History GenreSavvy / Literature

12th Feb '16 7:06:12 AM crazysamaritan
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* Creator/TerryPratchett's Literature/{{Discworld}} features characters like this, thanks to the TheoryOfNarrativeCausality:
** Several of the witches, especially Granny Weatherwax, have a feel for "stories", and can use them to their own ends if they have to.
** Commander Sam Vimes of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch is when it comes to tropes of detective stories and police procedurals.
** Malicia from ''The Amazing Maurice And His Educated Rodents'' is either ''too'' GenreSavvy, or [[WrongGenreSavvy not savvy enough.]] She insists on ''always'' seeing things in terms of stories, ranging from fairy tales to KidDetective novels like ''Tom Swift'', ''The Hardy Boys'', and ''The Famous Five'' (she claims at one point that four kids and a dog is "the right number for an adventure"). Furthermore, she has trouble in coping with subversions and exceptions, and [[HeroicWannabe always makes herself out to be the main character of the "story"]].
** Rincewind the Wizzard [sic], meanwhile, is very much aware of FinaglesLaw and similar narrative conventions that keep his life interesting. He hates them.
** It's the whole basis of the plot in ''Discworld/WitchesAbroad''. The stories want to be told, whatever the effects on their players. Lily is arranging the city of Genua along the lines of these stories. The toymaker will be a jolly, red-faced man who whistles while he works ''if he knows what's good for him''. The servant girl will marry the prince, with the help of her fairy godmother, whoever has to get hurt along the way.
** The ''Discworld/GuardsGuards!'' novel, when Vimes has just confronted the hidden villain of the story. The villain, (using the title of the book) summons several mooks to take Vimes into custody. However, the mooks, despite Vimes having no weapons and just standing there, show extreme hesitation. When the villain demands an explanation, they indicate they know what happens in situations like this: the likelihood is that if they try to take Vimes into custody, he will kill them all by engaging in swashbuckling clichés such as performing somersaults or swinging off chandeliers (the villain points out, somewhat hysterically, that there ''are'' no chandeliers in the room at all). It takes Vimes' assurances that he will not do so and would not know how to do so if he tried before the mooks take him prisoner.
** Also inverted in Discworld with [[Discworld/GoingPostal Moist Von Lipwig]], who knows very well how things are supposed to go... and plays the part of the hero, because he knows that the innate genre savviness of the public will view him as a hero if he does. As a con artist, taking advantage of what people expect to see is his major skill.
** ''Discworld/ThiefOfTime'' has a running gag about Lu Tze's "Rule One": "[[MuggingTheMonster Never act incautiously when confronting]] [[OldMaster a bald, wrinkly, little old man who smiles all the time]]."
** Cohen the Barbarian and his Silver Horde in ''Discworld/TheLastHero'' are confronted by Captain Carrot. They're about to fight him when they realize that's there's only one of him and nine of them, and that he's trying to save the world. All experienced heroes who have spent decades winning against incredible odds, they see that the fight can only go one way and back down. This is pure genius considering that the Horde took advantage of that very trope ''themselves'' in their first appearance in ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'' (though it didn't end quite the way you might think).
*** The Night Guard have exploited this rule as well for their own benefits by increasing the odds of a dangerous act succeeding from 100/1 to a million to 1, mainly because lower odds are more likely to happen.
** The Horde's motivation is this trope in regards to EndOfAnAge. Their dangerous actions were spurred on by their belief that the time of heroes has passed. It has, but only for ''their'' kind of kick-in-the-door, rob-the-temple, big-thug-with-a-sword hero. Carrot, who routinely risks his life for a city salary the Silver Horde wouldn't consider enough to tip a barmaid, represents a new '''type''' of hero: one who's simply determined to do the right thing. The Silver Horde are confronted by this generational and cultural transition -- from hero''ing'' to hero''ism'' -- and it floors them.
*** Taken to its logically extreme when the Silver Horde meet up with Evil Harry Dread and his minions. They spend some time reminiscing about how Evil Harry used to follow [[GenreBlindness The Code]] by doing things like having the standard dress code for his soldiers include helmets that fully covered his face, hiring stupid henchmen who couldn't tell the difference between an old washerwoman and a hero dressed like an old washerwoman, and so forth. Evil Harry always did everything the EvilOverlordList, something with which he is clearly [[DangerouslyGenreSavvy intimately familiar with]], says not to do -- [[ContractualGenreBlindness on purpose]]. After complimenting Harry on the utter stupidity of his current batch of minions, they go on to complain about how the current generation of Evil Overlords go about doing everything The EvilOverlordList says to do, which just isn't right. That is, if they bother with the Evil Overlording at all and don't just go straight into bureaucracy. At the same time, Evil Harry Dread is complaining about how the new heroes are refusing to live up to their end of the bargain by doing things like sabotaging the Evil Overlord's escape tunnel. Guys like Cohen always left the escape tunnel intact, [[ContractualGenreBlindness even thought they knew the Evil Overlord would inevitably escape through one]]. The reasoning behind this is that Evil Overlords are a hero's bread and butter, so killing them all off would leave them unemployed.
*** Rincewind demonstrates a perfect level of this trope in this story. At one point, he announces to Lord Vetinari that he does not wish to volunteer for the mission. He's ''going'', of course, because he's perfectly aware that that's how his life goes, but he wants it known that he doesn't ''wish to''. The other wizards present, knowing what kind of things he's gone through (for what appears to be rather more than 20 years by this point) concur with him on this point.
** The Patrician has wearily recognized the pattern of supernaturally powered fads running riot over his city (''Discworld/SoulMusic'', ''Discworld/MovingPictures'') etc., but interestingly when he says so in ''Discworld/TheTruth'' he's actually being WrongGenreSavvy, because the fad in that book -- newspapers -- isn't supernatural and doesn't fade away like the earlier ones.
** Cohen the Barbarian shows a moment of GenreSavvy in ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'': knowing that [[EvilChancellor Grand Viziers are always evil]], he asks Twoflower, "Do you know anything about Grand-Viziering?" Twoflower says no. He gets the job, precisely ''because'' someone who knew something about it would be ''evil''.
** And it's not just the good guys who are GenreSavvy. The old Count Magpyr in ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum'' has huge stocks of lemons, holy water, and wooden stakes; his servant Igor even added a handy anatomy chart to help vampire hunters find the heart. Windows were easily opened to the sun, and dozens of objects could be converted into an easily recognised holy symbol. Why? His role was the ''recurring'' monster, and he knew what people would do if he tried Going Too Far.

to:

* Creator/TerryPratchett's Literature/{{Discworld}} ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' features characters like this, thanks to the TheoryOfNarrativeCausality:
** Several of
TheoryOfNarrativeCausality as an active force in the witches, especially Granny Weatherwax, have a feel for "stories", and can use them to their own ends if they have to.
** Commander Sam Vimes of
world, blurring the Ankh-Morpork City Watch is when it comes to tropes of detective stories and police procedurals.
** Malicia from ''The Amazing Maurice And His Educated Rodents'' is either ''too'' GenreSavvy, or [[WrongGenreSavvy not savvy enough.]] She insists on ''always'' seeing things in terms of
line between referencing past experiences, actual stories, ranging from fairy tales to KidDetective novels like ''Tom Swift'', ''The Hardy Boys'', and ''The Famous Five'' (she claims at one point that four kids and a dog is "the right number for an adventure"). Furthermore, she has trouble in coping with subversions and exceptions, and [[HeroicWannabe always makes herself out to be the main character physics of the "story"]].
Disc:
** Rincewind Witches are said to guard the Wizzard [sic], meanwhile, is very much aware of FinaglesLaw edges, and similar narrative conventions that they frequently tell each other stories about other witches to keep his life interesting. He hates them.
** It's
an eye on each other. In ''Discworld/WitchesAbroad'', the whole basis of the plot Lancre witches have to fight Granny Weatherwax's twin sister, Lily, with fairy tale stories in ''Discworld/WitchesAbroad''.Genua. The stories want to be told, whatever the effects on their players. Lily is arranging the city of Genua along the lines of these stories. The toymaker will be a jolly, red-faced man who whistles while he works ''if he knows what's good for him''. The servant girl will marry the prince, with the help of her fairy godmother, whoever has to get hurt along the way.
way. Since Granny and Lily are twins, one ''must'' be the "evil" twin because "that's how the stories go".
** The ''Discworld/GuardsGuards!'' novel, when Vimes Malicia from ''The Amazing Maurice And His Educated Rodents'' insists on ''always'' seeing things in terms of stories, ranging from fairy tales to KidDetective novels like ''Tom Swift'', ''The Hardy Boys'', and ''The Famous Five'' (she claims at one point that four kids and a dog is "the right number for an adventure"). Furthermore, she has just confronted trouble in coping with subversions and exceptions, and [[HeroicWannabe always makes herself out to be the hidden villain main character of the story. The villain, (using the title of the book) summons several mooks to take Vimes into custody. However, the mooks, despite Vimes having no weapons and just standing there, show extreme hesitation. When the villain demands an explanation, they indicate they know what happens in situations like this: the likelihood is that if they try to take Vimes into custody, he will kill them all by engaging in swashbuckling clichés such as performing somersaults or swinging off chandeliers (the villain points out, somewhat hysterically, that there ''are'' no chandeliers in the room at all). It takes Vimes' assurances that he will not do so and would not know how to do so if he tried before the mooks take him prisoner.
"story"]].
** Also inverted in Discworld with [[Discworld/GoingPostal In ''Discworld/GoingPostal'', Moist Von Lipwig]], who Lipwig knows very well how things are supposed to go... and plays the part of the hero, because he knows that the innate genre savviness of the public will view him as a hero if he does. As is a con artist, and taking advantage of what people expect to see is his major skill.
** ''Discworld/ThiefOfTime'' has a running gag about Lu Tze's "Rule One": "[[MuggingTheMonster Never act incautiously
skill. So when confronting]] [[OldMaster a bald, wrinkly, little old man who smiles all he hears that the time]]."
** Cohen
cat is stuck in the Barbarian and his Silver Horde in ''Discworld/TheLastHero'' are confronted by Captain Carrot. They're about to fight him when they realize that's burning building after getting everyone ''else'' out safely, he knows that there's only one of him and nine of them, and that he's trying choice. If he wants to continue this story, he ''must'' run back in to save the world. All experienced heroes who have spent decades winning against incredible odds, they see that the fight can only go one way and back down. This is pure genius considering that the Horde took advantage of that very trope ''themselves'' in their first appearance in ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'' (though it didn't end quite the way you might think).
*** The Night Guard have exploited this rule as well for their own benefits by increasing the odds of a dangerous act succeeding from 100/1 to a million to 1, mainly because lower odds are more likely to happen.
** The Horde's motivation is this trope in regards to EndOfAnAge. Their dangerous actions were spurred on by their belief that the time of heroes has passed. It has, but only for ''their'' kind of kick-in-the-door, rob-the-temple, big-thug-with-a-sword hero. Carrot, who routinely risks his life for a city salary the Silver Horde wouldn't consider enough to tip a barmaid, represents a new '''type''' of hero: one who's simply determined to do the right thing. The Silver Horde are confronted by this generational and cultural transition -- from hero''ing'' to hero''ism'' -- and it floors them.
*** Taken to its logically extreme when the Silver Horde meet up with Evil Harry Dread and his minions. They spend some time reminiscing about how Evil Harry used to follow [[GenreBlindness The Code]] by doing things like having the standard dress code for his soldiers include helmets that fully covered his face, hiring stupid henchmen who couldn't tell the difference between an old washerwoman and a hero dressed like an old washerwoman, and so forth. Evil Harry always did everything the EvilOverlordList, something with which he is clearly [[DangerouslyGenreSavvy intimately familiar with]], says not to do -- [[ContractualGenreBlindness on purpose]]. After complimenting Harry on the utter stupidity of his current batch of minions, they go on to complain about how the current generation of Evil Overlords go about doing everything The EvilOverlordList says to do, which just isn't right. That is, if they bother with the Evil Overlording at all and don't just go straight into bureaucracy. At the same time, Evil Harry Dread is complaining about how the new heroes are refusing to live up to their end of the bargain by doing things like sabotaging the Evil Overlord's escape tunnel. Guys like Cohen always left the escape tunnel intact, [[ContractualGenreBlindness even thought they knew the Evil Overlord would inevitably escape through one]]. The reasoning behind this is that Evil Overlords are a hero's bread and butter, so killing them all off would leave them unemployed.
*** Rincewind demonstrates a perfect level of this trope in this story. At one point, he announces to Lord Vetinari that he does not wish to volunteer for the mission. He's ''going'', of course, because he's perfectly aware that
cat "because that's how his life goes, but he wants it known that he doesn't ''wish to''. The other wizards present, knowing what kind of things he's gone through (for what appears to be rather more than 20 years by this point) concur with him on this point.
** The Patrician has wearily recognized
the pattern of supernaturally powered fads running riot over his city (''Discworld/SoulMusic'', ''Discworld/MovingPictures'') etc., but interestingly when he says so in ''Discworld/TheTruth'' he's actually being WrongGenreSavvy, because the fad in that book -- newspapers -- isn't supernatural and doesn't fade away like the earlier ones.
** Cohen the Barbarian shows a moment of GenreSavvy in ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'': knowing that [[EvilChancellor Grand Viziers are always evil]], he asks Twoflower, "Do you know anything about Grand-Viziering?" Twoflower says no. He gets the job, precisely ''because'' someone who knew something about it would be ''evil''.
** And it's not just the good guys who are GenreSavvy. The old Count Magpyr in ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum'' has huge stocks of lemons, holy water, and wooden stakes; his servant Igor even added a handy anatomy chart to help vampire hunters find the heart. Windows were easily opened to the sun, and dozens of objects could be converted into an easily recognised holy symbol. Why? His role was the ''recurring'' monster, and he knew what people would do if he tried Going Too Far.
hero does".
11th Feb '16 12:21:44 PM ObsidianFire
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* Aside from all the LampshadeHanging in the ''Literature/AuntDimity'' series, there are some specific instances of characters' experiences informing their actions. For example, Lori recounts her friend Emma's excessive optimism in planning her solo hiking trip at the start of ''[[Literature/AuntDimity Aunt Dimity: Snowbound]]'' ("...[[YouCantMissIt you can't miss it]]."); thus, when she has gotten lost and snowed in and she sets out from the main house to check on the caretaker in his cottage, her fellow hiker Jamie gives directions to the cottage and starts to utter [[TemptingFate the fateful phrase]]:
--> "...You can't missó"\\
I clamped a gloved hand over his mouth.\\
"Don't say it," I snapped. "Don't even ''think'' of saying it."\\
"Mmmph," Jamie agreed, nodding earnestly.



* John Scalzi's ''Redshirts'' is a book about, you guessed it, the more [[RedShirt genre savvy expendable crew members]] onboard the UUCS ''Intrepid''.



* In ''Literature/{{Divergent}}'', Marcus seems to know he's in a book. [[spoiler: He was an abusive father and husband and so the heroine Tris hates him]]. However he seems to KNOW Tris is the heroine and so takes her threats lying down instead of fighting back, since fighting would make him look more of a bad guy. He plays it very mysterious in ''Insurgent'', which lessens his chances of ending up dead like ALMOST EVERY OTHER CHARACTER. He also keeps going on about the fact he has a secret and is the only one who knows it, meaning if he dies it dies with him (which would ruin the book). Towards the end he even manipulates Tris into helping him against his wife, who might otherwise win since karma wise, he owes her one. But any enterprise with Tris in it has a higher rate of success...He also refuses to take any risks on their mission, making Tris take most of them instead as if he knows that, as the heroine she is less likely to die.
* In Creator/RebeccaLickiss's ''Literature/EccentricCircles'', Piper's joining in a conversation of likely suspects with trope logic makes her fit right in.



* In ''Literature/TheLeonardRegime'', Ben is always one step ahead of everybody else. He always seems to know what's going to happen next or what the next move is. Daniel also has moments where he proves he is genre savvy.
* The narrator of ''Literature/MrBlank'' knows he's a noir anti-hero and points out that trusting Mina, his femme fatale, is the equivalent of going off alone, stripping to his underwear, and looking for a cat in a horror film.
** He's just as savvy in [[Literature/GetBlank the sequel]].
* ''[[Literature/ZeusIsDead Zeus Is Dead: A Monstrously Inconvenient Adventure]]'' has a couple of examples:
** Leif. He may even be a little too genre-savvy, as certain things he expects to happen just don't. Still, he gets it right more often than not. [[spoiler: Zeus eventually recruits him for this very reason.]]
** The Muses could be considered to be this, too, since they spend most of their time helping to craft stories.
%% * Tessa Gray from ''Literature/TheInfernalDevices'', because she's so well-read.
* In ''{{Literature/Armada}}'', many of the main characters like Zack, Xavier, etc. are really genre savvy. The amount of popculture consumed by them probably helped.
* The main characters of ''Literature/TheFaultInOurStars'' know every terminal illness trope in the book.



* ''Literature/TheHungerGames'': Katniss Everdeen spent a good part of every year of her childhood watching the Hunger Games, giving her a rough idea of how the Gamemakers manipulate the arena, the character traits of Tributes which endears them to sponsors, the strategies of the Tributes from other districts, among others. Needless to say, it helps her [[spoiler:win the Games.]]
11th Feb '16 12:10:24 PM ObsidianFire
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* ''Literature/LeftBehind'' has an "unintentional" variant that cripples the narrative from the get-go. Many of the characters, who should have shown emotions at certain times, seem to be aware of the type of book they are in; they thus either do not display the appropriate emotions, or merely go through the motions. This cripples the first book of the series to an extreme extent in regards to making the characters seem real.



* In Jeffery Channing Wells' online masterpiece, ''Mundementia One'', there exists the Humility Company. This group of bodyguards is the best in the entire world because they refuse to say that they are the best out loud. By continuously downplaying their own skill they manage to survive for another battle. They even have an android Cardinal Richlieu to tell them when they've become too badass and have to sacrifice the rookie to the mysterious monster in the darkness.
** Frankly everyone in ''Mundementia One'' is genre savvy, though Charles is still trying to fully gain his.
* A few characters in the Comicbook/XWingSeries are at least a little genre savvy.
--> '''Wedge''': [[NoodleImplements We'll need a wheeled transport, one of the flatcam units our pursuers are carrying, and four sets of women's clothing.]]
--> '''Hobbie''': Boss, please tell me you're not putting us in women's clothing.
--> '''Wedge''': [[BlatantLies Very well. I'm not putting us in women's clothing]].
--> (in the next chapter, [[GilliganCut the four pilots are in women's clothing]])
--> '''Hobbie''': You lied to me.
* In the [[Literature/{{Emberverse}} novels of the Change]], [[EvilOverlord Lord Protector Norman Arminger]] actually puts out a rough approximation of the EvilOverlordList for his provincial governors.
* In JohnCWright's [[Literature/TheGoldenOecumene ''The Golden Age'', ''The Phoenix Exultant'', and ''The Golden Transcedence'']], the accuracy and applicability of Daphne's stories to the events happening to them is a matter of great discussion. Sometimes it definitely helps, as when Daphne's response to hearing they are under attack is to throw herself out of the line of fire, saving her life.
* In Creator/AaronAllston's ''Literature/GalateaIn2D'', Red and Penny [[ArtInitiatesLife came to life from a painting]] of Achilles and Penthesilea, and the other characters deduce the AchillesHeel.
* The children's book ''Dear Peter Rabbit'' shows that the wolves of both the Three Little Pigs and Little Red Riding Hood tales show a rather remarkable dose of learning their lessons from their given genre (though we only see it for one page). The wolf from the Red Riding Hood tale consoles the Big Bad Wolf over losing his tail to the pigs and their brick house, and suggests that as painful as it would be, they would have to change their diets to exclude pigs and little girls - it was just too dangerous. The Big Bad Wolf, looking very glum and having an artificial tail being sewn on, doesn't look like he's too inclined to disagree.
* In Joe Haldeman's ''The Accidental Time Machine'' our hero, who accidentally builds a time machine which can only travel into the future, shows an incredible amount of genre savvyness. When, after a jump, he is apprehended for a murder he didn't commit, someone of his physique places the exact amount of money needed for his bail with a proxy, even before the bail is even set (and the amount known). The hero then deduces that it must be himself from the future having found a way to travel backwards in order to set him free for his next jump. He then goes on to continue his adventure in relative fearlessness, because he knows he will be alive in the future to travel back into the past.
* George Beard from the ''Literature/CaptainUnderpants'' books is very genre savvy, more so than usual in the book "The Perilous Plot of the Purple Potty People". Harold Hutchins, the other protagonist of the series (and rather {{Genre Blind|ness}} in his own right), is constantly spouting things like "At least it can't get any worse!" George replies in disdain, claiming that whenever someone says something like that, things are inevitably going to get FAR worse (and rightly so, since they always do). When the police arrive to haul the boys off to jail for the rest of their lives, Harold spouts his "can't get any worse", and sure enough the evil mastermind Professor Tippy Tinkletrousers arrives in his giant, freeze-ray equipped pants bent on revenge against the boys.
* In the Literature/LiadenUniverse books by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller, Clan Korval has had plenty of time to become accustomed to its own WeirdnessMagnet and CoincidenceMagnet nature. As a result, it takes some pretty bizarre happenstance to more than mildly startle its more-experienced members, and they are at least somewhat able to recognize and take it into account in their planning (as when [[spoiler:Daav advises Theo that she ''needs'' a dependable co-pilot to help deal with the trouble her Korval nature will attract]] in ''Ghost Ship''). To some extent, the rest of the galaxy has also realized that Korval tends to attract trouble, even if they don't rightly understand why. [[spoiler:(Even ''Bechimo'' was advised by his builders, hundreds of years ago, against having anything to do with Clan Korval, and yos'Phelium in particular.)]]
* The kids in ''Literature/HeroDotCom'' and the protagonist in its sister series ''Literature/VillainDotNet'' are familiar enough with superhero stories to hang lampshades and snark, though Lorna inexplicably wanted to try and garner [[AttentionWhore fame]] with their powers.
* Renfield becomes quite GenreSavvy in Creator/BramStoker's ''Literature/{{Dracula}}'': when he realizes that the Count is going to cheat him of his promised prize he figures to himself that since madmen are supposed to have supernatural strength, he could fight Drac on at least somewhat equal ground. It actually works, as he attacks Dracula in his smoke-form with his bare hands, and manages to force him back to material form! Of course after that things go downhill for him.
** Van Helsing is also genre-savvy--he's a scientist, but having recognized that they were fighting a monster out of legend, he goes to those legends to learn how to fight it.
* Fisk in the ''Literature/KnightAndRogueSeries'' manages to be this mostly through street smarts, almost compensating for [[TooDumbToLive Michael's less thought out actions]].
* In ''Privilege'' by Kate Brian, after Ariana kills someone and throws them in the lake, instead of just leaving, she puts her favorite necklace on the body and waits for the body to float back up. The police assume that the body was her trying to either escape juvie or kill herself and they cremate the body. She is now free to assume the identity of the person she actually killed.

to:

* In Jeffery Channing Wells' online masterpiece, ''Mundementia One'', there exists the Humility Company. This group of bodyguards is the best in the entire world because they refuse to say that they are the best out loud. By continuously downplaying their own skill they manage to survive for another battle. They even have an android Cardinal Richlieu to tell them when they've become too badass and have to sacrifice the rookie to the mysterious monster in the darkness.
** Frankly everyone in ''Mundementia One'' is genre savvy, though Charles is still trying to fully gain his.
* A few characters in the Comicbook/XWingSeries are at least a little genre savvy.
--> '''Wedge''': [[NoodleImplements We'll need a wheeled transport, one of the flatcam units our pursuers are carrying, and four sets of women's clothing.]]
--> '''Hobbie''': Boss, please tell me you're not putting us in women's clothing.
--> '''Wedge''': [[BlatantLies Very well. I'm not putting us in women's clothing]].
--> (in the next chapter, [[GilliganCut the four pilots are in women's clothing]])
--> '''Hobbie''': You lied to me.
* In the [[Literature/{{Emberverse}} novels of the Change]], [[EvilOverlord Lord Protector Norman Arminger]] actually puts out a rough approximation of the EvilOverlordList for his provincial governors.
* In JohnCWright's [[Literature/TheGoldenOecumene ''The Golden Age'', ''The Phoenix Exultant'', and ''The Golden Transcedence'']], the accuracy and applicability of Daphne's stories to the events happening to them is a matter of great discussion. Sometimes it definitely helps, as when Daphne's response to hearing they are under attack is to throw herself out of the line of fire, saving her life.
* In Creator/AaronAllston's ''Literature/GalateaIn2D'', Red and Penny [[ArtInitiatesLife came to life from a painting]] of Achilles and Penthesilea, and the other characters deduce the AchillesHeel.
* The children's book ''Dear Peter Rabbit'' shows that the wolves of both the Three Little Pigs and Little Red Riding Hood tales show a rather remarkable dose of learning their lessons from their given genre (though we only see it for one page). The wolf from the Red Riding Hood tale consoles the Big Bad Wolf over losing his tail to the pigs and their brick house, and suggests that as painful as it would be, they would have to change their diets to exclude pigs and little girls - it was just too dangerous. The Big Bad Wolf, looking very glum and having an artificial tail being sewn on, doesn't look like he's too inclined to disagree.
* In Joe Haldeman's ''The Accidental Time Machine'' our hero, who accidentally builds a time machine which can only travel into the future, shows an incredible amount of genre savvyness. When, after a jump, he is apprehended for a murder he didn't commit, someone of his physique places the exact amount of money needed for his bail with a proxy, even before the bail is even set (and the amount known). The hero then deduces that it must be himself from the future having found a way to travel backwards in order to set him free for his next jump. He then goes on to continue his adventure in relative fearlessness, because he knows he will be alive in the future to travel back into the past.
* George Beard from the ''Literature/CaptainUnderpants'' books is very genre savvy, more so than usual in the book "The Perilous Plot of the Purple Potty People". Harold Hutchins, the other protagonist of the series (and rather {{Genre Blind|ness}} in his own right), is constantly spouting things like "At least it can't get any worse!" George replies in disdain, claiming that whenever someone says something like that, things are inevitably going to get FAR worse (and rightly so, since they always do). When the police arrive to haul the boys off to jail for the rest of their lives, Harold spouts his "can't get any worse", and sure enough the evil mastermind Professor Tippy Tinkletrousers arrives in his giant, freeze-ray equipped pants bent on revenge against the boys.
* In the Literature/LiadenUniverse books by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller, Clan Korval has had plenty of time to become accustomed to its own WeirdnessMagnet and CoincidenceMagnet nature. As a result, it takes some pretty bizarre happenstance to more than mildly startle its more-experienced members, and they are at least somewhat able to recognize and take it into account in their planning (as when [[spoiler:Daav advises Theo that she ''needs'' a dependable co-pilot to help deal with the trouble her Korval nature will attract]] in ''Ghost Ship''). To some extent, the rest of the galaxy has also realized that Korval tends to attract trouble, even if they don't rightly understand why. [[spoiler:(Even ''Bechimo'' was advised by his builders, hundreds of years ago, against having anything to do with Clan Korval, and yos'Phelium in particular.)]]
* The kids in ''Literature/HeroDotCom'' and the protagonist in its sister series ''Literature/VillainDotNet'' are familiar enough with superhero stories to hang lampshades and snark, though Lorna inexplicably wanted to try and garner [[AttentionWhore fame]] with their powers.
* Renfield becomes quite GenreSavvy in Creator/BramStoker's ''Literature/{{Dracula}}'': when he realizes that the Count is going to cheat him of his promised prize he figures to himself that since madmen are supposed to have supernatural strength, he could fight Drac on at least somewhat equal ground. It actually works, as he attacks Dracula in his smoke-form with his bare hands, and manages to force him back to material form! Of course after that things go downhill for him.
**
''Literature/{{Dracula}}'': Van Helsing is also genre-savvy--he's a scientist, but having recognized that they were fighting a monster out of legend, he goes to those legends to learn how to fight it.
* Fisk in the ''Literature/KnightAndRogueSeries'' manages to be this mostly through street smarts, almost compensating for [[TooDumbToLive Michael's less thought out actions]].
* In ''Privilege'' by Kate Brian, after Ariana kills someone and throws them in the lake, instead of just leaving, she puts her favorite necklace on the body and waits for the body to float back up. The police assume that the body was her trying to either escape juvie or kill herself and they cremate the body. She is now free to assume the identity of the person she actually killed.
it.



* Nearly every single character in ''Literature/SkulduggeryPleasant'', which is fairly justified since most of them are hundreds of years old and so have the experience.
* In the ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'', one of Tarkin's cohorts ask him why he doesn't just use the Death Star to blow up Coruscant and become Emperor himself. Tarkin replies that Palpatine obviously has measures to prevent this, and any attempt would just get them all killed.
** Over the course of ''Literature/GalaxyOfFear'', multiple characters realize that trouble follows them everywhere they go, and especially that it tends to pick up when the kids have been SeparatedFromTheAdults - which is also when the books' formula changes.
---> '''Hoole''': "This is a pleasure. I have left you alone for several hours, and [[TemptingFate nothing eventful has happened]]. No Imperial invasions. No dangerous criminals."
* In Geoph Essex's ''Lovely Assistant'', [[spoiler: Lyle and Lloyd]] aren't just GenreSavvy, they're ''trope'' savvy, [[ConversationalTroping dropping tropes]] practically by name in some cases and reciting examples from the corresponding entries. The topper comes in the climax, when [[spoiler:Lloyd]] brags to TheDragon: "[[CrowningMomentOfAwesome Crowning Moment]] of ''kicked your ass''!" They also manage to piece together the BigBad's identity and some key elements of the EvilPlan through their [[DiscussedTrope encyclopedic knowledge of tropes]], blatantly suggesting that the characters (and the author) are OneOfUs.
* Thrasymachus in Creator/{{Plato}}'s ''Literature/TheRepublic'' calls Creator/{{Socrates}} out on his usual debate style, involving ObfuscatingStupidity and {{Armor Piercing Question}}s, and demands he just get to the point.
* Subverted in ''Literature/CountZero'' by William Gibson, where a 16 year-old wannabe hacker nearly gets himself killed after watching too many hacker movies and trying a cyberspace run for real.
* In ''Literature/CityOfAshes'', Simon Lewis says the following line after Valentine's ship blows up.
-->'''Simon''': Never believe the bad guy is dead until you see a body. That just leads to unhappiness and surprise ambushes.



* In the [[Literature/{{Destroyermen}} Destroyermen series]], it would be faster to list those who are not genre-savvy. With the exception of a few characters, primarily in the Grik faction, virtually the entire recurring cast is genre savvy to some extent because every character has seen the pitfalls of previous military or technological strategies back home. As the stakes grows higher, the more genre-savvy characters tend to become out of necessity for survival. Some examples would include:
** Captain Matthew Reddy - Saw and experienced first-hand the stupidity of the handling of the Asiatic fleet, as well as formally studying naval and military history. He is a huge reason for turning the war from a hopeless extinction to a legitimate fight.
** Dennis Silva - A literal master of survival, sabotage, and unconventional tactics. He is the series closest equivalent to a true commando because he has a very clear idea of what he is usually facing and how his adversaries will react.
** Chief Gray - Is a non-commissioned officer who has so much time under his belts, virtually no officers would dare give him an order. Being well into his 60's, he has a tremendous amount of experience and skill at his duties, also being able to find problems and accommodate for them fairly quickly.
** "Chief Spanky" - Gray's engineering counterpart, who is able to find problems purely based on feel and sound. He is the alliance's most skilled raw engineer and played a supporting role in the advancement of the alliance's technology.
** Sergeant Alden - A strategic and tactical genius, despite all of his denial of such. He manages to construct fierce armies that have a very high success rate. On one occasion, he fought off over three thousand better armed Grik warriors with barely 150 able warriors, with a large number literally armed with sticks and stones long enough for the cavalry to arrive.
11th Feb '16 11:33:54 AM ObsidianFire
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* Princess Cimorene of the ''Literature/EnchantedForestChronicles'' is fairly genre savvy, as are most of the characters to one extent or another. She just refuses to conform to type. (Note that this is an AffectionateParody universe where genre savviness is actively taught to people; Cimorene's education included things like the right way to scream when being carried off by a giant.)
** One example: the obnoxiously determined IdiotHero who's been [[UnwantedRescue trying to rescue her]] accidentally releases a genie, who announces that he will now kill them, but they may choose the manner of their deaths. Cimorene ''immediately'' replies, "Old age." She winds up catching the genie out on trying to get around the rules and cutting a deal where he goes back in the jar and they pretend the whole thing never happened.
%%** Her son, Daystar, is even more so, to the point of being a TykeBomb.
** One of the best examples is in book one, in a character known only as the stone prince. He earns his namesake due to taking SchmuckBait that would have had him TakenForGranite, in the form of a gold and jewel covered dipper for a fountain of healing water alongside a tin one. But instead of panicking, he stuck his arm in the spring, allowing him to retain his form, sentience, and motion even as stone.
** He does even better a bit later when Cimorene accidentally finds out a weakness for the wizards: [[KillItWithWater soapy water with lemon juice]]. Unfortunately, the BigBad wizard uses Morwen, a witch that they're friends with, as a shield. The prince douses them both, reasoning that Morwen couldn't possibly melt in soapy water given what he's seen of her [[NeatFreak spotless house.]]
* Creator/MercedesLackey's ''Literature/TalesOfTheFiveHundredKingdoms'' series uses this idea -- indeed, it is central to its premise. The idea is that the world in governed by a mysterious force called "The Tradition" which forces peoples' lives to follow traditional story tales, like Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, etc. The main characters are either Godmothers or are being helped by Godmothers to achieve the story's end -- or to change the story from one with a fair amount of deaths to one with a happy ending. As such, all Godmothers need to know what story they are in and, preferably, numerous other stories they can try and manipulate.



* In Creator/TimothyZahn's ''The Domino Pattern'', Frank Compton and his colleague Bayta seem aware they're in a detective novel (albeit one in a science-fictional setting.) Therefore they are careful to ''have'' the conversation with the being who has important information before he can be the next victim leaving them clueless, and even comment on the importance of not waiting to speak to him!



* Commissar Literature/CiaphasCain is this in universe. He realizes that acting like the rest of the Imperium's commissars (trigger happy hardasses) will only get him killed faster, and realizes that giving a damn about his troops means he doesn't get fragged, they give a damn about him, and he more chances to avoid getting killed. He also realizes the grim dark setting for what it is, and realizes that most forms of danger are better avoided if he doesn't try to run. He knows that being a fanatical jackass makes him expendable, so unlike the rest of the Imperium (who put large amounts of faith in the God Emperor of Humanity), he decides to proactively work very hard at saving his own ass himself, making him one of the smartest humans in the whole series. It has also been observed that, in a strange way, this may actually make him the most pious Commissar in the entire Imperium. He, seemingly genuinely, believes that he shouldn't rely on the GodEmperor's protection because ''he doesn't want to distract Him from more important things''. Given [[CrapsackWorld the state of the galaxy]], this is quite a reasonable attitude.
11th Feb '16 11:21:35 AM ObsidianFire
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* In Book Nine of ''Literature/TheIliad,'' the Greek hero Diomedes doesn't believe Achilles' threats to sail home from Troy because he is fated to die there. He turns out to be right.



* In the novel ''Literature/ThePhantomOfTheOpera'', Raoul seems to know he's the [[BettyAndVeronica "safe" love interest]] in a Gothic romance, given his utter lack of surprise at Christine's love for her stalker/kidnapper despite no recognition of StockholmSyndrome as such at the time.
* Creator/ENesbit[='=]s ''Literature/{{Melisande}}'' is a variation of Rapunzel set in a fairy tale world where everyone is GenreSavvy:
** The king and queen deliberately refuse to hold a christening party, knowing what happened to the Sleeping Beauty. When all the fairies are furious that they weren't invited, and they want to curse the princess, the king points out that traditionally, only ''one'' of them can curse the princess or they'll go out "like a candle-flame". He's more or less bluffing, but since the evil fairy Malevola already did the cursing, they decide not to risk it, thank the queen for a lovely afternoon, and leave.
** In this apparent fairy-tale world, Melisande has - the text itself states - read ''Literature/AliceInWonderland'' and knows to avoid crying on people when expanded to giant size.

to:

* In the novel ''Literature/ThePhantomOfTheOpera'', Raoul seems to know he's the [[BettyAndVeronica "safe" love interest]] in a Gothic romance, given his utter lack of surprise at Christine's love for her stalker/kidnapper despite no recognition of StockholmSyndrome as such at the time.
* Creator/ENesbit[='=]s ''Literature/{{Melisande}}'' is a variation of Rapunzel set in a fairy tale world where everyone is GenreSavvy:
** The king and queen deliberately refuse to hold a christening party, knowing what happened to the Sleeping Beauty. When all the fairies are furious that they weren't invited, and they want to curse the princess, the king points out that traditionally, only ''one'' of them can curse the princess or they'll go out "like a candle-flame". He's more or less bluffing, but since the evil fairy Malevola already did the cursing, they decide not to risk it, thank the queen for a lovely afternoon, and leave.
**
''Literature/{{Melisande}}'': In this apparent fairy-tale world, Melisande has - the text itself states - read ''Literature/AliceInWonderland'' and knows to avoid crying on people when expanded to giant size.



'The heroines of thrillers deserve all they get. When a mysterious voice rings them up and says it is Scotland Yard, they never think of ringing back to verify the call. Hence the prevalence of kidnapping.'
::She rings back to check, and discovers that the call was a fake. (Dorothy L. Sayers, ''Gaudy Night'', ch. 18, p. 349).

to:

'The heroines of thrillers deserve all they get. When a mysterious voice rings them up and says it is Scotland Yard, they never think of ringing back to verify the call. Hence the prevalence of kidnapping.'
::She
' [[note]]She rings back to check, and discovers that the call was a fake. (Dorothy L. Sayers, ''Gaudy Night'', ch. 18, p. 349).[[/note]]



* ''Literature/ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents'': The Count Olaf in TheFilmOfTheBook seems to have read the books, because he knows to make sure Violet signs her name using her right hand.
* Literature/{{HIVESeries}}: Shelby Trinity
--> '''Shelby''': From now on, no one's dead until I read the autopsy report.



** Marco shows a strong indication that he knows he's in a fairly dark series with a rather sadistic author whenever he's being a DeadpanSnarker.
---> '''Cassie:''' "I wonder if there's a limit to how many morphs you can do."
---> '''Marco:''' "I guess we'll find out. Probably at the worst possible time."
** Later in the same book, upon being told they're not comic book heroes, he makes the rather prophetic comment: "Yes, but I really really want it to be a comic book. See in a comic book the heroes don't get killed."

to:

** Marco shows a strong indication that he knows he's in a fairly dark series with a rather sadistic author whenever he's being a DeadpanSnarker.
---> '''Cassie:''' "I wonder if there's a limit to how many morphs you can do."
---> '''Marco:''' "I guess we'll find out. Probably at the worst possible time."
** Later in the same book, upon
Upon being told they're not comic book heroes, he Marco makes the rather prophetic comment: "Yes, but I really really want it to be a comic book. See in a comic book the heroes don't get killed."



* In the [[FramingDevice Framing Story]] of Literature/HowKazirWonHisWife, the sorcerer implies that he got his position through [[KnightsAndKnaves knowing how to deal with pairs of people of whom one always lied and the other always told the truth]]. In the StoryWithinAStory, the king was genre savvy enough to realise that Kazir was familiar with the KnightsAndKnaves puzzle, so Kazir ended up WrongGenreSavvy when the king set a slightly different puzzle.



"". Commander Sam Vimes of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch is when it comes to tropes of detective stories and police procedurals.

to:

"". ** Commander Sam Vimes of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch is when it comes to tropes of detective stories and police procedurals.
9th Jan '16 7:56:22 PM eowynjedi
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Literature/NorthangerAbbey'', the protagonist Catherine is a ''big'' fan of Gothic novels and [[WrongGenreSavvy incorrectly applies their tropes]] when she visits the Tilneys at their home, the Abbey of the title. Her LoveInterest Henry is a fan of them himself--so when he finds Catherine snooping around his late mother's rooms, he surmises that Catherine is imagining a tale of imprisonment and murder, with herself as the heroine come to uncover these dark secrets. And he's spot-on.
5th Jan '16 6:00:01 AM HighCrate
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** When TheCavalry arrives to rescue them much earlier than Kitty predicted they would, she asks what happened. Turned out her husband had sent them immediately when he couldn't reach her by phone, on the assumption that (once again) someone was trying to kill her.
5th Jan '16 5:58:12 AM HighCrate
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* Arguably the pre-eminent example of this, Literature/DonQuixote spends much of his entire story ruminating on how the future author of his works will portray his adventures, using the tropes he has picked up from reading volume after volume of chivalric literature.

to:

* Arguably the pre-eminent example of this, * Literature/DonQuixote spends much of his entire story ruminating on how the future author of his works will portray his adventures, using the tropes he has picked up from reading volume after volume of chivalric literature.



* Creator/ENesbit[='=]s ''Literature/{{Melisande}}'' is a variation of Rapunzel set in a fairy tale world where everyone is GenreSavvy. For example, the king and queen deliberately refuse to hold a christening party, knowing what happened to the Sleeping Beauty. When all the fairies are furious that they weren't invited, and they want to curse the princess, the king points out that traditionally, only ''one'' of them can curse the princess or they'll go out "like a candle-flame". He's more or less bluffing, but since the evil fairy Malevola already did the cursing, they decide not to risk it, thank the queen for a lovely afternoon, and leave.

to:

* Creator/ENesbit[='=]s ''Literature/{{Melisande}}'' is a variation of Rapunzel set in a fairy tale world where everyone is GenreSavvy. For example, the GenreSavvy:
** The
king and queen deliberately refuse to hold a christening party, knowing what happened to the Sleeping Beauty. When all the fairies are furious that they weren't invited, and they want to curse the princess, the king points out that traditionally, only ''one'' of them can curse the princess or they'll go out "like a candle-flame". He's more or less bluffing, but since the evil fairy Malevola already did the cursing, they decide not to risk it, thank the queen for a lovely afternoon, and leave.



* Peter Pevensie demonstrates a degree of GenreSavvy in Creator/CSLewis's ''Literature/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe'', particularly when -- after Edmund suggests the robin they are following might be leading them into a trap -- he observes that in all of the stories he has read, robins are creatures of good.

to:

* ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'':
**
Peter Pevensie demonstrates a degree of GenreSavvy in Creator/CSLewis's ''Literature/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe'', particularly ''Literature/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe'' when -- after Edmund suggests the robin they are following might be leading them into a trap -- he observes that in all of the stories he has read, robins are creatures of good.



* Creator/JohnDicksonCarr's detective Dr. Gideon Fell is well aware that he's in a detective novel.
** In ''The Three Coffins'', he stops the action to explain to everybody how a locked room murder mystery can be pulled off, explaining that there's no point in pretending they're ''not'' in a detective novel.

to:

* Creator/JohnDicksonCarr's detective Dr. Gideon Fell is well aware that he's in a detective novel.
**
novel. In ''The Three Coffins'', he stops the action to explain to everybody how a locked room murder mystery can be pulled off, explaining that there's no point in pretending they're ''not'' in a detective novel.



** Gandalf in particular is GenreSavvy enough to recognise that Gollum is a ChekhovsGun. "My heart tells me that Gollum has some part to play"
*** Justified, given that Gandalf is Maiar, a semi-divine being.
** Frodo's line after meeting Aragorn that an enemy would "look fairer and feel fouler" could count as this. Many fantasy villains (the ones that aren't {{Mooks}} at least) tend to follow this.
*** Interestingly, this seems to be case of WrongGenreSavvy to an extent since the prettiest of Sauron's minions are probably Wormtongue and Saruman - neither of whom are particularly comely. On the other hand, Sauron himself ''used'' to be fairer before he became a giant, flaming eyeball.



* Creator/TerryPratchett's Literature/{{Discworld}} features characters like this, thanks to the TheoryOfNarrativeCausality. Several of the witches, especially Granny Weatherwax, have a feel for "stories", and can use them to their own ends if they have to. Commander Sam Vimes of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch is when it comes to tropes of detective stories and police procedurals. Malicia from ''The Amazing Maurice And His Educated Rodents'' is either ''too'' GenreSavvy, or [[WrongGenreSavvy not savvy enough.]] She insists on ''always'' seeing things in terms of stories, ranging from fairy tales to KidDetective novels like ''Tom Swift'', ''The Hardy Boys'', and ''The Famous Five'' (she claims at one point that four kids and a dog is "the right number for an adventure"). Furthermore, she has trouble in coping with subversions and exceptions, and [[HeroicWannabe always makes herself out to be the main character of the "story"]]. Rincewind the Wizzard [sic], meanwhile, is very much aware of FinaglesLaw and similar narrative conventions that keep his life interesting. He hates them.

to:

* Creator/TerryPratchett's Literature/{{Discworld}} features characters like this, thanks to the TheoryOfNarrativeCausality. TheoryOfNarrativeCausality:
**
Several of the witches, especially Granny Weatherwax, have a feel for "stories", and can use them to their own ends if they have to. to.
"".
Commander Sam Vimes of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch is when it comes to tropes of detective stories and police procedurals. procedurals.
**
Malicia from ''The Amazing Maurice And His Educated Rodents'' is either ''too'' GenreSavvy, or [[WrongGenreSavvy not savvy enough.]] She insists on ''always'' seeing things in terms of stories, ranging from fairy tales to KidDetective novels like ''Tom Swift'', ''The Hardy Boys'', and ''The Famous Five'' (she claims at one point that four kids and a dog is "the right number for an adventure"). Furthermore, she has trouble in coping with subversions and exceptions, and [[HeroicWannabe always makes herself out to be the main character of the "story"]]. "story"]].
**
Rincewind the Wizzard [sic], meanwhile, is very much aware of FinaglesLaw and similar narrative conventions that keep his life interesting. He hates them.



*** His nephew, the new Count is just as GenreSavvy, but more ambitious. As savvy as he is though, he's not quite a match for Granny Weatherwax.



** Her son, Daystar, is even more so, to the point of being a TykeBomb.

to:

** %%** Her son, Daystar, is even more so, to the point of being a TykeBomb.



*** He does even better a bit later when Cimorene accidentally finds out a weakness for the wizards: [[KillItWithWater soapy water with lemon juice]]. Unfortunately, the BigBad wizard uses Morwen, a witch that they're friends with, as a shield. The prince douses them both, reasoning that Morwen couldn't possibly melt in soapy water given what he's seen of her [[NeatFreak spotless house.]]

to:

*** ** He does even better a bit later when Cimorene accidentally finds out a weakness for the wizards: [[KillItWithWater soapy water with lemon juice]]. Unfortunately, the BigBad wizard uses Morwen, a witch that they're friends with, as a shield. The prince douses them both, reasoning that Morwen couldn't possibly melt in soapy water given what he's seen of her [[NeatFreak spotless house.]]



* Sergey Lukaynenko's ''Rough Draft'' and its sequel ''Final Draft'' are practically dripping with genre savvy. Characters frequently reflect on how the events of the story follow certain genre conventions. Sometimes their observations foreshadow the actual outcome, sometimes they turn out to be wrong and other times their realization of what genre convention they wound up facing comes too late to do any good.
** In one of the early chapters, the main character meets up with a science fiction writer (a thinly-veiled [[AuthorAvatar Lukyanenko stand-in]]) in order to try to figure out the solution to his decisively supernatural problem. The writer winds up explaining how various Russian science fiction authors would resolve it, ending with his own take (which didn't match the actual ending of the novels.)

to:

* Sergey Lukaynenko's ''Rough Draft'' and its sequel ''Final Draft'' are practically dripping with genre savvy. Characters frequently reflect on how the events of the story follow certain genre conventions. Sometimes their observations foreshadow the actual outcome, sometimes they turn out to be wrong and other times their realization of what genre convention they wound up facing comes too late to do any good.
**
good. In one of the early chapters, the main character meets up with a science fiction writer (a thinly-veiled [[AuthorAvatar Lukyanenko stand-in]]) in order to try to figure out the solution to his decisively supernatural problem. The writer winds up explaining how various Russian science fiction authors would resolve it, ending with his own take (which didn't match the actual ending of the novels.)



** Quentyn Martell [[spoiler:is emboldened to reckless action by stories in which princes win fights against dragons and get the beautiful princess afterwards, but he makes a much of it and dies a horrible death]].

to:

** Quentyn Martell [[spoiler:is emboldened to reckless action by stories in which princes win fights against dragons and get the beautiful princess afterwards, but he makes a much muck of it and dies a horrible death]].



* Commissar Literature/CiaphasCain is this in universe. He realizes that acting like the rest of the Imperium's commissars (trigger happy hardasses) will only get him killed faster, and realizes that giving a damn about his troops means he doesn't get fragged, they give a damn about him, and he more chances to avoid getting killed. He also realizes the grim dark setting for what it is, and realizes that most forms of danger are better avoided if he doesn't try to run. He knows that being a fanatical jackass makes him expendable, so unlike the rest of the Imperium (who put large amounts of faith in the God Emperor of Humanity), he decides to proactively work very hard at saving his own ass himself, making him one of the smartest humans in the whole series.
** It has also been observed that, in a strange way, this may actually make him the most pious Commissar in the entire Imperium. He, seemingly genuinely, believes that he shouldn't rely on the GodEmperor's protection because ''he doesn't want to distract Him from more important things''. Given [[CrapsackWorld the state of the galaxy]], this is quite a reasonable attitude.

to:

* Commissar Literature/CiaphasCain is this in universe. He realizes that acting like the rest of the Imperium's commissars (trigger happy hardasses) will only get him killed faster, and realizes that giving a damn about his troops means he doesn't get fragged, they give a damn about him, and he more chances to avoid getting killed. He also realizes the grim dark setting for what it is, and realizes that most forms of danger are better avoided if he doesn't try to run. He knows that being a fanatical jackass makes him expendable, so unlike the rest of the Imperium (who put large amounts of faith in the God Emperor of Humanity), he decides to proactively work very hard at saving his own ass himself, making him one of the smartest humans in the whole series.
**
series. It has also been observed that, in a strange way, this may actually make him the most pious Commissar in the entire Imperium. He, seemingly genuinely, believes that he shouldn't rely on the GodEmperor's protection because ''he doesn't want to distract Him from more important things''. Given [[CrapsackWorld the state of the galaxy]], this is quite a reasonable attitude.



** "Gentleman" Johnny Marcone. Competent, ruthless, and precautionary to a tee, he nearly always manages to both place himself on the good side of a certain wizard, and talk his way into learning about the threat of the book. Since the start of the series, he has survived quite handily through attacks from vampires, werewolves, fallen angels, fae, undead, ghouls, and has even established himself as a member of the setting's regulatory body for supernatural war and diplomacy.
*** To give an idea of not only how GenreSavvy, but {{Badass}} this last point makes him; he is a perfectly normal mortal human being, no special powers whatsoever, and he's a member of a group consisting of the most powerful elements of the supernatural world.
*** As an example, in the first book, Harry confronts Marcone by blowing the doors off his club. In ''Even Hand'', Marcone notes that since that incident, he's refurnished the entrances to his establishments: While strategic entrances are properly secured and warded, ''dramatic'' entrances are made with cheap balsa wood so that any other wizards attempting such an entrance won't harm anyone with the shrapnel. To be fair to Harry, that first dramatic entrance he blew the doors ''out'', past him and his kinetic shield, so as to not hurt anyone. Marcone probably made that change just to save on replacement cost.
*** Marcone gave orders to all of his establishments to treat Harry with the utmost courtesy - including making Harry a platinum member of Marcone's, ahem, ''health club''. He reasons that if Harry is too distracted by boobs , Marcone's buildings are less likely to burn down. And even if Harry is NotDistractedByTheSexy, giving him a key and allowing him to come and go as he pleases means that he'll never feel the need to force his way in, which keeps property insurance premiums low and reduces the risk of injury to Marcone's employees. Though it's not explicitly stated, Harry doesn't like to hurt women, which also helps.
*** Upon coming face to face with his [[EvilTwin sub-conscious]], Harry says "So I'm good Harry and you're Evil Harry and you only come out at night?"
** Harry tracks a target by first showing the target all of the magical tracking that the target's genre-savvy would expect, then [[MundaneSolution siccing a muggle detective on him]].
** Some acquired genre savvy on Harry's part would be the issue of darkness - Wizards immediately call light, making targets of themselves. Harry has apparently never heard of the concept of night-vision goggles (though it [[WalkingTechbane probably wouldn't do him any good even if he had]]), or a similar spell, but he will call up a wall of lava somewhere else that won't make him a target.
** And there was the time in ''Ghost Story'' where he sees a bunch of Fomorians attacking Molly, who's fighting back with [[MasterOfIllusion lots and lots of illusions and veils]]. They eventually realize that the wall of fire she conjured is not, in fact, a wall of fire, and things start to go badly for her. So Harry steps in with his own spell. HilarityEnsues.
--->One of them gave the wall of flame a disdainful snort and calmly walked into it.\\
Like I said, I'm not much when it comes to illusions.\\
[[KillItWithFire I am, however, reasonably good with fire.]]
4th Jan '16 11:23:44 PM BattleMaster
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*** Marcone gave orders to all of his establishments to treat Harry with the utmost courtesy - including making Harry a platinum member of Marcone's, ahem, ''health club''. He reasons that if Harry is too distracted by boobs , Marcone's buildings are less likely to burn down. Though it's not explicitly stated, Harry doesn't like to hurt women, which also helps.

to:

*** Marcone gave orders to all of his establishments to treat Harry with the utmost courtesy - including making Harry a platinum member of Marcone's, ahem, ''health club''. He reasons that if Harry is too distracted by boobs , Marcone's buildings are less likely to burn down. And even if Harry is NotDistractedByTheSexy, giving him a key and allowing him to come and go as he pleases means that he'll never feel the need to force his way in, which keeps property insurance premiums low and reduces the risk of injury to Marcone's employees. Though it's not explicitly stated, Harry doesn't like to hurt women, which also helps.


Added DiffLines:

* In the ''Literature/KittyNorvell'' novel ''Kitty's House of Horrors," upon realizing that the "reality show" she and the other guests have come to attend is actually a front for some [[FantasyRacism anti-supernatural bigots]] who are trying to kill them and that the house they're in is a giant DeathTrap, Kitty's immediate response is to gather the group and inform them that the number one reason people die in horror movies is because they don't watch horror movies. She then lists all the standard ways to get yourself killed in a slasher movie and how to avoid them.
** When TheCavalry arrives to rescue them much earlier than Kitty predicted they would, she asks what happened. Turned out her husband had sent them immediately when he couldn't reach her by phone, on the assumption that (once again) someone was trying to kill her.
30th Nov '15 9:07:22 AM HighCrate
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* ''Literature/TheHungerGames'': Katniss Everdeen, and how. She spent a good part of every year of her childhood watching the Hunger Games, giving her a rough idea of how the Gamemakers manipulate the arena, the character traits of Tributes which endears them to sponsors, the strategies of the Tributes from other districts, among others. Needless to say, it helps her [[spoiler:win the Games.]]

to:

* ''Literature/TheHungerGames'': Katniss Everdeen, and how. She Everdeen spent a good part of every year of her childhood watching the Hunger Games, giving her a rough idea of how the Gamemakers manipulate the arena, the character traits of Tributes which endears them to sponsors, the strategies of the Tributes from other districts, among others. Needless to say, it helps her [[spoiler:win the Games.]]
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