History Creator / FyodorDostoevsky

25th May '16 8:46:13 AM Faruke97
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** Bear in mind that this is a case of UnbuiltTrope since Dostoevsky was a rough contemporary of Nietzche but did not read his books, while the latter read his books after formulating some of his beliefs and noted how Dostoevsky anticipated his ideas.

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** Bear in mind that this is a case of UnbuiltTrope since Dostoevsky was a rough contemporary of Nietzche Nietzsche but did not read his books, while the latter read his books after formulating some of his beliefs and noted how Dostoevsky anticipated his ideas.
10th Mar '16 8:03:06 PM JulianLapostat
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* ''Literature/TheBrothersKaramazov'' was loosely adapted as ''Die Morder Dimitri Karamasoff'' a Soviet-German co-production by Feodor Osep, starring Fritz Rasp (of ''Film/{{Metropolis}}'' fame) and Anna Sten (who appeared in some MGM films). It's more well known for the 1950s Hollywood adaptation by Richard Brooks starring Creator/YulBrynner.

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* ''Literature/TheBrothersKaramazov'' was loosely adapted as ''Die Morder ''Der Mörder Dimitri Karamasoff'' a Soviet-German co-production by Feodor Osep, starring Fritz Rasp (of ''Film/{{Metropolis}}'' fame) and Anna Sten (who appeared in some MGM films). It's more well known for the 1950s Hollywood adaptation by Richard Brooks starring Creator/YulBrynner.
14th Feb '16 2:14:33 PM DoctorCooper
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* CharacterFilibuster: See AuthorTract above.



** Depending on your point of view, that is either HilariousInHindsight or HarsherInHindsight, as the Russian Orthodox Church is ''now'' mostly known for being [[CorruptChurch anything but innocent]].
7th Feb '16 6:15:55 AM JulianLapostat
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* ''White Nights'' was adapted into ''La Notti bianche'' by Creator/LuchinoVisconti, ''Four nights of a dreamer'' by Creator/RobertBresson, and loosely adapted into ''Film/TwoLovers'' by Creator/JamesGray

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* ''White Nights'' was adapted into ''La Notti bianche'' by Creator/LuchinoVisconti, ''Four nights of a dreamer'' by Creator/RobertBresson, and loosely adapted into ''Film/TwoLovers'' ''Two Lovers'' by Creator/JamesGrayJames Gray.
7th Feb '16 6:15:17 AM JulianLapostat
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!! Notable adaptations of his works include:
* ''White Nights'' was adapted into ''La Notti bianche'' by Creator/LuchinoVisconti, ''Four nights of a dreamer'' by Creator/RobertBresson, and loosely adapted into ''Film/TwoLovers'' by Creator/JamesGray
* ''The Double'' was adapted by Creator/BernardoBertolucci as ''Partner'' and ''Film/TheDouble'' by Richard Ayoade, starring Creator/JesseEisenberg.
* ''The Gambler'' was adapted as ''The Great Sinner'' (A MGM adaptation by Robert Siodmak, with a screenplay by Christopher Isherwood, and Creator/GregoryPeck). Loose modern-day adaptations include Film/AlexAndEmma and Creator/MartinScorsese's ''[[Film/NewYorkStories Life Lessons]]''.
* ''Literature/NotesFromUnderground'' has few direct adaptations, but it's most famous influence was on ''Film/TaxiDriver'' to the point that Creator/MartinScorsese and Creator/PaulSchrader consider it a SpiritualAdaptation.
* ''Literature/TheIdiot'' was adapted into a notable film by Creator/AkiraKurosawa and an obscure Indian film by Mani Kaul starring Creator/ShahRukhKhan.
* ''Literature/TheBrothersKaramazov'' was loosely adapted as ''Die Morder Dimitri Karamasoff'' a Soviet-German co-production by Feodor Osep, starring Fritz Rasp (of ''Film/{{Metropolis}}'' fame) and Anna Sten (who appeared in some MGM films). It's more well known for the 1950s Hollywood adaptation by Richard Brooks starring Creator/YulBrynner.
30th Aug '15 12:07:21 PM RushLimborg
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He's really remembered for the work he turned out after he came back from exile. Having had a religious experience while in prison, he spent the rest of his life exploring themes such as free will, guilt, religious awakening, and the effects of nihilism. His most famous novels are all critically-acclaimed for being thought-provoking explorations of the human condition in the face of suffering and despair. If Dostoevsky wasn't the [[TropeMaker clear "father"]] of the PsychologicalThriller, he certainly [[TropeCodifier set the standard for future practitioners of the genre.]]


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He's really remembered for the work he turned out after he came back from exile. Having had a religious experience while in prison, he spent the rest of his life exploring themes such as free will, guilt, religious awakening, and the effects of nihilism. His most famous novels are all critically-acclaimed for being thought-provoking explorations of the human condition in the face of suffering and despair. despair.

If Dostoevsky wasn't the [[TropeMaker clear "father"]] of the PsychologicalThriller, he certainly [[TropeCodifier set the standard for future practitioners of the genre.]]

]] In addition, his thematic and philosophical emphases link him strongly to the roots of FilmNoir--particularly the appropriately-named ''Crime And Punishment''.
30th Aug '15 12:00:20 PM RushLimborg
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He's really remembered for the work he turned out after he came back from exile. Having had a religious experience while in prison, he spent the rest of his life exploring themes such as free will, guilt, religious awakening, and the effects of nihilism. His most famous novels are all critically-acclaimed for being thought-provoking explorations of the human condition in the face of suffering and despair.

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He's really remembered for the work he turned out after he came back from exile. Having had a religious experience while in prison, he spent the rest of his life exploring themes such as free will, guilt, religious awakening, and the effects of nihilism. His most famous novels are all critically-acclaimed for being thought-provoking explorations of the human condition in the face of suffering and despair. \n If Dostoevsky wasn't the [[TropeMaker clear "father"]] of the PsychologicalThriller, he certainly [[TropeCodifier set the standard for future practitioners of the genre.]]



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1st May '15 3:21:51 AM IHateAlmostEverything
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* AwesomeMcCoolName: Pyotr Verkhovensky, whose family name is formed from "verkhovenstvo", which means "supremacy" in Russian.


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* EsotericHappyEnding: ''The Beggar Boy at Christ's Christmas Tree'', where titular beggar boy, who is abused by his alcoholic parents, freezes to death during during Christmas, but he dies happily, because he saw Christ in his DyingDream and felt that he is beloved by God.


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* FallenCreator: InUniverse, Karamzinov from ''Demons'', who had been one of the greatest Russian writers in the past, but then he JumpedTheShark.


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* TheGulag: ''Notes from the Dead House'', which describe Dostoyevsky's imprisonment in Siberia. Also a rare non-Soviet example of this trope.


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* ObfuscatingStupidity: If there is a ManipulativeBastard in his book, he ''will'' use this trick.
26th Mar '15 2:08:07 AM JulianLapostat
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* MisaimedFandom: [[invoked]] A posthumous example. Dostoevsky wrote about revolutionaries or aspiring radicals, social rejects, outsiders and featured characters who tend to scorn family values and religion. This made him influential on leftists, philosophers, freethinkers and young adolescents despite himself being a conservative Orthodox Christian Russian writer.

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* MisaimedFandom: [[invoked]] [[invoked]]
**
A posthumous example. Dostoevsky wrote about revolutionaries or aspiring radicals, social rejects, outsiders and featured characters who tend to scorn family values and religion. This made him influential on leftists, philosophers, freethinkers and young adolescents despite himself being a conservative Orthodox Christian Russian writer.



* NietzscheWannabe: Many, including pretty much ''all'' the young radicals in ''Demons'' (although Stavrogin and Verkhovensky stand out), and Arkady in ''The Adolescent''.

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* NietzscheWannabe: Many, including NietzscheWannabe:
** Dostoevsky codified these characters in many of his books. Raskolnikov is perhaps the archetypal example. Other examples include The Underground Man and
pretty much ''all'' the young radicals in ''Demons'' (although Stavrogin and Verkhovensky stand out), and Arkady in ''The Adolescent''.Adolescent''.
** Bear in mind that this is a case of UnbuiltTrope since Dostoevsky was a rough contemporary of Nietzche but did not read his books, while the latter read his books after formulating some of his beliefs and noted how Dostoevsky anticipated his ideas.



* ThroughTheEyesOfMadness: "The Double", though it's narrated through third-person.

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* ThroughTheEyesOfMadness: "The Double", though it's narrated through third-person.



* WesternTerrorists: ''Demons' '' plot revolves around such group.

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* WesternTerrorists: ''Demons' '' plot revolves around such group.a group. Though it must be noted that the Nihilists of 19th Century Russia ''were'' the [[TropeMaker original]] terrorists.



** Also, he never finished ''Netochka Nezvanova'', one of his first works.

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** Also, he never finished ''Netochka Nezvanova'', one of his first works. He started it before his imprisonment and by the time he was released his pre-occupations had drifted far from the pre-Prison writer.
21st Mar '15 9:27:36 PM Fireblood
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* AllWomenAreDomsAllMenAreSubs: Though without sexual meaning, many, if not the most relationships in his books are female-led and man is submissive. Dmitri Karamazov even says "I believe that every good man must be kept under the heel of some woman!", which may be the view of Dostoyevsky himself(or not).

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* AllWomenAreDomsAllMenAreSubs: Though without sexual meaning, many, if not the most relationships in his books are female-led and man is submissive. Dmitri Karamazov even says "I believe that every good man must be kept under the heel of some woman!", which may be the view of Dostoyevsky himself(or himself (or not).



* BombThrowingAnarchists: The gang of terrorists in ''Demons'' starts as one, but throughout the novel they change their goal form destroying the authorities and liberating everyone to installing crueller regime and enslaving 90% of population.

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* BombThrowingAnarchists: The gang of terrorists in ''Demons'' starts as one, but throughout the novel they change their goal form destroying the authorities and liberating everyone to installing crueller a crueler regime and enslaving 90% of the population.



** Depending on your point of view, that is either HilariousInHindsight or HarsherInHindsight, as Russian Orthodox Church is ''now'' mostly known for being [[CorruptChurch anything but innocent]].

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** Depending on your point of view, that is either HilariousInHindsight or HarsherInHindsight, as the Russian Orthodox Church is ''now'' mostly known for being [[CorruptChurch anything but innocent]].



* DownerEnding: [[spoiler: ''The Idiot'', to a certain degree ''Demons'' as well.]]

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* DownerEnding: [[spoiler: ''The Idiot'', to Idiot''. To a certain degree ''Demons'' as well.]]



* UsefulNotes/{{Epilepsy}}: Dostoevsky was a famous real-life epileptic who often suffered periodic fits. His family and friends noted that his fits came suddenly without warning and that he would describe his trance like state and visions in considerable detail. This eventually made its way into his books where many characters, notably Prince Myshkin and Smerdyakov are epileptics and a lot of MindScrew comes from their descriptions of their fits.
* FaceOfAnAngelMindOfADemon: Stavrogin is described as absolutely charming and beautiful, like a prince from fairy tale, while in fact, he is a depraved murderer, pedophile and rapist.

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* UsefulNotes/{{Epilepsy}}: Dostoevsky was a famous real-life epileptic who often suffered periodic fits. His family and friends noted that his fits came suddenly without warning and that he would describe his trance like trance-like state and visions in considerable detail. This eventually made its way into his books where many characters, notably Prince Myshkin and Smerdyakov are epileptics and a lot of MindScrew comes from their descriptions of their fits.
* FaceOfAnAngelMindOfADemon: Stavrogin is described as absolutely charming and beautiful, like a prince from a fairy tale, while in fact, he is a depraved murderer, pedophile and rapist.



* HenpeckedHusband: Anton von Lembke from ''Demons'' is a spineless doormat for his wife and is generally a weak-willed person. The narrator says with total contempt, that he was a virgin, she he married his wife, while she wasn't.
* HistoricalDomainCharacter: For an artist with such a colourful life, Dostoevsky has been fictionalized in books like ''Sumer in Baden Baden'' by Leonid Tsypkin and ''The Master of Petersburg'' by J. M. Coetzee.

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* HenpeckedHusband: Anton von Lembke from ''Demons'' is a spineless doormat for his wife and is generally a weak-willed person. The narrator says with total contempt, contempt that he was a virgin, she virgin when he married his wife, while she wasn't.
* HistoricalDomainCharacter: For an artist with such a colourful colorful life, Dostoevsky has been fictionalized in books like ''Sumer in Baden Baden'' by Leonid Tsypkin and ''The Master of Petersburg'' by J. M. Coetzee.
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