History Creator / GregEgan

16th May '16 7:46:13 AM BrendanRizzo
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* FalseCrucible: In ''Permutation City'' the initial protagonist repeatedly attempts to download his intelligence into a computer, but the downloaded intelligence always kills itself, so he (the original, human one) brainwashes himself to believe he's one of the downloaded copies, to get a better appreciation of what it's like for them. At least, this is what his devoted girlfriend explains to him when he [[spoiler: wakes up after 'deleting' himself. After he repeats the test a few times, she ceases to exist...]]
16th May '16 7:44:51 AM BrendanRizzo
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* AdamAndEvePlot: With all the religious symbolism that shows up in ''Permutation City'', it's only fitting that it should end with [[spoiler:Paul and Maria]] setting off together into their own newly-created universe.
14th Dec '15 6:19:07 AM Spindriver
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A lot of Egan's early stories first appeared in ''Magazine/{{Interzone}}'' magazine, which can thus boast that he's to some extent their discovery.
13th Aug '15 8:33:33 PM SolipSchism
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* AFormYouAreComfortableWith: In works featuring the galaxy-spanning superculture known as the Amalgam (short stories "Riding the Crocodile" and "Glory", and the novel ''Literature/{{Incandescence}}''), the Amalgam has mastered the trick of manipulating matter on an atomic level to turn pretty much any matter into pretty much whatever they want. The Amalgam's favored method of making FirstContact with young races is to use artificial bodies that mimic the members of the race being contacted. The trope features most prominently in "Glory".


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* AlternativeNumberSystem: Numbers in Egan's works are always shown in decimal thanks to a TranslationConvention, but in several of his works that take place from a nonhuman perspective, it's strongly implied that the characters use a different number base. In ''Literature/{{Orthogonal}}'', the unnamed race of aliens apparently use a duodecimal/dozenal (base-12) number system, while the six-legged "Arkdwellers" in ''Literature/{{Incandescence}}'' clearly use a base-6 system. The clearest evidence of this is that where a human might hyperbolize a large number as "a thousand" or "ten thousand" (ten times a hundred or a hundred times a hundred, respectively), the Arkdwellers tend to use phrases such as "six times thirty-six" or "thirty-six times thirty-six" when they want to exaggerate with an indeterminate large number.


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* FirstContact: Quite a few of Egan's works prominently feature the idea of a spacefaring race making contact with one that hasn't yet attained space travel, and a few, bizarrely, don't even involve space travel at all. A surprising number of them play the trope from the perspective of the spacefaring race.
** ''Literature/{{Diaspora}}'', "Glory", and ''Literature/{{Incandescence}}'' all feature spacefaring humans making first contact with aliens who haven't attained space travel, although in the first case the aliens in question have already met ''other'' spacefaring aliens.
** ''Literature/PermutationCity'' and "Crystal Nights" feature humans who create computer-simulated universes in which life "evolves" from first principles, and the humans make "first contact" with the aliens from literally ''outside'' their known universe (imagine realizing that our entire universe was being simulated--not manipulated, but simply run on a computer--and then imagine meeting the beings who ''designed the computer'').
** "Luminous" and its sequel "Dark Integers" feature humans making first contact with a race of intelligent beings who live in a universe that exists alongside ours--not a parallel universe, exactly, but one that exists in the same space and time. The two universes follow different mathematics, and once each race realizes that the other exists, they are able to communicate more or less by ''doing math'' at each other. [[MindScrew Yeah]].
29th Jun '15 8:12:40 AM SolipSchism
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* ''PermutationCity''

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* ''PermutationCity''''Literature/PermutationCity''
29th Jun '15 4:24:35 AM MaxChaplin
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* ''PermutationCity''



* ''Permutation City'' - Philosophical inquiry leads to the creation of a universe, simply by starting to simulate it and then turning the computer off.
21st Apr '15 3:33:29 PM BrendanRizzo
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* CrapsackOnlyByComparison: "Oceanic" gives us Covenant, which the narrative goes to great lengths to set up as a BadFuture in which society has declined, but which doesn't really seem that worse than 21st-century Earth. Of course, when the civilization that preceded it was one in which nobody ever died, it's a bit easier to accept that Martin wishes he were born earlier, especially since then [[spoiler:he wouldn't have lost his mother]].
24th Feb '15 6:22:21 AM BrendanRizzo
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* AwesomenessByAnalysis: In "[[http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/stories/tap.htm TAP]]", the users with the highest level of skill with the eponymous AppliedPhlebotinum have this ability, being able to critically analyse everything perfectly. [[spoiler:This is the reason that the villains want to suppress it, as if the ability were widespread, nobody would allow corrupt politicians or religious figures to remain in power.]]


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* CreepyChild: Jane Remedios, of "TAP", gives off this vibe, because she appears to have the emotional maturity of an adult, in a child's body. [[CreepyGood She's one of the good guys, though.]]


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* DespotismJustifiesTheMeans: In "TAP", it turns out that the murder victim's death was caused by [[spoiler:a secret cabal who wish to suppress the TAP technology so that their power is never threatened by a generation of perfect critical thinkers]]. The murder itself is just a means to that end.
* DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything: The main conflict of "Glory" is [[UsefulNotes/ColdWar between two factions of an alien species, which don't trust each other at all and spend most of their time trying to one-up the other at the expense of the planet's smaller countries]], and despite their posturing to the contrary, [[NotSoDifferent neither side has the moral high ground]]. The [[OutgrownSuchSillySuperstitions human main character]] monologues about [[AuthorFilibuster how irrational the whole thing is]].


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* GeniusDitz: "In the Ruins" has Emma, who, despite being a textbook DumbBlonde, actually knows how to solve some pretty advanced physics word problems, at least when she actually goes through the effort to do so. That's pretty impressive for someone who isn't a physics or engineering major and has no interest in science at all.


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* MundaneMadeAwesome: "Glory" opens with a [[TechnologyPorn loving description]] of the process required to transport the human main characters to the aliens' star system, which involves [[JustForFun/AbusingTheKardashevScaleForFunAndProfit creating a kilogram each of matter and antimatter just to explode them in the core of a star, using the resultant energy to shoot two nanomachines to an icy moon several planets away from the aliens' home world, and then build both the heroes' spaceships and their new bodies (which look just like those of the aliens) individually, atom by atom, from the surrounding materials]].


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* ObliviouslyEvil: When they aren't straight up Evil Reactionaries, his villains tend to be people who honestly do not comprehend that their worldview is self-contradictory and harmful to society as a whole. Jack Hamilton of "Oracle" and Prospero of "The Planck Dive" are probably the best examples (though calling the latter one "evil" is a stretch).


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* TheCuckoolanderWasRight: "TAP" opens with Helen Sharpe being convinced that her mother was murdered as part of a conspiracy to discredit the eponymous technology and the subculture that has fully adopted it. Nobody, not even the private investigator she hires to take the case, actually believes that Sharpe's mother was murdered. As it turns out, [[spoiler: a reactionary conspiracy ''did'' kill her to turn the public against TAP, but the methods used were different from how Helen initially suspected]].
* TheGreatPoliticsMessUp: "Yeyuka" was written in 1997, and as a result has the Democratic Republic of the Congo still called Zaire by characters who live in the 2020s.


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* {{Zeerust}}: Though still hard science fiction, some of the stories Egan wrote in TheNineties, such as "TAP", haven't aged well because of VirtualReality being an important plot point. ([[TechnologyMarchesOn Though given recent advances]], [[SubvertedTrope this may swing back to respectability in a few years]].)
6th Nov '14 7:56:22 PM grendelkhan
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* AuthorAvatar: Martin, the protagonist of "Oceanic" is quite clearly a stand-in for Egan himself, as the story of Martin losing his faith in the local CrystalDragonJesus religion is almost identical to the autobiographical essay wherein Egan recounts his own such experience.

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* AuthorAvatar: Martin, the protagonist of "Oceanic" is quite clearly a stand-in for Egan himself, as the story of Martin losing his faith in the local CrystalDragonJesus religion is almost identical to [[http://gregegan.customer.netspace.net.au/ESSAYS/BAB/BAB.html the autobiographical essay essay]] wherein Egan recounts his own such experience.
15th Oct '14 7:25:24 PM TVRulezAgain
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* VillainProtagonist: "The Moral Virologist" has one. The first few paragraphs lead the readers to think that Shawcross is [[SignatureStyle your typical]] ScienceHero; however, [[CompleteMonster he is]] [[TheFundamentalist anything]] [[MadScientist but]].

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* VillainProtagonist: "The Moral Virologist" has one. The first few paragraphs lead the readers to think that Shawcross is [[SignatureStyle your typical]] ScienceHero; however, [[CompleteMonster he is]] is [[TheFundamentalist anything]] [[MadScientist but]].
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