History Creator / DuMont

8th Nov '17 9:52:33 AM CaptainAmazing
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The fourth network from the early days of television in the United States, though actually the third to come to the air in 1946. [[note]](ABC was the fourth in 1948. NBC and CBS were first [1941] and second [1941, an hour later the same day] respectively.)[[/note]] It eventually failed, as its problems included an FCC ruling restricting it because of part-ownership by Creator/{{Paramount}} (who also operated their own TV network on the West Coast); not having an associated radio network to bring over programs and performers (and absorb costs); a forced over-dependence on UHF stations in an era when all-channel tuning wasn't required on TV sets (and it wouldn't be until 1964); and aforementioned part-owners Paramount doing little to help the network to overcome these problems, and creating new ones of their own, partly because [[NewMediaAreEvil they feared the impact television would have on their main movie business]]. [[note]]Said fears might've been the reason that, following [=DuMont=]'s fall, they mostly stopped doing television until Gulf+Western bought [[Creator/DesiluStudios Desilu]] in 1967 and renamed it Paramount Television, being the last major film studio to get their own TV division.[[/note]]

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The fourth network from the early days of television in the United States, though actually the third to come to the air in 1946. [[note]](ABC was the fourth in 1948. NBC and CBS were first [1941] and second [1941, an hour later the same day] respectively.)[[/note]] It eventually failed, [[NetworkDeath failed ]], as its problems included an FCC ruling restricting it because of part-ownership by Creator/{{Paramount}} (who also operated their own TV network on the West Coast); not having an associated radio network to bring over programs and performers (and absorb costs); a forced over-dependence on UHF stations in an era when all-channel tuning wasn't required on TV sets (and it wouldn't be until 1964); and aforementioned part-owners Paramount doing little to help the network to overcome these problems, and creating new ones of their own, partly because [[NewMediaAreEvil they feared the impact television would have on their main movie business]]. [[note]]Said fears might've been the reason that, following [=DuMont=]'s fall, they mostly stopped doing television until Gulf+Western bought [[Creator/DesiluStudios Desilu]] in 1967 and renamed it Paramount Television, being the last major film studio to get their own TV division.[[/note]]



The only things left to keep the lights on were sporting events per prior commitments, which continued to air sporadically over the next ten months. Following the broadcast of ''Boxing from St. Nicholas Arena'' on August 6, 1956 (one retrospective claims it was only seen on '''five stations'''), [=DuMont=] went bust and the remaining network-owned stations (WABD, New York and WTTG, Washington) spun off into the [=DuMont=] Broadcasting Corporation.

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The only things left to keep the lights on were sporting events per prior commitments, which continued to air sporadically over the next ten months. Following the broadcast of ''Boxing from St. Nicholas Arena'' on August 6, 1956 (one retrospective claims it was only seen on '''five stations'''), [=DuMont=] [[NetworkDeath went bust bust]] and the remaining network-owned stations (WABD, New York and WTTG, Washington) spun off into the [=DuMont=] Broadcasting Corporation.
13th Oct '17 9:39:44 AM Malady
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Ironically, Paramount's former theater division, United Paramount Theatres [[note]](forcibly stripped from Paramount proper by the Supreme Court's landmark 1948 ruling ''U.S. v. Paramount'', which was one of the major causes of the FallOfTheStudioSystem)[[/note]], purchased Creator/{{ABC}} in February 1953, and the steady revenue stream from movie theaters helped it quickly leapfrog [=DuMont=] to become the third network.

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Ironically, Paramount's former theater division, United Paramount Theatres [[note]](forcibly stripped from Paramount proper by the Supreme Court's landmark 1948 ruling ''U.S. v. Paramount'', which was one of the major causes of the FallOfTheStudioSystem)[[/note]], UsefulNotes/FallOfTheStudioSystem)[[/note]], purchased Creator/{{ABC}} in February 1953, and the steady revenue stream from movie theaters helped it quickly leapfrog [=DuMont=] to become the third network.
10th Oct '17 6:17:55 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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[=DuMont=] was also unique in that it employed a potentially-money-saving advertising tactic of letting advertisers '''choose''' where their commercials ran, rather than do what the other three networks did and force a large number of stations on them. They also started the modern practice of selling advertising time to several sponsors per show due to their difficulty in attracting enough sponsors for their programs.

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[=DuMont=] was also unique in that it employed a potentially-money-saving advertising tactic of letting advertisers '''choose''' where their commercials ran, rather than do what the other three networks did and force a large number of stations on them. They also started the modern practice of selling advertising time to several sponsors per show due to their difficulty in attracting enough sponsors for their programs.
programs. [[note]]An interesting application of this practice was seen on ''Cavalcade of Stars'': while the program was technically sponsored by Quality Drugs, the company in turn sold their commercial time to various other companies.[[/note]]
8th Oct '17 3:23:59 PM nombretomado
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As the years progressed, Metromedia purchased more TV and radio stations as well as producing and distributing many series, most notably ''TruthOrConsequences'' and ''Series/TheCrossWits'', plus the 1972-86 era of ''The Creator/MervGriffin Show''. They also distributed many of Creator/AaronSpelling's series in syndication during the era.

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As the years progressed, Metromedia purchased more TV and radio stations as well as producing and distributing many series, most notably ''TruthOrConsequences'' ''Series/TruthOrConsequences'' and ''Series/TheCrossWits'', plus the 1972-86 era of ''The Creator/MervGriffin Show''. They also distributed many of Creator/AaronSpelling's series in syndication during the era.
28th Jun '17 5:30:53 PM nombretomado
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It should be noted that Allen B. [=DuMont=], the creator of the network, seemed to realize the benefits of keeping his network's programming library as intact as possible, and admirably did so despite the general practices of the era and the network's own escalating money issues. [[DownerEnding That was for naught, however]], as several of the kinescopes (both 35mm and 16mm ones) were destroyed by 1958 to reclaim the ''tiny'' amounts of silver that were within, and by the early 1970s the remaining library wound up in the hands of ABC, who ultimately loaded most (if not all) of the lot in three trucks and dumped it in New York City's Upper Bay to make room in their warehouse for more recent videotapes. As such, only an estimated 350 complete shows by the network survive; TheOtherWiki has [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_surviving_DuMont_Television_Network_broadcasts a list]] if you're so inclined, which also includes video links.

to:

It should be noted that Allen B. [=DuMont=], the creator of the network, seemed to realize the benefits of keeping his network's programming library as intact as possible, and admirably did so despite the general practices of the era and the network's own escalating money issues. [[DownerEnding That was for naught, however]], as several of the kinescopes (both 35mm and 16mm ones) were destroyed by 1958 to reclaim the ''tiny'' amounts of silver that were within, and by the early 1970s the remaining library wound up in the hands of ABC, who ultimately loaded most (if not all) of the lot in three trucks and dumped it in New York City's Upper Bay to make room in their warehouse for more recent videotapes. As such, only an estimated 350 complete shows by the network survive; TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki has [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_surviving_DuMont_Television_Network_broadcasts a list]] if you're so inclined, which also includes video links.
6th Mar '17 6:41:52 PM mlsmithca
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Most, if not all, of [=DuMont=]'s programs were produced on small budgets out of necessity rather than a conscious decision (again, Paramount refused to help and had stopped financially supporting the network in 1941), but the network made up for this shortcoming by use of good writing and ''very'' energetic crews. The result was a bunch of wobbly sets filled with people (typically from Broadway shows) who come across as genuinely putting 110% into what they're doing, with a lot of now-famous faces gracing the lineup. [=DuMont=]'s endearing charm, "gung-ho" attitude, general quirkiness, and abundant imagination resulted in being SoCoolItsAwesome on its best days and SoBadItsGood on its worst even when nothing seems to go right, especially on a live show, they're at least ''trying''... which is a lot more than can be said of some shows or networks today.

to:

Most, if not all, of [=DuMont=]'s programs were produced on small budgets out of necessity rather than a conscious decision (again, Paramount refused to help and had stopped financially supporting the network in 1941), but the network made up for this shortcoming by use of good writing and ''very'' energetic crews. The result was a bunch of wobbly sets filled with people (typically from Broadway shows) who come across as genuinely putting 110% into what they're doing, with a lot of now-famous faces gracing the lineup. [=DuMont=]'s endearing charm, "gung-ho" attitude, general quirkiness, and abundant imagination resulted in being SoCoolItsAwesome awesome on its best days and SoBadItsGood on its worst even when nothing seems to go right, especially on a live show, they're at least ''trying''... which is a lot more than can be said of some shows or networks today.
15th Jan '17 1:26:40 PM Xtifr
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The fourth network from the early days of television in the United States, though actually the third to come to the air in 1946. [[note]](ABC was the fourth in 1948. NBC and CBS were first [1941] and second [1941, an hour later the same day] respectively.)[[/note]] It eventually failed, as its problems included an FCC ruling restricting it because of part-ownership by [[Main/ParamountPictures Paramount]] (who also operated their own TV network on the West Coast); not having an associated radio network to bring over programs and performers (and absorb costs); a forced over-dependence on UHF stations in an era when all-channel tuning wasn't required on TV sets (and it wouldn't be until 1964); and aforementioned part-owners Paramount doing little to help the network to overcome these problems, and creating new ones of their own, partly because [[NewMediaAreEvil they feared the impact television would have on their main movie business]]. [[note]]Said fears might've been the reason that, following [=DuMont=]'s fall, they mostly stopped doing television until Gulf+Western bought [[Creator/DesiluStudios Desilu]] in 1967 and renamed it Paramount Television, being the last major film studio to get their own TV division.[[/note]]

to:

The fourth network from the early days of television in the United States, though actually the third to come to the air in 1946. [[note]](ABC was the fourth in 1948. NBC and CBS were first [1941] and second [1941, an hour later the same day] respectively.)[[/note]] It eventually failed, as its problems included an FCC ruling restricting it because of part-ownership by [[Main/ParamountPictures Paramount]] Creator/{{Paramount}} (who also operated their own TV network on the West Coast); not having an associated radio network to bring over programs and performers (and absorb costs); a forced over-dependence on UHF stations in an era when all-channel tuning wasn't required on TV sets (and it wouldn't be until 1964); and aforementioned part-owners Paramount doing little to help the network to overcome these problems, and creating new ones of their own, partly because [[NewMediaAreEvil they feared the impact television would have on their main movie business]]. [[note]]Said fears might've been the reason that, following [=DuMont=]'s fall, they mostly stopped doing television until Gulf+Western bought [[Creator/DesiluStudios Desilu]] in 1967 and renamed it Paramount Television, being the last major film studio to get their own TV division.[[/note]]
25th Dec '16 9:23:39 PM ADrago
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After Creator/PaulWinchell sued Metromedia over the rights to his children's series ''Winchell-Mahoney Time'', company management opted to [[WhatAnIdiot destroy the tapes]] a mistake of epic proportions that resulted in Winchell being awarded $17.8M in compensation and punitive damages. [[note]](Even so, Winchell was likely still upset - a ruling in his favor can't offset the fact that his show was quite probably LostForever.)[[/note]]

to:

After Creator/PaulWinchell sued Metromedia over the rights to his children's series ''Winchell-Mahoney Time'', company management opted to [[WhatAnIdiot destroy the tapes]] a mistake of epic proportions that resulted in Winchell being awarded $17.8M in compensation and punitive damages. [[note]](Even so, Winchell was likely still upset - a ruling in his favor can't offset the fact that his show was quite probably LostForever.[[MissingEpisode lost]].)[[/note]]
25th Dec '16 9:23:39 PM ADrago
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5th Nov '16 6:53:43 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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It should be noted that Alfred B. [=DuMont=], the creator of the network, seemed to realize the benefits of keeping his network's programming library as intact as possible, and admirably did so despite the general practices of the era and the network's own escalating money issues. [[DownerEnding That was for naught, however]], as several of the kinescopes (both 35mm and 16mm ones) were destroyed by 1958 to reclaim the ''tiny'' amounts of silver that were within, and by the early 1970s the remaining library wound up in the hands of ABC, who ultimately loaded most (if not all) of the lot in three trucks and dumped it in New York City's Upper Bay to make room in their warehouse for more recent videotapes. As such, only an estimated 350 complete shows by the network survive; TheOtherWiki has [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_surviving_DuMont_Television_Network_broadcasts a list]] if you're so inclined, which also includes video links.

to:

It should be noted that Alfred Allen B. [=DuMont=], the creator of the network, seemed to realize the benefits of keeping his network's programming library as intact as possible, and admirably did so despite the general practices of the era and the network's own escalating money issues. [[DownerEnding That was for naught, however]], as several of the kinescopes (both 35mm and 16mm ones) were destroyed by 1958 to reclaim the ''tiny'' amounts of silver that were within, and by the early 1970s the remaining library wound up in the hands of ABC, who ultimately loaded most (if not all) of the lot in three trucks and dumped it in New York City's Upper Bay to make room in their warehouse for more recent videotapes. As such, only an estimated 350 complete shows by the network survive; TheOtherWiki has [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_surviving_DuMont_Television_Network_broadcasts a list]] if you're so inclined, which also includes video links.
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