History Fridge / FireEmblem

14th Sep '17 9:51:12 PM Monsund
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* Notice how each game puts sole emphasis on its respective nation, often when it's concerning the BigBad and sometimes the GreaterScopeVillain? It was stated that most of the world was flooded by Ashunera when she got out of control. One must wonder: was it just Tellius that got hit with this or ''the rest of the nations of the VideoGame/FireEmblem world?'' This could be one explanation as to why the world of ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'' and possibly the other worlds [[MedievalStasis have not technologically advanced despite Awakening being literally 2000 years since Marth's reign]], Anri being thousands of years before Marth, and [[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral Judgral]] being another several thousand years earlier than him, including the thousands of years it's been since Loptyr ruled the world ([[spoiler:[[FridgeHorror Grima]]]] could be another explanation). It's also a ''very'' good thing that the heroes of their respective continents stopped their respective [[BigBad Big Bads]], too, because if they didn't, imagine ''the horrors that could be wrought upon the other continents if they weren't stopped'', such as [[OmnicidalManiac Lop]][[BackFromTheDead tyr]], [[GodIsEvil Ash]][[KillEmAll era]], and ''especially'' [[spoiler:'''[[EldritchAbomination GRI]][[{{Dracolich}} MA]]''']].
22nd Jul '17 11:45:22 PM MayIncon
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** Also Elincia fills the same role as [[VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight Nyna]] and [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBindingBlade Guinevere]], as the princess in exile who the heroes helped to restore their respective kindgoms. and never end up as the main character's love interests for some reason.

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** Also Elincia fills the same role as [[VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight Nyna]] and [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBindingBlade Guinevere]], as the princess in exile who the heroes helped to restore their respective kindgoms. and never end up as the main character's love interests for some reason.reasons such as political issues or the princess already has someone in mind.
22nd Jul '17 11:43:23 PM MayIncon
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Added DiffLines:

** Also Elincia fills the same role as [[VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight Nyna]] and [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBindingBlade Guinevere]], as the princess in exile who the heroes helped to restore their respective kindgoms. and never end up as the main character's love interests for some reason.
8th May '17 11:26:56 PM ElodieHiras
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Added DiffLines:

** Also from Radiant Down: Part 4 involves TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt caued by a mad goddess and efforts to reverse it. Why then would the survivors split into three groups? In Fire Emblem, you have [[QuantityVersusQuality the best Quality of troops versus the best Quantity of troops the enemy brings against you]], therefore grouping all your troops in one location is just begging for all the enemies to gang up on the weak link, or any link at all, and wear them down until they die. Therefore, splitting up in teams is the best way for the player army to fight the much larger enemy army by forcing them to split down and lose the advantage of numbers without you losing your advantage of quality. Splitting into three army is just a larger scale version of that.
4th May '17 9:18:06 AM GlitteringFlowers
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** Ike does not get the princess, but he does get the [[spoiler:[[YaoiGuys prince]]. Of Daein, no less.]] FridgeBrilliance indeed.

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** Ike does not get the princess, but he does ''does'' get the [[spoiler:[[YaoiGuys prince]]. Of Daein, no less.]] FridgeBrilliance indeed.indeed.
** Plus, Elincia ''can'' get [[LadyAndKnight her own Knight!]] And it's Geoffrey, who's had a BodyguardCrush on her for a long time and is ''far'' more used to noble life than Ike will ever be.



* How come Celice is specialized in killing mages? Given how the cult has taken over Jugdral, he figures the best way to solve the problem is to focus on those responsible for the misery of everyone.
** It's important to note that amongst the Legendary Weapon users, Celice and Aless are essentially a Paladin with Swords as their preferred weapon. Gae Bolg and Gugnir are wielded by DragonRider, while the Helswath are a thrown Axe. It makes tons of sense that the only close range weapon that is wielded by non-airborne units are given the strongest anti magical capabilities.

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* How come Celice Seliph is specialized in killing mages? Given how the cult has taken over Jugdral, he figures the best way to solve the problem is to focus on those responsible for the misery of everyone.
** It's important to note that amongst the Legendary Weapon users, Celice Seliph and Aless are essentially a Paladin with Swords as their preferred weapon. Gae Bolg and Gugnir are wielded by DragonRider, while the Helswath are a thrown Axe. It makes tons of sense that the only close range weapon that is wielded by non-airborne units are given the strongest anti magical capabilities.
8th Mar '17 11:21:43 AM BlackBaroness
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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LM-s5C0dnZs The US commercial]] for ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword]]'' is a good example of the confusion that can arise from GameplayAndStorySegregation. On one hand, the "trust nobody" tagline makes sense in the context of the setting: the player's band of warriors routinely has to deal with the consequences of shadow politics, in which betrayal and attempted assassinations are common elements. However, none of this affects the player directly, as the battlefield is strictly divided between friendly and enemy units, with no amount diplomacy beyond convincing certain enemies to join your side. In fact, said enemies are the ''only'' defectors on the battlefield, and on the player's side they will remain as loyal as every other playable unit; the player would no be able to recruit them if they were to take the "trust nobody" tagline at face value. Also, [[BadBoss why would the good guys]] [[KickTheDog poison one of their own comrades]]?

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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LM-s5C0dnZs The US commercial]] for ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword]]'' is a good example of the confusion that can arise from GameplayAndStorySegregation. On one hand, the "trust nobody" tagline makes sense in the context of the setting: the player's band of warriors routinely has to deal with the consequences of shadow politics, in which betrayal and attempted assassinations are common elements. However, none of this affects the player directly, as the battlefield is strictly divided between friendly and enemy units, with no amount diplomacy beyond convincing certain enemies to join your side. In fact, said enemies are the ''only'' defectors on the battlefield, and on the player's side they will remain as loyal as every other playable unit; the player would no not be able to recruit them if they were to take the "trust nobody" tagline at face value. Also, [[BadBoss why would the good guys]] [[KickTheDog poison one of their own comrades]]?
8th Mar '17 11:21:21 AM BlackBaroness
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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LM-s5C0dnZs The US commercial]] for ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword]]'' is a good example of the confusion that can arise from GameplayAndStorySegregation. On one hand, the "trust nobody" tagline makes sense in the context of the setting: the player's band of warriors routinely has to deal with the consequences of shadow politics, in which betrayal and attempted assassinations are common elements. However, none of this affects the player directly, as the battlefield is strictly divided between friendly and enemy units, with no amount diplomacy beyond convincing certain enemies to join your side. In fact, said enemies are the ''only'' defectors on the battlefield, and on the player's side they will remain as loyal as everyone else; the player would no be able to do this if they were to take the "trust nobody" tagline at face value. Also, [[BadBoss why would the good guys]] [[KickTheDog poison one of their own comrades]]?

to:

* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LM-s5C0dnZs The US commercial]] for ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword]]'' is a good example of the confusion that can arise from GameplayAndStorySegregation. On one hand, the "trust nobody" tagline makes sense in the context of the setting: the player's band of warriors routinely has to deal with the consequences of shadow politics, in which betrayal and attempted assassinations are common elements. However, none of this affects the player directly, as the battlefield is strictly divided between friendly and enemy units, with no amount diplomacy beyond convincing certain enemies to join your side. In fact, said enemies are the ''only'' defectors on the battlefield, and on the player's side they will remain as loyal as everyone else; every other playable unit; the player would no be able to do this recruit them if they were to take the "trust nobody" tagline at face value. Also, [[BadBoss why would the good guys]] [[KickTheDog poison one of their own comrades]]?
8th Mar '17 11:20:28 AM BlackBaroness
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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LM-s5C0dnZs The US commercial]] for ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword]]'' is a good example of the confusion that can arise from GameplayAndStorySegregation. On one hand, the "trust nobody" tagline makes sense in the context of the setting: the player's band of warriors routinely has to deal with the consequences of shadow politics, in which betrayal is a common element. However, none of this affects the player directly, as the battlefield is strictly divided between friendly and enemy units, with no amount diplomacy beyond convincing certain enemies to join your side. In fact, said enemies are the ''only'' defectors on the battlefield, and on the player's side they will remain as loyal as everyone else; the player would no be able to do this if they were to take the "trust nobody" tagline at face value. Also, [[BadBoss why would the good guys]] [[KickTheDog poison one of their own comrades]]?

to:

* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LM-s5C0dnZs The US commercial]] for ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword]]'' is a good example of the confusion that can arise from GameplayAndStorySegregation. On one hand, the "trust nobody" tagline makes sense in the context of the setting: the player's band of warriors routinely has to deal with the consequences of shadow politics, in which betrayal is a and attempted assassinations are common element.elements. However, none of this affects the player directly, as the battlefield is strictly divided between friendly and enemy units, with no amount diplomacy beyond convincing certain enemies to join your side. In fact, said enemies are the ''only'' defectors on the battlefield, and on the player's side they will remain as loyal as everyone else; the player would no be able to do this if they were to take the "trust nobody" tagline at face value. Also, [[BadBoss why would the good guys]] [[KickTheDog poison one of their own comrades]]?
8th Mar '17 11:19:34 AM BlackBaroness
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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LM-s5C0dnZs The US commercial]] for ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword]]'' falls under this when taken at face value: the game - and the rest of the series - ''isn't'' about trusting nobody, and in fact the heroes are very trusting in that they recruit everyone that's interested in their cause. Also, [[BadBoss why would the good guys]] [[KickTheDog poison one of their own comrades]]?

to:

* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LM-s5C0dnZs The US commercial]] for ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword]]'' falls under this when taken at face value: the game - and the rest is a good example of the series - ''isn't'' about trusting nobody, and in fact the heroes are very trusting in confusion that can arise from GameplayAndStorySegregation. On one hand, the "trust nobody" tagline makes sense in the context of the setting: the player's band of warriors routinely has to deal with the consequences of shadow politics, in which betrayal is a common element. However, none of this affects the player directly, as the battlefield is strictly divided between friendly and enemy units, with no amount diplomacy beyond convincing certain enemies to join your side. In fact, said enemies are the ''only'' defectors on the battlefield, and on the player's side they recruit will remain as loyal as everyone that's interested in their cause.else; the player would no be able to do this if they were to take the "trust nobody" tagline at face value. Also, [[BadBoss why would the good guys]] [[KickTheDog poison one of their own comrades]]?
21st Feb '17 9:19:17 AM CalicoJackRackham
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* If you think about it from a realistic perspective, the weapon triangle makes complete sense. Swords beat Axes because Swords are more graceful and less clumsy than an Axe. Axes are effective against Lances, simply because an Axe has the power to snap a Lance in half. Lances beat Swords because of their longer reach and ability to hit more vital parts
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