History EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / TabletopGames

21st Jul '17 12:24:02 PM Stinkoman87
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*** Additionally, true archetypes (that care about a portion of the card's name) weren't introduced until a couple of years into the game. And for a few years after that, it still talked about 'cards with "X" in their name' instead of the more streamlined '"X" card',
15th Jul '17 7:31:41 AM narm00
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* ''TabletopGame/Bakugan'' didn't have any of the Battle Gear gimmicks or Ultimate Formations that later rebranding would introduce. In addition, the Ultimate Formations were initially CombiningMecha rather than the MoreDakka the later ones would become.

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* ''TabletopGame/Bakugan'' ''TabletopGame/{{Bakugan}}'' didn't have any of the Battle Gear gimmicks or Ultimate Formations that later rebranding would introduce. In addition, the Ultimate Formations were initially CombiningMecha rather than the MoreDakka the later ones would become.
27th Jun '17 6:00:45 AM TheKaizerreich
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** Orks also ''looked'' incredibly different and acted less impulsive. Modern Orks came about due to the GaidenGame ''TabletopGame/{{Gorkamorka}}'', which codified their ''Film/MadMax'' design and hooligan-style approach to warfare. The older Orks had such oddities as beards, a more streamlined and straight-forward look for their tech instead of "cobbled-together scrap that somehow works", resembled the Huns and Mongolians a lot more and used Germanic iconography, including swastikas (one of many reasons why Ghazghkull Mag Uruk Thraka can be legitimately compared to UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler, since his banner often featured one in official art); and overall Orks looked a lot smaller and wimpier, compared to the hulking monstrosities they became. In fact, Gorkamorka's Ork models, while more muscled, are still somewhat tiny like the Rogue Trader miniatures, compared to later ones.


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** Dark Eldar and Necrons, and the Tau to some degree, also received noticable changes since their original inceptions. The Dark Eldar miniature range was completely redone for 2011 and now makes it clear that they essentially are a race of torture-loving, slave-keeping and ever-hedonistic space vampires, and it's reflected in their spikes, whips, lean bodies and organicly-shaped technology, as well as their emphasis on how they have to suck soul energy out of their victims to survive. Necrons were originally unthinking, undead killer robots enslaved by their C'tan masters, while the 2011 release gave them some personality, Egyptian flavour and explained that the C'tan were enslaved '''by them''' and shattered (explaining while the RealityWarper C'tan are so weak in battle - they're not the real deal anyore). It also added some special characters, something they completely missed before, and removed the human-turned-Necron units called "Pariahs" in favour of an all-Necron force. The Tau overall changed very little, but in accordance with the setting became noticably darker, more oppressive (still the lightest faction of the setting in comparison), and their "everyone works perfectly together" outlook shattered when Tau "rebel forces" were introduced who do not share the same opinion on the "Greater Good".
4th Jun '17 3:30:28 AM VenomousSeal
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* ''TabletopGame/Bakugan'' didn't have any of the Battle Gear gimmicks or Ultimate Formations that later rebranding would introduce. In addition, the Ultimate Formations were initially CombiningMecha rather than the MoreDakka the later ones would become.
28th May '17 3:37:08 PM nombretomado
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* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' was initially just ''WarhammerFantasy RecycledInSpace'' with things like the Eldar being explicitly called "Space Elves". It also wasn't actually called "Warhammer 40 000" untill the 2nd edition (the first edition is called Rogue Trader)

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' was initially just ''WarhammerFantasy ''TabletopGame/WarhammerFantasy RecycledInSpace'' with things like the Eldar being explicitly called "Space Elves". It also wasn't actually called "Warhammer 40 000" untill the 2nd edition (the first edition is called Rogue Trader)
22nd May '17 8:53:28 AM CptnLhurgoyf
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** The original edition was called ''Rogue Trader'' because back then, there weren't army lists; it was assumed that each player's forces would represent a band of mercenaries, space pirates, and hired guns drawn from different races and factions, rather than a formal army of any power. The Imperium was presented as a force that stayed largely in the background and functioned as {{Obstructive Bureaucrat}}s at best and villains at worst, not the VillainProtagonist faction behind most of the playable armies they are now.
22nd May '17 6:29:40 AM CptnLhurgoyf
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** In the first edition of ''Role Play'', Sigmar is mentioned in passing as being a minor deity and the patron of the Empire but not worshipped widely. It wasn't until later that he became the single most powerful and important non-Chaos god in the entire setting.
1st Jan '17 10:16:21 AM darkpast
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*** The very concept of Chaos as a faction didn't exist at all in the 1st edition rulebook, either. There were Warp space and Warp monsters that could possess people, but nothing like Chaos Space Marines, Chaos Cultists etc.


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** Orks were very different in the first two editions of Warhammer 40K. They were notably better at shooting, but worse at close combat; they often wore bright and garish colours; they weren't a type of space fungus, but humanoids with an odd reproductive system; their clan system was described in great detail and had substantial effects on game play; they had lots of [[LethalJokeItem Lethal Joke Items]]. In the original rulebook they were subject to hatred of all enemies, an element of psychology that was never again part of the rules.
9th Oct '16 4:44:15 PM ArcaneAzmadi
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** As ''Magic'' was the pioneer CCG, Richard Garfield and his team had ''no'' idea how powerful certain aspects of the games could be, perhaps most notably card advantage, resulting in some absolutely ''absurd'' cases of imbalance in the Alpha set. This could be seen most obviously in the "Boon" set, 5 instant spells of each of the 5 colours that gave you [[RuleOfThree 3 of an effect themed to that colour]] for one mana. This set included Red's Lightning Bolt (3 damage), Green's Giant Growth (+3/+3 until end of turn), White's Healing Salve (3 damage prevention or life gain), Black's Dark Ritual (3 black mana) and... Blue's Ancestral Recall, which instantly let you '''draw three cards for 1 mana.''' Once people began to learn how to actually ''play Magic'' Ancestral Recall rapidly came to be considered one of the most overpowered cards in the game's entire history (one of the infamous "Power Nine") and it was never reprinted after the Unlimited set.
7th Oct '16 10:23:03 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''VampireTheMasquerade'' was a vastly different beast in First Edition (1991-1992) and the earliest parts of Second Edition (around 1992-1993, though 2e as a whole continued until 1999). The biggest example of this is the total lack of a {{Metaplot}}. There were other key differences between First Edition and the later editions of the game.

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* ''VampireTheMasquerade'' ''TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade'' was a vastly different beast in First Edition (1991-1992) and the earliest parts of Second Edition (around 1992-1993, though 2e as a whole continued until 1999). The biggest example of this is the total lack of a {{Metaplot}}. There were other key differences between First Edition and the later editions of the game.



** The other denizens of the OldWorldOfDarkness were less defined. Werewolves and Mages were insanely powerful boss monsters whose motives and backgrounds were completely unknown. Ghosts and Faeries were also alluded to, and Faeries were even more dangerous than either Werewolves or Mages to the point that they did not have concrete stats, only suggestions for the GM. Mages were less about reshaping reality and more like traditional wizards with insanely high levels of Thaumaturgy and other spells.

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** The other denizens of the OldWorldOfDarkness TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness were less defined. Werewolves and Mages were insanely powerful boss monsters whose motives and backgrounds were completely unknown. Ghosts and Faeries were also alluded to, and Faeries were even more dangerous than either Werewolves or Mages to the point that they did not have concrete stats, only suggestions for the GM. Mages were less about reshaping reality and more like traditional wizards with insanely high levels of Thaumaturgy and other spells.
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