History Creator / GregEgan

18th Aug '17 5:53:18 PM dlchen145
Is there an issue? Send a Message


An Australian author who puts the Hard Science back into [[MohsScaleOfScienceFictionHardness Hard Science Fiction]]. Likes to [[ShownTheirWork show his work.]] Quite unapologetic for being deeply technical - he's got his niche of the "1% that treats science as something of interest in its own right", the rest have enough authors writing for them already.

to:

An Greg Egan (born 20 August 1961) is Australian author who puts put the Hard Science back into [[MohsScaleOfScienceFictionHardness Hard Science Fiction]]. Likes to [[ShownTheirWork show his work.]] Quite unapologetic for being deeply technical - he's got his niche of the "1% that treats science as something of interest in its own right", the rest have enough authors writing for them already.
26th Jun '17 10:12:59 AM lakingsif
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* SpeculativeFictionLGBT: He likes this trope, frequently either using it or at least paying lip service to it. It's notable in at least 5 of his works.
22nd Apr '17 6:35:31 AM Zaratustra
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* LifeOrLimbDecision: Another recurring theme, usually followed by an extended description of the SelfSurgery required.
13th Apr '17 2:21:45 AM ShadowoftheSun
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Common themes in his works include TheSingularity, [[{{Transhuman}} Transhumanism]], atheism, regional politics, religion being the source of many problems, and non-standard sexual identities.

to:

Common themes in his works include TheSingularity, [[{{Transhuman}} Transhumanism]], atheism, regional politics, religion being the source of many problems, and non-standard sexual and/or gender identities.
28th Mar '17 4:31:25 PM SwampAdder
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: In "Oracle", any historical figure who would be important to the plot gets replaced, though less important figures are name-dropped without alteration. Specifically, Robert Stoney replaces Alan Turing, and Jack Hamilton replaces C. S. Lewis. At least in Stoney's case, there is some FridgeBrilliance about it, since [[spoiler:Helen couldn't save Turing himself, because it would quite possibly negate her timeline, but a CaptainErsatz of him is perfectly fine]].

to:

* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: NoHistoricalFiguresWereHarmed: In "Oracle", any historical figure who would be important to the plot gets replaced, though less important figures are name-dropped without alteration. Specifically, Robert Stoney replaces Alan Turing, and Jack Hamilton replaces C. S. Lewis. At least in Stoney's case, there is some FridgeBrilliance about it, since [[spoiler:Helen couldn't save Turing himself, because it would quite possibly negate her timeline, but a CaptainErsatz of him is perfectly fine]].
16th Feb '17 10:28:57 AM SwampAdder
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Incandescence'' - Pre-industrial aliens discover General Relativity because their world circles the black hole at the centre of the galaxy.

to:

* ''Incandescence'' - Pre-industrial aliens discover General Relativity because their world circles the black hole at the centre of the galaxy.is located in a steep gravity well.
16th May '16 7:46:13 AM BrendanRizzo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* FalseCrucible: In ''Permutation City'' the initial protagonist repeatedly attempts to download his intelligence into a computer, but the downloaded intelligence always kills itself, so he (the original, human one) brainwashes himself to believe he's one of the downloaded copies, to get a better appreciation of what it's like for them. At least, this is what his devoted girlfriend explains to him when he [[spoiler: wakes up after 'deleting' himself. After he repeats the test a few times, she ceases to exist...]]
16th May '16 7:44:51 AM BrendanRizzo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AdamAndEvePlot: With all the religious symbolism that shows up in ''Permutation City'', it's only fitting that it should end with [[spoiler:Paul and Maria]] setting off together into their own newly-created universe.
14th Dec '15 6:19:07 AM Spindriver
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

A lot of Egan's early stories first appeared in ''Magazine/{{Interzone}}'' magazine, which can thus boast that he's to some extent their discovery.
13th Aug '15 8:33:33 PM SolipSchism
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* AFormYouAreComfortableWith: In works featuring the galaxy-spanning superculture known as the Amalgam (short stories "Riding the Crocodile" and "Glory", and the novel ''Literature/{{Incandescence}}''), the Amalgam has mastered the trick of manipulating matter on an atomic level to turn pretty much any matter into pretty much whatever they want. The Amalgam's favored method of making FirstContact with young races is to use artificial bodies that mimic the members of the race being contacted. The trope features most prominently in "Glory".


Added DiffLines:

* AlternativeNumberSystem: Numbers in Egan's works are always shown in decimal thanks to a TranslationConvention, but in several of his works that take place from a nonhuman perspective, it's strongly implied that the characters use a different number base. In ''Literature/{{Orthogonal}}'', the unnamed race of aliens apparently use a duodecimal/dozenal (base-12) number system, while the six-legged "Arkdwellers" in ''Literature/{{Incandescence}}'' clearly use a base-6 system. The clearest evidence of this is that where a human might hyperbolize a large number as "a thousand" or "ten thousand" (ten times a hundred or a hundred times a hundred, respectively), the Arkdwellers tend to use phrases such as "six times thirty-six" or "thirty-six times thirty-six" when they want to exaggerate with an indeterminate large number.


Added DiffLines:

* FirstContact: Quite a few of Egan's works prominently feature the idea of a spacefaring race making contact with one that hasn't yet attained space travel, and a few, bizarrely, don't even involve space travel at all. A surprising number of them play the trope from the perspective of the spacefaring race.
** ''Literature/{{Diaspora}}'', "Glory", and ''Literature/{{Incandescence}}'' all feature spacefaring humans making first contact with aliens who haven't attained space travel, although in the first case the aliens in question have already met ''other'' spacefaring aliens.
** ''Literature/PermutationCity'' and "Crystal Nights" feature humans who create computer-simulated universes in which life "evolves" from first principles, and the humans make "first contact" with the aliens from literally ''outside'' their known universe (imagine realizing that our entire universe was being simulated--not manipulated, but simply run on a computer--and then imagine meeting the beings who ''designed the computer'').
** "Luminous" and its sequel "Dark Integers" feature humans making first contact with a race of intelligent beings who live in a universe that exists alongside ours--not a parallel universe, exactly, but one that exists in the same space and time. The two universes follow different mathematics, and once each race realizes that the other exists, they are able to communicate more or less by ''doing math'' at each other. [[MindScrew Yeah]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 34. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.GregEgan