History GameBreaker / TabletopGames

18th Jun '16 11:53:51 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** A later game from the same manufacturers, LegendOfTheBurningSands, was completely broken out of the box; this was eventually explained by the fact that it included a bunch of cards copied from LegendOfTheFiveRings without paying attention to how they worked in the new system. The huge breaker? Blacksmith, a card that gave a +2 strength to any character. In Five Rings, where fights were determined by comparing the total Strength on each side, this was a reasonable advantage; but in Burning Sands, where a unit with higher strength was immune from any unit with lower Strength, it was utterly overwhelming and the game boiled down to rushing out djinni armed with swords as quickly as possible. The game died shortly afterwards.

to:

** A later game from the same manufacturers, LegendOfTheBurningSands, was completely broken out of the box; this was eventually explained by the fact that it included a bunch of cards copied from LegendOfTheFiveRings ''TabletopGame/LegendOfTheFiveRings'' without paying attention to how they worked in the new system. The huge breaker? Blacksmith, a card that gave a +2 strength to any character. In Five Rings, where fights were determined by comparing the total Strength on each side, this was a reasonable advantage; but in Burning Sands, where a unit with higher strength was immune from any unit with lower Strength, it was utterly overwhelming and the game boiled down to rushing out djinni armed with swords as quickly as possible. The game died shortly afterwards.
22nd Apr '16 6:20:34 PM lufan131
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The ''[[TabletopGame/{{Pokemon}} Pokémon]]'' trading card game has had few cards so broken they were banned (most banned cards are gag cards that were intended simply to be promotional giveaways), but there were two notable examples; Slowking and Sneasel from the Neo Genesis set. Slowking had a Pokémon Power that allowed its user to flip a coin whenever the opponent played a Trainer card, and if that coin was heads, the Trainer card would return to the user's deck without affecting the game. In the Japanese version of the game, this Power could only be used while Slowking was active. When the card was translated to English, however, it was translated incorrectly. The English version of the card not only allowed its owner to use the Power while Slowking was benched, but the power was cumulative, meaning players could flip a coin for each Slowking they had in play every time their opponent played a Trainer card, and if even one were heads, that card would have no effect. While the Japanese version of the card was barely playable (Slowking was not a good attacker, and was easily KO'ed when active), the English version was exceedingly powerful because a player could place one or more Slowking on the bench, prevent the opponent from playing any Trainer cards, and still play a stronger Pokémon as the active Pokémon, which basically shut down the opponent's deck forever. Sneasel was simply banned because it was too powerful offensively; by the second turn of the game, its Beat Up attack allowed the user to flip up to six coins (one for each benched Pokemon and one for Sneasel), netting 20 damage per heads, and + 20 more damage due to the two Darkness energies that were on Sneasel in order to use the attack. Along with broken trainers like Computer Search and Professor Oak, this was easy to accomplish, and from the second turn on it was easy to AVERAGE 80 damage per turn; considering the maximum HP for any Pokemon was 120 at the time (and 120 was a rare trait, the average for a fully evolved Pokemon was about 80-90), it's easy to see why this was banned; you simply didn't win if you didn't play your own Sneasel deck. These bans were effectively lifted once the set was rotated out of the Modified format (since you could only play them in the Unlimited format then), and since then, no card that has been released in a regular set intended for play has been banned.

to:

* The ''[[TabletopGame/{{Pokemon}} Pokémon]]'' trading card game has had few cards so broken they were banned (most banned cards are gag cards that were intended simply to be promotional giveaways), but there were two notable examples; Slowking and Sneasel from the Neo Genesis set. Slowking had a Pokémon Power that allowed its user to flip a coin whenever the opponent played a Trainer card, and if that coin was heads, the Trainer card would return to the user's deck without affecting the game. In the Japanese version of the game, this Power could only be used while Slowking was active. When the card was translated to English, however, it was translated incorrectly. The English version of the card not only allowed its owner to use the Power while Slowking was benched, but the power was cumulative, meaning players could flip a coin for each Slowking they had in play every time their opponent played a Trainer card, and if even one were heads, that card would have no effect. While the Japanese version of the card was barely playable (Slowking was not a good attacker, and was easily KO'ed when active), the English version was exceedingly powerful because a player could place one or more Slowking on the bench, prevent the opponent from playing any Trainer cards, and still play a stronger Pokémon as the active Pokémon, which basically shut down the opponent's deck forever. Sneasel was simply banned because it was too powerful offensively; by the second turn of the game, its Beat Up attack allowed the user to flip up to six coins (one for each benched Pokemon and one for Sneasel), netting 20 damage per heads, and + 20 more damage due to the two Darkness energies that were on Sneasel in order to use the attack. Along with broken trainers like Computer Search and Professor Oak, this was easy to accomplish, and from the second turn on it was easy to AVERAGE 80 damage per turn; considering the maximum HP for any Pokemon was 120 at the time (and 120 was a rare trait, the average for a fully evolved Pokemon was about 80-90), it's easy to see why this was banned; you simply didn't win if you didn't play your own Sneasel deck. These bans were effectively lifted once the set was rotated out of the Modified format (since you could only play them in the Unlimited format then), with only two other cards being banned since, First Ticket due to a rule change, and since then, no card that has been released in a regular set intended for play has been banned.Lysandre's Trump Card, because the recycling ability it had disabled one way to win.
25th Sep '15 2:36:33 AM JohnimusPrime
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the Marvel themed deck building game Legendary, Deadpool has a card called "odd ball" which gives him a power bonus equal to the number of previously played cards with odd card values. It itself has an odd card value, meaning that playing 3 Odd Balls gives Deadpool at least a +6 bonus. By stuffing the deck with them a player can devastate villains and almost assure a win; the only solution found so far is to simply ban Deadpool.

to:

* In the Marvel themed deck building game Legendary, Deadpool has a card called "odd ball" which gives him a power bonus equal to the number of previously played cards with odd card values. It itself has an odd card value, meaning that playing 3 Odd Balls gives Deadpool at least a +6 bonus. By stuffing the deck with them a player can devastate villains and almost assure a win; the only solution found so far is to simply ban Deadpool.Deadpool.
** That's nothing. In Legendary Villains, Electro has a card ("Supercharge") that gives you +1 attack for every card you discarded before playing it. All of Electro's other cards have a mechanic ("Dodge") that lets you discard them to draw a new card. If you can manage to get rid of enough of your starting cards, and buy nothing but Dodge cards and Supercharge throughout the game, you can end up in an infinite loop, dodging cards and drawing more Dodge cards. You can keep this going for as long as you like, until you decide it's time to play Supercharge and get the actual attack bonus. It does require a lot of time, and specific tailoring of your deck, but effectively gives you infinite attack. The flavor text is "Unlimited power!!", implying that this strategy may, in fact, be the intention of the designers.
** Another one is Spider-Man. Nearly all of Spider-Man's cards tell you to reveal the top card of your deck, and draw it if it costs 2 or less. All of Spider-Man's cards cost 2. All your starting cards (obviously) cost 0. So if you buy nothing but Spider-Man cards, it's very easy to end up drawing your entire deck in any given turn. Spider-Man's cards have small bonuses, but when you're drawing your entire deck, you still end up with huge amounts of attack.
22nd Aug '15 2:26:03 PM HeraldAlberich
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Another fine example from Wizards of the Coast: in their ''StarWars Miniatures'' game, a ''CloneWars'' version of Obi-Wan called General Obi-Wan Kenobi, or GOWK, was so insanely hard to damage that it was eventually banned due to dominating the tournament scene. The brokenness was compounded in that GOWK came from a starter set, meaning anyone who wanted one could buy the starter (as opposed to ripping through countless random booster packs).

to:

* Another fine example from Wizards of the Coast: in their ''StarWars ''Franchise/StarWars Miniatures'' game, a ''CloneWars'' Clone Wars version of Obi-Wan called General Obi-Wan Kenobi, or GOWK, was so insanely hard to damage that it was eventually banned due to dominating the tournament scene. The brokenness was compounded in that GOWK came from a starter set, meaning anyone who wanted one could buy the starter (as opposed to ripping through countless random booster packs).
26th Jul '15 10:35:02 PM CountDorku
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** The successor game, ''TabletopGame/WarhammerAgeOfSigmar'', tries to avoid this by not caring about game balance to begin with, to the point where units don't even have points values, but some of this still crept in as early as the changeover PDF's. High Elf Repeater Bolt Throwers, for example, are ambiguously written so it's not hard to read them as firing 72 shots per turn. Also, with no restriction on the units you can bring at all, fielding 36 Dark Elf War Hydras or an entire wheelbarrowful of Nagashes is mechanically fine; the expectation is that it'll be balanced by you being thrown out of the gaming group, which is kind of an awkward basis.
27th Jun '15 6:35:21 PM chc232323
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** A similar technique will allow you to prevent anyone from ever attacking you, to make yourself the only one allowed to vote on any votes, to prevent anyone from introducing any new cards, and to be promptly shown the door and told to never return to the game again.
24th Jun '15 8:40:07 AM Prfnoff
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Three Dragon Ante supplemental card game for Dungeons and Dragons 3.5 edition had some pretty nasty cards on it's own, meant to suck the stakes and your fellow players dry when it comes to gold coinage. The new Emperor's Gambit edition, meant for D&D 4 can be used in conjunction with the original, essentially meant to suck your opponents dry in just a few rounds. Then again, they can do the same to you, but if you are dealt a few unlucky hands...
* {{Agricola}} has its share of cards popularly seen as broken. Chief offender is the Taster, which you can use to go first in a round any time you feel like it. In a WorkerPlacementGame, that's essentially an auto-win for a decent player.

to:

* The Three Dragon Ante ''Three-Dragon Ante'' supplemental card game for Dungeons and Dragons 3.5 edition had some pretty nasty cards on it's its own, meant to suck the stakes and your fellow players dry when it comes to gold coinage. The new Emperor's Gambit edition, meant for D&D 4 can be used in conjunction with the original, essentially meant to suck your opponents dry in just a few rounds. Then again, they can do the same to you, but if you are dealt a few unlucky hands...
* {{Agricola}} ''TabletopGame/{{Agricola}}'' has its share of cards popularly seen as broken. Chief offender is the Taster, which you can use to go first in a round any time you feel like it. In a WorkerPlacementGame, that's essentially an auto-win for a decent player.



* The ridiculous lack of balance in early sets of LegendOfTheFiveRings is kind of understandable; the development of card games was in its infancy, and designers on the whole didn't really have a handle on the whole "balance" thing. Free "corrupt" gold that accelerated your production to a ludicrous degree if you were lucky enough to get a bunch of it on early turns, an event (Iris Festival) that destroyed every single Shadowlands card in play when Shadowlands was one of the playable factions, a 0-cost action (Breach of Etiquette) that, when played on a Lion clan player on the first turn, resulted in them being totally unable to buy any personality in their deck... these were all merely symptoms of the times. By the time Lotus Edition rolled around, there was no excuse. Lotus Edition was an entire arc of GameBreaker against GameBreaker: no-risk duel decks that constantly refilled their hands and collected rewards as they sliced your guys down vs. pirate decks that created ludicrous amounts of gold by "raiding" even though they could play any one of their very powerful personalities as a follower for a paltry 3 gold vs. Khol Wall, which became synonymous with "cheese" vs. Ratling decks with exponentially-growing horde armies vs. ninjas with confusing mechanics that never actually worked right, and effects that killed personalities near-unconditionally were cheap and numerous... every game was a test of "Whose ludicrous tech goes off first?" It reached its nadir with the "Test of Enlightenment" set, where many of the personalities included had abilities that might as well have read "Battle: Kill, like, five guys. Don't even bow to do it." The fact that the next block, Samurai Edition, was going to be much weaker than Lotus was considered a major selling point.

to:

* The ridiculous lack of balance in early sets of LegendOfTheFiveRings ''TabletopGame/LegendOfTheFiveRings'' is kind of understandable; the development of card games was in its infancy, and designers on the whole didn't really have a handle on the whole "balance" thing. Free "corrupt" gold that accelerated your production to a ludicrous degree if you were lucky enough to get a bunch of it on early turns, an event (Iris Festival) that destroyed every single Shadowlands card in play when Shadowlands was one of the playable factions, a 0-cost action (Breach of Etiquette) that, when played on a Lion clan player on the first turn, resulted in them being totally unable to buy any personality in their deck... these were all merely symptoms of the times. By the time Lotus Edition rolled around, there was no excuse. Lotus Edition was an entire arc of GameBreaker against GameBreaker: no-risk duel decks that constantly refilled their hands and collected rewards as they sliced your guys down vs. pirate decks that created ludicrous amounts of gold by "raiding" even though they could play any one of their very powerful personalities as a follower for a paltry 3 gold vs. Khol Wall, which became synonymous with "cheese" vs. Ratling decks with exponentially-growing horde armies vs. ninjas with confusing mechanics that never actually worked right, and effects that killed personalities near-unconditionally were cheap and numerous... every game was a test of "Whose ludicrous tech goes off first?" It reached its nadir with the "Test of Enlightenment" set, where many of the personalities included had abilities that might as well have read "Battle: Kill, like, five guys. Don't even bow to do it." The fact that the next block, Samurai Edition, was going to be much weaker than Lotus was considered a major selling point.
19th Jan '15 10:38:20 AM Nimeroni
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** A lot of the new secret techs in the expansion, Eclipse: rise of the ancients, directly counter Plasma Missiles. The expansion also add a new game breaker: Antimatter Canon + Antimatter splitter + Point defense.
8th Dec '14 1:44:29 PM Mikiroon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[IronKingdoms Warmachine/Hordes]] is, for the most part, very well-balanced. However, the Hordes army Legion of Everblight is, without a doubt, the most broken army in the game. Just looking at its warcasters and warbeasts provides some reasons why:
** The first reason requires some explanation. In Warmachine/Hordes, there's a trait called Focus or Fury, respectively, that allows you to boost attacks, buy more melee or ranged attacks, or do a number of other things. In Warmachine, such Focus must be allocated in advance by your warcaster (army leader) to his warjacks (big, steampunk mecha that serve as the main war machines for every army), and each warjack can only hold 3 Focus points. Fury, however, can be spontaneously generated by warbeasts (the Hordes equivalent of warjacks, except they're usually animals of some type), with a varying upper limit depending on the beast, meaning that warbeasts can buy however many attacks they need without their warlock's help. However, this is offset by the fact that generating Fury means that there's a chance that they'll frenzy and attack the nearest unit, whether it's friend or foe, next turn, and the more Fury generated, the greater the risk. Quite often, though, the nearest model is going to be an enemy that the beast is in melee with or an enemy that's near them, so it's not that huge a risk to begin with usually.
*** With the Legion of Everblight, however, most warbeasts have a special rule called "Blood Creation," which specifically says that they will ''never'' attack friendly faction warlocks, even in frenzy, which lowers the risk involved in generating frenzy for those models even more.
*** This however is only a game breaker for beginners, as a frenzied war beast can't used any special attacks or abilities and easily be baited into a trap.
** In addition, some of their warlocks have ridiculous feats (special abilities that can only be used once per game, but which are usually quite powerful):
*** Thagrosh, Prophet of Everblight, can resurrect ''any'' dead warbeast on his side. Like the massive Carnivean (a heavy warbeast that is heavily damaging, well protected, and has a special ability it can use that damages ''your'' jack/beast bit by bit every time you hit it). Granted, the beast can't do anything the turn it arrives, but still, spending all that time battering something like that down, only to have it come back - talk about a morale-killer. And if he decides to revive warbeasts that is even stronger than Carnivean such as Archangel? Do please weep, we'll provide the bucket.
*** Absylonia is even worse - her feat heals her completely, then lets her heal ''all'' damage on however many warbeasts in her battlegroup she feels like. The cost to her? One damage point ''per warbeast healed.'' Not per damage box healed, per MODEL healed. Alright, so the best solution is to make sure any warbeast you attack dies right then and there, right? Well, Absylonia also has a spell with a 4-inch Area of Effect that renders you unable to allocate focus or generate fury, so no boosting attacks or buying extra attacks to go for the sure death. Better hope the dice roll in your favor.
*** Saeryn has a feat that keeps every warbeast in her battlegroup from being targeted by melee attacks for one round. This by itself is bad for melee-heavy armies like Khador, but theoretically, even shooty armies like Cygnaran may not be safe as the Legion has a model called Nyss Sorceress on Hellion, who can cast a spell which disallows enemy unit from shooting either (although the sorceress is not a warbeast, so they are not protected by Saeryn's feat). So for one round, you can't melee their warbeasts, and you can't shoot either. Have fun.
*** Epic Lylyth (Shadow of Everblight). Her feat is where it all starts - it gives EVERYONE in her (admittedly small) control area +4 Range to their ranged weapons (effectively giving Snipe, normally an upkeep spell that can only affect one person/unit at a time, to everyone in her control area). But that's not all! It also gives her and her warbeasts one extra shot with their ranged weapons that turn, ignoring Rate of Fire. Of course, most people playing this list will likely take Ravagores (the Legion's main heavy shooting beast) to get the most out of this feat. So how do you counter this? You tell me. You can't hide behind clouds or use Stealthed models (Lylyth and all of the Legion warbeasts have Eyeless Sight, which sees through clouds and Stealth). You can't shoot them first unless you're playing Cygnar, because only Cygnar can equal that sort of range without artillery (18 inches for the aforementioned Ravagores), and you probably won't be able to shoot the beasts anyways since Lylyth has the spell Shadow Pack (which puts Stealth on her and her warbeasts) which she'll almost certainly have activated (and NOTHING has a charge threat range of 18 inches). Use the Choir of Menoth's Hymn of Passage (which keeps enemies from shooting your warjacks with non-magical weapons)? Nope - there's a light warbeast called a Naga Nightlurker that has a Cost 2 animus that makes the target's ranged weapons magical, so the Ravagores can easily get through that if one is taken. Khador's Wind Wall spell (which makes non-magical ranged attacks on the caster and those 3 inches from him miss)? Nope - that doesn't affect magical weapons either. AND the Ravagore's animus (which costs all of ONE fury) makes that weapon's entire blast radius set things on fire (in addition to its corrosion damage aftereffect that already exists), and Lylyth can cast that cheap animus herself to ensure that the Ravagores can boost both the attack and damage rolls of both their shots. In short, if you find yourself facing this list, just concede and save yourself the pain.
** In truth its Warmachine/Hordes has so many game breakers most players find it one of the most Balance Tabletop Game.

to:

* [[IronKingdoms Warmachine/Hordes]] is, for the is generally considered a fairly balanced game, however most part, very well-balanced. However, armies provide examples of Warcasters and Warlocks that handily break the Hordes army game.
** Cygnar brings us the game's most famous example. Epic Victoria Haley. A caster who offers such ridiculous amounts of board control that it's not uncommon to walk away feeling like your opponent is just playing alone while you watch. She has everything from damaging spells that reduce Spd (which stops charges and slams), she can move enemy models into vulnerable positions, she offers one of the best defensive spells against ranged attacks, and just for kicks she can copy any spells cast in her rather immense control range. Just to top it all off, her Feat makes her dominate the board like nobody else. Every enemy model caught in her control range loses either its movement or action AND she gets to decide the order you activate models. A veteran player will know how make you activate your units in such a perfect way that you will feel lucky to be able to attack anything for your entire turn.
** Saeryn of the
Legion of Everblight is, without a doubt, the most broken army in the game. Just looking at its warcasters and warbeasts provides some reasons why:
** The first reason requires some explanation. In Warmachine/Hordes, there's a trait called Focus or Fury, respectively, that allows you to boost attacks, buy more melee or ranged attacks, or do a number of other things. In Warmachine, such Focus must be allocated in advance by your warcaster (army leader) to his warjacks (big, steampunk mecha that serve as the main war machines for every army), and each warjack can only hold 3 Focus points. Fury, however, can be spontaneously generated by warbeasts (the Hordes equivalent of warjacks, except they're usually animals of some type), with a varying upper limit depending on the beast, meaning that warbeasts can buy however many attacks they need without their warlock's help. However, this is offset by the fact that generating Fury means that there's a chance that they'll frenzy and attack the nearest unit, whether it's friend or foe, next turn, and the more Fury generated, the greater the risk. Quite often, though, the nearest model is going to be an enemy that the beast is in melee with or an enemy that's near them, so it's not that huge a risk to begin with usually.
*** With the Legion of Everblight, however, most warbeasts have a special rule called "Blood Creation," which specifically says that they will ''never'' attack friendly faction warlocks, even in frenzy, which lowers the risk involved in generating frenzy for those models even more.
*** This however is only a game breaker for beginners, as a frenzied war beast can't used any special attacks or abilities and easily be baited into a trap.
** In addition, some of their warlocks have ridiculous feats (special abilities that can only be used once per game, but which are usually quite powerful):
*** Thagrosh, Prophet of Everblight, can resurrect ''any'' dead warbeast on his side. Like the massive Carnivean (a heavy warbeast that is heavily damaging, well protected, and has a special ability it can use that damages ''your'' jack/beast bit by bit every time you hit it). Granted, the beast can't do anything the turn it arrives, but still, spending all that time battering something like that down, only to have it come back - talk about a morale-killer. And if he decides to revive warbeasts that is even stronger than Carnivean such as Archangel? Do please weep, we'll provide the bucket.
*** Absylonia is even worse - her feat heals her completely, then lets her heal ''all'' damage on however many warbeasts in her battlegroup she feels like. The cost to her? One damage point ''per warbeast healed.'' Not per damage box healed, per MODEL healed. Alright, so the best solution is to make sure any warbeast you attack dies right then and there, right? Well, Absylonia also has a spell with a 4-inch Area of Effect that renders you unable to allocate focus or generate fury, so no boosting attacks or buying extra attacks to go for the sure death. Better hope the dice roll in your favor.
*** Saeryn
has a feat that keeps every warbeast in her battlegroup from being targeted by melee attacks for one round. This Which by itself is bad for melee-heavy armies like Khador, just sounds incredibly powerful, but theoretically, even shooty armies like Cygnaran may not be safe as it realyl becomes ridiculous in the Legion has a model called Nyss Sorceress on Hellion, who can cast a spell details. It effectively means that Warbeasts are also immune to free-strikes which disallows enemy unit from shooting either (although the sorceress is not a warbeast, so are all melee. The Legions specialization in fast, often flying, warbeasts means that they are not protected by Saeryn's feat). So for completely free to position themselves INSIDE enemy ranks without issue. Which synergizes perfectly with one round, you can't melee their warbeasts, and you can't shoot either. Have fun.
***
of her spells which creates a large AoE around a friendly Warbeast which Auto-hits any enemies caught inside.
**
Epic Lylyth (Shadow of Everblight). Her feat Everblight) is where it all starts - it gives EVERYONE rather infamous for absolutely crushing new players. In any army that largely ignores stealth, she provides Snipe to everything in her (admittedly small) control area +4 Range battlegroup, and a free additional shot. Combined with Ravagors which have a powerful, already long-ranged attack which leaves a damaging AoE and continuous fire effects and Bolt Throwers which push targets back. eLylyth's strategy is to their completely shred the opponent from across the board while completely ignoring many forms of defense against ranged weapons (effectively giving Snipe, normally an upkeep spell combat.
** It has been nerfed, but the Pirate Queen Skarre was also well known for a technique called 'Skarre Bombing'. Her ability Sacrificial Strike gives her a 10-inch auto-hit attack based on the Armor of a single friendly model
that can she sacrifices, with her feat also buffing friendly armor by up to 5 (post-nerf it only affect accounts for base armor), it was easy to end up with an unmissable pow 21 shot. This is a game where a common mantra for players is that even a luck handcannon shot (pow 12) can handily end a game. A pow 21 would devastate all but the hardiest warcasters, if not leave them in a borderline crippled state and easy to finish off.
*** Outside the realm of Warcasters and Warlocks we have some units and models that are considered quite gamebreaking. For a long time the innocuous Bile Thralls of the Cryx army were absolutely devastating to any unit heavy armies. On paper they seem balanced enough. Cheap, slow, weak, armed only with a pitiful ranged weapon that they are absolutely abysmal at aiming with, their statline is awful beyond awful. However, they possess a large suicide attack that auto-hits anything caught for fairly hefty damage. Getting an entire unit across the board is almost impossible, but
one person/unit at a time, to everyone in her control area). But or two should be easy enough, and that's not all! It also gives her and her warbeasts one extra shot with their ranged weapons that turn, ignoring Rate of Fire. Of course, most people playing this list will likely take Ravagores (the Legion's main heavy shooting beast) to get the most out of this feat. So how do all you counter this? You tell me. You can't hide behind clouds or use Stealthed models (Lylyth and all of the Legion warbeasts have Eyeless Sight, which sees through clouds and Stealth). You can't shoot them first unless you're playing Cygnar, because only Cygnar can equal that sort of range without artillery (18 inches for the aforementioned Ravagores), and you probably won't be able need to shoot the beasts anyways since Lylyth has the spell Shadow Pack (which puts Stealth on her and her warbeasts) which she'll almost certainly have activated (and NOTHING has a charge threat range of 18 inches). Use the Choir of Menoth's Hymn of Passage (which keeps enemies from shooting your warjacks with non-magical weapons)? Nope - there's a light warbeast called a Naga Nightlurker that has a Cost 2 animus that makes the target's ranged weapons magical, so the Ravagores can easily get through that if one is taken. Khador's Wind Wall spell (which makes non-magical ranged attacks on the caster and those 3 inches from him miss)? Nope - that doesn't affect magical weapons either. AND the Ravagore's animus (which costs all of ONE fury) makes that weapon's entire blast radius set things on fire (in addition to its corrosion damage aftereffect that already exists), and Lylyth can cast that cheap animus herself to ensure that the Ravagores can boost both the attack and damage rolls of both their shots. In short, if you find yourself facing this list, just concede and save yourself the pain.
** In truth its Warmachine/Hordes has so many game breakers most players find it one of the most Balance Tabletop Game.
completely obliterate lower armor units.
13th Aug '14 3:01:46 AM Medinoc
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Lizardmen in general have been bumped one step closer to gamebreaker thanks to 8th edition's broken magic system making Slann one of the few wizards to bypass all the negatives of the new magic system and the added emphasis on large infantry bricks make Saurus Spear Warrior units into one of the nastiest basic troopers in the game. But with the two together you face waves of tough infantry guarding non-squishy wizards that are blasting all of your army into Hell/pieces/ashes. Then they got nerfed pretty heavily in the 8th edition book; they're still very scary, but you can no longer buy Slann that get free dice for everything, the miscast-guaranteeing effects are gone, and the resistance to miscasting is reduced to an option allowing you to add or remove one point from the roll. Of course, they still have some of the scariest wizards and basic infantry in the game, but that just makes them "tough", rather than "the annihilating fury of vengeful, presumably dead gods" as they were previously.

to:

*** Lizardmen in general have been bumped one step closer to gamebreaker thanks to 8th edition's broken magic system making Slann one of the few wizards to bypass all the negatives of the new magic system and the added emphasis on large infantry bricks make Saurus Spear Warrior units into one of the nastiest basic troopers in the game. But with the two together you face waves of tough infantry guarding non-squishy wizards that are blasting all of your army into Hell/pieces/ashes. Then they got nerfed pretty heavily in the 8th edition army book; they're still very scary, but you can no longer buy Slann that get free dice for everything, the miscast-guaranteeing effects are gone, and the resistance to miscasting is reduced to an option allowing you to add or remove one point from the roll. Of course, they still have some of the scariest wizards and basic infantry in the game, but that just makes them "tough", rather than "the annihilating fury of vengeful, presumably dead gods" as they were previously.
This list shows the last 10 events of 134. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=GameBreaker.TabletopGames