History Franchise / LEGO

21st Oct '17 12:26:11 PM Saber15
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* HumongousMecha: ''Exo-Force'' was a line of anime-inspired mechs with [[AnimeHair very anime-inspired]] pilots featuring heavy-duty clicky joints allowing them to be posed like an action figure.

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* HumongousMecha: ''Exo-Force'' was a line of anime-inspired mechs mechas with [[AnimeHair very much anime-inspired]] pilots featuring pilots. The mechas introduced heavy-duty clicky joints two degree of freedom joints, allowing them to be posed like an action figure.figure. A few other mechs have shown up in other LEGO lines before and since ''Exo-Force'', but not as the main focus.
21st Oct '17 12:24:07 PM Saber15
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* HumongousMecha: ''Exo-Force'' was a line of anime-inspired mechs with [[AnimeHair very anime-inspired]] pilots featuring heavy-duty clicky joints allowing them to be posed like an action figure.
18th Oct '17 10:14:21 PM jormis29
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* ''VideoGame/LEGOBattles''
7th Oct '17 5:07:36 PM Prinzenick
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** Minifigs weren't introduced until 1975, and the earliest ones prior to 1978 had no faces, arms or movable legs.
7th Oct '17 4:52:52 PM Prinzenick
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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The earliest Lego products weren't even construction bricks but wooden toys. They didn't even start making plastic toys until 1947, and it took another couple years before they even made their first precursor to a Lego brick, the Automatic Binding Brick.

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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: EarlyInstallmentWeirdness:
**
The earliest Lego products weren't even construction bricks but wooden toys. They didn't even start making plastic toys until 1947, and it took another couple years before they even made their first precursor to a Lego brick, the Automatic Binding Brick.
** And even then, the brick in its iconic form wasn't finalized until 1958, and the bricks before that had limited interlocking and a less modular design.
** The bricks from 1949 to 1957 were also made of cellulose acetate, while the bricks from 1958 and on are madr with ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) polymer.



* NoBackwardsCompatibilityInTheFuture: Averted. Save for specialized parts (i.e. the Technic or Galidor line) Lego bricks are designed to be modular and universally adaptatable. A Lego brick from 1958 will absolutely work with a Lego brick from 2017.

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* NoBackwardsCompatibilityInTheFuture: NoBackwardsCompatibilityInTheFuture:
**
Averted. Save for specialized parts (i.e. the Technic or Galidor line) Lego bricks are designed to be modular and universally adaptatable. A Lego brick from 1958 will absolutely work with a Lego brick from 2017.2017.
** Sadly, this doesn't apply to the Lego bricks made from 1949 to 1957, which have limited locking ability and lack of versatility compared to the bricks from 1958 and on.
7th Oct '17 4:43:44 PM Prinzenick
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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The earliest Lego products weren't even construction toys (their iconic brick wasn't even invented until the mid 50's) but wooden toys.

to:

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The earliest Lego products weren't even construction toys (their iconic brick wasn't even invented until the mid 50's) bricks but wooden toys.toys. They didn't even start making plastic toys until 1947, and it took another couple years before they even made their first precursor to a Lego brick, the Automatic Binding Brick.
7th Oct '17 4:40:00 PM Prinzenick
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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The earliest Lego products weren't even construction toys (their iconic brick wasn't even invented until the mid 50's) but wooden toys.
5th Oct '17 6:21:09 PM ElSquibbonator
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* FamilyFreindlyFirearms: See under ActualPacifist. This was the company's stance for a ''long'' time, and to some extent it still is today. For example, you still won't see any LEGO models representing realistic military vehicles (with the exception of two [[http://www.ibrickcity.com/lego-10226-sopwith-camel/ collector's]] [[http://lego.wikia.com/wiki/10024_Red_Baron models]] featuring a Sopwith Camel and a Fokker Triplane). They aren't quite as strict about it as they used to be, though; since they were first introduced with the Pirate theme in the 1990s, stylized minifig-scale guns have appeared in the ''Adventurers,'', ''Batman'', ''Indiana Jones'' and ''Wonder Woman'' themes.

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* FamilyFreindlyFirearms: FamilyFriendlyFirearms: See under ActualPacifist. This was the company's stance for a ''long'' time, and to some extent it still is today. For example, you still won't see any LEGO models representing realistic military vehicles (with the exception of two [[http://www.ibrickcity.com/lego-10226-sopwith-camel/ collector's]] [[http://lego.wikia.com/wiki/10024_Red_Baron models]] featuring a Sopwith Camel and a Fokker Triplane). They aren't quite as strict about it as they used to be, though; since they were first introduced with the Pirate theme in the 1990s, stylized minifig-scale guns have appeared in the ''Adventurers,'', ''Batman'', ''Indiana Jones'' and ''Wonder Woman'' themes.
5th Oct '17 6:16:47 PM ElSquibbonator
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* ActualPacifist: The creator of LEGO, Creator/OleKirkChristiansen, having lived through WWII, was one. It is for this reason that LEGO does not make military sets, and even the first gun pieces for cowboys and the like were controversial within the company. This is also why LEGO bricks initially came in bright primary colors that didn't include green or brown; Christiansen didn't want kids to make realistic military vehicles and gear out of them.
** The company itself is more of a TechnicalPacifist that allows for FamilyFriendlyFirearms. Depictions of medieval or futuristic warfare are apparently fine (consider the Castle, Pirates and Star Wars sets). It's just the modern and [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI World]] [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Wars]] era that LEGO firmly refuses to cover. There have been a handful of exceptions through the years, though, including a series of [[http://www.ibrickcity.com/lego-10226-sopwith-camel/ collector's]] [[http://lego.wikia.com/wiki/10024_Red_Baron models]] featuring a Sopwith Camel and a Fokker Triplane, two World War I fighter planes, as well as a handful of [[Franchise/IndianaJones Indiana Jones]] sets featuring the [[http://lego.wikia.com/wiki/7198_Fighter_Plane_Attack Pilatus P-2]] (which admittedly never saw combat, being intended as a "trainer" aircraft) plus another World War I fighter in the Albatros D.III. Furthermore, the F-86 Sabre and Mark VIII heavy tank both have official designs depicted in [[VideoGame/LegoIndianaJones Lego Indiana Jones 2]], but these were never released into physical sets. The Film/WonderWoman sets also depict World War I-era fighter planes.

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* ActualPacifist: The creator of LEGO, Creator/OleKirkChristiansen, having lived through WWII, was one. It is for this reason that LEGO does not make military sets, and even the first gun pieces for cowboys pirates and the like in the 1990s were controversial within the company. This is also why LEGO bricks initially came in bright primary colors that didn't include green or brown; Christiansen didn't want kids to make realistic military vehicles and gear out of them.
them (not that it actually stopped them. . .).
** The company itself today is more of a TechnicalPacifist that allows for FamilyFriendlyFirearms.FamilyFriendlyFirearms and stylized depictions of real weapons. Depictions of medieval or futuristic warfare are apparently fine (consider the Castle, Pirates and Star Wars sets). It's just the modern and [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI World]] [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Wars]] era that LEGO firmly refuses to cover. There have been a handful of exceptions through the years, though, including a series of [[http://www.ibrickcity.com/lego-10226-sopwith-camel/ collector's]] [[http://lego.wikia.com/wiki/10024_Red_Baron models]] featuring a Sopwith Camel and a Fokker Triplane, two World War I fighter planes, as well as a handful of [[Franchise/IndianaJones Indiana Jones]] sets featuring the [[http://lego.wikia.com/wiki/7198_Fighter_Plane_Attack Pilatus P-2]] (which admittedly never saw combat, being intended as a "trainer" aircraft) plus another World War I fighter in the Albatros D.III. Furthermore, the F-86 Sabre and Mark VIII heavy tank both have official designs depicted in [[VideoGame/LegoIndianaJones Lego Indiana Jones 2]], but these were never released into physical sets. The Film/WonderWoman sets also depict World War I-era fighter planes.



* FamilyFreindlyFirearms: See under ActualPacifist. This was the company's stance for a ''long'' time, and to some extent it still is today. For example, you still won't see any LEGO models representing realistic military vehicles (with the exception of two [[http://www.ibrickcity.com/lego-10226-sopwith-camel/ collector's]] [[http://lego.wikia.com/wiki/10024_Red_Baron models]] featuring a Sopwith Camel and a Fokker Triplane). They aren't quite as strict about it as they used to be, though; since they were first introduced with the Pirate theme in the 1990s, stylized minifig-scale guns have appeared in the ''Adventurers,'', ''Batman'', ''Indiana Jones'' and ''Wonder Woman'' themes.



* ImpossibleHourglassFigure: Pretty much every female minifigure is printed with one.

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* ImpossibleHourglassFigure: Pretty much every female minifigure is printed with one.one, though the shape of the minifigure mold make it stand out a bit less.



* {{Mukokuseki}}: LEGO have yellow skin for this reason, however many people think of them as being White. There are minifigures with more realistic skin colors.

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* {{Mukokuseki}}: LEGO have yellow skin for this reason, however many people think of them as being White. reason. There are minifigures with more realistic skin colors.colors--usually if the figure in question is adapted from another property where the character they are based on is of a specific race to begin with.
4th Oct '17 12:32:40 PM Prinzenick
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* UnderCrank: LEGO commercials use this technique--whenever the set is being thrown together in the commercial, it's actually the model being taken apart in reverse so it looks smoother and faster when played forward at faster speed.
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