History CulturalTranslation / AnimeAndManga

1st Jul '16 1:16:36 PM StarSword
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Also, many of ''Anime/SpaceBattleshipYamato'''s references to ''TheShinsengumi'' were changed to the story of ''JasonAndTheArgonauts''.

to:

** Also, many of ''Anime/SpaceBattleshipYamato'''s references to ''TheShinsengumi'' UsefulNotes/TheShinsengumi were changed to the story of ''JasonAndTheArgonauts''.
26th May '16 1:57:32 PM spaceace72
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Noticeably, the dub never changed any of the Japanese text that appears, probably to keep with the surreal feel of the show.
14th May '16 10:12:32 AM Soufriere
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Averted in the dub of the OVA series dub (recorded years earlier by a different studio), which goes out of its way to preserve much of the Japanese terminology, as well as the metric system.

to:

** Averted in the dub of the OVA series dub (recorded years earlier by a different studio), which goes out of its way to preserve much of the Japanese terminology, as well as the metric system.
14th May '16 10:10:46 AM Soufriere
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Names are changes to diminutives that sound more vaguely Western – Nobita becomes Noby, for example. Kanji signs are overlaid with their English translations (as seen in that screenshot).

to:

*** Names are changes changed to diminutives that sound more vaguely Western – Nobita becomes Noby, for example. Kanji signs are overlaid with their English translations (as seen in that screenshot).
14th May '16 10:09:47 AM Soufriere
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Done slightly in the ''Anime/CowboyBebop'' dub. When tracking down a hacker, Faye remarks that their target is probably a smelly nerd, rather than using the term {{Otaku}}. This was changed back to its original comment in later runs.

to:

* Done slightly in the ''Anime/CowboyBebop'' dub. When tracking down a hacker, Faye remarks that their target is probably a smelly nerd, rather than using the term {{Otaku}}. This was changed back to its The DVD release and the later uncut broadcast has the original comment in later runs.line.



** Perhaps one of the most [[MemeticMutation (in)famous]] instances of this was with Brocks... [[http://38.media.tumblr.com/6c723e9fb8f33ac9219e47af376f7f8a/tumblr_inline_njkxwuwl811rfe165.gif jelly-filled donuts]].

to:

** Perhaps one of the most [[MemeticMutation (in)famous]] instances of this was with Brocks...Brock's... [[http://38.media.tumblr.com/6c723e9fb8f33ac9219e47af376f7f8a/tumblr_inline_njkxwuwl811rfe165.gif jelly-filled donuts]].



* The river Sanzu was changed to the Western equivalent, the river Styx, in the dub of ''Manga/YuYuHakusho''. ** Also done for ''LoneWolfAndCub: Baby Cart at the River Styx''.

to:

* The river River Sanzu was changed to the Western equivalent, the river River Styx, in the dub of ''Manga/YuYuHakusho''. ''Manga/YuYuHakusho''.
** Also done for ''LoneWolfAndCub: ''Manga/LoneWolfAndCub: Baby Cart at the River Styx''.



* Creator/{{Geneon}}'s dub of the ''Anime/LupinIIIRedJacket'' TV series - originally created in the 1970s but dubbed in the 2000s - replaced dated Japanese pop-culture references with American equivalents, which was a good translation between country cultures, but also used ''modern'' references [[AnachronismStew in a show that was obviously not set in the modern day]], which were usually bad translations between decade cultures. [[RuleOfFunny It was still pretty funny though]].

to:

* Creator/{{Geneon}}'s dub of the ''Anime/LupinIIIRedJacket'' TV series - originally created in the 1970s 1977 but dubbed in the 2000s - 2003 – replaced dated Japanese pop-culture references with American equivalents, which was a good translation between country cultures, but also used equivalents. However, many of those references were to ''modern'' references pop-culture [[AnachronismStew in a show that was obviously not clearly set a quarter-century in the modern day]], which were usually bad translations between decade cultures.past]], making them stand out like a sore thumb. [[RuleOfFunny It was still pretty funny though]]. The pop-culture references were toned down significantly after the first season, a.k.a. the episodes that ''didn't'' air on U.S. television.
** Probably the most infamous example is from the episode "The Sleight Before Christmas", where Fujiko name-checks ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' and Jigen references then-current basketball player Shaquille O'Neal.
** In "Shaky Pisa", the evil Italian scientist creating earthquakes demands a ransom, which in the original he calculates in Italian Lira, but the dub changes to U.S. Dollars.
** In another episode, Lupin and Jigen break into a NASA laboratory which uses voiced passwords. The original Japanese makes oblique references to Music/TheBeatles and Music/{{Elvis|Presley}}, while the English dub swaps them out with ''[[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Star Trek: TOS]]'' references – arguably more appropriate, as many NASA engineers are known to be ''Trek'' fans.



* In ''LightNovel/{{Slayers}}'', Lina Inverse is known as the "Dragon Spooker", where "spooker" is a [[FunWithAcronyms contrived acronym]] "Dragon Steps Past Out Of Clear Revulsion". In the original, it's "Dra-mata", meaning "dragon mo mata ide tooru" (even a dragon would step over it), a play on words on the Japanese phrase "neko mo mata ide tooru" (even a cat would step over it), which means a nasty person. The acronym was needed because to finish the play on words, a dragon really does step over Lina.

to:

* In ''LightNovel/{{Slayers}}'', Lina Inverse is known as the "Dragon Spooker", where "spooker" is a [[FunWithAcronyms contrived acronym]] acronym]]: "Dragon Steps Past Out Of Clear Revulsion". In the original, it's "Dra-mata", meaning "dragon mo mata ide tooru" (even a dragon would step over it), a play on words on the Japanese phrase "neko mo mata ide tooru" (even a cat would step over it), which means a nasty person. The acronym was needed because to finish the play on words, a dragon really does step over Lina.



** Yukari temporarily switches from Language to Math to P.E. on a whim. Soccer is the initial game of choice. When questioned about her knowledge of the rules, she said, according to the sub, "I'm Nakata," probably referring to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hidetoshi_Nakata Hidetoshi]]. In the dub, however, she instead says, "I'm Mia Hamm," an ''American'' soccer player. In the American translation of the manga by ADV, she's Pele. In the French translation of the manga by Kurokawa (possibly the editor relying the most on Cultural Translation in the French manga market), she's Ronaldo (the Brazilian player, not Cristiano Ronaldo).
** Another example would be Osaka meeting Chiyo's father. She makes a comment on his face. In the sub, she refers to him having a face similar to Mori Yoshiro, a former Japanese Prime Minister. In the dub, she comments that he looks similar to Bill Clinton, a former President of the United States.
** In the manga of ''Azumanga Daioh'', however, Osaka is translated to be from New York - Yukari-sensei invites her to say to the class, "Yo, how ''[[{{Friends}} you]] doin'?" The other girls also ask her about meatball sandwiches and Mickey D's instead of [=McDonald's=]. The phonetic accent works...[[WebVideo/YuGiOhTheAbridgedSeries less perfectly...]]but otherwise, eh, fuhgeddaboudit!
** In one strip of the manga, Tomo greeted Yomi by saying "Good [[HelloProject Morning Musume]]!" ADV's translation of the manga changed this to another musical reference: "[[{{Oasis}} What's the story, morning glory?!]]"
* Although the actual cultural references in ''LightNovel/FullMetalPanic!'' are unchanged, in the English dub of ''Anime/FullMetalPanicFumoffu'' a passage from Sousuke's Japanese Classics assignment is read in what appears to be Middle English, in order to preserve the effect and explain why Sousuke is having so much trouble understanding the text.

to:

** Yukari temporarily switches from Language to Math to P.E. on a whim. Soccer is the initial game of choice. When questioned about her knowledge of the rules, she said, according to the sub, "I'm Nakata," probably referring to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hidetoshi_Nakata Hidetoshi]]. In the dub, however, she instead says, "I'm Mia Hamm," an ''American'' soccer player. In the American translation of the manga manga, also by ADV, she's Pele. In the French translation of the manga by Kurokawa (possibly the editor relying the most on Cultural Translation in the French manga market), she's Ronaldo (the Brazilian player, not Cristiano Ronaldo).
** Another example would be Osaka meeting Chiyo's father. She makes a comment on his face. In the sub, she refers to him having a face similar to Mori Yoshiro, Yoshiro Mori, a former Japanese Prime Minister. Minister (who kinda ''did'' look like that). In the dub, she comments that he looks similar to Bill Clinton, UsefulNotes/BillClinton, a former President of the United States.
** In The English dub of the manga of ''Azumanga Daioh'', however, Osaka is Daioh'' anime translated Osaka's accent as vaguely Texan (appropriate for many reasons, though ADV being in Houston was probably the deciding factor), but the manga translates Osaka to be from [[BigApplesauce New York - Yukari-sensei York]] – Yukari invites her to say to the class, "Yo, how ''[[{{Friends}} you]] ''you'' doin'?" The other girls also ask her about meatball sandwiches and Mickey D's instead of [=McDonald's=]. The phonetic accent works...works… [[WebVideo/YuGiOhTheAbridgedSeries less perfectly...]]but perfectly…]] but otherwise, eh, fuhgeddaboudit!
** In one strip of the manga, Tomo greeted greets Yomi by saying "Good [[HelloProject Morning Musume]]!" ADV's translation of the manga changed this to another musical reference: "[[{{Oasis}} "[[Music/{{Oasis}} What's the story, morning glory?!]]"
* Although the actual cultural references in ''LightNovel/FullMetalPanic!'' are unchanged, in the English dub of ''Anime/FullMetalPanicFumoffu'' ''Anime/FullMetalPanicFumoffu'', a passage from Sousuke's Japanese Classics assignment is read in what appears to be Middle English, English in order to preserve the effect and explain why Sousuke is having so much trouble understanding the text.



* In ''Anime/SailorMoon'' the famous "{{odango}} atama" insult, which translates as "dumpling head", was changed to "meatball head" in the Creator/DiC dub because odango style round snack dumplings aren't common in the west, whereas the similar sized meatball is. Both objects are roughly the same shape as Usagi/Serena's famous hair "balls". The Creator/{{Viz}} sub goes for "bun-head" instead, which fits both as a food-related insult and an apt description of her hair.

to:

* In ''Anime/SailorMoon'' the famous "{{odango}} atama" insult, which translates as "dumpling head", was changed to "meatball head" in the Creator/DiC Creator/{{DiC}} dub because odango style round snack dumplings aren't common in the west, whereas the similar sized meatball is. Both objects are roughly the same shape as Usagi/Serena's famous hair "balls". The Creator/{{Viz}} sub Creator/{{Viz|Media}} redub goes for "bun-head" instead, which fits both as a food-related insult and an apt description of her hair. hair.



* In Filipino dubs of anime the JapaneseSiblingTerminology for familial relations are quite easily translated, with mat of the inherent context intact, since Filipino has direct equivalents. "Ate" for "Onee-san," "Kuya" for "Onii-san," and so on. Also like the Japanese language, Filipino allows for the usage of said pronouns to [[HonoraryUncle refer to unrelated people]].

to:

* In Filipino dubs of anime the JapaneseSiblingTerminology for familial relations are quite easily translated, with mat much of the inherent context intact, since Filipino has direct equivalents. "Ate" for "Onee-san," "Kuya" for "Onii-san," and so on. Also like the Japanese language, Filipino allows for the usage of said pronouns to [[HonoraryUncle refer to unrelated people]].



* ''Manga/OnePiece'' has plenty, such as a rice ball Zoro/Zolo is fed being changed to a cookie (that he somehow swallowed whole, which made a bit more sense with rice).
** Surprisingly enough for a 4Kids dub, most of the characters' names are not only left intact, but actually left in Japanese order of family name first, something that even the likes of VIZ or Funimation rarely do.

to:

* The infamous 4Kids dub of ''Manga/OnePiece'' has plenty, such as given its severe {{Bowdlerization}}. One early example is a rice ball Zoro/Zolo is fed being changed to a cookie (that he somehow swallowed whole, which made a bit more sense with rice).
** Surprisingly enough for a 4Kids dub, most of the characters' names are not only left intact, but actually left in Japanese order of family name first, something that even the likes of VIZ or Funimation rarely do.
rice).



* Although almost everyone else in ''Manga/{{Hellsing}}'' has (or at least attempted) a British accent, Alucard spoke with a distinctively American tang. Interviews with the translation director revealed he made this decision because of a theory that people can relate to a protagonist better if he sounds like them.

to:

* Although almost everyone else in ''Manga/{{Hellsing}}'' has (or at least attempted) a British accent, Alucard spoke with a distinctively American tang. Interviews with the translation director revealed he made this decision because of a theory that people can relate to a protagonist better if he sounds like them. Amusingly enough, Creator/CrispinFreeman said in an interview that he'd offered to give Alucard a Romanian accent (one of his theatre teachers was a Romanian expat) and was rebuffed. He ''does'' use the accent briefly at the beginning of the second episode of ''Ultimate''.



* ''Manga/DetectiveConan'' underwent Americanization, but this was specifically at the request of creator Gosho Aoyama, who thought foreign fans would better identify with local characters than Japanese ones. The name change to ''Case Closed'', however, was purely a legal issue. This however still doesn't explain why only the American release had to be changed and all the other releases in over 15 Countries were left completely intact.
** This actually kept a DubInducedPlotHole from forming in one of the dubbed episodes - Ran Mouri is used as an alibi, and the culprit is surprised when she realises that her father so ''happens'' to be Kogoro Mouri. While it may seem like a WhatAnIdiot moment, this is actually easy to understand - for one, RAn does ''not'' resemble her father in any way, and two, Mouri may be a common surname in Japan, westerners won't usually know this, but they ''do'' know that Moore ''is'' a common name.

to:

* ''Manga/DetectiveConan'' underwent Americanization, but this was specifically at the request of creator Gosho Aoyama, who thought foreign fans would better identify with local characters than Japanese ones. The name change to ''Case Closed'', however, was purely a legal issue. This however still doesn't explain why only issue thanks to DC Comics and Edgar Rice Burroughs's estate being infamously litigious over the American release name "Conan".[[labelnote:†]] Seriously. Conan O'Brien had to obtain a "We Won't Sue" notification from them just to be changed and all the other releases in over 15 Countries were left completely intact.
able to host a show titled with ''his own name''.[[/labelnote]]
** This actually kept a DubInducedPlotHole from forming in one of the dubbed episodes - Ran Mouri is used as an alibi, and the culprit is surprised when she realises that her father so ''happens'' to be Kogoro Mouri. While it may seem like a WhatAnIdiot moment, this is actually easy to understand - for one, RAn Ran does ''not'' resemble her father in any way, and two, Mouri may be a common surname in Japan, westerners won't usually know this, but they ''do'' know that Moore ''is'' a common name. name.



* The Creator/BangZoomEntertainment dub of ''Manga/KOn'' has changed the currency from yen to dollars.

to:

* The Creator/BangZoomEntertainment dub of ''Manga/KOn'' has changed the currency from yen to dollars.dollars.
* The ''Manga/AhMyGoddess'' TV series English dub likewise changes the currency from Yen to Dollars… at least in dialogue; the visuals are untouched. It also replaces metric measurements with American ones.
** Averted in the dub of the OVA series dub (recorded years earlier by a different studio), which goes out of its way to preserve much of the Japanese terminology, as well as the metric system.



* Early examples of the Dutch ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' dub introduced the euro system to the currency world. Mind you this was YEARS before the euro was introduced as currency in the Dutch society, being late 90s and the euro entering the world as currency in 2002. This is true for the German dub as well.

to:

* Early examples of the Dutch ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' dub introduced the euro Euro system to the currency world. Mind you this was YEARS years before the euro was introduced as currency in the Dutch society, Guilder disappeared, being late 90s and the euro Euro only entering the world as currency official circulation in 2002. This is true for the German dub as well. Arguably prescient, since everyone knew the Euro was coming anyway (prices in future Eurozone countries were listed in both currencies for up to three years before the switch) and maintaining continuity is important if early episodes are ever rerun.



* Some of the less, shall we say, scrupulous (read: probably bootleg) translations of ''Anime/{{Doraemon}}'' published in Taiwan had the series set in Taiwan rather than Japan, changing out all of the locations.
** * Likewise the original Japanese Disney XD versions of ''Manga/{{Doraemon}}'' is pictured above. The English dub of the 2005 series, starting in 2014, makes some alterations to bring the series into a more general American setting (as well as tone down certain elements that wouldn't be considered child-appropriate by Western standards, such as the show's frequent use of NakedPeopleAreFunny gags). It should be noted that these animation changes were made by the original studio, so while the purists will hate them, they typically mesh a lot better than, say, ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'''s bouncing sandwich.

to:

* ''Manga/{{Doraemon}}'' has gotten this a lot, all around the world, both manga and anime.
** The image at the top of this page is from the Disney XD airing of the 2005 series. The dub, produced in 2014, makes some alterations to the visuals to bring the series into a less-obviously Japanese setting… as well as tone down certain elements that aren't considered child-appropriate by Western standards, such as the show's frequent use of NakedPeopleAreFunny gags. It must be noted that these alterations were made by the original studio, ''not'' Disney, so while the purists will complain (as they do regardless), the changes mesh better than, say, ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'''s bouncing sandwich.
*** Names are changes to diminutives that sound more vaguely Western – Nobita becomes Noby, for example. Kanji signs are overlaid with their English translations (as seen in that screenshot).
*** The other half of the screenshot up there shows Nobita's godawful test score. Changing this one is understandable given the differences in Japanese and Western (read: American) grading styles – a checkmark indicates a correct answer in English, but an incorrect one in Japan, so the checks are changes to X's. The "F" was then added just to drive the point home (Japanese tests don't use letter grades).
**
Some of the less, shall we say, scrupulous (read: probably bootleg) translations of ''Anime/{{Doraemon}}'' published in Taiwan had the series set in Taiwan rather than Japan, changing out all of the locations.
** * Likewise the original Japanese Disney XD versions of ''Manga/{{Doraemon}}'' is pictured above. The English dub of the 2005 series, starting in 2014, makes some alterations to bring the series into a more general American setting (as well as tone down certain elements that wouldn't be considered child-appropriate by Western standards, such as the show's frequent use of NakedPeopleAreFunny gags). It should be noted that these animation changes were made by the original studio, so while the purists will hate them, they typically mesh a lot better than, say, ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'''s bouncing sandwich.
locations.



* This trope is referenced in the translation notes for Volume 3 of Del Rey's translation of xxxHOLiC, to note an aversion and to assure us that Watanuki did really mistake Yuuko's reference to ''Anime/NeoHumanCasshern'' for one to ''Franchise/StarWars'' in both languages.
* Spanish dubbing studio Luk Internacional is heading into this territory with their ''Manga/CrayonShinChan'' and ''{{Manga/Kochikame}}'' dubs. No, the sexual stuff is intact. However, they sometimes seem to have a 4Kids-level dislike of Japanese culture and like to hide it whenever possible. Two {{egregious}} examples: In ''Manga/CrayonShinChan'', Masao's nickname of "Riceball Head" is changed to "Onion Head", which would normally count as a {{woolseyism}} except they even do it ''when obvious visual references to riceballs are shown''. Even worse was an episode of ''Manga/{{Kochikame}}'' about the Hanami festival. Not only they kept referring to it as a "picnic" and nothing more, they also called the cherry blossom trees '''almond trees''', for no reason unless they absolutely needed to hide that little bit of Japanese culture. To be fair, this seems to be [[DependingOnTheWriter depending on the translator]], as they can go the opposite route at times too, but when they do this, they do it '''bad'''.

to:

* This trope is referenced in the translation notes for Volume 3 of Del Rey's translation of xxxHOLiC, ''Manga/{{xxxHOLiC}}'', to note an aversion and to assure us that Watanuki did really mistake Yuuko's reference to ''Anime/NeoHumanCasshern'' for one to ''Franchise/StarWars'' in both languages.
* Spanish dubbing studio Luk Internacional is heading into this territory with their ''Manga/CrayonShinChan'' and ''{{Manga/Kochikame}}'' ''Manga/{{Kochikame}}'' dubs. No, the sexual stuff is intact. However, they sometimes seem to have a 4Kids-level dislike of Japanese culture and like to hide it whenever possible. Two {{egregious}} examples: In ''Manga/CrayonShinChan'', Masao's nickname of "Riceball Head" is changed to "Onion Head", which would normally count as a {{woolseyism}} except they even do it ''when obvious visual references to riceballs are shown''. Even worse was an episode of ''Manga/{{Kochikame}}'' about the Hanami festival. Not only they kept referring to it as a "picnic" and nothing more, they also called the cherry blossom trees '''almond trees''', for no reason unless they absolutely needed to hide that little bit of Japanese culture. To be fair, this seems to be [[DependingOnTheWriter depending on the translator]], as they can go the opposite route at times too, but when they do this, they do it '''bad'''.



* In the 4Kids dub of ''Anime/SonicX'', in an episode Eggman rambles about giving names to three mechs, and at a certain point he tries with "[[Film/TheThreeStooges Larry, Moe and Curly]]". In the Italian dub, the Three Stooges reference was replaced with one to Italian comedians Aldo, Giovanni and Giacomo.

to:

* In the 4Kids dub of ''Anime/SonicX'', in an episode Eggman rambles about giving names to three mechs, and at a certain point he tries with "[[Film/TheThreeStooges Larry, Moe and Curly]]". In the Italian dub, the Three Stooges reference was replaced with one to Italian comedians Aldo, Giovanni Giovanni, and Giacomo.
11th May '16 9:37:05 PM PKMN37
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Mexican dubbing of anime and cartoons has been very guilty of this, inserting as many references to Mexican culture as they can have, which often results in borderline {{Gag Dub}}s; the more (in)famous examples are ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''. However, the public rarely protest, maybe because of the Mexican dominance in the Latin American pop culture since the 1930s until today, via films and soap operas. Some immortal examples of this: at one point during the Saiyans saga in ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', Yamcha says "We'll turn them into guacamole!"; in the ''Pokémon'' dub, James sometimes starts speaking in a heavy accent from either Veracruz, Nuevo León, or the Yucatán peninsula; and in one chapter of ''TheSimpsons'' a reference to Richard Simms was replaced for a more known (for Latin Americans) Lorenzo Lamas, without replacing the visual representation.

to:

* Mexican dubbing of anime and western cartoons has been very guilty of this, inserting as many references to Mexican culture as they can have, which often results in borderline {{Gag Dub}}s; the more (in)famous examples are ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''. However, the public rarely protest, maybe because of the Mexican dominance in the Latin American pop culture since the 1930s until today, via films and soap operas. Some immortal examples of this: at one point during the Saiyans saga in ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', Yamcha says "We'll turn them into guacamole!"; in the ''Pokémon'' dub, James sometimes starts speaking in a heavy accent from either Veracruz, Nuevo León, or the Yucatán peninsula; and in one chapter of ''TheSimpsons'' a reference to Richard Simms was replaced for a more known (for Latin Americans) Lorenzo Lamas, without replacing the visual representation.
11th May '16 2:15:25 PM Wyldchyld
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Following in the footsteps of ''Anime/DemashitaPowerpuffGirlsZ'' is ''Anime/{{Stitch}}'', a Japanese version of ''WesternAnimation/LiloAndStitchTheSeries''. Most notably, the original's Hawaiian setting is transplanted over to Okinawa, and Lilo is replaced by a new girl named Yuna. (Interesting in that a significant portion of the people who live in Hawai'i are ethnically Japanese.) Extra points go to it for replacing ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'' in its time slot.

to:

* Following in the footsteps of ''Anime/DemashitaPowerpuffGirlsZ'' is ''Anime/{{Stitch}}'', a Japanese version of ''WesternAnimation/LiloAndStitchTheSeries''. Most notably, the original's Hawaiian setting is transplanted over to Okinawa, and Lilo is replaced by a new girl named Yuna. (Interesting in that a significant portion of the people who live in Hawai'i are ethnically Japanese.) Extra points go to it for replacing ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'' in its time slot.
10th May '16 9:51:27 AM BreadBull
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Likewise the DisneyXD dub has the series set in America.

to:

** * Likewise the DisneyXD original Japanese Disney XD versions of ''Manga/{{Doraemon}}'' is pictured above. The English dub has of the 2005 series, starting in 2014, makes some alterations to bring the series set in America.into a more general American setting (as well as tone down certain elements that wouldn't be considered child-appropriate by Western standards, such as the show's frequent use of NakedPeopleAreFunny gags). It should be noted that these animation changes were made by the original studio, so while the purists will hate them, they typically mesh a lot better than, say, ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'''s bouncing sandwich.



* ''Manga/{{Doraemon}}'' is pictured above. The English dub of the 2005 series, starting in 2014, makes some alterations to bring the series into a more general American setting (as well as tone down certain elements that wouldn't be considered child-appropriate by Western standards, such as the show's frequent use of NakedPeopleAreFunny gags). It should be noted that these animation changes were made by the original studio, so while the purists will hate them, they typically mesh a lot better than, say, ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'''s bouncing sandwich.
9th May '16 2:19:47 PM Kitch
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Which is HilariousInHindsight, as later eras sometimes have both Ash's crew and Team Rocket actually eating sandwiches.
4th May '16 2:40:17 PM PhantomDusclops92
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Episode 7's daifuku was changed to "cupcakes" in the English dub, and in the Italian version, it was changed to "dulces".
*** The same thing that happened in episode 7 of [=DoReMi=] happened in the Italian version of [[Anime/YesPrettyCure5GoGo Yes! Pretty Cure 5 GoGo: Okashi No Kuni No Happy Birthday]]. Nutts' introduction speech had the word "mamedaifuku" changed to "dulces" in the Italian version.

to:

** Episode 7's daifuku was changed to "cupcakes" in the English dub, and in the Italian version, it was changed to "dulces"."sweets".
*** The same thing that happened in episode 7 of [=DoReMi=] happened in the Italian version of [[Anime/YesPrettyCure5GoGo Yes! Pretty Cure 5 GoGo: Okashi No Kuni No Happy Birthday]]. Nutts' introduction speech had the word "mamedaifuku" changed to "dulces" "sweets" in the Italian version.


Added DiffLines:

* In the 4Kids dub of ''Anime/SonicX'', in an episode Eggman rambles about giving names to three mechs, and at a certain point he tries with "[[Film/TheThreeStooges Larry, Moe and Curly]]". In the Italian dub, the Three Stooges reference was replaced with one to Italian comedians Aldo, Giovanni and Giacomo.
This list shows the last 10 events of 73. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=CulturalTranslation.AnimeAndManga