History ExecutiveMeddling / ComicBooks

11th Oct '17 6:01:45 PM DarkChirano
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* [[ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehogIDW The IDW Sonic comic]] has all the same restrictions as the Archie comic, along with one "addition": obscure Sega-made characters like Ray the Flying Squirrel aren't allowed to show up.
9th Oct '17 4:32:26 PM DarkChirano
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* [[ComicBook/SonicTheHedgehogIDW The IDW Sonic comic]] has all the same restrictions as the Archie comic, along with one "addition": obscure Sega-made characters like Ray the Flying Squirrel aren't allowed to show up.
30th Sep '17 1:06:36 AM Divra
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* ''ComicBook/LibertyMeadows', during its syndicated period, was heavily censored. The strip relies quite heavily on sexual allusion and was more than willing to nudge the line between PG-13 and R whereas the executives wanted something "five-year-old-friendly". This eventually led to the artist Frank Cho dropping syndication altogether. However, Cho has stated that he is still grateful for the suggestion to change Leslie into a frog, instead of keeping him as a talking lima bean.

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* ''ComicBook/LibertyMeadows', ''ComicBook/LibertyMeadows'', during its syndicated period, was heavily censored. The strip relies quite heavily on sexual allusion and was more than willing to nudge the line between PG-13 and R whereas the executives wanted something "five-year-old-friendly". This eventually led to the artist Frank Cho dropping syndication altogether. However, Cho has stated that he is still grateful for the suggestion to change Leslie into a frog, instead of keeping him as a talking lima bean.
30th Sep '17 1:05:56 AM Divra
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Added DiffLines:

* ''ComicBook/LibertyMeadows', during its syndicated period, was heavily censored. The strip relies quite heavily on sexual allusion and was more than willing to nudge the line between PG-13 and R whereas the executives wanted something "five-year-old-friendly". This eventually led to the artist Frank Cho dropping syndication altogether. However, Cho has stated that he is still grateful for the suggestion to change Leslie into a frog, instead of keeping him as a talking lima bean.
21st Sep '17 8:14:57 PM erforce
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* This trope lead to the CreatorKiller of Creator/TakeTwoInteractive's own comic company, Double Take. Take Two had hired former Marvel Comics editor Bill Jemas (who was also responsible for the tripe that was ''ComicBook/{{Marville}}'') to create a new comic universe and planned to do so using ''VideoGame/XCom'', ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'' and ''VideoGame/BioShock'' as a massive SharedUniverse (how that would have worked is really unknown). However, the games division was ''really'' protective of their franchises and didn't want this "outsider" messing with them, forcing the entirety of Double Take being yanked out of Take-Two's offices and into a new office. Scrambling for something to replace what they lost, they decided to focus on ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead'' and try to turn that into a superhero universe. However, that was met with incredible disappointment and the company would ultimately fold without really getting it's foot out the door.

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* This trope lead to the CreatorKiller of Creator/TakeTwoInteractive's own comic company, Double Take. Take Two had hired former Marvel Comics editor Bill Jemas (who was also responsible for the tripe that was ''ComicBook/{{Marville}}'') to create a new comic universe and planned to do so using ''VideoGame/XCom'', ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'' and ''VideoGame/BioShock'' as a massive SharedUniverse (how that would have worked is really unknown). However, the games division was ''really'' protective of their franchises and didn't want this "outsider" messing with them, forcing the entirety of Double Take being yanked out of Take-Two's offices and into a new office. Scrambling for something to replace what they lost, they decided to focus on ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead'' ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968'' and try to turn that into a superhero universe. However, that was met with incredible disappointment and the company would ultimately fold without really getting it's foot out the door.
4th Jul '17 11:36:27 AM MBG
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* ''ComicBook/YoungJustice'': Creator/PeterDavid was restricted with what he would do with Tim Drake (who was Robin at the time) during the mid-'90s to early 2000s because the [[Franchise/{{Batman}} Bat-family comics]] editors had the final say on how ''Batman''-related characters were used. One of the restrictions put on him was that Robin couldn't be seen in public, as the Bat-family was supposed to be considered an urban legend InUniverse.

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* ''ComicBook/YoungJustice'': Creator/PeterDavid was restricted with what he would do with Tim Drake (who was Robin at the time) during the mid-'90s to early 2000s because the [[Franchise/{{Batman}} Bat-family comics]] editors had the final say on how ''Batman''-related characters were used. One of the restrictions put on him was that Robin couldn't be seen in public, as the Bat-family was supposed to be considered an urban legend InUniverse. He [[BitingTheHandHumor mostly parodied the whole idea]], with Robin hiding in the shadows even in broad daylight and characters saying things like "we know it's you, Tim."
4th Jul '17 11:32:37 AM MBG
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** The writers wanted Cassandra Cain to discover religion, but the editor-in-chief forced them to make her pull a FaceHeelTurn. The turn was eventually reverted due to fan backlash.

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** The writers wanted Despite still selling reasonably well 70 issues in, editorial cancelled Cassandra Cain to discover religion, but Cain's book with the editor-in-chief forced them justification of "we're launching a new Hawkgirl title and we don't want too many female-led books" and ordered the writers to make her pull a FaceHeelTurn. The turn was eventually reverted due to fan backlash.
11th May '17 1:50:26 PM morenohijazo
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* ''ComicBook/MortadeloYFilemon'': A lot in the early years - the Bruguera company even tried to "steal" the characters from Ibáñez and give them to other authors a couple of times. He also had to deal with the Francoist official censorship, which was pretty hard at suppresing ToiletHumor and anything that denoted "subversion". For instance, the cops are called "gendarmes" and their uniforms and cars do not look anything like the Spanish police ones of the time[[note]]While there may be cops in stories written during the Francoist epoch, they dress like British ones, and they even have in their cars the word "Police", instead of the Spanish "Policía". Penals are also non Spanish ones such as Sing-Sing[[/note]]; when a character made any reference to the Spanish Civil War it either disappeared or was changed to "[[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI the '14 war]]", a war in which Spain never took part, and so on. One character of 13 Rue del Percebe (another comic strip from the same author that sometimes {{Cross Over}}ed with Mortadelo y Filemón), a parodic MadScientist that built monsters for a living, was eventually written out and substituted by a tailor because the dead-hard Catholic government thought that "Only God can create life". This is also why women ''do not appear at all'' in late 50s strips - each time Ibáñez drew one, the censors eliminated so much curves that it ended looking like a broomstick.
** Even some dialogues had to be changed because censorship. In one instance, Mortadelo sees a monster, and runs to Filemón in panic, trying to alert him. He tries to say "¡Un monstruo!" ("A monster!") but he's so scared that he can only babble: "¡Un mo... un mo...!". Filemón thinks he's trying to say "un moco" ("snot") and says "Si tiene un moco, suénese" ("If you've got snot, blow your nose") as he produces a handkerchief. "Moco", though a quite colloquial, innocent word, was such a profanity for some censor that Filemón's answer was rewritten as "¿Un mono? Aquí no hay monos" ("A monkey? There are no monkeys here"), making the gesture of producing the handkerchief completely absurd.
10th Apr '17 6:49:39 AM KhesterBarbatos
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** DC insisted Batman have a KidSidekick, which creator Bob Kane protested for being a stupid idea. He lost the argument, leading to the creation Dick Grayson, the first ComicBook/{{Robin}}. Another account claims that Kane had drafted a more fantastical sidekick for Batman, a young boy with the codename "Mercury" who'd wear a special suit that gave him powers. Jerry Robinson then convinced Kane to bring the child down to a more realistic level and suggested the name "Robin" after "Robin Hood" (the bird symbolism wouldn't come into play until much later).

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** DC insisted Batman have a KidSidekick, which creator co-creator Bob Kane protested for being a stupid idea. He lost the argument, leading to the creation Dick Grayson, the first ComicBook/{{Robin}}. Another account claims that Kane had drafted a more fantastical sidekick for Batman, a young boy with the codename "Mercury" who'd wear a special suit that gave him powers. Jerry Robinson then convinced Kane to bring the child down to a more realistic level and suggested the name "Robin" after "Robin Hood" (the bird symbolism wouldn't come into play until much later).
23rd Feb '17 9:19:46 AM LondonKdS
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** Hasbro has, over the years, forced numerous characters to change their names when the original G1 name either fell out of copyright or they were unable to secure it. This is why, for example, Hot Rod changed his name to Rodimus. However, the weird example is Slag the Dinobot. Slag, as it turns out, means something offensive in certain parts of the English-speaking world. Hasbro decided to change the character's name to Slug. IDW's comic did not handle this transition well. Arcee told Slag that his name meant something crude and offensive. Slag, who was characterized as [[{{Jerkass}} making a point of being crude and offensive]], responded by agreeing to change his name to Slug.

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** Hasbro has, over the years, forced numerous characters to change their names when the original G1 name either fell out of copyright or they were unable to secure it. This is why, for example, Hot Rod changed his name to Rodimus. However, the weird example is Slag the Dinobot. Slag, "Slag", as it turns out, means something is an extremely offensive term for a sexually-immoral woman in certain parts of the English-speaking world. Hasbro decided to change the character's name to Slug. IDW's comic did not handle this transition well. Arcee told Slag that his name meant something crude and offensive. Slag, who was characterized as [[{{Jerkass}} making a point of being crude and offensive]], responded by agreeing to change his name to Slug.
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