History GameBreaker / TabletopGames

4th Dec '16 7:00:51 PM GuiRitter
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** Saeryn of the Legion of Everblight has a feat that keeps every warbeast in her battlegroup from being targeted by melee attacks for one round. Which by itself just sounds incredibly powerful, but it realyl becomes ridiculous in the details. It effectively means that Warbeasts are also immune to free-strikes which are all melee. The Legions specialization in fast, often flying, warbeasts means that they are completely free to position themselves INSIDE enemy ranks without issue. Which synergizes perfectly with one of her spells which creates a large AoE around a friendly Warbeast which Auto-hits any enemies caught inside.

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** Saeryn of the Legion of Everblight has a feat that keeps every warbeast in her battlegroup from being targeted by melee attacks for one round. Which by itself just sounds incredibly powerful, but it realyl really becomes ridiculous in the details. It effectively means that Warbeasts are also immune to free-strikes which are all melee. The Legions specialization in fast, often flying, warbeasts means that they are completely free to position themselves INSIDE enemy ranks without issue. Which synergizes perfectly with one of her spells which creates a large AoE around a friendly Warbeast which Auto-hits any enemies caught inside.
4th Dec '16 1:14:15 PM SteveMB
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** The second edition of the game modified the Masquerade card (if you have no cards in hand, you don't pass ''or'' receive any) to [[ObviousRulePatch neutralize this combo]].
29th Nov '16 1:29:26 PM Yukianesa
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** A portmanteau term, "CoDzilla", was used to refer to extremely overpowered Cleric and Druid builds through 3E. In addition to incredible magical power on par with the big magic classes like Wizards and Sorcerers (sometimes ''even better'', and unlike Wizards they don't even have to plan their spells out), and CoDzilla got way better combat and utility abilities on top of that. Clerics could wear heavy armour in a total {{Aver|tedTrope}}sion of SquishyWizard, plus better base attack progression. Druids were even more broken, as the ''Wild Shape'' class feature combined with the ''Natural Spell'' feat let them take on incredibly powerful combat forms while retaining their ability to pump out magic. Here's a given example: a Cleric with the Strength domain can boost his Strength by his caster level for one round, plus Righteous Might, Divine Power, Divine Favour and charging with a two-handed weapon, could conceivably kill 99% of the game's monsters in one hit, and ''this is far from the most optimised Cleric build''.
** Monte Cook ''[[CreatorsPet really]]'' [[CreatorsPet likes Wizards]], and in 5E, boy does it show.

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** A portmanteau term, "CoDzilla", "[[Franchise/{{Godzilla}} CoDzilla]]", was used to refer to extremely overpowered Cleric and Druid builds through 3E. In addition to incredible magical power on par with the big magic classes like Wizards and Sorcerers (sometimes ''even better'', and unlike Wizards they don't even have to plan their spells out), and CoDzilla got way better combat and utility abilities on top of that. Clerics could wear heavy armour in a total {{Aver|tedTrope}}sion of SquishyWizard, plus better base attack progression. Druids were even more broken, as the ''Wild Shape'' class feature combined with the ''Natural Spell'' feat let them take on incredibly powerful combat forms while retaining their ability to pump out magic. Here's a given example: a Cleric with the Strength domain can boost his Strength by his caster level for one round, plus Righteous Might, Divine Power, Divine Favour and charging with a two-handed weapon, could conceivably kill 99% of the game's monsters in one hit, and ''this is far from the most optimised Cleric build''.
** Monte Cook ''[[CreatorsPet really]]'' [[CreatorsPet likes Wizards]], and in 5E, boy does it show. LinearWarriorQuadraticWizards applies, and while a low-level Wizard with paltry HP and a limited spell selection can be a challenging play, by mid-level Wizards with creative players are effectively [[StoryBreakerPower walking cheat codes]]. By high levels, the party has effectively been relegated to the role of audience for the Wizard while they {{Curb Stomp|Battle}} {{Physical God}}s.
17th Nov '16 5:21:47 PM Yukianesa
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** Another one is Spider-Man. Nearly all of Spider-Man's cards tell you to reveal the top card of your deck, and draw it if it costs 2 or less. All of Spider-Man's cards cost 2. All your starting cards (obviously) cost 0. So if you buy nothing but Spider-Man cards, it's very easy to end up drawing your entire deck in any given turn. Spider-Man's cards have small bonuses, but when you're drawing your entire deck, you still end up with huge amounts of attack.

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** Another one is Spider-Man. Nearly all of Spider-Man's cards tell you to reveal the top card of your deck, and draw it if it costs 2 or less. All of Spider-Man's cards cost 2. All your starting cards (obviously) cost 0. So if you buy nothing but Spider-Man cards, it's very easy to end up drawing your entire deck in any given turn. Spider-Man's cards have small bonuses, but when you're drawing your entire deck, you still end up with huge amounts of attack.attack.
* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'':
** A portmanteau term, "CoDzilla", was used to refer to extremely overpowered Cleric and Druid builds through 3E. In addition to incredible magical power on par with the big magic classes like Wizards and Sorcerers (sometimes ''even better'', and unlike Wizards they don't even have to plan their spells out), and CoDzilla got way better combat and utility abilities on top of that. Clerics could wear heavy armour in a total {{Aver|tedTrope}}sion of SquishyWizard, plus better base attack progression. Druids were even more broken, as the ''Wild Shape'' class feature combined with the ''Natural Spell'' feat let them take on incredibly powerful combat forms while retaining their ability to pump out magic. Here's a given example: a Cleric with the Strength domain can boost his Strength by his caster level for one round, plus Righteous Might, Divine Power, Divine Favour and charging with a two-handed weapon, could conceivably kill 99% of the game's monsters in one hit, and ''this is far from the most optimised Cleric build''.
** Monte Cook ''[[CreatorsPet really]]'' [[CreatorsPet likes Wizards]], and in 5E, boy does it show.
9th Aug '16 11:22:52 PM red43
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*** So far averted with Match Play, the point system of Age of Sigmar, so far its been halted as Games-Workshops most balance system to date.
18th Jun '16 11:53:51 PM nombretomado
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** A later game from the same manufacturers, LegendOfTheBurningSands, was completely broken out of the box; this was eventually explained by the fact that it included a bunch of cards copied from LegendOfTheFiveRings without paying attention to how they worked in the new system. The huge breaker? Blacksmith, a card that gave a +2 strength to any character. In Five Rings, where fights were determined by comparing the total Strength on each side, this was a reasonable advantage; but in Burning Sands, where a unit with higher strength was immune from any unit with lower Strength, it was utterly overwhelming and the game boiled down to rushing out djinni armed with swords as quickly as possible. The game died shortly afterwards.

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** A later game from the same manufacturers, LegendOfTheBurningSands, was completely broken out of the box; this was eventually explained by the fact that it included a bunch of cards copied from LegendOfTheFiveRings ''TabletopGame/LegendOfTheFiveRings'' without paying attention to how they worked in the new system. The huge breaker? Blacksmith, a card that gave a +2 strength to any character. In Five Rings, where fights were determined by comparing the total Strength on each side, this was a reasonable advantage; but in Burning Sands, where a unit with higher strength was immune from any unit with lower Strength, it was utterly overwhelming and the game boiled down to rushing out djinni armed with swords as quickly as possible. The game died shortly afterwards.
22nd Apr '16 6:20:34 PM lufan131
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* The ''[[TabletopGame/{{Pokemon}} Pokémon]]'' trading card game has had few cards so broken they were banned (most banned cards are gag cards that were intended simply to be promotional giveaways), but there were two notable examples; Slowking and Sneasel from the Neo Genesis set. Slowking had a Pokémon Power that allowed its user to flip a coin whenever the opponent played a Trainer card, and if that coin was heads, the Trainer card would return to the user's deck without affecting the game. In the Japanese version of the game, this Power could only be used while Slowking was active. When the card was translated to English, however, it was translated incorrectly. The English version of the card not only allowed its owner to use the Power while Slowking was benched, but the power was cumulative, meaning players could flip a coin for each Slowking they had in play every time their opponent played a Trainer card, and if even one were heads, that card would have no effect. While the Japanese version of the card was barely playable (Slowking was not a good attacker, and was easily KO'ed when active), the English version was exceedingly powerful because a player could place one or more Slowking on the bench, prevent the opponent from playing any Trainer cards, and still play a stronger Pokémon as the active Pokémon, which basically shut down the opponent's deck forever. Sneasel was simply banned because it was too powerful offensively; by the second turn of the game, its Beat Up attack allowed the user to flip up to six coins (one for each benched Pokemon and one for Sneasel), netting 20 damage per heads, and + 20 more damage due to the two Darkness energies that were on Sneasel in order to use the attack. Along with broken trainers like Computer Search and Professor Oak, this was easy to accomplish, and from the second turn on it was easy to AVERAGE 80 damage per turn; considering the maximum HP for any Pokemon was 120 at the time (and 120 was a rare trait, the average for a fully evolved Pokemon was about 80-90), it's easy to see why this was banned; you simply didn't win if you didn't play your own Sneasel deck. These bans were effectively lifted once the set was rotated out of the Modified format (since you could only play them in the Unlimited format then), and since then, no card that has been released in a regular set intended for play has been banned.

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* The ''[[TabletopGame/{{Pokemon}} Pokémon]]'' trading card game has had few cards so broken they were banned (most banned cards are gag cards that were intended simply to be promotional giveaways), but there were two notable examples; Slowking and Sneasel from the Neo Genesis set. Slowking had a Pokémon Power that allowed its user to flip a coin whenever the opponent played a Trainer card, and if that coin was heads, the Trainer card would return to the user's deck without affecting the game. In the Japanese version of the game, this Power could only be used while Slowking was active. When the card was translated to English, however, it was translated incorrectly. The English version of the card not only allowed its owner to use the Power while Slowking was benched, but the power was cumulative, meaning players could flip a coin for each Slowking they had in play every time their opponent played a Trainer card, and if even one were heads, that card would have no effect. While the Japanese version of the card was barely playable (Slowking was not a good attacker, and was easily KO'ed when active), the English version was exceedingly powerful because a player could place one or more Slowking on the bench, prevent the opponent from playing any Trainer cards, and still play a stronger Pokémon as the active Pokémon, which basically shut down the opponent's deck forever. Sneasel was simply banned because it was too powerful offensively; by the second turn of the game, its Beat Up attack allowed the user to flip up to six coins (one for each benched Pokemon and one for Sneasel), netting 20 damage per heads, and + 20 more damage due to the two Darkness energies that were on Sneasel in order to use the attack. Along with broken trainers like Computer Search and Professor Oak, this was easy to accomplish, and from the second turn on it was easy to AVERAGE 80 damage per turn; considering the maximum HP for any Pokemon was 120 at the time (and 120 was a rare trait, the average for a fully evolved Pokemon was about 80-90), it's easy to see why this was banned; you simply didn't win if you didn't play your own Sneasel deck. These bans were effectively lifted once the set was rotated out of the Modified format (since you could only play them in the Unlimited format then), with only two other cards being banned since, First Ticket due to a rule change, and since then, no card that has been released in a regular set intended for play has been banned.Lysandre's Trump Card, because the recycling ability it had disabled one way to win.
25th Sep '15 2:36:33 AM JohnimusPrime
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* In the Marvel themed deck building game Legendary, Deadpool has a card called "odd ball" which gives him a power bonus equal to the number of previously played cards with odd card values. It itself has an odd card value, meaning that playing 3 Odd Balls gives Deadpool at least a +6 bonus. By stuffing the deck with them a player can devastate villains and almost assure a win; the only solution found so far is to simply ban Deadpool.

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* In the Marvel themed deck building game Legendary, Deadpool has a card called "odd ball" which gives him a power bonus equal to the number of previously played cards with odd card values. It itself has an odd card value, meaning that playing 3 Odd Balls gives Deadpool at least a +6 bonus. By stuffing the deck with them a player can devastate villains and almost assure a win; the only solution found so far is to simply ban Deadpool.Deadpool.
** That's nothing. In Legendary Villains, Electro has a card ("Supercharge") that gives you +1 attack for every card you discarded before playing it. All of Electro's other cards have a mechanic ("Dodge") that lets you discard them to draw a new card. If you can manage to get rid of enough of your starting cards, and buy nothing but Dodge cards and Supercharge throughout the game, you can end up in an infinite loop, dodging cards and drawing more Dodge cards. You can keep this going for as long as you like, until you decide it's time to play Supercharge and get the actual attack bonus. It does require a lot of time, and specific tailoring of your deck, but effectively gives you infinite attack. The flavor text is "Unlimited power!!", implying that this strategy may, in fact, be the intention of the designers.
** Another one is Spider-Man. Nearly all of Spider-Man's cards tell you to reveal the top card of your deck, and draw it if it costs 2 or less. All of Spider-Man's cards cost 2. All your starting cards (obviously) cost 0. So if you buy nothing but Spider-Man cards, it's very easy to end up drawing your entire deck in any given turn. Spider-Man's cards have small bonuses, but when you're drawing your entire deck, you still end up with huge amounts of attack.
22nd Aug '15 2:26:03 PM HeraldAlberich
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* Another fine example from Wizards of the Coast: in their ''StarWars Miniatures'' game, a ''CloneWars'' version of Obi-Wan called General Obi-Wan Kenobi, or GOWK, was so insanely hard to damage that it was eventually banned due to dominating the tournament scene. The brokenness was compounded in that GOWK came from a starter set, meaning anyone who wanted one could buy the starter (as opposed to ripping through countless random booster packs).

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* Another fine example from Wizards of the Coast: in their ''StarWars ''Franchise/StarWars Miniatures'' game, a ''CloneWars'' Clone Wars version of Obi-Wan called General Obi-Wan Kenobi, or GOWK, was so insanely hard to damage that it was eventually banned due to dominating the tournament scene. The brokenness was compounded in that GOWK came from a starter set, meaning anyone who wanted one could buy the starter (as opposed to ripping through countless random booster packs).
26th Jul '15 10:35:02 PM CountDorku
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** The successor game, ''TabletopGame/WarhammerAgeOfSigmar'', tries to avoid this by not caring about game balance to begin with, to the point where units don't even have points values, but some of this still crept in as early as the changeover PDF's. High Elf Repeater Bolt Throwers, for example, are ambiguously written so it's not hard to read them as firing 72 shots per turn. Also, with no restriction on the units you can bring at all, fielding 36 Dark Elf War Hydras or an entire wheelbarrowful of Nagashes is mechanically fine; the expectation is that it'll be balanced by you being thrown out of the gaming group, which is kind of an awkward basis.
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