History Creator / FriedrichNietzsche

10th Jul '16 10:11:40 AM FearlessSon
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'''Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche''' was [[DichterAndDenker an eccentric German author who wrote lots of books,]] laden with extremely provocative and controversial ideas for his time (some of which are ''still controversial'' to this day), and they made him famous. Nowadays, he is often placed among the most influential philosophers of all time. It didn't end well for him back in his day, though, as he went nuts and soon died in his fifties.

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'''Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche''' was [[DichterAndDenker [[UsefulNotes/DichterAndDenker an eccentric German author who wrote lots of books,]] laden with extremely provocative and controversial ideas for his time (some of which are ''still controversial'' to this day), and they made him famous. Nowadays, he is often placed among the most influential philosophers of all time. It didn't end well for him back in his day, though, as he went nuts and soon died in his fifties.
25th Jun '16 9:05:21 PM nombretomado
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* The original ''BaldursGate'' opens with the "HeWhoFightsMonsters" quote, hinting at [[spoiler:the dangers of Bhaal's legacy (probably)]].

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* The original ''BaldursGate'' ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' opens with the "HeWhoFightsMonsters" quote, hinting at [[spoiler:the dangers of Bhaal's legacy (probably)]].
25th Jun '16 12:34:11 AM Eagal
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* BeYourself[=/=]DesperatelyLookingForAPurposeInLife: A major theme in his philosophy.

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* BeYourself[=/=]DesperatelyLookingForAPurposeInLife: BeYourself: A major theme in his philosophy.



* BerserkButton: Yeah, don't insult the Jews around Nietzsche. Despite what his [[MisaimedFandom Misaimed]] FanDumb would have you believe ([[ThoseWackyNazis and there]] [[StrawNihilist are many]]) he'd rip German anti-Semites apart if they neglected the contributions of Jewish culture and philosophy to Europe. [[ProudScholarRaceGuy Well, rip them apart rhetorically anyway.]]

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* BerserkButton: Yeah, don't insult the Jews around Nietzsche. Despite what his [[MisaimedFandom Misaimed]] FanDumb MisaimedFandom would have you believe ([[ThoseWackyNazis and there]] [[StrawNihilist are many]]) he'd rip German anti-Semites apart if they neglected the contributions of Jewish culture and philosophy to Europe. [[ProudScholarRaceGuy Well, rip them apart rhetorically anyway.]]



* TheFatalist[=/=]YouCantFightFate: His preaching of ''amor fati'' is one of the major reasons why he is bashed as a nihilist. Ordinary people psychologically react to a fatalistic life (such as inevitable suffering) by perceiving it as a CosmicHorrorStory, hence causing [[DespairEventHorizon depre]][[DrivenToSuicide ssion]], [[DarknessInducedAudienceApathy apa]][[TheHedonist thy]] and/or [[OmnicidalManiac rage]]. However, those extraordinary few should [[SillyRabbitCynicismIsForLosers reject this suicidal perception]], instead both accepting this fatalistic outlook, loving it and living it [[WorldOfHam as if it was an art form]] (hence a possible wordplay on "Übermensch"). His thought experiment on EternalRecurrence boils down to how confident people with strong enough willpower can accept the challenge of life over and over again, fully appreciating this AndIMustScream existence and making it joyfully worthwhile without any regrets. This also comes hand-in-hand with appreciating the Ancient Greeks' view on a fatalistic life (e.g., expressing it in the art form of Tragedy, which in contrast to our modern view of Tragedy as a DespairEventHorizon, was appreciated by Greeks as something very much like an EarnYourHappyEnding story. See also Aristotle's concept of CatharsisFactor).

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* TheFatalist[=/=]YouCantFightFate: TheFatalist: His preaching of ''amor fati'' is one of the major reasons why he is bashed as a nihilist. Ordinary people psychologically react to a fatalistic life (such as inevitable suffering) by perceiving it as a CosmicHorrorStory, hence causing [[DespairEventHorizon depre]][[DrivenToSuicide ssion]], [[DarknessInducedAudienceApathy apa]][[TheHedonist thy]] and/or [[OmnicidalManiac rage]]. However, those extraordinary few should [[SillyRabbitCynicismIsForLosers reject this suicidal perception]], instead both accepting this fatalistic outlook, loving it and living it [[WorldOfHam as if it was an art form]] (hence a possible wordplay on "Übermensch"). His thought experiment on EternalRecurrence boils down to how confident people with strong enough willpower can accept the challenge of life over and over again, fully appreciating this AndIMustScream existence and making it joyfully worthwhile without any regrets. This also comes hand-in-hand with appreciating the Ancient Greeks' view on a fatalistic life (e.g., expressing it in the art form of Tragedy, which in contrast to our modern view of Tragedy as a DespairEventHorizon, was appreciated by Greeks as something very much like an EarnYourHappyEnding story. See also Aristotle's concept of CatharsisFactor).



* InTheStyleOf: Some of his works were deliberately written in Biblical style, possibly for additional irony. ''Thus Spoke Zarathustra'' is a particularly good example.



* {{Retraux}}[=/=]InTheStyleOf: Some of his works were deliberately written in Biblical style, possibly for additional irony. ''Thus Spoke Zarathustra'' is a particularly good example.
* {{Romanticism}}[=/=]ScienceIsBad: Not exactly. While his poetic, hammy and caustic criticism of modernity heavily influenced Postmodernism, he did understand the importance of modern science, and the unquestionable truth of its discoveries, and definitely approved of its methods as superior to religious or philosophical ones for investigation of reality. However, [[RomanticismVersusEnlightenment he regarded scientists' and the Enlightenment's relentless obsession for objective truth-and in particular, the extension of the scientific method to the study of human beings, e.g. modern psychology, behaviorism and neuroscience-as a dangerous development that makes humans dependent on what science simply tells them, and obscures important elements of the human condition that cannot be quantified such as individuality]], that which will eventually lead to a {{Dystopia}}n future. A possible interpretation of his most famous phrase "GodIsDead, and we have killed him"; our science essentially killed the relevance of metaphysics, theology, ethics, philosophy and such in the modern world, replacing them instead with technology's materialistic BreadAndCircuses.

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* {{Retraux}}[=/=]InTheStyleOf: Some of his works were deliberately written in Biblical style, possibly for additional irony. ''Thus Spoke Zarathustra'' is a particularly good example.
* {{Romanticism}}[=/=]ScienceIsBad:
{{Romanticism}}: Not exactly. While his poetic, hammy and caustic criticism of modernity heavily influenced Postmodernism, he did understand the importance of modern science, and the unquestionable truth of its discoveries, and definitely approved of its methods as superior to religious or philosophical ones for investigation of reality. However, [[RomanticismVersusEnlightenment he regarded scientists' and the Enlightenment's relentless obsession for objective truth-and in particular, the extension of the scientific method to the study of human beings, e.g. modern psychology, behaviorism and neuroscience-as a dangerous development that makes humans dependent on what science simply tells them, and obscures important elements of the human condition that cannot be quantified such as individuality]], that which will eventually lead to a {{Dystopia}}n future. A possible interpretation of his most famous phrase "GodIsDead, and we have killed him"; our science essentially killed the relevance of metaphysics, theology, ethics, philosophy and such in the modern world, replacing them instead with technology's materialistic BreadAndCircuses.



* SocialDarwinist[=/=]MightMakesRight: Whenever the terms "Übermensch," "Will-To-Power," "Master-slave morality," Nietzsche's rejection of egalitarianism/democracy and such comes up, distinctions between Nietzsche and Social Darwinism are severely blurred, hence Nietzsche's frequent misassociation with notable Social Darwinists like ThoseWackyNazis and radical {{transhuman}}ists. Note that Nietzsche wasn't really that much of a ''social'' Darwinist; his philosophy is rather different.

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* SocialDarwinist[=/=]MightMakesRight: SocialDarwinist
**
Whenever the terms "Übermensch," "Will-To-Power," "Master-slave morality," Nietzsche's rejection of egalitarianism/democracy and such comes up, distinctions between Nietzsche and Social Darwinism are severely blurred, hence Nietzsche's frequent misassociation with notable Social Darwinists like ThoseWackyNazis and radical {{transhuman}}ists. Note that Nietzsche wasn't really that much of a ''social'' Darwinist; his philosophy is rather different.



*** He believed that it would favor the lowest but most fertile elements of humanity (e.g. [[Film/{{Idiocracy}} retards]] and rapists) because of the lower fertility rates of intellectuals. Hence why DemocracyIsBad. Nietzsche's will-to-power system is more comparable to [[LamarckWasRight Lamarckian evolution]] which makes personal learned ability and skills, rather than [[ZergRush sheer quantity of genes]] and {{explosive breed|er}}ing as with Darwin, the center of evolutionary progress.

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*** ** He believed that it would favor the lowest but most fertile elements of humanity (e.g. [[Film/{{Idiocracy}} retards]] and rapists) because of the lower fertility rates of intellectuals. Hence why DemocracyIsBad. Nietzsche's will-to-power system is more comparable to [[LamarckWasRight Lamarckian evolution]] which makes personal learned ability and skills, rather than [[ZergRush sheer quantity of genes]] and {{explosive breed|er}}ing as with Darwin, the center of evolutionary progress.



* TemptingFate[=/=]WhatCouldPossiblyGoWrong: In ''Ecce Homo'', Nietzsche wrote about his fear that he would be [[MisaimedFandom pronounced holy by future readers]], therefore he wanted to publish the book before anyone would make the mistake. Due to his mental breakdown, his book was published years after his death. You can guess what happened on the day of his funeral, [[ImperialGermany and]] [[ThoseWackyNazis after]].
* TheThemeParkVersion: [[StrawNihilist Sadly very common]].

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* TemptingFate[=/=]WhatCouldPossiblyGoWrong: TemptingFate: In ''Ecce Homo'', Nietzsche wrote about his fear that he would be [[MisaimedFandom pronounced holy by future readers]], therefore he wanted to publish the book before anyone would make the mistake. Due to his mental breakdown, his book was published years after his death. You can guess what happened on the day of his funeral, [[ImperialGermany and]] [[ThoseWackyNazis after]].
* TheThemeParkVersion: [[StrawNihilist Sadly very common]].%%* TheThemeParkVersion



* WorthyOpponent: {{Jesus}} and Creator/{{Socrates}}. He regarded both as {{Ubermensch}}en who changed the course of history, although he didn't like where they went with it, or even more sharply what other people did with it after they died. On the other hand, in ''The Antichrist'' he described St. Paul as a contemptible StrawNihilist who encouraged ApatheticCitizens and HappinessInSlavery.

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* WorthyOpponent: WorthyOpponent:
**
{{Jesus}} and Creator/{{Socrates}}. He regarded both as {{Ubermensch}}en who changed the course of history, although he didn't like where they went with it, or even more sharply what other people did with it after they died. On the other hand, in ''The Antichrist'' he described St. Paul as a contemptible StrawNihilist who encouraged ApatheticCitizens and HappinessInSlavery.
13th Apr '16 5:21:59 PM 04tele
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Film/TheDoors'', Jim Morrison's incoherent student film ends with Jim strolling across a rooftop reading out random bits from ''The Portable Nietzsche''. The professor, played by the movie's actual director Creator/OliverStone, delivers the ArmorPiercingResponse "Pretty pretentious, Jim," which annoys Morrison so much that he quits college, goes to sit on a beach and is subsequently invited by a duly impressed Ray Manzarek to form a band.
13th Apr '16 5:15:37 PM 04tele
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He also seemed to regard Gautama Buddha as one. He liked what he saw in Buddhism as a realist philosophy that actually tries to deal with real-world suffering instead of the vague word "sin" though he did disapprove of the nihilistic aspects, namely reduction of suffering as a means towards non-existence, and disliked its attention towards an otherworldly goal.

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He also seemed to regard Gautama Buddha as one. He liked what he saw in Buddhism as a realist philosophy that actually tries to deal with real-world suffering instead of the vague word "sin" though he did disapprove of the nihilistic aspects, namely reduction of suffering as a means towards non-existence, and disliked its attention towards an otherworldly goal.\\
13th Apr '16 5:14:04 PM 04tele
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** He did, however, point out a few historical figures who were either Ubermenschen or very close; for the most part, in contrast to the popular misconception of Nietzsche advocating {{transhuman}}ism (a literal take on "übermensch") or complete sociopathy (as with ThoseWackyNazis), the proto-übermenschen tend to be instead relatively benign philosophers and the founders of influential schools of thought. \\

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** He did, however, point out a few historical figures who were either Ubermenschen or very close; for the most part, in contrast to the popular misconception of Nietzsche advocating {{transhuman}}ism (a literal take on "übermensch") or complete sociopathy (as with ThoseWackyNazis), the proto-übermenschen tend to be instead relatively benign philosophers and the founders of influential schools of thought. \\


Added DiffLines:

\\
The closest he came to having a hero among modern men was Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe, who he regarded (with some justification) as having emancipated himself from the common prejudices of his time and place, and who he praised without reservation in ''Twilight of the Idols'' as "the last German before whom I feel reverence."
13th Apr '16 5:06:57 PM 04tele
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* TheStateless: Renounced his Prussian citizenship in 1869 and remained stateless until his death.

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* TheStateless: Renounced his Prussian citizenship in 1869 and remained stateless until his death. He felt so out of sympathy with German culture that he used to entertain the idea that his family was actually ethnically Polish. (It wasn't, though.)
13th Apr '16 5:04:08 PM 04tele
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* ''The Will to Power'': Again, not actually one of his books, but a collection of his notes; scholars to this day [[SeriousBusiness have serious debates]] whether he had intended to finish this work at all. Either way, the work covers Nietzsche's ideas about the history of nihilism in the West. The subtitle, ''An Attempt at the Revaluation of All Values'', points at the middle part of the work, in which he begins to try to point the way for anyone who might become a proper {{Ubermensch}}. Recent editions take pains to note that ''The Will to Power'' is hardly complete, and really isn't supposed to exist. See above, about his [[ThoseWackyNazis wacky]] sister, for details.

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* ''The Will to Power'': Again, not actually one of his books, but a collection of his notes; scholars to this day [[SeriousBusiness have serious debates]] whether he had intended to finish this work at all. Either way, the work covers Nietzsche's ideas about the history of nihilism in the West. The subtitle, ''An Attempt at the Revaluation of All Values'', points at the middle part of the work, in which he begins to try to point the way for anyone who might become a proper {{Ubermensch}}. Recent editions take pains to note that ''The Will to Power'' is hardly complete, and not really isn't supposed a book, and certainly doesn't meet Nietsche's exacting standards; academic discussions of his work generally regard the book as too compromised to exist.be used as a reliable source. See above, about his [[ThoseWackyNazis wacky]] sister, for details.
13th Apr '16 5:01:35 PM 04tele
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* PetTheDog: In an age when antisemitism was pretty much widespread in Germany, Nietzsche was outspoken in his defense of the Jewish people and their influence on German (and world) culture.

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* PetTheDog: In an age when antisemitism was pretty much widespread commonplace in Germany, Nietzsche was outspoken in his defense of the Jewish people and their influence on German (and world) culture.culture.
13th Apr '16 4:59:37 PM 04tele
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* JesusWasWayCool: While he had little positive to say of ''Christianity'', which he considered to be a pollution of Jesus' real teachings, Nietzsche had something of a begrudging respect for Jesus. Not that Nietzsche thought Jesus was above criticism (he thought he was [[WideEyedIdealist too idealistic]] and [[CloudCuckooLander downright unusual]]), but he still seemed to like him.

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* JesusWasWayCool: While he had little positive to say of about ''Christianity'', which he considered to be a pollution of Jesus' real teachings, Nietzsche had something of a begrudging respect for Jesus. Not that Nietzsche thought Jesus was above criticism (he thought he was [[WideEyedIdealist too idealistic]] and [[CloudCuckooLander downright unusual]]), but he still seemed to like him.thought Jesus was a far more interesting and inspiring figure than any of his disciples: in ''The Antichrist'', he wrote "in reality there has been only one Christian, and he died on the Cross."
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