History DracoInLeatherPants / Theatre

7th Sep '15 6:59:55 PM nombretomado
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* Gabriel Goodman of NextToNormal may be a subversion, as he is portrayed in canon as extremely seductive/alluring in canon and is DILPed by Diana herself. He also gets several EXTREMELY sexy {{Villain Song}}s.

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* Gabriel Goodman of NextToNormal ''Theatre/NextToNormal'' may be a subversion, as he is portrayed in canon as extremely seductive/alluring in canon and is DILPed by Diana herself. He also gets several EXTREMELY sexy {{Villain Song}}s.
4th Sep '15 5:44:56 AM Morgenthaler
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* People also tend to Leather Pants ''Theatre/RichardIII'' in Shakepeare's play of the same name. True, he wasn't nearly as bad in real life and this play is one of the most famous cases of HistoricalVillainUpgrade, but he's still an evil bastard in the play. I suppose this is a case of HistoryMarchesOn, as it was long believed that UsefulNotes/RichardIII did commit many of the atrocities he did in the play.

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* People also tend to Leather Pants ''Theatre/RichardIII'' in Shakepeare's play of the same name. True, he wasn't nearly as bad in real life and this play is one of the most famous cases of HistoricalVillainUpgrade, but he's still an evil bastard in the play. I suppose this This is probably a case of HistoryMarchesOn, DatedHistory, as it was long believed that UsefulNotes/RichardIII did commit many of the atrocities he did in the play.
27th Mar '15 3:41:40 PM MrThorfan64
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* People also tend to Leather Pants ''Theatre/RichardIII'' in Shakepeare's play of the same name. True, he wasn't nearly as bad in real life, but he's still an evil bastard in the play. I suppose this is a case of HistoryMarchesOn, as it was long believed that UsefulNotes/RichardIII did commit many of the atrocities he did in the play.

to:

* People also tend to Leather Pants ''Theatre/RichardIII'' in Shakepeare's play of the same name. True, he wasn't nearly as bad in real life, life and this play is one of the most famous cases of HistoricalVillainUpgrade, but he's still an evil bastard in the play. I suppose this is a case of HistoryMarchesOn, as it was long believed that UsefulNotes/RichardIII did commit many of the atrocities he did in the play.


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** It helps that most of the characters in Richard III seem rather boring and stupid compared to the charismatic, witty Richard. Even the supposed hero, Henry VII, barely appears and only comes in at the end.
4th Dec '14 11:49:03 PM PrincessGwen
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** Judge Turpin can get this in productions where the song "Joana" is kept. This song gives him more depth, portraying him as a tortured person who knows his lust is wrong but is unable to keep it in check. However, many use this as an excuse to absolve him of ''everything''

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** Judge Turpin can get this in productions where the song "Joana" "Johanna" is kept. This song gives him more depth, portraying him as a tortured person who knows his lust is wrong but is unable to keep it in check. However, many use this as an excuse to absolve him of ''everything''
17th Nov '14 11:01:50 AM Patachou
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* People also tend to Leather Pants ''Theatre/RichardIII'' in Shakepeare's play of the same name. True, he wasn't nearly as bad in real life, but he's still an evil bastard in the play. I suppose this is a case of HistoryMarchesOn, as it was long believed that RichardOfGloucester did commit many of the atrocities he did in the play.

to:

* People also tend to Leather Pants ''Theatre/RichardIII'' in Shakepeare's play of the same name. True, he wasn't nearly as bad in real life, but he's still an evil bastard in the play. I suppose this is a case of HistoryMarchesOn, as it was long believed that RichardOfGloucester UsefulNotes/RichardIII did commit many of the atrocities he did in the play.
18th Oct '14 9:26:11 PM HamburgerTime
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Phantom'' also has an in-universe example in the form of [[ShowWithinAShow Erik's own opera]], ''Don Juan Triumphant''. From what little we see of it, it appears to be a rewrite of Mozart's ''Opera/DonGiovanni'', with the title character avoiding his KarmicDeath from the source and getting the girl in the end. This, of course, fits perfectly with Erik's character given that he sees himself as a misunderstood genius and lover, so of course he would identify with Giovanni rather than his victims.
5th Sep '14 11:03:56 AM ChaoticNovelist
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** The fact that the musical itself romanticizes the Phantom doesn't help. Gaston Leroux's original portrayal in the novel was much harsher and less sympathetic. And of course, Andrew Lloyd Webber noticed many fans were unsatisfied with the ending, so he decided to create a little sequel called ''Theatre/LoveNeverDies''; fanning the flames of Leather-Pantsing and making [[spoiler: all militant Erik/Christine shippers']] dreams come true, and arguably invalidating the point of the original musical.

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** The fact that the musical itself romanticizes the Phantom doesn't help.certainly helps. Gaston Leroux's original portrayal in the novel was much harsher and less sympathetic. And of course, Andrew Lloyd Webber noticed many fans were unsatisfied with the ending, so he decided to create a little sequel called ''Theatre/LoveNeverDies''; fanning the flames of Leather-Pantsing and making [[spoiler: all militant Erik/Christine shippers']] dreams come true, and arguably invalidating the point of the original musical.



* [[Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice Shylock]] is what happens when this attitude drifts down into academic circles, and then into the general public. Nearly all modern interpretations transform him from the [[ValuesDissonance (admittedly very unsettling)]] antagonist to a tragic character, while the intended heroes are racist assholes bent on ruining his life. Nevermind that Shylock's entire scheme was to ''murder Antonio'' [[DisproportionateRetribution over him insulting Shylock's profession.]] And then his daughter (who also gets this treatment, despite being little more than a greedy bitch according to the play) runs off with most of his money and his family heirloom. Shylock then refuses double the amount owed, simply so he can kill Antonio, who HAD NOTHING TO DO WITH HIS DAUGHTER.
** In most cases, this is an example of compensating for ValuesDissonance rather than a legitimate example of the trope. Traditionally, the Shylock was either a completely evil monster or he was played as an unsympathetic and repulsive buffoon. However, modern audiences almost always treat both interpretations as being antisemitic despite those traits being character traits of the Shylock and not a commentary on the Jewish people as a whole. It's easy to forget that, prior to about the 19th century, anti-Semitism was based not on racism but on religious bigotry (indeed, most Europeans believed that they, themselves, were descended from the Jewish people before the Indo-Aryan hypothesis was put forward by German linguists), and in the play Jessica is a "good Jew" because she wants to become a Christian. And apparently, since Shylock himself is forced to convert at the end of the play, the implication is that either he'll undergo a HeelFaceTurn or he'll just continue to be evil - this time, as an evil Christian.

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* [[Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice Shylock]] Theatre/TheMerchantOfVenice: Shylock is what happens when this attitude drifts down into academic circles, and then into the general public. Nearly all modern interpretations transform him from the [[ValuesDissonance (admittedly very unsettling)]] antagonist to a tragic character, while the intended heroes are racist assholes bent on ruining his life. Nevermind that Shylock's entire scheme was to ''murder Antonio'' [[DisproportionateRetribution over him insulting Shylock's profession.]] And then his daughter (who also gets this treatment, despite being little more than a greedy bitch according to the play) runs off with most of his money and his family heirloom. Shylock then refuses double the amount owed, simply so he can kill Antonio, who HAD NOTHING TO DO WITH HIS DAUGHTER.
** In most cases, this is an example of compensating for ValuesDissonance rather than a legitimate example of the trope. Traditionally, the Shylock was either a completely evil monster or he was played as an unsympathetic and repulsive buffoon. However, modern audiences almost always usually treat both interpretations as being antisemitic despite those traits being character traits of the Shylock and not a commentary on the Jewish people as a whole. It's easy to forget that, prior to about the 19th century, anti-Semitism was based not on racism but on religious bigotry (indeed, most Europeans believed that they, themselves, were descended from the Jewish people before the Indo-Aryan hypothesis was put forward by German linguists), and in the play Jessica is a "good Jew" because she wants to become a Christian. And apparently, Apparently, since Shylock himself is forced to convert at the end of the play, the implication is that either he'll undergo a HeelFaceTurn or he'll just continue to be evil - this time, as an evil Christian.
3rd Aug '14 12:24:28 PM HawktureShorts155
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** In most cases, this is an example of compensating for ValuesDissonance rather than a legitimate example of the trope. Traditionally, the Shylock was either a completely evil monster or he was played as an unsympathetic and repulsive buffoon. However, modern audiences almost always treat both interpretations as being antisemitic despite those traits being character traits of the Shylock and not a commentary on the Jewish people as a whole.

to:

** In most cases, this is an example of compensating for ValuesDissonance rather than a legitimate example of the trope. Traditionally, the Shylock was either a completely evil monster or he was played as an unsympathetic and repulsive buffoon. However, modern audiences almost always treat both interpretations as being antisemitic despite those traits being character traits of the Shylock and not a commentary on the Jewish people as a whole. It's easy to forget that, prior to about the 19th century, anti-Semitism was based not on racism but on religious bigotry (indeed, most Europeans believed that they, themselves, were descended from the Jewish people before the Indo-Aryan hypothesis was put forward by German linguists), and in the play Jessica is a "good Jew" because she wants to become a Christian. And apparently, since Shylock himself is forced to convert at the end of the play, the implication is that either he'll undergo a HeelFaceTurn or he'll just continue to be evil - this time, as an evil Christian.
6th Apr '14 1:45:54 PM DrOO7
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* Erik, the titular character in ''Theatre/ThePhantomOfTheOpera'' is a disfigured, tortured soul, longing for compassion from another human being...who also happens to be obsessively stalking a girl and in serious need of therapy. He kills ''at least'' two people, sabotages a chandelier, kidnaps Christine, blackmails her by threatening to kill her fiancee unless she marries him, and essentially forces a world-renowned opera house to put on his self-insert fanfiction - which he then literally inserts himself into! A lot of fans tend to give him the {{Woobie}} treatment and ignore his terrible actions, as well as romanticize his relationship with Christine and portray [[RonTheDeathEater Raoul as a jerk]] [[DieForOurShip who doesn't respect her]].

to:

* Erik, the titular character in ''Theatre/ThePhantomOfTheOpera'' is a disfigured, tortured soul, longing for compassion from another human being...who also happens to be obsessively stalking a girl and in serious need of therapy. He kills ''at least'' two people, sabotages a chandelier, chandelier--which could have injured or killed even ''more'' people (the TV miniseries depicts exactly this in the aftermath), kidnaps Christine, Christine (and quite possibly takes advantage of her while she's entranced/unconscious), blackmails her by threatening to kill her fiancee unless she marries him, and essentially forces a world-renowned opera house to put on his self-insert fanfiction - which he then literally inserts himself into! A lot of fans tend to give him the {{Woobie}} treatment and ignore his terrible actions, as well as romanticize his relationship with Christine and portray [[RonTheDeathEater Raoul as a jerk]] [[DieForOurShip who doesn't respect her]].
15th Dec '13 12:12:22 AM EarlOfSandvich
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* Erik, the titular character in ''PhantomOfTheOpera'' is a disfigured, tortured soul, longing for compassion from another human being...who also happens to be obsessively stalking a girl and in serious need of therapy. He kills ''at least'' two people, sabotages a chandelier, kidnaps Christine, blackmails her by threatening to kill her fiancee unless she marries him, and essentially forces a world-renowned opera house to put on his self-insert fanfiction - which he then literally inserts himself into! A lot of fans tend to give him the {{Woobie}} treatment and ignore his terrible actions, as well as romanticize his relationship with Christine and portray [[RonTheDeathEater Raoul as a jerk]] [[DieForOurShip who doesn't respect her]].

to:

* Erik, the titular character in ''PhantomOfTheOpera'' ''Theatre/ThePhantomOfTheOpera'' is a disfigured, tortured soul, longing for compassion from another human being...who also happens to be obsessively stalking a girl and in serious need of therapy. He kills ''at least'' two people, sabotages a chandelier, kidnaps Christine, blackmails her by threatening to kill her fiancee unless she marries him, and essentially forces a world-renowned opera house to put on his self-insert fanfiction - which he then literally inserts himself into! A lot of fans tend to give him the {{Woobie}} treatment and ignore his terrible actions, as well as romanticize his relationship with Christine and portray [[RonTheDeathEater Raoul as a jerk]] [[DieForOurShip who doesn't respect her]].
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