History Franchise / DisneyAnimatedCanon

22nd Feb '17 7:58:44 AM dsneybuf
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** "Human Again" from ''Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast'' and "Morning Report" from ''Disney/TheLionKing'' were un-needed additions to their respective films, since the movies didn't have them originally ("Human Again" was a BigLippedAlligatorMoment that rendered the story's timeline confusing, a realization that convinced Editor-In-Chief and studio chief Jeffrey Katzenberg to send it to the scrapboard. "Morning Report" didn't even exist until the time came for ''The Lion King'' to hit Broadway, and disappeared from movie prints and home video releases struck from 2011 onward.). They aren't terrible songs, nor ''completely'' irrelevant (they're both in the stage versions of the respective movies, too). Neither of them exactly advanced the plot or provided much if any character development, but both are in the Special Editions released during the TurnOfTheMillennium.

to:

** "Human Again" from ''Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast'' and "Morning Report" from ''Disney/TheLionKing'' were un-needed additions to their respective films, since the movies didn't have them originally ("Human Again" was a BigLippedAlligatorMoment that rendered the story's timeline confusing, a realization that convinced Editor-In-Chief and studio chief Jeffrey Katzenberg to send it to the scrapboard.scrapboard, while Alan Menken and Howard Ashman relocated some of the parts about Belle's and the Beast's love blossoming to the replacement song "Something There". "Morning Report" didn't even exist until the time came for ''The Lion King'' to hit Broadway, and disappeared from movie prints and home video releases struck from 2011 onward.). They aren't terrible songs, nor ''completely'' irrelevant (they're both in the stage versions of the respective movies, too). Neither of them exactly advanced the plot or provided much if any character development, but both are in the Special Editions released during the TurnOfTheMillennium.
22nd Feb '17 7:56:36 AM dsneybuf
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* LimitedSpecialCollectorsUltimateEdition: [[WaltDisneyHomeVideo/WaltDisneyClassics The "Black Diamond" Classics]], the [[WaltDisneyHomeVideo/WaltDisneyMasterpieceCollection Masterpiece Collection]], the [[WaltDisneyHomeVideo/WaltDisneyGoldClassicCollection Gold Classic Collection]], the [[WaltDisneyHomeVideo/WaltDisneyPlatinumEditions Platinum Editions]], the [[WaltDisneyHomeVideo/WaltDisneyDiamondEditions Diamond Editions]] and the [[WaltDisneyHomeVideo/WaltDisneySignatureCollection Signature Collection]], all of these sets being released in a wide variety of home video formats, with VHS, DVD, Blu-ray, and [=LaserDisc=] being the most popular. And of course, the Disney Vault that these all get shoved into if you don't buy them now!
** Special mention goes to the Masterpiece Collection, which included nearly ''every'' VHS release at the time that was part of the Canon, including the stuff nobody remembers (like the compilation films) and the brand-new movies [[note]] ''Fantasia'', ''The Rescuers Down Under'', ''The Great Mouse Detective'', ''Beauty and the Beast'', ''Pinocchio'', ''Aladdin'', ''The Fox and the Hound'', ''Saludos Amigos'', and ''Make Mine Music'' were the only canon films at the time that were never issued under the Masterpiece Collection; all but the last two of these made up the majority of the back half of the Walt Disney "Black Diamond" Classics series that predated the Masterpiece Collection; the other two wouldn't be released until 2000. [[/note]]. From ''Tarzan'' on, they just put "Walt Disney Pictures Presents" on new releases until about 2011, after which only "Disney" was used (on virtually every release as well, including Walt's films).
13th Feb '17 8:53:07 AM Hedging
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* NonStandardCharacterDesign: Most of their films centering on a human cast (especially their princess ones) use this type of design formula: The lead characters, such as the prince and princess, and sometimes their parents, have hyper-realistic designs, while the rest of the cast have more cartoonish and exagerated proportions.
12th Feb '17 5:29:42 PM Luigifan
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The book ''Literature/TheFoxAndTheHound'' ends with a full blown DownerEnding where [[spoiler: Tod and both of his mates and his kits all die, and Copper gets shot in the head by Amos so he doesn't have to abandon him when he's taken to a nursing home.]] The Disney adaptation alters it into a BittersweetEnding where [[spoiler: [[SparedByTheAdaptation Tod, his mate Vixie, and Copper survive]], but are forced to go their seperate ways.]]

to:

** The book ''Literature/TheFoxAndTheHound'' ends with a full blown DownerEnding where [[spoiler: Tod and both of his mates and his kits all die, and Copper gets shot in the head by Amos so he doesn't have to abandon him when he's taken to a nursing home.]] The Disney adaptation alters it into a BittersweetEnding where [[spoiler: [[SparedByTheAdaptation [[spoiler:[[SparedByTheAdaptation Tod, his mate Vixie, and Copper survive]], but are forced to go their seperate ways.]]



** ''Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame'' heavily changes the ending of the story - in the original [[Literature/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame Victor Hugo novel]], both Esmeralda and Quasimodo die; in the Disney version, they both survive, Esmeralda marries Phoebus and Quasimodo gets accepted by the society. Interestingly, the ScreenToStageAdaptation of the Disney movie brings back the DownerEnding.
** ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'' completely changes the ending. In the [[Myth/ClassicalMythology original myths]], Herakles dies, but after Philoctetes lit his funeral pyre, he ascended to godhood in Mount Olympus and stayed there. The Disney movie changes it to where Hercules earns his godhood by saving Meg from Hades and is allowed to come home to Olympus--but Hercules, who realizes Meg can't join him there, willingly gives up his godhood so that he can stay with Meg.

to:

** ''Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame'' heavily changes the ending of the story - -- in the original [[Literature/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame Victor Hugo novel]], both Esmeralda and Quasimodo die; in the Disney version, they both survive, Esmeralda marries Phoebus and Quasimodo gets accepted by the society. Interestingly, the ScreenToStageAdaptation of the Disney movie brings back the DownerEnding.
** ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'' completely changes the ending. In the [[Myth/ClassicalMythology original myths]], Herakles dies, but after Philoctetes lit his funeral pyre, he ascended to godhood in Mount Olympus and stayed there. The Disney movie changes it to where Hercules earns his godhood by saving Meg from Hades and is allowed to come home to Olympus--but Olympus -- but Hercules, who realizes Meg can't join him there, willingly gives up his godhood so that he can stay with Meg.



** All of the fairy tale-based films fall under this by default as the original fairy tales are typically rather short and simplistic, requiring a good amount of character and plot expansion to stretch them out to an hour and half. ''Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs'' padded out its length with several dwarf-centric scenes, ''Sleeping Beauty'' greatly expanded the roles of the fairies and gave the prince something to do other than be lucky enough to be standing in front of the thorns just as the century-long spell expired, ''Tangled'' has Rapunzel spend more time outside her tower than inside it for the film's running time, etc.

to:

** All of the fairy tale-based films fall under this by default default, as the original fairy tales are typically rather short and simplistic, requiring a good amount of character and plot expansion to stretch them out to an hour and half. ''Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs'' padded out its length with several dwarf-centric scenes, ''Sleeping Beauty'' greatly expanded the roles of the fairies and gave the prince something to do other than be lucky enough to be standing in front of the thorns just as the century-long spell expired, ''Tangled'' has Rapunzel spend more time outside her tower than inside it for the film's running time, etc.



** ''Meet the Robinsons'' added a whole time travel plot around the children's story ''A Day With Wilbur Robinson''. The second act, where Lewis meets the Robinson family and looks for Grandpa's teeth, is the only part of the movie that's actually in the book

to:

** ''Meet the Robinsons'' added a whole time travel plot around the children's story ''A Day With Wilbur Robinson''. The second act, where Lewis meets the Robinson family and looks for Grandpa's teeth, is the only part of the movie that's actually in the bookbook.



** Captain Phoebus from ''Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame'' is transformed from a dishonest cad to a genuinely heroic figure, being a JerkWithAHeartOfGold at worst. And Quasimodo, while not being as mean as Phoebus in the book, is transformed from a rude and angry Jerkass to a [[NiceGuy timid and kind guy]].
** ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'': By modern standards, the Hercules of Greek Myth [[AntiHero wasn't exactly a paragon of heroic virtue]]. He killed more than one innocent person simply for being too close when his temper got the better of him (although he was always remorseful when this happened), and [[HotBlooded he would go stage a HUGE war for a mere verbal insult one day]], although he did went to great lengths to help his friends and his deeds did the world a lot of good. The Hercules in this movie is a wide eyed boy scout who doesn't have much, if any, vices. The worst thing he does is lash out at Phil for trying to warn him about Meg being in league with Hades, but he immediately comes to regret that. Also, Hera is presented as Hercules's loving mother. In the myths, she was not his mother and did not like him one bit - it was her that made Herc go mad and murder his wife. The film omits that plot entirely and gives AdaptationalVillainy to [[EverybodyHatesHades Hades]]. And anyone who knows their Greek myth knows that Zeus is [[JerkassGods a self-righteous, womanizing jerk]] and [[DoubleStandardRapeDivineOnMortal rapist]]. Here, he's pretty much a cross between GrandpaGod and BumblingDad who certainly loves Hercules and stays loyal with Hera, making his status as a TopGod of Mt. Olympus and BigGood of the series a lot more plausible.

to:

** Captain Phoebus from ''Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame'' is transformed from a dishonest cad to a genuinely heroic figure, being a JerkWithAHeartOfGold at worst. And Quasimodo, while not being as mean as Phoebus in the book, is transformed from a rude and angry Jerkass {{Jerkass}} to a [[NiceGuy timid and kind guy]].
** ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'': By modern standards, the Hercules of Greek Myth [[AntiHero wasn't exactly a paragon of heroic virtue]]. He killed more than one innocent person simply for being too close when his temper got the better of him (although he was always remorseful when this happened), and [[HotBlooded he would go stage a HUGE war for a mere verbal insult one day]], although he did went go to great lengths to help his friends and his deeds did the world a lot of good. The Hercules in this movie is a wide eyed boy scout who doesn't have much, if any, vices. The worst thing he does is lash out at Phil for trying to warn him about Meg being in league with Hades, but he immediately comes to regret that. Also, Hera is presented as Hercules's loving mother. In the myths, she was not his mother and did not like him one bit - -- it was her that made Herc go mad and murder his wife. The film omits that plot entirely and gives AdaptationalVillainy to [[EverybodyHatesHades Hades]]. And anyone who knows their Greek myth knows that Zeus is [[JerkassGods a self-righteous, womanizing jerk]] and [[DoubleStandardRapeDivineOnMortal rapist]]. Here, he's pretty much a cross between GrandpaGod and BumblingDad who certainly loves Hercules and stays loyal with Hera, making his status as a TopGod of Mt. Olympus and BigGood of the series a lot more plausible.



** Rapunzel's parents in ''Disney/{{Tangled}}''. The father steals lettuce from a witch's garden in the original tale, simply because his pregnant wife had a craving for them. They also disappear from the story and never seem to bother about the whereabouts of the daughter they gave up. In the film, the mother is dying. And rather than knowingly stealing from the witch, they find a golden flower that the witch had been using to make herself young. And the witch kidnaps the baby. [[spoiler: Rapunzel is also reunited with her parents at the end]] - and they're implied to have been searching for her all her life.

to:

** Rapunzel's parents in ''Disney/{{Tangled}}''. The father steals lettuce from a witch's garden in the original tale, simply because his pregnant wife had a craving for them. They also disappear from the story and never seem to bother about the whereabouts of the daughter they gave up. In the film, the mother is dying. And rather than knowingly stealing from the witch, they find a golden flower that the witch had been using to make herself young. And the witch kidnaps the baby. [[spoiler: Rapunzel [[spoiler:Rapunzel is also reunited with her parents at the end]] - -- and they're implied to have been searching for her all her life.



** In ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'', the eponymous mermaid and one of her sisters change personalities--the most distinguishing traits of Andersen's heroine were that she was thoughtful, quiet, and pensive (quite unlike Ariel), and one of her sisters is actually said to be by far the most daring and boldest of the family (quite like Ariel). Also, the Sea Witch becomes a cunning, dishonest, power-hungry villain who tricks Ariel into signing a contract with her, rather than the neutral character in the original tale who warns the mermaid of the consequences of her magic.

to:

** In ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'', the eponymous mermaid and one of her sisters change personalities--the personalities -- the most distinguishing traits of Andersen's heroine were that she was thoughtful, quiet, and pensive (quite unlike Ariel), and one of her sisters is actually said to be by far the most daring and boldest of the family (quite like Ariel). Also, the Sea Witch becomes a cunning, dishonest, power-hungry villain who tricks Ariel into signing a contract with her, rather than the neutral character in the original tale who warns the mermaid of the consequences of her magic.



*** Of course, in the book Frollo is the Archdeacon, making this a case of the DecompositeCharacter.

to:

*** Of course, in the book book, Frollo is the Archdeacon, making this a case of the DecompositeCharacter.



** ''Disney/{{Pinocchio}}'': The puppeteer from Literature/{{Pinocchio}} (Mangiafuoco in the book, Stromboli in the film). In the film he was far more cruel and simply wanted to exploit Pinocchio and states that he'll use him as firewood after he can't perform anymore. In the book although he initially does want to use Pinocchio as firewood after the boy accidentally ruins one of his puppet shows, Pinocchio is able to convince him not to do so, and he [[PetTheDog even gives the talking puppet some coins to help Geppetto out]]. This is probably an influence from Alexey N. Tolstoy's book adaptation, Buratino, where the puppeteer, named Carabas Barabas, is the [[BigBad main villain]] and a very ominous person (although, incidentally, the scene mentioned above still happens anyways).
** ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}'': Chernabog in the Night on Bald Mountain sequence. While he was a black god, he wasn't evil as a pre-christian slavic deity. Though we don't really know enough about Chernobog to say whether he was or wasn't evil, it's certain he wasn't a giant Satanic figure who called up the spirits of the damned. The film works around this by referring to him as Satan himself, but Disney prefers to call him Chernabog these days.

to:

** ''Disney/{{Pinocchio}}'': The puppeteer from Literature/{{Pinocchio}} (Mangiafuoco in the book, Stromboli in the film). In the film film, he was far more cruel and simply wanted to exploit Pinocchio Pinocchio, and states that he'll use him as firewood after he can't perform anymore. In the book book, although he initially does want to use Pinocchio as firewood after the boy accidentally ruins one of his puppet shows, Pinocchio is able to convince him not to do so, and he [[PetTheDog even gives the talking puppet some coins to help Geppetto out]]. This is probably an influence from Alexey N. Tolstoy's book adaptation, Buratino, where the puppeteer, named Carabas Barabas, is the [[BigBad main villain]] and a very ominous person (although, incidentally, the scene mentioned above still happens anyways).
** ''Disney/{{Fantasia}}'': Chernabog in the Night on Bald Mountain sequence. While he was a black god, he wasn't evil as evil; he was a pre-christian slavic deity.pre-Christian [[UsefulNotes/SlavicMythology Slavic deity]]. Though we don't really know enough about Chernobog to say whether he was or wasn't evil, it's certain he wasn't a giant Satanic figure who called up the spirits of the damned. The film works around this by referring to him as Satan himself, but Disney prefers to call him Chernabog these days.



** ''Disney/AliceInWonderland'': The Queen of Hearts is depicted as an AxCrazy villainess in the Disney adaptation. In the book by Creator/LewisCarroll, while she does constantly order executions, the King quietly pardons everybody she sentences to death when she isn't looking and no real harm is done. She never notices this, and the inhabitants of Wonderland just choose to play along with her. Also, it's outright said by the Gryphon that she doesn't execute anyone. Part of the reason for this is because the Queen as depicted in the movie is a [[CompositeCharacter mash-up of three different characters]] from ''Alice's Adventure in Wonderland'' and ''Alice Through The Looking Glass'' (the Queen of Hearts, the Duchess and the Red Queen). The King himself goes from pardoning people to openly supporting the Queen's executions (though in Alice's case he instead makes sure all available options are exhausted ''before'' going along with it). The Cheshire Cat in the Disney movie is a JerkAss to Alice if not a villain, while in the book he was a [[NiceGuy more friendly character.]] And as a lesser example, the White Rabbit in the Disney version is a pompous servant of the Queen. In the book he's a little friendlier to Alice, advising her not to play well in the croquet game so the Queen can win. The Walrus in "The Walrus and the Carpenter" also goes through this. While neither he nor the Carpenter were particularly good people in the original poem (Alice notes that the Walrus [[spoiler: showed remorse for his actions but still ate more oysters than the Carpenter, while the Carpenter ate as many as he could]]), he was much more remorseful in the poem. Here, however, he's depicted as an [[SmugSnake arrogant, manipulative]], [[VillainousGlutton greedy]], [[AristocratsAreEvil evil aristocrat]]. Also, [[spoiler: this movie portrays the oysters as youngsters, making the Walrus [[EatsBabies seem even more monstrous!]]]]

to:

** ''Disney/AliceInWonderland'': The Queen of Hearts is depicted as an AxCrazy villainess in the Disney adaptation. In the book by Creator/LewisCarroll, while she does constantly order executions, the King quietly pardons everybody she sentences to death when she isn't looking and no real harm is done. She never notices this, and the inhabitants of Wonderland just choose to play along with her. Also, it's outright said by the Gryphon that she doesn't execute anyone. Part of the reason for this is because the Queen as depicted in the movie is a [[CompositeCharacter mash-up of three different characters]] from ''Alice's Adventure in Wonderland'' and ''Alice Through The Looking Glass'' (the Queen of Hearts, the Duchess Duchess, and the Red Queen). The King himself goes from pardoning people to openly supporting the Queen's executions (though in Alice's case case, he instead makes sure all available options are exhausted ''before'' going along with it). The Cheshire Cat in the Disney movie is a JerkAss to Alice if not a villain, while in the book he was a [[NiceGuy more friendly character.]] And as a lesser example, the White Rabbit in the Disney version is a pompous servant of the Queen. In the book book, he's a little friendlier to Alice, advising her not to play well in the croquet game so the Queen can win. The Walrus in "The Walrus and the Carpenter" also goes through this. While neither he nor the Carpenter were particularly good people in the original poem (Alice notes that the Walrus [[spoiler: showed [[spoiler:showed remorse for his actions but still ate more oysters than the Carpenter, while the Carpenter ate as many as he could]]), he was much more remorseful in the poem. Here, however, he's depicted as an [[SmugSnake arrogant, manipulative]], [[VillainousGlutton greedy]], [[AristocratsAreEvil evil aristocrat]]. Also, [[spoiler: this [[spoiler:this movie portrays the oysters as youngsters, making the Walrus [[EatsBabies seem even more monstrous!]]]]



** ''Disney/TheJungleBook'': Kaa the python. In the book, he is a mentor and friend of Mowgli as much as Bagheera and Baloo are and helps to save him when he is kidnapped by monkeys, engages him in friendly wrestling matches, and offers him advice for battle against the dholes, indeed never harming or threatening him in any way and saving his life more than once. The other animals in the jungle [[TheDreaded respect and fear him]] for his [[OldMaster wisdom]] and powers of hypnosis, which only Mowgli, because he is human, is immune to. In the Disney movie, he is an AffablyEvil villain whose only role in the plot is to serve as a minor nuisance. Apparently it was thought by Disney that audiences [[SnakesAreSinister wouldn't accept a snake as a heroic character.]] This also applies to Shere Kahn; In the books he was an antagonist, but represented as somewhat pitiful (he has a bad leg, restricting his ability to hunt), is something of an [[SmugSnake arrogant fool]], and is taken half-heartedly by a lot of residents of the jungle, including Bagheera. The other animals generally see him as a troublemaker and a coward because he attacks humans (something forbidden under the Law of the Jungle), and characters like Bagheera and Kaa command a lot more respect and fear. In the original Disney film, he is somewhat comedic and playful, but is genuinely feared and implied to be stronger than many animals put together.

to:

** ''Disney/TheJungleBook'': Kaa the python. In the book, he is a mentor and friend of Mowgli as much as Bagheera and Baloo are and helps to save him when he is kidnapped by monkeys, engages him in friendly wrestling matches, and offers him advice for battle against the dholes, indeed never harming or threatening him in any way and saving his life more than once. The other animals in the jungle [[TheDreaded respect and fear him]] for his [[OldMaster wisdom]] and powers of hypnosis, which only Mowgli, because he is human, is immune to. In the Disney movie, he is an AffablyEvil villain whose only role in the plot is to serve as a minor nuisance. Apparently it was thought by Disney that audiences [[SnakesAreSinister wouldn't accept a snake as a heroic character.]] This also applies to Shere Kahn; In in the books books, he was an antagonist, but represented as somewhat pitiful (he has a bad leg, restricting his ability to hunt), is something of an [[SmugSnake arrogant fool]], and is taken half-heartedly by a lot of residents of the jungle, including Bagheera. The other animals generally see him as a troublemaker and a coward because he attacks humans (something forbidden under the Law of the Jungle), and characters like Bagheera and Kaa command a lot more respect and fear. In the original Disney film, he is somewhat comedic and playful, but is genuinely feared and implied to be stronger than many animals put together.



** ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'': The Sea Witch in the Creator/HansChristianAndersen [[Literature/TheLittleMermaid fairy tale]] is a neutral character who shows no vindictive intentions toward the unnamed mermaid, only making the famous tongue-for-legs exchange, even warning the mermaid of the consequences of the transformation. She doesn't go back on the deal or interfere with her relationship with the prince until she is asked to by the mermaid's sisters, and only indirectly. In the Disney movie, she is named Ursula, is an out-and-out villain with a tendency toward [[DealWithTheDevil Faustian deals]], and gets in the way of Ariel's romance with Prince Eric far more than the character in the fairy tale did. Ursula also takes the place of the princess who the prince eventually marries in the original, who is innocent in Andersen's fairy tale and genuinely loves him.
** ''Disney/{{Aladdin}}'': While its far from the first adaptation to make UsefulNotes/GrandVizierJafar a villain, its probably the most well known example of it. In the Literature/ArabianNights, Jafar was a minor character but generally a hero (although Sunni tradition, which thinks very highly of Harun al-Rashid, assumed that Ja'far must have been guilty of ''something'' if the great Caliph had him killed). And in the Aladdin story, the Grand Vizier (who is actually not the same character as Jafar, as Jafar did not appear in the Arabian Nights Aladdin story, but he is replaced by Jafar in the movie) is hostile to Aladdin at first, but then [[TheCassandra he has a point]], and is actually TheGoodChancellor in contrast to the Disney movies depiction of Jafar as an EvilChancellor; the real villain of the story is a magician from North Africa.

to:

** ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'': The Sea Witch in the Creator/HansChristianAndersen [[Literature/TheLittleMermaid fairy tale]] is a neutral character who shows no vindictive intentions toward the unnamed mermaid, only making the famous tongue-for-legs exchange, even warning the mermaid of the consequences of the transformation. She doesn't go back on the deal or interfere with her relationship with the prince until she is asked to by the mermaid's sisters, and only indirectly. In the Disney movie, she is named Ursula, is an out-and-out villain with a tendency toward [[DealWithTheDevil Faustian deals]], and gets in the way of Ariel's romance with Prince Eric far more than the character in the fairy tale did. Ursula also [[CompositeCharacter takes the place of the princess who the prince eventually marries in the original, original]], who is innocent in Andersen's fairy tale and genuinely loves him.
** ''Disney/{{Aladdin}}'': While its it's far from the first adaptation to make UsefulNotes/GrandVizierJafar a villain, its it's probably the most well known well-known example of it. In the Literature/ArabianNights, Jafar was a minor character but generally a hero (although Sunni tradition, which thinks very highly of Harun al-Rashid, assumed that Ja'far must have been guilty of ''something'' if the great Caliph had him killed). And in the Aladdin story, the Grand Vizier (who is actually not the same character as Jafar, as Jafar did not appear in the Arabian Nights Aladdin story, but he is replaced by Jafar in the movie) is hostile to Aladdin at first, but then [[TheCassandra he has a point]], and is actually TheGoodChancellor in contrast to the Disney movies movie's depiction of Jafar as an EvilChancellor; the real villain of the story is a magician from North Africa.



** ''Disney/{{Fantasia}} 2000'': In the story of "The Firebird Suite", the titular creature aids a Prince to defeating an evil wizard. In the animated segment at the end of the film, the Firebird is a destructive EldritchAbomination in the shape of a bird that destroys an entire forest.

to:

** ''Disney/{{Fantasia}} 2000'': In the story of "The Firebird Suite", the titular creature aids a Prince to in defeating an evil wizard. In the animated segment at the end of the film, the Firebird is a destructive EldritchAbomination in the shape of a bird that destroys an entire forest.



* AnachronismStew: Several of their features deliberately employ this for laughs, most famously ''Aladdin'', ''Hercules'' and ''The Emperors New Groove''. Even the more serious features like ''The Hunchback of Notre Dame'' will employ anachronisms for laughs (most notably in the "A Guy Like You" musical number). Some features like ''Mulan'' and ''Atlantis: The Lost Empire'' employ it on purpose for the sake of atmosphere or story.

to:

* AnachronismStew: Several of their features deliberately employ this for laughs, most famously ''Aladdin'', ''Hercules'' ''Hercules'', and ''The Emperors Emperor's New Groove''. Even the more serious features like ''The Hunchback of Notre Dame'' will employ anachronisms for laughs (most notably in the "A Guy Like You" musical number). Some features like ''Mulan'' and ''Atlantis: The Lost Empire'' employ it on purpose for the sake of atmosphere or story.



** ''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove'''s features Yzma's potions which turn people into animals.
** ''Disney/ThePrincessAndTheFrog''.

to:

** ''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove'''s ''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove'' features Yzma's potions which turn people into animals.
** ''Disney/ThePrincessAndTheFrog''.''Disney/ThePrincessAndTheFrog'': like ''Brother Bear'' before it, a BalefulPolymorph makes up the crux of the plot, though in this case it's an attempt by the BigBad to sweep the prince under the rug and out of the way of his plan.



** Most films in the canon are named after and based on a prior-existing story, though the degree to which they are faithful to the original varies from film to film. The bulk of the 19 animated features made in Walt Disney's own lifetime were based on pre-existing stories -- the only features he made that weren't based on any pre-existing stories were ''Saludos Amigos'' and ''The Three Caballeros''. The bulk of ''Make Mine Music'' and ''Melody Time'' consist of original story material as well, but have a couple segments based on pre-existing stories, such as ''Casey at the Bat'', ''Johnny Appleseed'', ''Little Toot'' and ''Pecos Bill''.

to:

** Most films in the canon are named after and based on a prior-existing story, though the degree to which they are faithful to the original varies from film to film. The bulk of the 19 animated features made in Walt Disney's own lifetime were based on pre-existing stories -- the only features he made that weren't based on any pre-existing stories were ''Saludos Amigos'' and ''The Three Caballeros''. The bulk of ''Make Mine Music'' and ''Melody Time'' consist of original story material as well, but have a couple segments based on pre-existing stories, such as ''Casey at the Bat'', ''Johnny Appleseed'', ''Little Toot'' Toot'', and ''Pecos Bill''.



* AnimatedMusical: Most of the movies in the canon are this, though there are exceptions such as ''Tarzan'', ''Lilo & Stitch'', ''Wreck-It Ralph'', and ''Zootopia''.

to:

* AnimatedMusical: Most of the movies in the canon are this, though there are exceptions such as ''Tarzan'', ''Lilo & Stitch'', ''Wreck-It Ralph'', and ''Zootopia''. (''Tarzan'' does include several musical numbers, but only one of them is sung by the characters in-universe).



** Every now and again, during the 2D era, some characters would get much better animation than their fellow cast (see [[Disney/TheRescuers Madame Medusa and Mr. Snoops]], [[{{Disney/Aladdin}} Genie]] or [[Disney/AtlantisTheLostEmpire Helga]]).

to:

** Every now and again, during the 2D era, some characters would get much better animation than their fellow cast (see [[Disney/TheRescuers Madame Medusa and Mr. Snoops]], [[{{Disney/Aladdin}} Genie]] Genie]], or [[Disney/AtlantisTheLostEmpire Helga]]).



** According to animators [[Creator/DisneysNineOldMen Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston]] in their book ''Literature/TheDisneyVillain'', [[HeWhoMustNotBeSeen Man]], the villain of Disney/{{Bambi}} is this, simply because he had no comprehension of the pain and terror he was inflicting on what he simply thought were mindless animals.
-->"The biggest threat, of course, is from the predator, man, and his gun. As victims, the deer have no way of combating this foe and must suffer the consequences. Man, for his part, has no thought or understanding of the pain he is inflicted on the wild animals bu pursing his own personal desires. There is no villainy in his heart when he kills Bambi's mother, yet to the audience, this is an event that stays with them for the rest of their lives."

to:

** According to animators [[Creator/DisneysNineOldMen Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston]] in their book ''Literature/TheDisneyVillain'', [[HeWhoMustNotBeSeen Man]], the villain of Disney/{{Bambi}} Disney/{{Bambi}}, is this, simply because he had no comprehension of the pain and terror he was inflicting on what he simply thought were mindless animals.
-->"The biggest threat, of course, is from the predator, man, and his gun. As victims, the deer have no way of combating this foe and must suffer the consequences. Man, for his part, has no thought or understanding of the pain he is has inflicted on the wild animals bu by pursing his own personal desires. There is no villainy in his heart when he kills Bambi's mother, yet to the audience, this is an event that stays with them for the rest of their lives."



-->"He probably wouldn't have minded killing Maurice. That was the extent where someone like the Beast, who had the potential to be good, could become a villain. The Beast was pitying himself, frustrated, so he felt justified in treating the father that way, and when he comes back, Belle is crying--his actions do cause people pain -- and he starts to get a glimmer that he's not entirely comfortable with the role of a villain... He had incredible limitations -- it's kind of like taking the villain and the hero and wrapping them up into one body."
** In Disney/TreasurePlanet, John Silver is [[DesignatedVillain supposed to be the bad guy]]; and he does it pretty well, most of the time. But he also turns out to be a great father figure to Jim Hawkins and his soft spot for the lad pushes him to do the right thing now and then. His core motivation of wanting to get what is, in his eyes, rightfully owed to him, is more complex than just standard pirate-related greed.
** Disney/BrotherBear: Denahi goes rather nuts after losing both his brothers.

to:

-->"He probably wouldn't have minded killing Maurice. That was the extent where someone like the Beast, who had the potential to be good, could become a villain. The Beast was pitying himself, frustrated, so he felt justified in treating the father that way, and when he comes back, Belle is crying--his crying -- his actions do cause people pain -- and he starts to get a glimmer that he's not entirely comfortable with the role of a villain... He had incredible limitations -- it's kind of like taking the villain and the hero and wrapping them up into one body."
** In Disney/TreasurePlanet, ''Disney/TreasurePlanet'', John Silver is [[DesignatedVillain supposed to be the bad guy]]; and he does it pretty well, most of the time. But he also turns out to be a great father figure to Jim Hawkins and his soft spot for the lad pushes him to do the right thing now and then. His core motivation of wanting to get what is, in his eyes, rightfully owed to him, is more complex than just standard pirate-related greed.
** Disney/BrotherBear: ''Disney/BrotherBear'': Denahi goes rather nuts after losing both his brothers.



** ''Disney/TheGreatMouseDetective'', ''Disney/OliverAndCompany'' and ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'' were intended by Roy E. Disney and (then-new) studio heads Jeffrey Katzenberg and Peter Schneider to take Disney animation in a lighter, more 1980s direction after former studio head Ron Miller's attempts in the late 1970s/early 1980s to take the studio in [[WereStillRelevantDammit a darker and moodier direction]] with ''Disney/TheRescuers'', ''Disney/TheFoxAndTheHound'' and ''Disney/TheBlackCauldron'' pretty much ended in failure (''Rescuers'' and ''Fox and Hound'' were still financial successes, with ''Rescuers'' getting a sequel from the new guard; ''Cauldron'' was NOT a success, and almost killed the canon off). ''The Great Mouse Detective'' itself was retitled from ''Basil of Baker Street'' after Michael Eisner decided that the original name was "too English" for American kids, which led to a major backlash from the animators who were working on the film; they protested with an infamous fake memo that Katzenberg got, and said memo made it to the press and on to ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', embarrassing Schneider in the process; Schneider repaid the favor by ripping into the department in a meeting for the stunt (Katzenberg was also unamused with the decoy memo at first, but he lightened up to the situation according to the documentary ''Film/WakingSleepingBeauty'').
** On a similar note, recently and not without backlash, ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'' and ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' received their title changes from ''Rapunzel'' and ''The Snow Queen'' respectively as well as a whole new marketing strategy to make sure their more princess-central films can still net young males. Notably this came after the presumed failings of ''Disney/ThePrincessAndTheFrog''. Though admittedly it was for the better as far as ''Frozen'' is concerned, seeing as the title fits the setting and theme a lot more than ''The Snow Queen'' does (it was also initially going to be an adaptation of ''The Snow Queen'', but ended up being inspired by it instead).

to:

** ''Disney/TheGreatMouseDetective'', ''Disney/OliverAndCompany'' ''Disney/OliverAndCompany'', and ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'' were intended by Roy E. Disney and (then-new) studio heads Jeffrey Katzenberg and Peter Schneider to take Disney animation in a lighter, more 1980s direction after former studio head Ron Miller's attempts in the late 1970s/early 1980s to take the studio in [[WereStillRelevantDammit a darker and moodier direction]] with ''Disney/TheRescuers'', ''Disney/TheFoxAndTheHound'' ''Disney/TheFoxAndTheHound'', and ''Disney/TheBlackCauldron'' pretty much ended in failure (''Rescuers'' and ''Fox and Hound'' were still financial successes, with ''Rescuers'' getting a sequel from the new guard; ''Cauldron'' was NOT a success, and almost killed the canon off). ''The Great Mouse Detective'' itself was retitled from ''Basil of Baker Street'' after Michael Eisner decided that the original name was "too English" for American kids, which led to a major backlash from the animators who were working on the film; they protested with an infamous fake memo that Katzenberg got, and said memo made it to the press and on to ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', embarrassing Schneider in the process; Schneider repaid the favor by ripping into the department in a meeting for the stunt (Katzenberg was also unamused with the decoy memo at first, but he lightened up to the situation according to the documentary ''Film/WakingSleepingBeauty'').
** On a similar note, recently and not without backlash, ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'' ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'', and ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' received their title changes from ''Rapunzel'' and ''The Snow Queen'' respectively respectively, as well as a whole new marketing strategy to make sure their more princess-central films can still net young males. Notably this came after the presumed failings of ''Disney/ThePrincessAndTheFrog''. Though admittedly it was for the better as far as ''Frozen'' is concerned, seeing as the title fits the setting and theme a lot more than ''The Snow Queen'' does (it was also initially going to be an adaptation of ''The Snow Queen'', but ended up being inspired by it instead).
7th Feb '17 8:23:55 PM erforce
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Disney/TheJungleBook bears little resemblance to [[Literature/TheJungleBook Kipling's original]] except for a few character names and the basic premise of a boy RaisedbyWolves.
** Disney/TheFoxAndTheHound: How Walt Disney Studios managed to look at [[Literature/TheFoxAndTheHound what reads like a fictionalized documentary about the life and times of a mongrel hunting dog and a human-reared wild fox who live through bear hunts, rabies epidemics, and the rise of suburbia among other things]] and thought it would make a wonderful talking animals musical about racism is a mystery for the ages.
** Disney/{{Hercules}}: Due to the sheer amount of changes made from the source material, the only things this movie has in common with the original Heracles myth is that they both star a super strong demigod protagonist and share a couple of similar plot points and settings. Heck, it feels less like an adaptation of the myth and more like Film/SupermanTheMovie and Film/{{Rocky}} [[RecycledInSpace mashed up and set in Ancient Greece.]] See SadlyMythtaken for how the film differs in so many ways from the original myth.
** Disney/{{Frozen}} is billed as an adaptation of Literature/TheSnowQueen, but it's probably better to say that it's just an adaptation of the title. The original fairy tale was about a peasant girl trying to rescue her friend from an AmbiguouslyEvil member of TheFairFolk, with [[RandomEventsPlot random encounters]] along the way; the Disney movie is primarily about a good, human queen with [[PowerIncontinence uncontrollable]] [[AnIcePerson ice magic]] and her relationship to her sister, with the threat of EndlessWinter and a few original characters thrown in. They both include a reindeer sidekick, though.
** Aside from the names, Disney/BigHero6 has very little in common with the comics it's inspired by, incuding RaceLifting the entire team and moving the setting from Japan to the fictional city of [[{{Americasia}} San Fransokyo]]. A case of TropesAreNotBad, as the source material is not as well looked upon due to being a rather ShallowParody of Japanese media tropes.

to:

** Disney/TheJungleBook ''Disney/TheJungleBook'' bears little resemblance to [[Literature/TheJungleBook Kipling's original]] except for a few character names and the basic premise of a boy RaisedbyWolves.
** Disney/TheFoxAndTheHound: ''Disney/TheFoxAndTheHound'': How Walt Disney Studios managed to look at [[Literature/TheFoxAndTheHound what reads like a fictionalized documentary about the life and times of a mongrel hunting dog and a human-reared wild fox who live through bear hunts, rabies epidemics, and the rise of suburbia among other things]] and thought it would make a wonderful talking animals musical about racism is a mystery for the ages.
** Disney/{{Hercules}}: ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'': Due to the sheer amount of changes made from the source material, the only things this movie has in common with the original Heracles myth is that they both star a super strong demigod protagonist and share a couple of similar plot points and settings. Heck, it feels less like an adaptation of the myth and more like Film/SupermanTheMovie ''Film/SupermanTheMovie'' and Film/{{Rocky}} ''Film/{{Rocky}}'' [[RecycledInSpace mashed up and set in Ancient Greece.]] See SadlyMythtaken for how the film differs in so many ways from the original myth.
** Disney/{{Frozen}} ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' is billed as an adaptation of Literature/TheSnowQueen, ''Literature/TheSnowQueen'', but it's probably better to say that it's just an adaptation of the title. The original fairy tale was about a peasant girl trying to rescue her friend from an AmbiguouslyEvil member of TheFairFolk, with [[RandomEventsPlot random encounters]] along the way; the Disney movie is primarily about a good, human queen with [[PowerIncontinence uncontrollable]] [[AnIcePerson ice magic]] and her relationship to her sister, with the threat of EndlessWinter and a few original characters thrown in. They both include a reindeer sidekick, though.
** Aside from the names, Disney/BigHero6 ''Disney/BigHero6'' has very little in common with the comics it's inspired by, incuding RaceLifting the entire team and moving the setting from Japan to the fictional city of [[{{Americasia}} San Fransokyo]]. A case of TropesAreNotBad, as the source material is not as well looked upon due to being a rather ShallowParody of Japanese media tropes.



** ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'': The [[Myth/ClassicalMythology original Heracles myth]] -- and Greek Mythology in general -- were as family unfriendly as you can get and had a ''lot'' of built-in ValuesDissonance (the basic conflict ''alone'' was unacceptable for a family film, since Hercules is a product of Zeus' adultery with a mortal, and Hera, Zeus' wife, is the villain who constantly makes Hercules' life miserable because of this), so the studio was forced to [[DisneyFication heavily rework the concept]]; it borrows the character names (not so much the personalities), story points and the setting from the myths, but [[AdaptedOut throws out]] and [[CanonImmigrant adds in]] things from other parts of Greek Myth (such as Pegasus and the Muses, who were not in the original Heracles story), and reworks everything else (such as expanding Hades role in the story [[EveryoneHatesHades by turning him into the main villain]]), ultimately making the film less an adaptation of Greek Mythology and more like a [[XMeetsY mashup of]] Film/SupermanTheMovie and Film/{{Rocky}} [[RecycledInSpace set in a]] [[TheThemeParkVersion burlesque of Ancient Greece.]]

to:

** ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'': The [[Myth/ClassicalMythology original Heracles myth]] -- and Greek Mythology in general -- were as family unfriendly as you can get and had a ''lot'' of built-in ValuesDissonance (the basic conflict ''alone'' was unacceptable for a family film, since Hercules is a product of Zeus' adultery with a mortal, and Hera, Zeus' wife, is the villain who constantly makes Hercules' life miserable because of this), so the studio was forced to [[DisneyFication heavily rework the concept]]; it borrows the character names (not so much the personalities), story points and the setting from the myths, but [[AdaptedOut throws out]] and [[CanonImmigrant adds in]] things from other parts of Greek Myth (such as Pegasus and the Muses, who were not in the original Heracles story), and reworks everything else (such as expanding Hades role in the story [[EveryoneHatesHades by turning him into the main villain]]), ultimately making the film less an adaptation of Greek Mythology and more like a [[XMeetsY mashup of]] Film/SupermanTheMovie ''Film/SupermanTheMovie'' and Film/{{Rocky}} ''Film/{{Rocky}}'' [[RecycledInSpace set in a]] [[TheThemeParkVersion burlesque of Ancient Greece.]]
6th Feb '17 3:44:32 PM RisefromYourGrave
Is there an issue? Send a Message


# December 17, 1999[[note]]general release was on June 16, 2000[[/note]] - ''Disney/{{Fantasia 2000}}''[=*=] (follow-up to ''Fantasia''; first animated film initially released in IMAX theaters; the first film of Disney's "Post-Renaissance" era)



# June 16, 2000 - ''Disney/{{Fantasia 2000}}''[=*=] (follow-up to ''Fantasia''; first animated film initially released in IMAX theaters; the first film of Disney's "Post-Renaissance" era)
# December 15, 2000 -''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove''

to:

# June 16, 2000 - ''Disney/{{Fantasia 2000}}''[=*=] (follow-up to ''Fantasia''; first animated film initially released in IMAX theaters; the first film of Disney's "Post-Renaissance" era)
# December 15, 2000 -''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove''- ''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove''
4th Feb '17 3:33:22 PM ryanasaurus0077
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''Disney/AliceInWonderland'': The Queen of Hearts is depicted as an AxCrazy villainess in the Disney adaptation. In the book by Creator/LewisCarroll, while she does constantly order executions, the King quietly pardons everybody she sentences to death when she isn't looking and no real harm is done. She never notices this, and the inhabitants of Wonderland just choose to play along with her. Also, it's outright said by the Gryphon that she doesn't execute anyone. Part of the reason for this is because the Queen as depicted in the movie is a [[CompositeCharacter mash-up of three different characters]] from ''Alice's Adventure in Wonderland'' and ''Alice Through The Looking Glass'' (the Queen of Hearts, the Duchess and the Red Queen). The King himself goes from pardoning people to openly supporting the Queen's executions. The Cheshire Cat in the Disney movie is a JerkAss to Alice if not a villain, while in the book he was a [[NiceGuy more friendly character.]] And as a lesser example, the White Rabbit in the Disney version is a pompous servant of the Queen. In the book he's a little friendlier to Alice, advising her not to play well in the croquet game so the Queen can win. The Walrus in "The Walrus and the Carpenter" also goes through this. While neither he nor the Carpenter were particularly good people in the original poem (Alice notes that the Walrus [[spoiler: showed remorse for his actions but still ate more oysters than the Carpenter, while the Carpenter ate as many as he could]]), he was much more remorseful in the poem. Here, however, he's depicted as an [[SmugSnake arrogant, manipulative]], [[VillainousGlutton greedy]], [[AristocratsAreEvil evil aristocrat]]. Also, [[spoiler: this movie portrays the oysters as youngsters, making the Walrus [[EatsBabies seem even more monstrous!]]]]

to:

** ''Disney/AliceInWonderland'': The Queen of Hearts is depicted as an AxCrazy villainess in the Disney adaptation. In the book by Creator/LewisCarroll, while she does constantly order executions, the King quietly pardons everybody she sentences to death when she isn't looking and no real harm is done. She never notices this, and the inhabitants of Wonderland just choose to play along with her. Also, it's outright said by the Gryphon that she doesn't execute anyone. Part of the reason for this is because the Queen as depicted in the movie is a [[CompositeCharacter mash-up of three different characters]] from ''Alice's Adventure in Wonderland'' and ''Alice Through The Looking Glass'' (the Queen of Hearts, the Duchess and the Red Queen). The King himself goes from pardoning people to openly supporting the Queen's executions.executions (though in Alice's case he instead makes sure all available options are exhausted ''before'' going along with it). The Cheshire Cat in the Disney movie is a JerkAss to Alice if not a villain, while in the book he was a [[NiceGuy more friendly character.]] And as a lesser example, the White Rabbit in the Disney version is a pompous servant of the Queen. In the book he's a little friendlier to Alice, advising her not to play well in the croquet game so the Queen can win. The Walrus in "The Walrus and the Carpenter" also goes through this. While neither he nor the Carpenter were particularly good people in the original poem (Alice notes that the Walrus [[spoiler: showed remorse for his actions but still ate more oysters than the Carpenter, while the Carpenter ate as many as he could]]), he was much more remorseful in the poem. Here, however, he's depicted as an [[SmugSnake arrogant, manipulative]], [[VillainousGlutton greedy]], [[AristocratsAreEvil evil aristocrat]]. Also, [[spoiler: this movie portrays the oysters as youngsters, making the Walrus [[EatsBabies seem even more monstrous!]]]]



** ''Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame'': [[SinisterMinister Claude Frollo]] was [[AntiVillain a more sympathetic character]] in [[Literature/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame the original novel]] by Creator/VictorHugo. While driven to evil deeds later by his lust for Esmeralda, he willingly adopts and cares for Quasimodo, instead of threatening to throw him down a well as he did in the Disney version of the story. All while looking after his layabout of a brother, Jehan (who most movie adaptations [[CompositeCharacter composite with Claude]]), and being orphaned himself to boot. He was also more tolerant of gypsies, asking only that they keep their activities away from the cathedral rather than actively hunting them down. Also, Frollo was originally archdeacon of Notre Dame; in the movie, the archdeacon is a [[DecompositeCharacter seperate, kindly character]], who induces a guilt trip on Frollo at the beginning and is beaten up by him at the end. In a sense, both these scenes depict the man struggling with ''himself''. It's believed the reason for this AdaptationalVillainy was due to Disney being concerned that having a priest for a BigBad would offend people, and their solution was to divide the literary character in two and give one all the good qualities and the other all the bad.

to:

** ''Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame'': [[SinisterMinister Claude Frollo]] was [[AntiVillain a more sympathetic character]] in [[Literature/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame the original novel]] by Creator/VictorHugo. While driven to evil deeds later by his lust for Esmeralda, he willingly adopts and cares for Quasimodo, instead of threatening to throw him down a well as he did in the Disney version of the story. All while looking after his layabout of a brother, Jehan (who most movie adaptations [[CompositeCharacter composite with Claude]]), and being orphaned himself to boot. He was also more tolerant of gypsies, asking only that they keep their activities away from the cathedral rather than actively hunting them down. Also, Frollo was originally archdeacon of Notre Dame; in the movie, the archdeacon is a [[DecompositeCharacter seperate, separate, kindly character]], who induces a guilt trip on Frollo at the beginning and is beaten up by him at the end. In a sense, both these scenes depict the man struggling with ''himself''. It's believed the reason for this AdaptationalVillainy was due to Disney being concerned that having a priest for a BigBad would offend people, and their solution was to divide the literary character in two and give one all the good qualities and the other all the bad.



** ''Disney/{{Cinderella}}'': Staying strong and hopeful in circumstances that try to beat you down.

to:

** ''Disney/{{Cinderella}}'': Staying strong and hopeful hopeful, even if just a little bit, in circumstances that try to beat you down.
4th Feb '17 12:41:12 PM Noah1
Is there an issue? Send a Message



->''"To think six years ahead - even two or three - in this business of making animated cartoon features, it takes calculated risk and much more than blind faith in the future of theatrical motion pictures. I see motion pictures as a family-founded institution closely related to the life and labor of millions of people. Entertainment such as our business provides has become a necessity, not a luxury... it is the part which offers us the greatest reassurance about the future in the animation field."''

to:

\n[[caption-width-right:225: [[HumbleBeginnings "I only hope that we don't lose sight of one thing — that it was all started by]] [[WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse a mouse."]]]]

->''"To think six years ahead - -- even two or three - -- in this business of making animated cartoon features, it takes calculated risk and much more than blind faith in the future of theatrical motion pictures. I see motion pictures as a family-founded institution closely related to the life and labor of millions of people. Entertainment such as our business provides has become a necessity, not a luxury... it is the part which offers us the greatest reassurance about the future in the animation field."''



** In the original stories and plays by J. M. Barrie, Literature/PeterPan was one of TheFairFolk and came off as a SociopathicHero - he didn't show much concern for his "friends," took nightmarish pleasure in killing pirates, and even ''murdered Lost Boys'' [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness just for growing up]] (or to make a battle against the pirates more interesting). [[Disney/PeterPan The Disney version]], understandably, left out this aspect of Peter.

to:

** In the original stories and plays by J. M. Barrie, Literature/PeterPan was one of TheFairFolk and came off as a SociopathicHero - -- he didn't show much concern for his "friends," took nightmarish pleasure in killing pirates, and even ''murdered Lost Boys'' [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness just for growing up]] (or to make a battle against the pirates more interesting). [[Disney/PeterPan The Disney version]], understandably, left out this aspect of Peter.



** In ''Disney/TheJungleBook'', Baloo and Bageehra essentially switch personalities (Baloo was a stern mentor and Bagheera was a laid-back friend in the book), Kaa becomes a clownish villain rather than a wise mentor for Mowgli, and Shere Khan is turned from a SmugSnake to a FauxAffablyEvil villain.

to:

** In ''Disney/TheJungleBook'', Baloo and Bageehra essentially switch personalities (Baloo was a stern mentor SternTeacher and Bagheera was a laid-back friend in the book), Kaa becomes a clownish villain rather than a wise mentor for Mowgli, and Shere Khan is turned from a SmugSnake to a FauxAffablyEvil villain.



** ''Disney/WreckItRalph'': A number of villains get together for a support group, and among them is [[Franchise/StreetFighter Zangief]], who isn't a villain in the games - though he is often a victim of this trope, being a villain in both the first live-action Street Fighter movie and Street Fighter American cartoon. This makes his comments toward Ralph during his sole scene all the more poignant.

to:

** ''Disney/WreckItRalph'': A number of villains get together for a support group, and among them is [[Franchise/StreetFighter Zangief]], who isn't a villain in the games - -- though he is often a victim of this trope, being a villain in both the first live-action Street Fighter Film/StreetFighter movie and Street Fighter WesternAnimation/StreetFighter American cartoon. This makes his comments toward Ralph during his sole scene all the more poignant.



* AnAesop: Most of the films in the line-up have one, though how prevalent and deeply tied into the story it is varies from film to film.

to:

* AnAesop: AnAesop / CentralTheme: Most of the films in the line-up have one, though how prevalent and deeply tied into the story it is varies from film to film.film:
** ''Disney/{{Cinderella}}'': Staying strong and hopeful in circumstances that try to beat you down.
** ''Disney/LadyAndTheTramp'': The divide between the rich and the poor.
** ''Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast'': [[TrueBeautyIsOnTheInside Who you are inside is far more important than what's on the outside.]]
** ''Disney/{{Aladdin}}'': Be honest with yourself and others, for deception will only get you so far.
** ''Disney/TheLionKing'': Taking responsibility, whether for yourself or for your duties.
** ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'': Family refers to those who turn to each other when no-one else will.
** ''Disney/MeetTheRobinsons'': Persevere towards the future and don't let your past control you.
** ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'': The nature and importance of love, and how it is far greater than mere romance.
** ''Disney/BigHero6'': Healing from a painful loss.
** ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'': The nature of bigotry and prejudice, and the role we play in overcoming it.



** Most films in the canon are named after and based on a prior-existing story, though the degree to which they are faithful to the original varies from film to film. The bulk of the 19 animated features made in Walt Disney's own lifetime were based on pre-existing stories--the only features he made that weren't based on any pre-existing stories were ''Saludos Amigos'' and ''The Three Caballeros''. The bulk of ''Make Mine Music'' and ''Melody Time'' consist of original story material as well, but have a couple segments based on pre-existing stories, such as ''Casey at the Bat'', ''Johnny Appleseed'', ''Little Toot'' and ''Pecos Bill''.

to:

** Most films in the canon are named after and based on a prior-existing story, though the degree to which they are faithful to the original varies from film to film. The bulk of the 19 animated features made in Walt Disney's own lifetime were based on pre-existing stories--the stories -- the only features he made that weren't based on any pre-existing stories were ''Saludos Amigos'' and ''The Three Caballeros''. The bulk of ''Make Mine Music'' and ''Melody Time'' consist of original story material as well, but have a couple segments based on pre-existing stories, such as ''Casey at the Bat'', ''Johnny Appleseed'', ''Little Toot'' and ''Pecos Bill''.



** Professor Terri Tatti from [[Disney/MakeMineMusic "The Whale Who Wanted to Sing at the Met"]], since he has a somewhat justifiable reason for attacking Willie--[[CaptainObvious whales normally don't sing opera]], so he assumes the whale swallowed three whole opera singers to get his talent (it actually comes from the fact that Willie has three uvulas), so he kills Willie with a harpoon to free them. His act is described not as a villainous one, but a misguided one springing from his lack of understanding.

to:

** Professor Terri Tatti from [[Disney/MakeMineMusic "The Whale Who Wanted to Sing at the Met"]], since he has a somewhat justifiable reason for attacking Willie--[[CaptainObvious Willie -- [[CaptainObvious whales normally don't sing opera]], so he assumes the whale swallowed three whole opera singers to get his talent (it actually comes from the fact that Willie has three uvulas), so he kills Willie with a harpoon to free them. His act is described not as a villainous one, but a misguided one springing from his lack of understanding.



** Edgar of Disney/TheAristocats is one of the few Disney Villains who is not exactly pure evil; while he is greedy, he does not seem to be cruel. It would have been easy for him to just kill Duchess and her kittens, but instead, he chose to kidnap them and release them into the wild—-and when that didn't work, he decides to send them to Timbuktu. Moreover, he's shown to have more redeeming features and is never willing to kill anyone.

to:

** Edgar of Disney/TheAristocats is one of the few Disney Villains who is not exactly pure evil; while he is greedy, he does not seem to be cruel. It would have been easy for him to just kill Duchess and her kittens, but instead, he chose to kidnap them and release them into the wild—-and wild —- and when that didn't work, he decides to send them to Timbuktu. Moreover, he's shown to have more redeeming features and is never willing to kill anyone.



-->"He probably wouldn't have minded killing Maurice. That was the extent where someone like the Beast, who had the potential to be good, could become a villain. The Beast was pitying himself, frustrated, so he felt justified in treating the father that way, and when he comes back, Belle is crying--his actions do cause people pain--and he starts to get a glimmer that he's not entirely comfortable with the role of a villain....He had incredible limitations--it's kind of like taking the villain and the hero and wrapping them up into one body."

to:

-->"He probably wouldn't have minded killing Maurice. That was the extent where someone like the Beast, who had the potential to be good, could become a villain. The Beast was pitying himself, frustrated, so he felt justified in treating the father that way, and when he comes back, Belle is crying--his actions do cause people pain--and pain -- and he starts to get a glimmer that he's not entirely comfortable with the role of a villain....villain... He had incredible limitations--it's limitations -- it's kind of like taking the villain and the hero and wrapping them up into one body."



** ''The Sword in the Stone'': The film tries to have a [[KnowledgeIsPower "Knowledge is the real power."]] message delivered by Merlin to Wart both throughout the film and in the ending, but almost nothing in the film supports it because Wart is a PinballProtagonist who has no control over anything that's going on around him, and his problems are almost always solved by Merlin's magic anyway [[{{Hypocrite}} despite Merlin saying magic can't solve all his problems]] (even if they do unwittingly tend to cause as many hardships as they solve, Merlin is basically doing the real work for Wart, even if he sincerely is trying to make a point to him) and he doesn't even get his happy ending by using anything he learned from Merlin--in fact, Wart ends up doing the ''exact opposite'' of what Merlin wanted by willingly accepting a degrading position as Kay's squire instead of focusing on an education. It was by sheer luck that he ends up going to London and turns out to be the one worthy of pulling out the sword, making him King of England right then and there.
** ''The Lion King'': In what is probably one of the most infamous cases, Simba the lion thinks he killed his own father and runs off to another land. Eventually people tell him to confront his fears and he goes back to challenge Scar, who took over his kingdom in his abscence and turned it into a tyranny. Yet when Scar again puts the blame on him for causing his fathers' death Simba starts to doubt himself again and the other lions doubt him too. It's only when Scar has Simba in a situation where he will probably die that he confesses that he was the actual murderer. This gives Simba the confidence to finally defeat Scar and when he does this, all the others finally accept him in their midst.
** ''Meet the Robinsons'' is particularly {{Anvilicious}} about its Aesop: don't worry about making mistakes because you can always learn from them and fix them later. The movie contains two plot-stopping lectures and a musical number to hammer it in. So, when confronted with DOR-15, Lewis solves the problem by declaring he will never invent her, causing a Temporal Paradox and removing her from existence. A quick and easy way to end the movie, but at the cost of undermining its Aesop. Right from the beginning, DOR-15 was still fully-functional, if only disobedient. The movie's solution prevents a viable third option: Instead of writing DOR-15 off as a failed invention too early, Lewis could remind his future self to either correct DOR-15's behavior or outright build a better one, allowing him to dispatch DOR-15 while still having his Helping Hat invention. Lewis also never demonstrates that he learned his roommate had needs and would be more conscientious about it. Meanwhile, the two characters who DO follow the Aesop's advice don't exactly get rewarded for it: Wilbur scrambles around trying to fix his careless mistake but only ends up making things worse and is eventually punished by his mother when he admits to it, while the Bowler Hat Guy keeps trying new schemes when the old ones fail and is consistently chewed out for his incompetence by DOR-15 and everyone else around him. The short version: The film's Aesop is about getting better through learning from your mistakes. While Lewis laments that he makes the same mistakes over and over again, he ends up solving his problems by denying his mistakes (and potentially repeating them), rather than identifying and improving on them. Conversely, when Wilbur and Bowler Hat Guy do try and learn from their own mistakes, they end up making things worse for themselves.

to:

** ''The Sword in the Stone'': ''TheSwordInTheStone'': The film tries to have a [[KnowledgeIsPower "Knowledge is the real power."]] message delivered by Merlin to Wart both throughout the film and in the ending, but almost nothing in the film supports it because Wart is a PinballProtagonist who has no control over anything that's going on around him, and his problems are almost always solved by Merlin's magic anyway [[{{Hypocrite}} despite Merlin saying magic can't solve all his problems]] (even if they do unwittingly tend to cause as many hardships as they solve, Merlin is basically doing the real work for Wart, even if he sincerely is trying to make a point to him) and he doesn't even get his happy ending by using anything he learned from Merlin--in Merlin -- in fact, Wart ends up doing the ''exact opposite'' of what Merlin wanted by willingly accepting a degrading position as Kay's squire instead of focusing on an education. It was by sheer luck that he ends up going to London and turns out to be the one worthy of pulling out the sword, making him King of England right then and there.
** ''The Lion King'': ''TheLionKing'': In what is probably one of the most infamous cases, Simba the lion thinks he killed his own father and runs off to another land. Eventually people tell him to confront his fears and he goes back to challenge Scar, who took over his kingdom in his abscence and turned it into a tyranny. Yet when Scar again puts the blame on him for causing his fathers' death Simba starts to doubt himself again and the other lions doubt him too. It's only when Scar has Simba in a situation where he will probably die that he confesses that he was the actual murderer. This gives Simba the confidence to finally defeat Scar and when he does this, all the others finally accept him in their midst.
** ''Meet the Robinsons'' ''MeetTheRobinsons'' is particularly {{Anvilicious}} about its Aesop: don't worry about making mistakes because you can always learn from them and fix them later. The movie contains two plot-stopping lectures and a musical number to hammer it in. So, when confronted with DOR-15, Lewis solves the problem by declaring he will never invent her, causing a Temporal Paradox and removing her from existence. A quick and easy way to end the movie, but at the cost of undermining its Aesop. Right from the beginning, DOR-15 was still fully-functional, if only disobedient. The movie's solution prevents a viable third option: Instead of writing DOR-15 off as a failed invention too early, Lewis could remind his future self to either correct DOR-15's behavior or outright build a better one, allowing him to dispatch DOR-15 while still having his Helping Hat invention. Lewis also never demonstrates that he learned his roommate had needs and would be more conscientious about it. Meanwhile, the two characters who DO follow the Aesop's advice don't exactly get rewarded for it: Wilbur scrambles around trying to fix his careless mistake but only ends up making things worse and is eventually punished by his mother when he admits to it, while the Bowler Hat Guy keeps trying new schemes when the old ones fail and is consistently chewed out for his incompetence by DOR-15 and everyone else around him. The short version: The film's Aesop is about getting better through learning from your mistakes. While Lewis laments that he makes the same mistakes over and over again, he ends up solving his problems by denying his mistakes (and potentially repeating them), rather than identifying and improving on them. Conversely, when Wilbur and Bowler Hat Guy do try and learn from their own mistakes, they end up making things worse for themselves.



%%* ClassicVillain

to:

%%* ClassicVillain* ClassicVillain: Just about every Disney Villain qualifies, to the point of Disney having it's own section on the page.



** ''Disney/SleepingBeauty'' - [[spoiler:Prince Phillip]]
** ''Disney/{{Pinocchio}}'' - [[spoiler:Pinocchio]]
** ''Disney/TheLionKing'' - [[spoiler:Pretty much everyone who survives]]
** ''Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame'' - [[spoiler:Quasimodo]]
** ''Disney/{{Mulan}}'' - [[spoiler:Mulan]]
** ''Disney/WreckItRalph'' - [[spoiler:Ralph]]
** ''{{Disney/Frozen}}'' - [[spoiler:Elsa/Anna]]

to:

** ''Disney/SleepingBeauty'' - -- [[spoiler:Prince Phillip]]
** ''Disney/{{Pinocchio}}'' - -- [[spoiler:Pinocchio]]
** ''Disney/TheLionKing'' - -- [[spoiler:Pretty much everyone who survives]]
** ''Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame'' - -- [[spoiler:Quasimodo]]
** ''Disney/{{Mulan}}'' - -- [[spoiler:Mulan]]
** ''Disney/WreckItRalph'' - -- [[spoiler:Ralph]]
** ''{{Disney/Frozen}}'' - -- [[spoiler:Elsa/Anna]]



* LightIsGood : Both this and DarkIsEvil are played straight in most of the movies.

to:

* LightIsGood : LightIsGood: Both this and DarkIsEvil are played straight in most of the movies.



* MomLooksLikeASister: [[MissingMom If a mother appears at all]], odds are she'll look to be only in her twenties, even if she's still around when her child reaches his or her late teens. To whit:

to:

* MomLooksLikeASister: MumLooksLikeASister: [[MissingMom If a mother appears at all]], odds are she'll look to be only in her twenties, even if she's still around when her child reaches his or her late teens. To whit:



** Neither Disney/TheManyAdventuresOfWinnieThePooh nor Disney/WinnieThePooh (2011) have a real villain in them--they're just figments of the characters imaginations.

to:

** Neither Disney/TheManyAdventuresOfWinnieThePooh nor Disney/WinnieThePooh (2011) have a real villain in them--they're them -- they're just figments of the characters imaginations.



* ObviouslyEvil: A great many of these films do this, even going so far as to base their color and shape schemes around it (as talked about in the ''Disney/{{Aladdin}}'' DVD documentaries). Just take one look at a character sheet for an average Disney film and you can immediately pick out the villains. This is kind of odd when it's done with AnimalStereotypes and say - bears are painted as horrible, deadly, kaiju-like monstrous demons in ''Disney/TheFoxAndTheHound'' and as friendly and lovable heroes in ''Disney/TheJungleBook'' and ''Disney/BrotherBear''. However, there have been subversions of this in their more recent films, such as Disney/Frozen.

to:

* ObviouslyEvil: A great many of these films do this, even going so far as to base their color and shape schemes around it (as talked about in the ''Disney/{{Aladdin}}'' DVD documentaries). Just take one look at a character sheet for an average Disney film and you can immediately pick out the villains. This is kind of odd when it's done with AnimalStereotypes and say - -- bears are painted as [[BearsAreBadNews horrible, deadly, kaiju-like deadly,]] {{kaiju}}-[[BearsAreBadNews like monstrous demons demons]] in ''Disney/TheFoxAndTheHound'' and as [[BearyFriendly friendly and lovable heroes heroes]] in ''Disney/TheJungleBook'' and ''Disney/BrotherBear''. However, there have been subversions of this in their more recent films, such as Disney/Frozen.Disney/{{Frozen}}.
* OddballInTheSeries: Disney was rather hands-off for the development of ''LiloAndStitch'', and it shows -- the film has a unique art-style, {{setting}}, and {{Genre}} in comparison to most other canon films, and it's narrative seems closer to {{Pixar}} films in terms of its themes and lack of musical numbers. The fact that it was the only real success of Disney's Millennium Era makes it's oddities stand out more, to the point that Disney really played up its oddness in comparison to other Disney films in its marketing. It's quite fitting that the film's protagonists are regarded as weird InUniverse.



** Phil Harris (''The Jungle Book'', ''The Aristocats'', ''Robin Hood'') and [[Creator/CheechAndChong Cheech Marin]] (''Oliver & Company'', ''The Lion King'') are particularly glaring examples of this.
** Kathryn Beaumont (''Alice in Wonderland'', ''Peter Pan'') who voiced both Alice and Wendy Darling (respectively).
** [[invoked]]Verna Felton only ever voiced either energetic/stuffy villains (''Dumbo'', ''Alice in Wonderland'', ''Lady and the Tramp'') or kindly matriarchs (''Dumbo'', [[TalkingToHimself again]]), ''Cinderella'', ''Sleeping Beauty'', ''The Jungle Book'').
** Pat Buttram (''The Aristocats'', ''Robin Hood'', ''The Rescuers'', ''The Fox and the Hound'') used his own distinct rural Alabama accent for every character he voiced.
** Alan Tudyk (''Wreck-It Ralph'', ''Frozen'', ''Big Hero 6'', ''Zootopia'') is a more recent example, if only for playing [[spoiler:antagonists]] in four movies in a row, two of which were [[spoiler:examples of EvilOldFolks]].

to:

** Phil Harris PhilHarris (''The Jungle Book'', ''The Aristocats'', ''Robin Hood'') and [[Creator/CheechAndChong Cheech Marin]] (''Oliver & Company'', ''The Lion King'') are particularly glaring examples of this.
** Kathryn Beaumont KathrynBeaumont (''Alice in Wonderland'', ''Peter Pan'') who voiced both Alice and Wendy Darling (respectively).
** [[invoked]]Verna Felton [[invoked]]VernaFelton only ever voiced either energetic/stuffy villains (''Dumbo'', ''Alice in Wonderland'', ''Lady and the Tramp'') or kindly matriarchs (''Dumbo'', [[TalkingToHimself again]]), ''Cinderella'', ''Sleeping Beauty'', ''The Jungle Book'').
** Pat Buttram PatButtram (''The Aristocats'', ''Robin Hood'', ''The Rescuers'', ''The Fox and the Hound'') used his own distinct rural Alabama accent for every character he voiced.
** Alan Tudyk AlanTudyk (''Wreck-It Ralph'', ''Frozen'', ''Big Hero 6'', ''Zootopia'') is a more recent example, if only for playing [[spoiler:antagonists]] in four movies in a row, two of which were [[spoiler:examples of EvilOldFolks]].



** ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'': The [[Myth/ClassicalMythology original Heracles myth]]--and Greek Mythology in general--were as family unfriendly as you can get and had a ''lot'' of built-in ValuesDissonance (the basic conflict ''alone'' was unacceptable for a family film, since Hercules is a product of Zeus' adultery with a mortal, and Hera, Zeus' wife, is the villain who constantly makes Hercules' life miserable because of this), so the studio was forced to [[DisneyFication heavily rework the concept]]; it borrows the character names (not so much the personalities), story points and the setting from the myths, but [[AdaptedOut throws out]] and [[CanonImmigrant adds in]] things from other parts of Greek Myth (such as Pegasus and the Muses, who were not in the original Heracles story), and reworks everything else (such as expanding Hades role in the story [[EveryoneHatesHades by turning him into the main villain]]), ultimately making the film less an adaptation of Greek Mythology and more like a [[XMeetsY mashup of]] Film/SupermanTheMovie and Film/{{Rocky}} [[RecycledInSpace set in a]] [[TheThemeParkVersion burlesque of Ancient Greece.]]

to:

** ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'': The [[Myth/ClassicalMythology original Heracles myth]]--and myth]] -- and Greek Mythology in general--were general -- were as family unfriendly as you can get and had a ''lot'' of built-in ValuesDissonance (the basic conflict ''alone'' was unacceptable for a family film, since Hercules is a product of Zeus' adultery with a mortal, and Hera, Zeus' wife, is the villain who constantly makes Hercules' life miserable because of this), so the studio was forced to [[DisneyFication heavily rework the concept]]; it borrows the character names (not so much the personalities), story points and the setting from the myths, but [[AdaptedOut throws out]] and [[CanonImmigrant adds in]] things from other parts of Greek Myth (such as Pegasus and the Muses, who were not in the original Heracles story), and reworks everything else (such as expanding Hades role in the story [[EveryoneHatesHades by turning him into the main villain]]), ultimately making the film less an adaptation of Greek Mythology and more like a [[XMeetsY mashup of]] Film/SupermanTheMovie and Film/{{Rocky}} [[RecycledInSpace set in a]] [[TheThemeParkVersion burlesque of Ancient Greece.]]



* ShadowArchetype: In addition to being {{Classic Villain}}s, the villains of many Disney movies reflect a potential flaw or weakness of {{the hero}}es, meaning that they must overcome themselves as well as the odds against them.



* TheThemeParkVersion: While many of the movies in the Disney Animated Canon are [[PragmaticAdaptation Pragmatic Adaptations]], they are often seen as Theme Park Versions of their sources due to PublicMediumIgnorance. It doesn't help that most people are generally familiar with the ''actual'' Theme Park Versions, from the literal theme parks, spin-offs/sequels, crossovers, or merchandise. Considering the popularity of those Theme Park Versions however, the company obviously has no intention of correcting this mindset towards the original films, much to the vexation of fans.

to:

* TheThemeParkVersion: While many of the movies in the Disney Animated Canon are [[PragmaticAdaptation Pragmatic Adaptations]], {{Pragmatic Adaptation}}s, they are often seen as Theme Park Versions of their sources due to PublicMediumIgnorance. It doesn't help that most people are generally familiar with the ''actual'' Theme Park Versions, from the literal theme parks, spin-offs/sequels, crossovers, or merchandise. Considering the popularity of those Theme Park Versions however, the company obviously has no intention of correcting this mindset towards the original films, much to the vexation of fans.



* TheVerse: Possibly with all the cameos and easter eggs and what not.

to:

* TheVerse: Possibly with all the cameos {{the cameo}}s and easter eggs {{Easter egg}}s and what not.not. If ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' is considered, each movie takes place in its own world that exists separate from the others due to the events of [[GreatOffscreenWar the Keyblade War]].


Added DiffLines:

* VerySpecialEpisode: ''{{Zootopia}}'' deeply explores the nature of racism in a way unexpected of most animated films, let alone Disney movies. It's especially notable given the increasing racial tensity of TheNewTens.
24th Jan '17 6:27:36 PM jameygamer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


# March 30, 2007 - ''Disney/MeetTheRobinsons'' (the last entry to be distributed by Buena Vista, and the first to include a VanityPlate for Walt Disney Animation Studios during the opening and closing)

to:

# March 30, 2007 - ''Disney/MeetTheRobinsons'' (the last entry to be distributed by Buena Vista, and the first to include a VanityPlate for Walt Disney Animation Studios and the new Walt Disney Pictures logo during the opening and closing)
24th Jan '17 6:26:39 PM jameygamer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


# July 10, 1981 - ''Disney/TheFoxAndTheHound'' (last entry to be distributed by Buena Vista)

to:

# July 10, 1981 - ''Disney/TheFoxAndTheHound'' (last entry to be distributed by carry the Buena Vista)Vista VanityPlate)



# November 28, 2008 - ''Disney/{{Bolt}}'' (usually considered the last film of the "Post-Renaissance" era, although it's sometimes considered the first film of the Disney Revival)

to:

# November 28, 2008 - ''Disney/{{Bolt}}'' (usually considered the last film of the "Post-Renaissance" era, although it's sometimes considered the first film of the Disney Revival)Revival; first entry distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures after Buena Vista was reorganized into that label)
This list shows the last 10 events of 572. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Franchise.DisneyAnimatedCanon