History Fridge / TheHunchbackOfNotreDame

1st Sep '16 6:30:28 PM Sithcario
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** The [[OminousLatinChanting Ominous Latin Chanting]] during Hellfire is from the Confiteor, which is [[BilingualBonus the Catholic confessional prayer]]. The lines sung by the priests at the beginning address God, Mary, the saints, and so forth. The counterpoint lines building to the main motif confess that one has sinned in thought, word, and deed. At this point, Frollo has sinned in though, which he does admit, and is presently sinning in word. The "Mea Culpa" is where the song goes completely opposite from the prayer instead of diverging as it had been. Frollo blames Esmeralda for his past sins instead of his humanity, denies that he has actually sinned, blames God for making it that sin could taint him, declares that his lust is not sinful, and demands that, instead of admitting that he is impure, that Esmeralda should be punished, be it damnation or him having his way with her without penalty on his soul. When you add the fact that Frollo is "praying" to Mary directly, he is not only spitting in God's face, but he's essentially saying to Mary "Everything your son taught is bull, so the rules don't apply to me."

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** The [[OminousLatinChanting Ominous Latin Chanting]] during Hellfire is from the Confiteor, which is [[BilingualBonus the Catholic confessional prayer]]. The lines sung by the priests at the beginning address God, Mary, the saints, and so forth. The counterpoint lines building to the main motif confess that one has sinned in thought, word, and deed. At this point, Frollo has sinned in though, which he does admit, and is presently sinning in word. The "Mea Culpa" is where [[JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope the song goes completely opposite from the prayer instead of diverging as it had been.been]]. Frollo blames Esmeralda for his past sins instead of his humanity, denies that he has actually sinned, blames God for making it that sin could taint him, declares that his lust is not sinful, and demands that, instead of admitting that he is impure, that Esmeralda should be punished, be it damnation or him having his way with her without penalty on his soul. When you add the fact that Frollo is "praying" to Mary directly, he is not only spitting in God's face, but he's essentially saying to Mary "Everything your son taught is bull, so the rules don't apply to me."
1st Sep '16 6:28:59 PM Sithcario
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Added DiffLines:

** The [[OminousLatinChanting Ominous Latin Chanting]] during Hellfire is from the Confiteor, which is [[BilingualBonus the Catholic confessional prayer]]. The lines sung by the priests at the beginning address God, Mary, the saints, and so forth. The counterpoint lines building to the main motif confess that one has sinned in thought, word, and deed. At this point, Frollo has sinned in though, which he does admit, and is presently sinning in word. The "Mea Culpa" is where the song goes completely opposite from the prayer instead of diverging as it had been. Frollo blames Esmeralda for his past sins instead of his humanity, denies that he has actually sinned, blames God for making it that sin could taint him, declares that his lust is not sinful, and demands that, instead of admitting that he is impure, that Esmeralda should be punished, be it damnation or him having his way with her without penalty on his soul. When you add the fact that Frollo is "praying" to Mary directly, he is not only spitting in God's face, but he's essentially saying to Mary "Everything your son taught is bull, so the rules don't apply to me."
***The kicker? From here on out, the choir has no lyrics proper until the "Kyrie Eleison" at the end, leaving part of the Confiteor unsung: the lines in which one asks for forgiveness and absolution.
18th Aug '16 6:23:59 AM Vampireandthen
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** Isn't it strange how, despite growing up raised by someone as cruel and abusive as Frollo, Quasi himself is kind and gentle, instead of becoming just as cruel and abusive as Frollo? Well, perhaps those gargoyles, if they really are guardian angels, were there to protect Quasi from Frollo, and prevent him from becoming too horribly traumatised from Frollo's mistreatment. God really does work in mysterious ways.....
18th Aug '16 4:17:15 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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*** Except when Quasimodo and Pheobus try to protest, Clopin remarks "That's what ''they all'' say"...
5th Aug '16 3:42:27 PM HouseLyrander
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* A small one, but Clopin's motley seems like a standard fool's outfit with a NiceHat instead of the typical [[HappyHarlequinHat belled cap]]. Nothing particularly noteworthy about that until you find out that [[CommediaDellArte harlequins]] often wore hat's just like Clopin's and belled caps were more closely associated with [[TheJester court jesters]]. He's also the one narrating the story and harlequins are the only ones supposed to [[NoFourthWall address the audience]] and Clopin becomes a clear harlequin archetype. [[spoiler: This can be seen as foreshadowing that Clopin is TheLeader of Paris's disenfranchised and and will help the heroes out in the end just like how the classic harlequin character is TheLeader of the Zanni and helps the lovers get together in the end.]]
23rd Jul '16 10:56:33 PM AtarahDerek
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* Quasimodo passes out while hanging from Esmeralda's hand, in a universe where dangling by one's arms is apparently quite easy. So why didn't Quasi last as long as the standard Disney character in the same position? His kyphosis. The abnormal thoracic curve responsible for his hunch also reduces his chest cavity greatly (this is one of the primary health issues suffered by kyphosis patients). While Quasi does have a lot of strength and stamina after years of ringing the bells, he still cannot withstand as long periods suspended by his arms as other characters can, due to the fact that his smaller lungs cause him to asphyxiate faster.
19th Jun '16 11:06:14 PM TastyHorse
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* Where was the Archdeacon in all this? Frollo works in the Palace of Justice, a fair distance away from Notre Dame, but the archdeacon - if he is anything like many Catholic ministers - likely also lives in the cathedral. He at least works there on a regular basis, and had a great deal more opportunity to see Quasimodo than Frollo did. In twenty years he never once talked to Quasimodo? Did he never come up to the bell tower to see this condemned youth and comfort him? In doing so he would have seen what horrible psychological damage Frollo was inflicting, and taken steps to prevent it. Was the archdeacon the true villain?
11th Jun '16 6:10:08 PM hiti67
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**At the beginning he was just a Judge, twenty years later he is Minister of Justice. He got promoted by the King of France for doing such a stand-up-job of Romani Murder and now he is basically Dicator of Paris.
5th May '16 2:07:37 AM annieholmes
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* The musical makes the talking gargoyles much more obviously hallucinations/wish fulfillments by Quasimodo's damaged mind. The equivalent of Jason Alexander's Hugo in the film is the same, but the Victor gargoyle is made into more of a loving father figure, and the female of the trio is changed into a beautiful angel gargoyle named Loni, who seems to be [[OedipusComplex both his source of motherly affection and romantically approachable]]. This is weird enough, but then you get to the final scene, in which Quasimodo is hesitating throwing Frollo off of the cathedral. Frollo pleads "You don't want to do this!", and Charles leans into Quasimodo's ear and whispers, "Yes, you do."

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* The musical makes the talking gargoyles much more obviously hallucinations/wish fulfillments by Quasimodo's damaged mind. The equivalent of Jason Alexander's Hugo in the film is the same, but the Victor gargoyle is made into more of a loving father figure, and the female of the trio is changed into a beautiful angel gargoyle named Loni, who seems to be [[OedipusComplex both his source of motherly affection and romantically approachable]]. This is weird enough, but then you get to the final scene, in which Quasimodo is hesitating throwing Frollo off of the cathedral. Frollo pleads "You don't want to do this!", and Charles (in the German version. It's the ''entire choir'' in the US version.) leans into Quasimodo's ear and whispers, "Yes, you do."
11th Mar '16 7:06:56 PM Totin0sthepizzaB0y
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**Don't worry, he's fine. At the very end of the movie when Phoebus and Esmeralda emerge from the church, you can see him standing in the large crowd. He most likely retired or passed away peacefully (guy was at least in his late 70s during the film's events) between movies. I actually don't know if Archdeacons are allowed to retire, but he's definitely alive and well by the end.
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