History GuideDangIt / Action

1st Aug '16 1:48:56 AM RAMChYLD
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** The PC port by [=NovaLogic=] plays this trope as well- if you want to use any audio source other than the PC speaker, you need to start the game with a particular option switch. Most other games of that era uses a config.exe or setup.exe program to change sound device options. People who got the game second hand without the manual are stuck with PC speaker sound because the instructions to change the sound device are in the manual, and this was the era before the internet, so you can't just look stuff up online.
29th Jun '16 5:53:03 PM nombretomado
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*** Worse - there's [[BraggingRightsReward no reward]] for finding the flags other than an achievement on the XBox 360.

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*** Worse - there's [[BraggingRightsReward no reward]] for finding the flags other than an achievement on the XBox 360.UsefulNotes/XBox360.
19th May '16 5:52:33 PM Exusia
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* ''VideoGame/TraumaCenter'': ''Under The Knife'': While most of the S-rank requirements are fairly straightforward, there's one in particular that requires you to get the subject's vitals (HP, basically) below a certain number. This is rather counter-intuitive as any player's instinct would be to keep the vitals ''as high'' as possible, plus in this particular mission, it takes a while for the vitals to get low enough because not much goes on.

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* ''VideoGame/TraumaCenter'': ''Under The Knife'': While most of the S-rank requirements are fairly straightforward, there's one in particular that requires you to get the subject's vitals (HP, basically) below a certain number. This is rather counter-intuitive as any player's instinct would be to keep the vitals ''as high'' as possible, plus possible. Plus, in this particular mission, operation, it takes a while for the vitals to get low enough because not much goes on.
19th May '16 5:49:29 PM Exusia
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* ''VideoGame/TraumaCenter'': ''Under The Knife'': While most of the S-rank requirements are fairly straightforward, there's one in particular that requires you to get the subject's vitals (HP, basically) below a certain number. This is rather counter-intuitive as any player's instinct would be to keep the vitals ''as high'' as possible, plus in this particular mission, it's hard to get the vitals low.

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* ''VideoGame/TraumaCenter'': ''Under The Knife'': While most of the S-rank requirements are fairly straightforward, there's one in particular that requires you to get the subject's vitals (HP, basically) below a certain number. This is rather counter-intuitive as any player's instinct would be to keep the vitals ''as high'' as possible, plus in this particular mission, it's hard to get it takes a while for the vitals low.to get low enough because not much goes on.
19th May '16 2:35:12 PM Exusia
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* ''VideoGame/TraumaCenter'': ''Under The Knife'': While most of the S-rank requirements are fairly straightforward, there's one in particular that requires you to get the subject's vitals (HP, basically) below a certain number. This is rather counter-intuitive as any player's instinct would be to keep the vitals ''as high'' as possible, plus in this particular mission, it's hard to get the vitals low.
10th May '16 5:17:10 AM erforce
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* In the NES ''Film/{{Terminator}}'' game, to complete the Police Station level, you must counterintuitively toss a box into the middle of the large gap to create a platform. How did anyone figure this out in those days?

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* In the NES ''Film/{{Terminator}}'' ''VideoGame/TheTerminator'' game, to complete the Police Station level, you must counterintuitively toss a box into the middle of the large gap to create a platform. How did anyone figure this out in those days?
14th Apr '16 3:36:33 PM aye_amber
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** There are ROM cartridges to be collected in the ruins, none of which are hinted at in the in-game hints. A few of these are hidden inside random sections of blank wall. However, this game teaches you very early on that smacking random sections of wall is bad and will get you killed: the manual says so, an early hint says that "every place that looks like it has something good has a trap" (and there's a demonstration in that same room), and the early levels are ''full'' of walls and other background objects that will hurt you badly if you smack them. The conclusion is: to find every ROM, you...smack every section of wall you find and eat the damage. And that's just the [=ROMs=] hidden in walls. This game hates you.

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** There are ROM cartridges to be collected in the ruins, none of which are hinted at in the in-game hints. A few of these are hidden inside random sections of blank wall. However, this game teaches you very early on that smacking random sections of wall is bad and will get you killed: the manual says so, an early hint says that "every place that looks like it has something good has a trap" (and there's a demonstration in that same room), and the early levels are ''full'' of walls and other background objects that will hurt you badly if you smack them. The conclusion is: to find every ROM, you...smack Smack every section of wall you find and eat the damage. And that's just the [=ROMs=] hidden in walls. This game hates you.



*** The "wall that looks like you need to hit it to proceed but really just smites you when you hit it" thing is very prominent in the early areas... and then in the later areas, sometimes you actually will have to do it to proceed. To be fair, there are a lot of things that are logically and obviously dangerous to hit (statue of a goddess... big door with symbols all over it...), but sometimes you'll just be whipping away at walls or rocks and you'll get struck by lightning. The remake at least puts eyes in the background of the rooms where smacking random things will hurt you. [[spoiler:Of course, this introduces a new puzzle: One kind of block hurts you in every room you encounter it... except one room in the entire game that doesn't have an eye in it.]]

to:

*** The "wall that looks like you need to hit it to proceed but really just smites you when you hit it" thing is very prominent in the early areas... and then in the later areas, sometimes you actually will have to do it to proceed. To be fair, there are a lot of things that are logically and obviously dangerous to hit (statue of a goddess... big door with symbols all over it...), but sometimes you'll just be whipping away at walls or rocks and you'll get struck by lightning. The remake at least puts eyes in the background of the rooms where smacking random things will hurt you. [[spoiler:Of [[spoiler: Of course, this introduces a new puzzle: One kind of block hurts you in every room you encounter it... except one room in the entire game that doesn't have an eye in it.]]



** Most of the secrets in ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania 64}}'' require the player to locate insanely-placed invisible platforms that are usually exactly halfway between the nearest savepoints and / or right before the end of the level. There is ''never'' any indication of the platform's position, and one even has a gap deliberately placed right before the nearest visible platform to kill you on the way back.

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** Most of the secrets in ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania 64}}'' ''VideoGame/Castlevania64'' require the player to locate insanely-placed invisible platforms that are usually exactly halfway between the nearest savepoints and / or right before the end of the level. There is ''never'' any indication of the platform's position, and one even has a gap deliberately placed right before the nearest visible platform to kill you on the way back.



** Also, there's the Spur. To get it, you have to hold on to the Polar Star (a weapon that's pretty much useless after the [[ShiftingSandLand Sand Zone]]) for most of the game. Then, when you get back to Mimiga Village [[spoiler:after the Doctor has abducted the rest of the Mimigas]], you fly up to the first cave and take it back to the gunsmith you stole it from. To some people, it's self-evident that returning something you stole is a good idea. There is one hint for it, though: If you go back to the cave after swapping the Polar Star for another weapon, the Gunsmith says someone stole it, and it "wasn't even complete yet".

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** Also, there's the Spur. To get it, you have to hold on to the Polar Star (a weapon that's pretty much useless after the [[ShiftingSandLand Sand Zone]]) for most of the game. Then, when you get back to Mimiga Village [[spoiler:after [[spoiler: after the Doctor has abducted the rest of the Mimigas]], you fly up to the first cave and take it back to the gunsmith you stole it from. To some people, it's self-evident that returning something you stole is a good idea. There is one hint for it, though: If you go back to the cave after swapping the Polar Star for another weapon, the Gunsmith says someone stole it, and it "wasn't even complete yet".



* Getting a character's second ending in ''BushidoBlade'' requires that you run to the well, during the battle with the first opponent, and leap into it... and then do a NoDamageRun. It's not immediately obvious that you can even ''leave'' the starting screen, and the only map the game ever gives you of the castle all the fights take place around has no sign of any such well.

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* Getting a character's second ending in ''BushidoBlade'' ''VideoGame/BushidoBlade'' requires that you run to the well, during the battle with the first opponent, and leap into it... and then do a NoDamageRun. It's not immediately obvious that you can even ''leave'' the starting screen, and the only map the game ever gives you of the castle all the fights take place around has no sign of any such well.
4th Apr '16 6:34:40 PM Kecleon2
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* ''VideoGame/LaMulana''? More like [[FanNickname La Manual]]! ''La-Mulana'' tops the list in this trope: switches that only affect a distant room at the far end of the map, treasures that only appear when a particular enemy is defeated, secret walls that only open when hit with ''just'' the right weapon... several times... There's almost always a tablet explaining the puzzle, but good luck finding it.
** Depressingly, the worst instance is the climactic puzzle, which requires you to read several tablets scattered all over the game, and use the mantras that are written on them. Not too bad, given that you can find a reasonable hint towards their location if you're paying attention. However, what the game doesn't tell you is that said tablets don't appear until you're near the end of the game, AND each tablet only appears after using the previous mantra, AND you have to use the mantras in specific rooms, AND the only way to recognize the rooms is to chant the mantra and see if it works. There are tablets hinting at all of these, but they're rather unclear.
*** There is a way of figuring out which room each Mantra has to be chanted in, but the game gives you no hint about what that is. [[spoiler:Check how you'd have to move from the cross on the front side to the boss room, then go to where you'd be if you followed those same directions from the cross on the backside. However, if it would involve going off the map, wrap around to the other side.]]
** And then there are quite a few cases where there are no monuments to give out hints. For instance, an elevator platform takes you to a button in plain sight, but said platform also goes into the above screen for a split second, long enough for you to spot a treasure chest. What you may not spot in that same room is the button necessary to open it, with it being [[PixelHunt camouflaged by the background]] and all. The button itself can be hard to trigger without the proper weapon. To top it off, you have to perform a tricky set of jumps to even collect the item. What does it do? Let you damage a previously {{Nigh Invulnerab|ility}}le monster outside of the ruins. The last bit, thankfully, ''is'' explained.
** And how about the steps to unlocking the [[BrutalBonusLevel Hell Temple]]? One particular step requires you to [[spoiler:go to an area in the Inferno Cavern and drop down 20 screens of a bottomless pool of lava, then go back up to the surface, then go down 19 screens and hit the breakable wall on your right. The in-game hint that you are given for this step is completely irrelevant.]]
*** Less annoying in the remake as [[spoiler:you only have to go down 20 rooms once]]. However, it's not explained in the game at all.

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* ''VideoGame/LaMulana''? More like [[FanNickname La Manual]]! ''VideoGame/LaMulana'':
**
''La-Mulana'' tops the list in this trope: for cryptic puzzles: switches that only affect a distant room at the far end of the map, treasures that only appear when a particular enemy is defeated, secret walls that only open when hit with ''just'' the right weapon... several times... There's almost always a tablet explaining the puzzle, but good luck finding it.
** Depressingly, the worst instance is the climactic puzzle, which requires you to read several tablets scattered all over the game, and use the mantras that are written on them. Not too bad, given that you can find a reasonable hint towards their location if you're paying attention. However, what the game doesn't tell you is that said tablets don't appear until you're near the end of the game, AND each tablet only appears after using the previous mantra, AND you have to use the mantras in specific rooms, AND the only way to recognize the rooms is to chant the mantra and see if it works. There are tablets hinting at all of these, but they're rather unclear.
*** There
unclear. Furthermore, there is a way of figuring out which room each Mantra has to be chanted in, but the game gives you no hint about what that is. [[spoiler:Check how you'd have to move from the cross on the front side to the boss room, then go to where you'd be if you followed those same directions from the cross on the backside. However, if it would involve going off the map, wrap around to the other side.]]
** And then there There are quite a few cases where there are no monuments to give out hints. For instance, an elevator platform takes you to a button in plain sight, but said platform also goes into the above screen for a split second, long enough for you to spot a treasure chest. What you may not spot in that same room is the button necessary to open it, with it being [[PixelHunt camouflaged by the background]] and all. The button itself can be hard to trigger without the proper weapon. To top it off, you have to perform a tricky set of jumps to even collect the item. What does it do? Let you damage a previously {{Nigh Invulnerab|ility}}le monster outside of the ruins. The last bit, thankfully, ''is'' explained.
** And how about the The steps to unlocking the [[BrutalBonusLevel Hell Temple]]? Temple]] are incredibly unintuitive. One particular step requires you to [[spoiler:go to an area in the Inferno Cavern and drop down 20 screens of a bottomless pool of lava, then go back up to the surface, then go down 19 screens and hit the breakable wall on your right. The in-game hint that you are given for this step is completely irrelevant.]]
*** Less
]] The puzzle is less annoying in the remake as [[spoiler:you only have to go down 20 rooms once]]. However, it's not explained in the game at all.



*** How about the ROM combos? Most cartridges are useless and broken, but some of them have different effects when combined. Many are purely cosmetic or give minor advantages, but there are some that are almost vital (such as Antarctic Adventure + Comic Bakery [[note]]Allows you to warp to rear-side grail tablets[[/note]]) How do you find out? Equip the cartridges randomly until you hear the sound effect, then dick around aimlessly until you figure out what the hell it does.
*** The "wall that looks like you need to hit it to proceed but really just smites you when you hit it" thing is very prominent in the early areas... and then in the later areas, sometimes you actually will have to do it to proceed. To be fair, there are a lot of things that are logically and obviously dangerous to hit (statue of a goddess... big door with symbols all over it...), but sometimes you'll just be whipping away at walls or rocks and you'll get struck by lightning.
*** The remake at least puts eyes in the background of the rooms where smacking random things will hurt you. [[spoiler:Of course, this introduces a new puzzle: One kind of block hurts you in every room you encounter it... except one room in the entire game that doesn't have an eye in it.]]

to:

*** How about the ROM combos? Most cartridges are useless and broken, but some of them have different effects when combined. Many are purely cosmetic or give minor advantages, but there are some that are almost vital (such as Antarctic Adventure + Comic Bakery [[note]]Allows you to warp to rear-side grail tablets[[/note]]) How do you find out? Equip the cartridges randomly until you hear the sound effect, then dick around aimlessly until you figure out what the hell it does.
*** The "wall that looks like you need to hit it to proceed but really just smites you when you hit it" thing is very prominent in the early areas... and then in the later areas, sometimes you actually will have to do it to proceed. To be fair, there are a lot of things that are logically and obviously dangerous to hit (statue of a goddess... big door with symbols all over it...), but sometimes you'll just be whipping away at walls or rocks and you'll get struck by lightning.
***
lightning. The remake at least puts eyes in the background of the rooms where smacking random things will hurt you. [[spoiler:Of course, this introduces a new puzzle: One kind of block hurts you in every room you encounter it... except one room in the entire game that doesn't have an eye in it.]]



** In the Endless Corridor, you are required to 'walk the end year of the Aztec Fifth Age' in the second level. While the solution is in the manual, the rest of the puzzle is downright confusing. You have to light four of the twelve-some lanterns on that level in a very specific order. The lanterns are labeled with the numerical glyphs you see around the ruins, but ''nowhere'' are the values of the glyphs mentioned. (They also appear on gates and Key Seals, but even there they can be easily overlooked.) In addition, the puzzle is somewhat buggy; you can enter the correct solution all you want, but the game will only open the third level when it feels like you've wasted enough time.
*** There's a tablet in the Mausoleum of the Giants whose only point is to show what glyph corresponds with what number, if you think of actually scanning it both with and without the Glyph Scanner ROM and comparing the results. Making things worse is that the text on the tablet looks like it's useful for something, but is actually just gibberish.
* The two PuzzleBoss fights in ''VideoGame/SyphonFilter2''. In the first, you have to sneak up on Gregorov (who is really an impostor) and tase him, which players will find impossible unless you know the lights can be destroyed. The second, with the ImmuneToBullets [[TheMole traitor]] Chance, involves a gun that pushes him backwards, which seems insignificant at first. Who would figure it could be used to push him into the spinning tail rotor blades? Even worse, since his armor is shrapnel/explosion proof as well, players might think he would also be impervious to the tail rotor.
** To be fair about Gregorov, the solution is foreshadowed in the prior stage: While attempting to evade you throughout the chase in the park, he constantly shoots at you, notably aiming for your head most of the time. The one time he doesn't do this and takes body shots instead is when he shoots out the lights in an attempt to lose you, hinting at his inability to see in the dark.

to:

** In the Endless Corridor, you are required to 'walk the end year of the Aztec Fifth Age' in the second level. While the solution is in the manual, the rest of the puzzle is downright confusing. You have to light four of the twelve-some lanterns on that level in a very specific order. The lanterns are labeled with the numerical glyphs you see around the ruins, but ''nowhere'' are the values of the ruins. (The same glyphs mentioned. (They also appear on gates and Key Seals, but even there they can be easily overlooked.) In addition, the puzzle is somewhat buggy; you can enter the correct solution all you want, but the The game will only open the third level when it feels like you've wasted enough time.
*** There's
offers one hint: there's a tablet in the Mausoleum of the Giants whose only point is to show what glyph corresponds with what number, if you think of actually scanning it both with and without the Glyph Scanner ROM and comparing the results. Making things worse is that the text on the tablet looks like it's useful for something, but is actually just gibberish.
gibberish. Without knowing the values of the glyphs, it is downright impossible to brute force the answer. In addition, the puzzle is somewhat buggy; you can enter the correct solution all you want, but the game will only open the third level when it feels like you've wasted enough time.
* The two PuzzleBoss fights in ''VideoGame/SyphonFilter2''. In the first, you have to sneak up on Gregorov (who is really an impostor) and tase him, which players will find impossible unless you know the lights can be destroyed. The solution is foreshadowed in the prior stage: While attempting to evade you throughout the chase in the park, he constantly shoots at you, notably aiming for your head most of the time. The one time he doesn't do this and takes body shots instead is when he shoots out the lights in an attempt to lose you, hinting at his inability to see in the dark, but the fact that ''you'' are able to shoot them out is never mentioned. The second, with the ImmuneToBullets [[TheMole traitor]] Chance, involves a gun that pushes him backwards, which seems insignificant at first. Who would figure it could be used to push him into the spinning tail rotor blades? Even worse, since his armor is shrapnel/explosion proof as well, players might think he would also be impervious to the tail rotor.
** To be fair about Gregorov, the solution is foreshadowed in the prior stage: While attempting to evade you throughout the chase in the park, he constantly shoots at you, notably aiming for your head most of the time. The one time he doesn't do this and takes body shots instead is when he shoots out the lights in an attempt to lose you, hinting at his inability to see in the dark.
rotor.



* Another Guide Dang It arcade game (and an RPG arcade game to boot): ''VideoGame/WonderBoyInMonsterLand''. To get either of the special items near the end of the game, you have to complete a series of [[FetchQuest fetch quests]], which often involve hidden rooms which there are no in-game hints alluding to, for example, the first stop is the hidden shop in Baraboro, which is accessed by pushing Up in front of a mundane window. To rack up a large amount of gold, essential for getting the higher-level equipment, you need to use the undocumented technique of waggling the joystick in midair at gold coin locations. And the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Legendary Sword]] is hidden in an invisible room which there are absolutely no hints about (not even a ? in the door location). TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon is a [[TheMaze repeating hallway maze]] combined with a BossRush. The only way to find the right path other than painstaking TrialAndErrorGameplay and quarter-munching is to have the Bell obtained from the Guide Dang It fetch quest, or look up a GameFAQs (which didn't exist back in the day except maybe on some [=BBSes=]); there were no printed guides. And if you die here, [[NonstandardGameOver "There are no continues, my friend"]]. The SMS version, while less difficult enemy-wise, still had the Guide Dang Its, and no continues whatsoever.
* While many of the numerous secret doors in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight'' can be found just by 'rapping on the walls' with your weapon or puzzling out visible switches, one in particular must be opened by passing through a tunnel in one animal form, and then switching to another animal form to backtrack. There is no practical reason to do this, no hint included in the course of play, and the opening door isn't even visible from the tunnel's end.
** What most people don't know is that there's actually an extra step in releasing that door. The reason most people don't know about it, is that most do it without even realizing it. When you (in all likelihood) pass through the breakable rock tunnel at the very beginning of the game in your human form, you're actually activating the first part. The secret to unlock the Jewel Sword room is to pass through the tunnel in every form except Mist. In other words, if someone were to go through the game without passing through that tunnel in human form, even most guides wouldn't be enough.
** There's also the secret elevator to gain early access to the Jewel Knuckles (a powerful weapon for such an early stage of the game). You have to break a wall and stand still in the alcove you just opened for about 20 seconds.
** Similarly, ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaIISimonsQuest'' is filled with obstacles that are nigh-impossible to figure out just by playing the game itself. The in-game hints range from incomprehensible to outright lies, such as telling the player to hit a cliff with his head to make a hole, when the solution is to summon a tornado with a magic crystal. Or the man who tells you that the boatman "likes garlic", when you actually have to speak with him with Dracula's heart equipped (something you'll only gather from putting together two separate, highly cryptic pieces of info in {{Moon Logic|Puzzle}} fashion). \\

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* Another Guide Dang It arcade game (and an RPG arcade game In ''VideoGame/WonderBoyInMonsterLand'', to boot): ''VideoGame/WonderBoyInMonsterLand''. To get either of the special items near the end of the game, you have to complete a series of [[FetchQuest fetch quests]], which often involve hidden rooms which there are no in-game hints alluding to, for example, the first stop is the hidden shop in Baraboro, which is accessed by pushing Up in front of a mundane window. To rack up a large amount of gold, essential for getting the higher-level equipment, you need to use the undocumented technique of waggling the joystick in midair at gold coin locations. And the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Legendary Sword]] is hidden in an invisible room which there are absolutely no hints about (not even a ? in the door location). TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon is a [[TheMaze repeating hallway maze]] combined with a BossRush. The only way to find the right path other than painstaking TrialAndErrorGameplay and quarter-munching is to have the Bell obtained from the Guide Dang It fetch quest, or look up a GameFAQs (which didn't exist back in the day except maybe on some [=BBSes=]); there were no printed guides. And if you die here, [[NonstandardGameOver "There are no continues, my friend"]]. The SMS version, while less difficult enemy-wise, still had the Guide Dang Its, and no continues whatsoever.
* ''Franchise/Castlevania'':
** ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight'':
***
While many of the numerous secret doors in ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight'' can be found just by 'rapping on the walls' with your weapon or puzzling out visible switches, one in particular must be opened by passing through a tunnel in one animal form, and then switching to another animal form to backtrack. There is no practical reason to do this, no hint included in the course of play, and the opening door isn't even visible from the tunnel's end.
**
end. What most people don't know is that there's actually an extra step in releasing that door. The reason most people don't know about it, is that most do it without even realizing it. When you (in all likelihood) pass through the breakable rock tunnel at the very beginning of the game in your human form, you're actually activating the first part. The secret to unlock the Jewel Sword room is to pass through the tunnel in every form except Mist. In other words, if someone were to go through the game without passing through that tunnel in human form, even most guides wouldn't be enough.
** *** There's also the a secret elevator to gain early access to the Jewel Knuckles (a powerful weapon for such an early stage of the game). You have to break a wall and stand still in the alcove you just opened for about 20 seconds.
** Similarly, ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaIISimonsQuest'' is filled with obstacles that are nigh-impossible to figure out just by playing the game itself. The in-game hints range from incomprehensible to outright lies, such as telling the player to hit a cliff with his head to make a hole, when the solution is to summon a tornado with a magic crystal. Or the man who tells you that the boatman "likes garlic", when you actually have to speak with him with Dracula's heart equipped (something you'll only gather from putting together two separate, highly cryptic pieces of info in {{Moon Logic|Puzzle}} fashion). \\
2nd Feb '16 5:25:28 PM GrammarNavi
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* ''VideoGame/TheTowerOfDruaga'' is one of the most notorious examples of this trope, unusual in an ArcadeGame. The hero adventures through a 60 floor tower; each mazelike level contains a hidden treasure whose properties cannot be discerned until obtained. Some treasures are essential to beating the game, and failing to obtain them on, say, level 4 makes the game {{Unwinnable}}, though this fact may not be discovered until level 38. By contrast, some treasures are traps, and obtaining them makes the game {{Unwinnable}}, though again this may not be discovered until many levels later. There are even useful items that will be replaced with harmful ones unless you collect the item before it. And on some floors you can TryEverything to find the treasure, only to fail because it [[MissingSecret doesn't exist]].

to:

* ''VideoGame/TheTowerOfDruaga'' is one of the most notorious examples of this trope, unusual in an ArcadeGame.UsefulNotes/ArcadeGame. The hero adventures through a 60 floor tower; each mazelike level contains a hidden treasure whose properties cannot be discerned until obtained. Some treasures are essential to beating the game, and failing to obtain them on, say, level 4 makes the game {{Unwinnable}}, though this fact may not be discovered until level 38. By contrast, some treasures are traps, and obtaining them makes the game {{Unwinnable}}, though again this may not be discovered until many levels later. There are even useful items that will be replaced with harmful ones unless you collect the item before it. And on some floors you can TryEverything to find the treasure, only to fail because it [[MissingSecret doesn't exist]].
31st Jan '16 2:44:30 AM jormis29
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* The two PuzzleBoss fights in ''VideoGame/SyphonFilter 2''. In the first, you have to sneak up on Gregorov (who is really an impostor) and tase him, which players will find impossible unless you know the lights can be destroyed. The second, with the ImmuneToBullets [[TheMole traitor]] Chance, involves a gun that pushes him backwards, which seems insignificant at first. Who would figure it could be used to push him into the spinning tail rotor blades? Even worse, since his armor is shrapnel/explosion proof as well, players might think he would also be impervious to the tail rotor.

to:

* The two PuzzleBoss fights in ''VideoGame/SyphonFilter 2''.''VideoGame/SyphonFilter2''. In the first, you have to sneak up on Gregorov (who is really an impostor) and tase him, which players will find impossible unless you know the lights can be destroyed. The second, with the ImmuneToBullets [[TheMole traitor]] Chance, involves a gun that pushes him backwards, which seems insignificant at first. Who would figure it could be used to push him into the spinning tail rotor blades? Even worse, since his armor is shrapnel/explosion proof as well, players might think he would also be impervious to the tail rotor.
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