don't need AttackItsWeakPoint, you only need to shoot it. A lot. Unfortunately not only does it not react at all to being hit, it can also absorb more damage than you actually have ammo for, making it look like it actually ''is'' a GuideDangIt.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'': In the ''Battle for Bikini Bottom'' and ''TheMovie'' games, socks and treasure chests are extremely hard to find without a guide. These items are required for a full 100%. And in ''TheMovie'', the last treasure chests are found while Shell City is dead ahead. Who the HELL would guess that hitting TOASTERS that appear to be BACKGROUND OBJECTS will give you a treasure chest? Even worse that you need to hit three toasters, and two of them are very hard to find and require the sonic wave guitar. Luckily you don't need all treasure chests for 100% 100%, so its it's more of a BraggingRightsReward.
* The final boss of ''[[VideoGame/StarTrekEliteForce Star Trek Voyager: Elite Force]]'' manages to be both an example and subversion at the same time. The boss itself requires no special puzzles and you don't need AttackItsWeakPoint, you only need to shoot it. A lot. Unfortunately Unfortunately, not only does it not react at all to being hit, it can also absorb more damage than you actually have ammo for, making it look like it actually ''is'' a GuideDangIt.



* ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII'' had a side-mission to find and solve puzzles hidden throughout the game. While the first 95% of them are moderate to hard in difficulty, the last few puzzles are exceedingly difficult and obscure, replacing regular modern number systems with antiquated representations of numbers such as Morse code.
** You won't get very far without either a guide or you just know how to count outside of base ten.
** Good luck trying to find all the flags on your own in the first game. There are 100 in each city, as well as another 100 in the massive "Kingdom" area. They are often hidden very well and even visiting every area will likely leave many hidden. Even with a guide it can be a difficult and time consuming process.
*** Worse - there's [[BraggingRightsReward no reward]] for finding the flags other than an achievement on the UsefulNotes/XBox360.

to:

* ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII'' had ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII'':
** There's
a side-mission to find and solve puzzles hidden throughout the game. While the first 95% of them are moderate to hard in difficulty, the last few puzzles are exceedingly difficult and obscure, replacing regular modern number systems with antiquated representations of numbers such as Morse code.
**
code. You won't get very far without either a guide or you just know knowing how to count outside of base ten.
** Good luck trying to find all the flags on your own in the first game. There are 100 in each city, as well as another 100 in the massive "Kingdom" area. They are often hidden very well and even visiting every area will likely leave many hidden. Even with a guide it can be a difficult and time consuming process.
***
process. Worse - there's [[BraggingRightsReward no reward]] for finding the flags other than an achievement on the UsefulNotes/XBox360.



** The PC port by [=NovaLogic=] plays this trope as well- if you want to use any audio source other than the PC speaker, you need to start the game with a particular option switch. Most other games of that era uses a config.exe or setup.exe program to change sound device options. People who got the game second hand without the manual are stuck with PC speaker sound because the instructions to change the sound device are in the manual, and this was the era before the internet, so you can't just look stuff up online.



** The PC port by [=NovaLogic=] plays this trope as well- if you want to use any audio source other than the PC speaker, you need to start the game with a particular option switch. Most other games of that era uses a config.exe or setup.exe program to change sound device options. People who got the game second hand without the manual are stuck with PC speaker sound because the instructions to change the sound device are in the manual, and this was the era before the internet, so you can't just look stuff up online.



** The controls for getting full use out of some glaives and rosaries as subweapons (at least in the Wii version) aren't explained or hinted at anywhere in the game or manual (you need to use the c button, which isn't indicated for any combat use, in conjunction with the Z button, the "subweapon" button)

to:

** The controls for getting full use out of some glaives and rosaries as subweapons (at least in the Wii version) aren't explained or hinted at anywhere in the game or manual (you need to use the c button, which isn't indicated for any combat use, in conjunction with the Z button, the "subweapon" button)button).



** ''VideoGame/{{Okamiden}}'' is even worse with this, since several things needed for 100% completion can be LostForever. Of course, the game doesn't bother telling you which items are missible or where there's a PointOfNoReturn.

to:

** * ''VideoGame/{{Okamiden}}'' is even worse with this, since several things needed for 100% completion can be LostForever. Of course, the game doesn't bother telling you which items are missible missable or where there's a PointOfNoReturn.



** One of the most {{egregious}} examples was in the very first game. Most of the "secrets" were stashed in hard to spot but easy to reach areas, or were sitting obviously on ledges the route to which were difficult to see. Towards the end of the game, however, was one that was nigh on impossible to see because it was ''floating in the air on an invisible platform'' (the one and only single solitary invisible platform in the entire game), and required a massive leap of faith in exactly the right direction to reach.

to:

** One of the most {{egregious}} examples was is in the very first game. Most of the "secrets" were are stashed in hard to spot but easy to reach areas, or were are sitting obviously on ledges the route to which were difficult to see. Towards the end of the game, however, was is one that was that's nigh on impossible to see because it was it's ''floating in the air on an invisible platform'' (the one and only single solitary invisible platform in the entire game), and required requires a massive leap of faith in exactly the right direction to reach.



*** Similarly, in Lud's Gate, you must kill a certain guard before he sees you, otherwise one of the secrets will be LostForever. The High Security Compound has two switches that both open a secret room much earlier in the level; if you throw both switches, it permanently closes.

to:

*** ** Similarly, in Lud's Gate, you must kill a certain guard before he sees you, otherwise one of the secrets will be LostForever. The High Security Compound has two switches that both open a secret room much earlier in the level; if you throw both switches, it permanently closes.



** And let's not forget ''VideoGame/Uncharted2AmongThieves'', where you can collect 100 artifacts plus an additional Strange Relic. Although the game counts this as artifact 101 of 100, it does not show up as a missed artifact during the chapter select screen, and it can be found in a level listed to have no artifacts, in a sewer down a manhole across the street from where Drake is making his way across some rooftops. You would have to jump down from the roof and go down an unobtrusive alleyway for no in-game reason to find the sewer holding this relic.
* ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity'' has several puzzles that rely on the player's knowledge that an electrified remote Batarang can knock out fuseboxes, (most notably, in a plot-specific instance when you're breaking into the Joker's Steel Mill for the second time). The only problem is that you can't throw those types of Batarangs by default - you have to electrify it with an outside source before hitting the fusebox with it. This is required for HundredPercentCompletion, but it isn't immediately noticeable unless you have a guide.

to:

** And let's not forget * In ''VideoGame/Uncharted2AmongThieves'', where you can collect 100 artifacts plus an additional Strange Relic. Although the game counts this as artifact 101 of 100, it does not show up as a missed artifact during the chapter select screen, and it can be found in a level listed to have no artifacts, in a sewer down a manhole across the street from where Drake is making his way across some rooftops. You would have to jump down from the roof and go down an unobtrusive alleyway for no in-game reason to find the sewer holding this relic.
* ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity'' has several ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity'':
** Several
puzzles that rely on the player's knowledge that an electrified remote Batarang can knock out fuseboxes, (most notably, in a plot-specific instance when you're breaking into the Joker's Steel Mill for the second time). The only problem is that you can't throw those types of Batarangs by default - you have to electrify it with an outside source before hitting the fusebox with it. This is required for HundredPercentCompletion, but it isn't immediately noticeable unless you have a guide.



** Along with finding the hidden briefcases for the UnlockableContent.
* At no point ever does ''VideoGame/SavantAscent'' even tell you that the orb you have to destroy in the (originally)final level can be [[spoiler:grabbed with the chain grab ability unlocked by collecting the sixth cd, only found in endless mode, and that it grants you the [[EleventhHourSuperpower Overdrive]] ability]] aside from possibly the one time intro scene.
* ''VideoGame/TraumaCenter'': ''Under The Knife'': While most of the S-rank requirements are fairly straightforward, there's one in particular that requires you to get the subject's vitals (HP, basically) below a certain number. This is rather counter-intuitive as any player's instinct would be to keep the vitals ''as high'' as possible. Plus, in this particular operation, it takes a while for the vitals to get low enough because not much goes on.

to:

** Along with finding the hidden briefcases for the UnlockableContent.
* At no point ever does ''VideoGame/SavantAscent'' even tell you that the orb you have to destroy in the (originally)final (originally) final level can be [[spoiler:grabbed with the chain grab ability unlocked by collecting the sixth cd, CD, only found in endless mode, and that it grants you the [[EleventhHourSuperpower Overdrive]] ability]] aside from possibly the one time intro scene.
* ''VideoGame/TraumaCenter'': ''VideoGame/TraumaCenter: ''Under The Knife'': While most of the S-rank requirements are fairly straightforward, there's one in particular that requires you to get the subject's vitals (HP, basically) below a certain number. This is rather counter-intuitive counter-intuitive, as any player's instinct would be to keep the vitals ''as high'' as possible. Plus, in this particular operation, it takes a while for the vitals to get low enough because not much goes on.
23rd Oct '16 1:05:14 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''VideoGame/WonderBoyInMonsterLand'', to get either of the special items near the end of the game, you have to complete a series of [[FetchQuest fetch quests]], which often involve hidden rooms which there are no in-game hints alluding to, for example, the first stop is the hidden shop in Baraboro, which is accessed by pushing Up in front of a mundane window. To rack up a large amount of gold, essential for getting the higher-level equipment, you need to use the undocumented technique of waggling the joystick in midair at gold coin locations. And the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Legendary Sword]] is hidden in an invisible room which there are absolutely no hints about (not even a ? in the door location). TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon is a [[TheMaze repeating hallway maze]] combined with a BossRush. The only way to find the right path other than painstaking TrialAndErrorGameplay and quarter-munching is to have the Bell obtained from the Guide Dang It fetch quest, or look up a GameFAQs (which didn't exist back in the day except maybe on some [=BBSes=]); there were no printed guides. And if you die here, [[NonstandardGameOver "There are no continues, my friend"]]. The SMS version, while less difficult enemy-wise, still had the Guide Dang Its, and no continues whatsoever.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/WonderBoyInMonsterLand'', to get either of the special items near the end of the game, you have to complete a series of [[FetchQuest fetch quests]], which often involve hidden rooms which there are no in-game hints alluding to, for example, the first stop is the hidden shop in Baraboro, which is accessed by pushing Up in front of a mundane window. To rack up a large amount of gold, essential for getting the higher-level equipment, you need to use the undocumented technique of waggling the joystick in midair at gold coin locations. And the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Legendary Sword]] is hidden in an invisible room which there are absolutely no hints about (not even a ? in the door location). TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon is a [[TheMaze repeating hallway maze]] combined with a BossRush. The only way to find the right path other than painstaking TrialAndErrorGameplay and quarter-munching is to have the Bell obtained from the Guide Dang It fetch quest, or look up a GameFAQs Website/GameFAQs (which didn't exist back in the day except maybe on some [=BBSes=]); there were no printed guides. And if you die here, [[NonstandardGameOver "There are no continues, my friend"]]. The SMS version, while less difficult enemy-wise, still had the Guide Dang Its, and no continues whatsoever.



** Also, to get the InfinityPlusOneSword, you need to pick up three statuettes which can each be found in different chapters -- [[LostForever no going back]] once the chapter is over -- and are hard to find. In at least one case you can end the chapter by accident before visiting the statuette room, and never know you missed anything until hours later when you find that you can't locate the third statuette and resort to checking GameFAQs.

to:

** Also, to get the InfinityPlusOneSword, you need to pick up three statuettes which can each be found in different chapters -- [[LostForever no going back]] once the chapter is over -- and are hard to find. In at least one case you can end the chapter by accident before visiting the statuette room, and never know you missed anything until hours later when you find that you can't locate the third statuette and resort to checking GameFAQs.Website/GameFAQs.
12th Sep '16 4:28:01 PM SquackSpencer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance'' doesn't really have much of these when it comes to normal gameplay, but getting some of the Data Storages and making one of the enemies with a collectable left arm to spawn are pretty obscure: one of the former requires you to stay on a damaged elevator as long as possible since the last enemy you kill drops it and it's basically impossible to avoid dying after you get it, while the latter requires you to accomplish 2 out of 3 current objectives without getting detected when stealth is strictly optional everywhere else.

to:

** ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance'' doesn't really have much of these when it comes to normal gameplay, but getting some of the Data Storages and making one of the enemies with a collectable left arm to spawn are pretty obscure: one of the former requires you to stay on a damaged elevator as long as possible since the last enemy you kill drops it and it's basically impossible to avoid dying after you get it, while the latter requires you to accomplish 2 out of 3 current objectives without getting detected when stealth is strictly optional everywhere else.[[note]]It hurts a bit deeper if you screw up and kill the enemy with the data arm without cutting it of. Or damaging the arm itself.[[/note]]
1st Aug '16 1:48:56 AM RAMChYLD
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** The PC port by [=NovaLogic=] plays this trope as well- if you want to use any audio source other than the PC speaker, you need to start the game with a particular option switch. Most other games of that era uses a config.exe or setup.exe program to change sound device options. People who got the game second hand without the manual are stuck with PC speaker sound because the instructions to change the sound device are in the manual, and this was the era before the internet, so you can't just look stuff up online.
29th Jun '16 5:53:03 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Worse - there's [[BraggingRightsReward no reward]] for finding the flags other than an achievement on the XBox 360.

to:

*** Worse - there's [[BraggingRightsReward no reward]] for finding the flags other than an achievement on the XBox 360.UsefulNotes/XBox360.
This list shows the last 10 events of 304. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=GuideDangIt.Action