History EarlyInstallmentWeirdness / TabletopGames

16th Jun '18 7:51:30 AM CptnLhurgoyf
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** While the concept of the Emperor being a decaying husk entombed in the Golden Throne has existed since ''Rogue Trader'', the idea that this was due to him being mortally wounded in a battle is a more recent invention. The original book implied that the Throne was simply a machine he used to prolong his lifespan, and his corpse-like state a result of incredibly advanced age.
29th May '18 3:18:03 AM Gravityman
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** In addition to almost all being Normal monsters, most monsters from the early game also tended to have low stats for their level. It was fairly common for Normal monsters with only 1500 or 1600 ATK requiring a sacrifice to summon. Additionally, many Fusion monsters also tended to have lackluster stats and no effect to make up for how difficult they were to summon.
18th Apr '18 8:30:10 AM CaptainCrawdad
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*** Characters now have multiple Armor Class values depending on the type of attack and the character's awareness of it.

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*** Armor Class is now simply the number that an attack roll needs to meet to score a hit, so the higher it is, the better. Characters now also have multiple Armor Class values depending on the type of attack and the character's awareness of it.
18th Apr '18 8:25:59 AM CaptainCrawdad
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*** One of the more famous departures is the combat system, in which players determine what number they have to roll above by taking their character's THAC0 score and subtracting their target's Armor Class. Thus, the lower your THAC0 and Armor Class, the better. This also introduced many players to the concept of subtracting negative numbers.

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*** One of the more famous departures is the combat system, in which players determine what number they have to roll above by taking their character's THAC0 [=THAC0=] score and subtracting their target's Armor Class. Thus, the lower your THAC0 [=THAC0=] and Armor Class, the better. This also introduced many players to the concept of subtracting negative numbers.
18th Apr '18 8:23:50 AM CaptainCrawdad
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** As ''Magic'' was the pioneer CCG, Richard Garfield and his team had ''no'' idea how powerful certain aspects of the games could be, perhaps most notably card advantage, resulting in some absolutely ''absurd'' cases of imbalance in the Alpha set. This could be seen most obviously in the "Boon" set, 5 instant spells of each of the 5 colours that gave you [[RuleOfThree 3 of an effect themed to that colour]] for one mana. This set included Red's Lightning Bolt (3 damage), Green's Giant Growth (+3/+3 until end of turn), White's Healing Salve (3 damage prevention or life gain), Black's Dark Ritual (3 black mana) and... Blue's Ancestral Recall, which instantly let you '''draw three cards for 1 mana.''' Once people began to learn how to actually play ''Magic'' Ancestral Recall rapidly came to be considered one of the most overpowered cards in the game's entire history (one of the infamous "Power Nine") and it was never reprinted after the Unlimited set.

to:

** As ''Magic'' was the pioneer CCG, Richard Garfield and his team had ''no'' idea how powerful certain aspects of the games could be, perhaps most notably card advantage, resulting in some absolutely ''absurd'' cases of imbalance in the Alpha set. This could be seen most obviously in the "Boon" set, 5 instant spells of each of the 5 colours that gave you [[RuleOfThree 3 of an effect themed to that colour]] for one mana. This set included Red's Lightning Bolt (3 damage), Green's Giant Growth (+3/+3 until end of turn), White's Healing Salve (3 damage prevention or life gain), Black's Dark Ritual (3 black mana) and... Blue's Ancestral Recall, which instantly let you '''draw draw three cards for 1 mana.''' mana. Once people began to learn how to actually play ''Magic'' Ancestral Recall rapidly came to be considered one of the most overpowered cards in the game's entire history (one of the infamous "Power Nine") and it was never reprinted after the Unlimited set.
18th Apr '18 8:23:19 AM CaptainCrawdad
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** The game's original set has many differences from the expansions.

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** The game's original set has many differences from the expansions.expansions:



** Some elements that have always been a part of the game didn't always have their modern rules.

to:

** Some elements that have always been a part of the game didn't always have their modern rules. rules:
18th Apr '18 8:22:40 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' has this in spades. The game's original setting was much closer to a StandardFantasySetting. (In fact, the first set, ''Alpha'' was a deliberate attempt to cram as many familiar fantasy elements as possible in one set.) The colors were much less defined mechanically than today - many cards did things that would be unacceptable in their colors today. The rules were messy. There were bizarre mechanics like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=603 flipping cards over in the air]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=813 dividing creatures into two different groups that can't ever meet]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=740 camouflaging creatures]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=980 subgames]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=1147 playing for ante]]. Rules text was written in a much less formal style, the ultimate example of this probably being [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202586 Rock Hydra]]. Also, some early cards also referred to abilities as "special powers." And finally, the "Block system" of one large set followed by two related sets, as we know it today, didn't actually begin until ''Mirage''. ''Homelands'' was originally shoehorned into an ''Ice Age'' "block", but then later made ''Coldsnap'' to properly complete the ''Ice Age'' "block".
** This can look especially weird with elements that have always been a part of the game, but didn't always have their modern rules. The most egregious examples are cards that represent weapons and the like before Equipment was made into a rule. With modern Equipment, a sword being used by a creature that gets killed can be equipped to a different creature. But old Equipment-like cards usually followed the user to the grave. This can also be seen in Arabian Nights, which has a lot of cards for unique characters (Aladdin, Ali Baba, etc.), but there was no "legend rule," so you could have a game with a half-dozen Aladdins running around at once!
*** This is particularly awkward when a long-standing ability finally gets keyworded, but not ''exactly'' how the previous version(s) worked. One example is "Deathtouch," which causes any amount of damage deal to a creature to be lethal--there were at least three previous versions, none of which worked that way (the other versions were all triggered abilities, either keying immediately off damage, immediately off blocking/being block regardless of damage, or at the end of combat after blocking/being blocked). The other primary example is "Lifelink," which causes the source's controller to gain life whenever it deals damage (like deathtouch, this is a property of the damage, not a triggered ability). The old version, usually referred as "Spirit Link," after the card that granted it, is a triggered ability. More importantly, "Spirit Link" causes whoever controls the effect granting "Spirit Link" to gain life, while Lifelink causes the controller of the damage source to gain life. This is relevant because a player can put "Spirit Link" on an opponent's creature to effectively nullify damage to themselves (as long as they don't die between the damage being dealt and the lifegain trigger resolving).
** On the topic of "equipment" artifacts predating the actual Equipment mechanic, the one that worked most similarly to the modern concept was [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=1837 Zelyon Sword]]. It used tapping and a continuous targeting effect to stay "attached" to a creature. Also of note is that it was a rare that was effectively a 3-mana artifact that granted +2/+0 with equip 3. By contrast, one of the first "proper" equipment in the game, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=370442 Bonesplitter]], granted the same stat bonus for only 1 mana each to cast and equip, at common.
*** In fairness to the designers of Zelyon Sword's era, Bonesplittler is acknowledged to be a bit overpowered. However, it's ''less'' overpowered than Zelyon Sword is underpowered.
** Also, many of the earliest cards had to basically explain the mechanics of the game in the card itself, with examples and all, while nowadays these are nearly always left out because the templating is much more streamlined and the rules are much more codified, with whole sections on things that used to be (and in a few cases still are) specific to one or two cards. A good example of this is [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=208 Keldon Warlord]], whose original card text was:
---> The Xs below are the number of non-wall creatures on your side, including Warlord. Thus if you have 2 other non-wall creatures, Warlord is 3/3. If one of those creatures is killed during the turn, Warlord immediately becomes 2/2.
*** The modern text is simply: "Keldon Warlord's power and toughness are each equal to the number of non-Wall creatures you control." Another good example is [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=100 Control Magic]], whose card text states:
---> You control target creature until enchantment is discarded or game ends. You can't tap target creature this turn, but if it was already tapped it stays tapped until you can untap it. If destroyed, target creature is put in its owner's graveyard.
*** The modern text just says: "You control enchanted creature."
*** This wording contains several other examples of EarlyInstallmentWeirdness. First and second, modern cards don't use the words "target" and "discard" the way this wording does. Third, the "can't tap" bit - an attempt to describe summoning sickness - was ''never'' entirely correct, so besides being redundant by modern templating standards, it's also just plain sloppy by those same standards. Fourth, the "until game ends" bit, while it meets with a resounding "well duh" from the modern-day reader, is there because at the time, Wizards of the Coast thought of ante as one of the game's most important rules. Therefore, they didn't think returning the card to its owner at the end of the game was nearly as obvious as it seems now. In reality, of course, ante was the first rule most people ignored.

to:

* ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' has this in spades.
**
The game's original set has many differences from the expansions.
*** The
setting was much closer to a StandardFantasySetting. (In fact, the first set, ''Alpha'' was a deliberate attempt to cram as many familiar fantasy elements as possible in one set.) StandardFantasySetting.
***
The colors were much less defined mechanically than today - many today. Many cards did things that would be unacceptable in their colors today. The rules were messy. today.
***
There were bizarre mechanics mechanics, like [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=603 flipping cards over in the air]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=813 dividing creatures into two different groups that can't ever meet]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=740 camouflaging creatures]], [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=980 subgames]] and [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=1147 playing for ante]].
***
Rules text was written in a much less formal style, the ultimate example of this probably being [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=202586 Rock Hydra]]. Also, some Some early cards also referred to abilities as "special powers." And finally, the "
** The
"Block system" of one large set followed by two related sets, as we know it today, didn't actually begin until ''Mirage''. ''Homelands'' was originally shoehorned into an ''Ice Age'' "block", but then later made ''Coldsnap'' to properly complete the ''Ice Age'' "block".
** This can look especially weird with Some elements that have always been a part of the game, but game didn't always have their modern rules. The most egregious examples are cards rules.
*** Cards
that represent weapons and the like before Equipment was made into a rule. For example, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=1837 Zelyon Sword]] used tapping and a continuous targeting effect to stay "attached" to a creature. With modern Equipment, a sword being used by a creature that gets killed can be equipped to a different creature. But creature, but old Equipment-like cards usually followed the user to the grave. This can also be seen in Arabian Nights, which has a lot of cards for unique characters (Aladdin, Ali Baba, etc.), but there was no "legend rule," so you could have a game with a half-dozen Aladdins running around at once!
grave.
*** This is particularly awkward when a long-standing ability finally gets keyworded, but not ''exactly'' how the previous version(s) worked. One example is "Deathtouch," which causes any amount of damage deal to a creature to be lethal--there were at least three previous versions, none of which worked that way (the other versions were all triggered abilities, either keying immediately off damage, immediately off blocking/being block regardless of damage, or at the end of combat after blocking/being blocked). The other primary example is "Lifelink," which causes the source's controller to gain life whenever it deals damage (like deathtouch, this is a property of the damage, not a triggered ability). The old version, usually referred as "Spirit Link," after the card that granted it, is a triggered ability. More importantly, "Spirit Link" causes whoever controls the effect granting "Spirit Link" to gain life, while Lifelink causes the controller of the damage source to gain life. This is relevant because a player can put "Spirit Link" on an opponent's creature to effectively nullify damage to themselves (as long as they don't die between the damage being dealt and the lifegain trigger resolving).
** On the topic of "equipment" artifacts predating the actual Equipment mechanic, the one that worked most similarly to the modern concept was [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=1837 Zelyon Sword]]. It used tapping and a continuous targeting effect to stay "attached" to a creature. Also of note is that it was a rare that was effectively a 3-mana artifact that granted +2/+0 with equip 3. By contrast, one of the first "proper" equipment in the game, [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=370442 Bonesplitter]], granted the same stat bonus for only 1 mana each to cast and equip, at common.
*** In fairness to the designers of Zelyon Sword's era, Bonesplittler is acknowledged to be a bit overpowered. However, it's ''less'' overpowered than Zelyon Sword is underpowered.
way.
** Also, many of the earliest cards had to basically use different words for core concepts and take less things for granted about the knowledge of the players. Cards often explain the mechanics of the game in the card itself, with examples and all, while nowadays these are nearly always left out because the templating is much more streamlined streamlined, and the rules are much more codified, with whole sections on things that used to be (and in a few cases still are) specific to one or two cards. A good example of this is [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=208 Keldon Warlord]], whose original card text was:
---> The
was: "The Xs below are the number of non-wall creatures on your side, including Warlord. Thus if you have 2 other non-wall creatures, Warlord is 3/3. If one of those creatures is killed during the turn, Warlord immediately becomes 2/2.
***
2/2." The modern text is simply: "Keldon Warlord's power and toughness are each equal to the number of non-Wall creatures you control." Another good example is [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=100 Control Magic]], whose card text states:
---> You control target creature until enchantment is discarded or game ends. You can't tap target creature this turn, but if it was already tapped it stays tapped until you can untap it. If destroyed, target creature is put in its owner's graveyard.
*** The modern text just says: "You control enchanted creature."
*** This wording contains several other examples of EarlyInstallmentWeirdness. First and second, modern cards don't use the words "target" and "discard" the way this wording does. Third, the "can't tap" bit - an attempt to describe summoning sickness - was ''never'' entirely correct, so besides being redundant by modern templating standards, it's also just plain sloppy by those same standards. Fourth, the "until game ends" bit, while it meets with a resounding "well duh" from the modern-day reader, is there because at the time, Wizards of the Coast thought of ante as one of the game's most important rules. Therefore, they didn't think returning the card to its owner at the end of the game was nearly as obvious as it seems now. In reality, of course, ante was the first rule most people ignored.



** As ''Magic'' was the pioneer CCG, Richard Garfield and his team had ''no'' idea how powerful certain aspects of the games could be, perhaps most notably card advantage, resulting in some absolutely ''absurd'' cases of imbalance in the Alpha set. This could be seen most obviously in the "Boon" set, 5 instant spells of each of the 5 colours that gave you [[RuleOfThree 3 of an effect themed to that colour]] for one mana. This set included Red's Lightning Bolt (3 damage), Green's Giant Growth (+3/+3 until end of turn), White's Healing Salve (3 damage prevention or life gain), Black's Dark Ritual (3 black mana) and... Blue's Ancestral Recall, which instantly let you '''draw three cards for 1 mana.''' Once people began to learn how to actually ''play Magic'' Ancestral Recall rapidly came to be considered one of the most overpowered cards in the game's entire history (one of the infamous "Power Nine") and it was never reprinted after the Unlimited set.

to:

** As ''Magic'' was the pioneer CCG, Richard Garfield and his team had ''no'' idea how powerful certain aspects of the games could be, perhaps most notably card advantage, resulting in some absolutely ''absurd'' cases of imbalance in the Alpha set. This could be seen most obviously in the "Boon" set, 5 instant spells of each of the 5 colours that gave you [[RuleOfThree 3 of an effect themed to that colour]] for one mana. This set included Red's Lightning Bolt (3 damage), Green's Giant Growth (+3/+3 until end of turn), White's Healing Salve (3 damage prevention or life gain), Black's Dark Ritual (3 black mana) and... Blue's Ancestral Recall, which instantly let you '''draw three cards for 1 mana.''' Once people began to learn how to actually ''play Magic'' play ''Magic'' Ancestral Recall rapidly came to be considered one of the most overpowered cards in the game's entire history (one of the infamous "Power Nine") and it was never reprinted after the Unlimited set.
17th Apr '18 1:30:10 PM CaptainCrawdad
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*** Characters are limited in what classes they could take based on their race. Nonhuman races have a [[{{Cap}} Level Cap]] on the classes they can take, but can also Multi-Class. Humans have no level restrictions, cannot Multi-Class, but can Dual Class, which is essentially abandoning your current class and starting over at first level in another class.

to:

*** Characters are limited in what classes they could take based on their race.race and attributes. Nonhuman races have a [[{{Cap}} Level Cap]] on the classes they can take, but can also Multi-Class. Humans have no level restrictions, cannot Multi-Class, but can Dual Class, which is essentially abandoning your current class and starting over at first level in another class. class.
*** The Bard class cannot be taken at 1st level. Only humans and half-elves with very high stats who pass a variety of difficult in-game challenges can become Bards, making it the most rare and prestigious class in the game.


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*** Weapons have different damage ranges depending on the size of the target. In general, blunt weapons do less damage to larger creatures, slashing weapons do more, and piercing weapons do the same.


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*** Bards are changed to just another class available at 1st level.
17th Apr '18 1:24:22 PM CaptainCrawdad
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*** Some of the core races and classes are removed, such as Monks.

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*** Some of the core races and classes are removed, such as Half-Orcs and Monks.
17th Apr '18 1:23:13 PM CaptainCrawdad
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** ''Dungeons & Dragons'' Third Edition: This is a complete overhaul of the game, retaining the game's spirit and hallmark elements, but discarding most of the former editions' game mechanics in favor of the new open-license D20 system.

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** ''Dungeons & Dragons'' Third Edition: Dragons 3rd Edition'': This is a complete overhaul of the game, retaining the game's spirit and hallmark elements, but discarding most of the former editions' game mechanics in favor of the new open-license D20 system.



** ''Dungeons & Dragons'' 4th Edition: This version was another large overhaul, intended to tone down the considerable numbers-crunching of 3.0 and 3.5 editions and appeal to a more casual crowd who had grown up on {{Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game}}s.

to:

** ''Dungeons & Dragons'' Dragons 4th Edition: Edition'': This version was another large overhaul, intended to tone down the considerable numbers-crunching of 3.0 and 3.5 editions and appeal to a more casual crowd who had grown up on {{Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game}}s.



** ''Dungeons & Dragons'' 5th Edition: This version is a follow-up attempt to streamline play.

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** ''Dungeons & Dragons'' Dragons 5th Edition: Edition'': This version is a follow-up attempt to streamline play.
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