History Creator / HansChristianAndersen

20th Jun '16 2:14:34 AM PaulA
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Born on April 2, 1805 (which is now "National Children's Book Day"), '''Hans Christian Andersen''' (abbreviated H. C. Andersen in Denmark) grew up to become to fairy tales what Creator/{{Shakespeare}} became to drama. His works range from the simple to the epic, are full of complex but meaningful symbolism, and span the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism. Among his most well known fairy tales today are:

to:

Born on April 2, 1805 (which is now "National Children's Book Day"), '''Hans Christian Andersen''' (abbreviated H. C. Andersen in Denmark) grew up to become to fairy tales what Creator/{{Shakespeare}} became to drama. His works range from the simple to the epic, are full of complex but meaningful symbolism, and span the SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism. Among his SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism.

The
most well known familiar version of "The Little Mermaid" in the western world is probably Disney's, which deviates strongly from the original: Hans Christian's protagonist has NoNameGiven, no bikini top made from seashells, and no {{Non Human Sidekick}}s, but does have a grandmother, and wants to marry the prince for "an immortal soul" (yes, in the Christian sense) as much as for romantic love. Not to mention the minor fact that said prince marries another girl, meaning she'll die unless she stabs him, which she doesn't. And then there's a bit of disconnected DeusExMachina {{Aesoptinum}} MoodWhiplash, but [[FanonDiscontinuity we don't talk about that]].

Interestingly, Creator/OscarWilde still thought the story too upbeat and penned an even darker version, "The Fisherman and His Soul" as a reaction. In this charming tale a human must [[DealWithTheDevil sell his immortal soul]] in order to marry a mermaid.

Other works have come through the adaptation process about as reasonably intact as can be expected. "The Snow Queen", basically an epic {{Gender Flip}}ped RescueRomance heavy on the symbolism, has been turned into a science-fiction novel, an animated movie, and an anime by NHK, ''Manga/CardcaptorSakura's'' network. The Disney film ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' was originally meant to be an adaptation of "The Snow Queen", and even had it as its WorkingTitle (and it's still titled that in some countries), but ended up developing into its own original story with inspiration from the
fairy tales today are:
tale.

TheOtherWiki says he was also quite possibly bisexual, so that's fun too. It's also noted that Andersen himself, his eccentric behavior and arrogance usually led to him getting kicked out by the various nobles who housed him.

----
!!Works by Hans Christian Andersen with their own pages include:



* "The Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep"



* "Literature/{{Thumbelina}}"



The most familiar version of "The Little Mermaid" in the western world is probably Disney's, which deviates strongly from the original: Hans Christian's protagonist has NoNameGiven, no bikini top made from seashells, and no {{Non Human Sidekick}}s, but does have a grandmother, and wants to marry the prince for "an immortal soul" (yes, in the Christian sense) as much as for romantic love. Not to mention the minor fact that said prince marries another girl, meaning she'll die unless she stabs him, which she doesn't. And then there's a bit of disconnected DeusExMachina {{Aesoptinum}} MoodWhiplash, but [[FanonDiscontinuity we don't talk about that]].

Interestingly, Creator/OscarWilde still thought the story too upbeat and penned an even darker version, "The Fisherman and His Soul" as a reaction. In this charming tale a human must [[DealWithTheDevil sell his immortal soul]] in order to marry a mermaid.

Other works have come through the adaptation process about as reasonably intact as can be expected. "The Snow Queen", basically an epic {{Gender Flip}}ped RescueRomance heavy on the symbolism, has been turned into a science-fiction novel, an animated movie, and an anime by NHK, ''Manga/CardcaptorSakura's'' network. The Disney film ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' was originally meant to be an adaptation of "The Snow Queen", and even had it as its WorkingTitle (and it's still titled that in some countries), but ended up developing into its own original story with inspiration from the fairy tale.

TheOtherWiki says he was also quite possibly bisexual, so that's fun too. It's also noted that Andersen himself, his eccentric behavior and arrogance usually led to him getting kicked out by the various nobles who housed him.

----
!!Andersen's works provide examples of:

to:

The most familiar version of "The Little Mermaid" in the western world is probably Disney's, which deviates strongly from the original: Hans Christian's protagonist has NoNameGiven, no bikini top made from seashells, and no {{Non Human Sidekick}}s, but does have a grandmother, and wants to marry the prince for "an immortal soul" (yes, in the Christian sense) as much as for romantic love. Not to mention the minor fact that said prince marries another girl, meaning she'll die unless she stabs him, which she doesn't. And then there's a bit of disconnected DeusExMachina {{Aesoptinum}} MoodWhiplash, but [[FanonDiscontinuity we don't talk about that]].

Interestingly, Creator/OscarWilde still thought the story too upbeat and penned an even darker version, "The Fisherman and His Soul" as a reaction. In this charming tale a human must [[DealWithTheDevil sell his immortal soul]] in order to marry a mermaid.

Other works have come through the adaptation process about as reasonably intact as can be expected. "The Snow Queen", basically an epic {{Gender Flip}}ped RescueRomance heavy on the symbolism, has been turned into a science-fiction novel, an animated movie, and an anime by NHK, ''Manga/CardcaptorSakura's'' network. The Disney film ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' was originally meant to be an adaptation of "The Snow Queen", and even had it as its WorkingTitle (and it's still titled that in some countries), but ended up developing into its own original story with inspiration from the fairy tale.

TheOtherWiki says he was also quite possibly bisexual, so that's fun too. It's also noted that Andersen himself, his eccentric behavior and arrogance usually led to him getting kicked out by the various nobles who housed him.

----
!!Andersen's other works provide examples of:



* AccentuateTheNegative: Features prominently in "The Snow Queen", but is also an important point in the tale "Something", where a {{caustic critic}} is "something" because he does that constantly. Also the Snail in "The Snail and the Rosebush", and the Devil in "The Philosopher's Stone".

to:

* AccentuateTheNegative: Features prominently in "The Snow Queen", but is also an AccentuateTheNegative:
** An
important point in the tale "Something", where a {{caustic critic}} is "something" because he does that constantly. Also the constantly.
** The
Snail in "The Snail and the Rosebush", and the Rosebush".
** The
Devil in "The Philosopher's Stone".



* BeautyEqualsGoodness: More than one of his characters ponder this, with ''truth'' as the third platonic entity in the mix. {{The Shadow}} is the inverted example. ''The Philosopher's stone'' plays it straight.

to:

* BeautyEqualsGoodness: More than one of his characters ponder this, with ''truth'' as the third platonic entity in the mix. {{The Shadow}} is the inverted example. ''The Philosopher's stone'' plays it straight.



* ComeBackMyPet: In "The Nightingale", the Emperor of China tames a nightingale, but neglects it in favor of a clockwork bird. When Death comes for the Emperor, it is the live Nightingale who charms the GrimReaper with his sweet song.



* DealWithTheDevil: "The Little Mermaid": For an ordeal seeking the mere chance at ''gaining'' a soul, she gives up her centuries-long lifespan and her voice, while gaining human legs with extraordinary grace, but feel like she's ''walking on knives'', making her feet bleed everytime she dances. If she marries the prince, she'll gain a soul, but if he marries someone else, she'll die permanently.
* DiedHappilyEverAfter:
** The "good" ending to "The Little Mermaid" is like this. When she refuses to kill the prince to regain her life as a mermaid, she instead becomes a spirit of the air, watching over children and waiting to gain a soul and go to heaven. (Well, at least it's better than the "she becomes sea-foam, eternally kissing the hull of the prince's ship" ending.) The ending is meant to be happy because mermaids naturally have no souls -- by sacrificing herself instead of her prince, the mermaid earned the right to [[EarnYourHappyEnding win her own happy ending]].
** Dying horribly (which appears to be intended as happily) and going to Heaven seems to be Andersen's idea of the ultimate HappyEnding.
** Averted, however in "The Nightingale", which has a regular HappyEnding: the protagonist, thought to be already dead by everyone, survives after all.

to:

* DealWithTheDevil: "The Little Mermaid": For an ordeal seeking the mere chance at ''gaining'' a soul, she gives up her centuries-long lifespan and her voice, while gaining human legs with extraordinary grace, but feel like she's ''walking on knives'', making her feet bleed everytime she dances. If she marries the prince, she'll gain a soul, but if he marries someone else, she'll die permanently.
* DiedHappilyEverAfter:
** The "good" ending to "The Little Mermaid" is like this. When she refuses to kill the prince to regain her life as a mermaid, she instead becomes a spirit of the air, watching over children and waiting to gain a soul and go to heaven. (Well, at least it's better than the "she becomes sea-foam, eternally kissing the hull of the prince's ship" ending.) The ending is meant to be happy because mermaids naturally have no souls -- by sacrificing herself instead of her prince, the mermaid earned the right to [[EarnYourHappyEnding win her own happy ending]].
**
DiedHappilyEverAfter: Dying horribly (which appears to be intended as happily) and going to Heaven seems to be Andersen's idea of the ultimate HappyEnding.
**
HappyEnding. Averted, however in "The Nightingale", which has a regular HappyEnding: the protagonist, thought to be already dead by everyone, survives after all.



%%* TheFairFolk: The Snow Queen and the Ice Maiden, among many others.

to:

%%* TheFairFolk: The Snow Queen and the Ice Maiden, among many others.



* FashionHurts: The Little Mermaid wears uncomfortable oysters on her tail.



%%* GrimReaper: Appears in "The Nightingale".



%%* AnIcePerson: The Snow Queen, The Ice Maiden.

to:

%%* AnIcePerson: The Snow Queen, The Ice Maiden.



%%* LivingShadow: "Literature/TheShadow", appropriately enough. It had a DownerEnding, too.



%%* NaiveEverygirl: "The Little Match Girl".



* {{Satan}}: Features in "Literature/TheSnowQueen", and in "The Philosopher's Stone", among other works. He is prominent when Andersen discusses truth vs untruth. Satan is clearly the "prince of lies", while God is the equivalent of truth.
* SecretTestOfCharacter: It's implied that the only reason that Literature/{{the Little Mermaid}} does not dissolve into sea-foam at the end is [[spoiler: that she refused to kill the prince. Killing him would have lost her her chance at an immortal soul forever]].

to:

* {{Satan}}: Features in "Literature/TheSnowQueen", and in "The Philosopher's Stone", among other works. He is prominent when Andersen discusses truth vs untruth. Satan is clearly the "prince of lies", while God is the equivalent of truth. \n* SecretTestOfCharacter: It's implied that the only reason that Literature/{{the Little Mermaid}} does not dissolve into sea-foam at the end is [[spoiler: that she refused to kill the prince. Killing him would have lost her her chance at an immortal soul forever]].



%%* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth: "The Little Match Girl", "The Little Mermaid".

to:

%%* TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth: "The Little Match Girl", "The Little Mermaid".
20th Jun '16 1:57:39 AM PaulA
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* [[VideoGame/FateExtra Fate Extra CCC]] and VideoGame/FateGrandOrder, where he is a Caster-type Servant.

to:

* [[VideoGame/FateExtra The 1952 film ''Hans Christian Andersen'', starring Creator/DannyKaye, which describes itself as "a fairy tale about the great spinner of fairy tales" (a colorful way of saying it's almost entirely made up).
* ''[[VideoGame/FateExtra
Fate Extra CCC]] CCC]]'' and VideoGame/FateGrandOrder, ''VideoGame/FateGrandOrder'', where he is a Caster-type Servant.
2nd May '16 7:30:48 PM MarchVee
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* CreatorBreakdown: Rumors abound that several of Andersen's works are a result of dealing with his own romantic and sexual issues. The Nightingale was allegedly a tribute to a singer known as "The Swedish Nightingale", Jenny Lind, who did not reciprocate Andersen's romantic feelings. "The Little Mermaid" was a similar case, of Andersen dealing with 'losing' a close friend (one he had feelings for) to marriage.
7th Jan '16 3:44:06 PM OmegaRadiance
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* [[VideoGame/FateExtra Fate Extra CCC]], where he is a Caster-type Servant.

to:

* [[VideoGame/FateExtra Fate Extra CCC]], CCC]] and VideoGame/FateGrandOrder, where he is a Caster-type Servant.
7th Jan '16 3:33:07 PM Edrobot
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* VideoGame/FateExtra, where he is a Caster-type Servant.

to:

* VideoGame/FateExtra, [[VideoGame/FateExtra Fate Extra CCC]], where he is a Caster-type Servant.
7th Jan '16 3:21:34 PM Edrobot
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----

to:

!!Andersen has appeared as a HistoricalDomainCharacter in the following works:
* VideoGame/FateExtra, where he is a Caster-type Servant.
----
6th Dec '15 3:57:31 PM morenohijazo
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%%* NamelessNarrative: Used in several of his stories.

to:

%%* NamelessNarrative: Used in several of his stories.LeafBoat: ''Thumbelina'' is probably the UrExample.


Added DiffLines:

%%* NamelessNarrative: Used in several of his stories.
15th May '15 11:42:59 PM LordGro
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* AccentuateTheNegative: Features prominently in "The Snow Queen", but is also an important point in the tale ''Something'', where a {{caustic critic}} is "something" because he does that constantly. Also the Snail in ''The Snail and the Rosebush'', and the Devil in ''the Philosopher's Stone'' (no, [[HarryPotter not that stone!]])

to:

* AccentuateTheNegative: Features prominently in "The Snow Queen", but is also an important point in the tale ''Something'', "Something", where a {{caustic critic}} is "something" because he does that constantly. Also the Snail in ''The "The Snail and the Rosebush'', Rosebush", and the Devil in ''the "The Philosopher's Stone'' (no, [[HarryPotter not that stone!]])Stone".
15th May '15 8:48:27 AM StFan
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* AccentuateTheNegative: Features prominently in {{the Snow Queen}}, but is also an important point in the tale ''Something'', where a {{caustic critic}} is "something" because he does that constantly. Also the Snail in ''The Snail and the Rosebush'', and the Devil in ''the Philosopher's Stone'' (no, [[HarryPotter not that stone!]])

to:

* AccentuateTheNegative: Features prominently in {{the "The Snow Queen}}, Queen", but is also an important point in the tale ''Something'', where a {{caustic critic}} is "something" because he does that constantly. Also the Snail in ''The Snail and the Rosebush'', and the Devil in ''the Philosopher's Stone'' (no, [[HarryPotter not that stone!]])
14th May '15 11:48:06 PM LordGro
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* AccentuateTheNegative: More than once. Features prominently in {{the Snow Queen}}, but is also an important point in the tale ''Something'', where a {{caustic critic}} is "something" because he does that constantly. Also the Snail in ''The Snail and the Rosebush'', and the Devil in ''the Philosopher's Stone'' (no, [[HarryPotter not that stone!]])

to:

* AccentuateTheNegative: More than once. Features prominently in {{the Snow Queen}}, but is also an important point in the tale ''Something'', where a {{caustic critic}} is "something" because he does that constantly. Also the Snail in ''The Snail and the Rosebush'', and the Devil in ''the Philosopher's Stone'' (no, [[HarryPotter not that stone!]])



* {{Disneyfication}}: A lot of his works has been adapted into animated features for kids, most of them naturally being done by Disney. ''WesternAnimation/{{Thumbelina}}'' also fell into this, [[FollowTheLeader despite being done]] by Creator/DonBluth.

to:

* %%* {{Disneyfication}}: A lot of his works has been adapted into animated features for kids, most of them naturally being done by Disney. ''WesternAnimation/{{Thumbelina}}'' also fell into this, [[FollowTheLeader despite being done]] by Creator/DonBluth.
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