History Creator / AsbjornsenAndMoe

11th Mar '17 12:57:08 PM Eilevgmyhren
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/GullibleMenAndMeanWives'' (''Dumme menn og troll til kjerringer).
14th Dec '16 3:33:56 PM Xtifr
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Authors '''Peter Christian Asbjørnsen''' and '''Jørgen Moe''' were a pair of UsefulNotes/{{Norw|ay}}egian FairyTale collectors. The result of their work is an anthology of roughly 150 tales, properly called "Norwegian Folktales", but more commonly referred to simply as '''Asbjørnsen and Moe'''.

'''Peter Christen Asbjørnsen''' was the urban one, born in the city of Christiania in 1812. He died in 1885, a vivid hobby scientist and professional zoologist, engaging in social issues, and in collecting of stories. Most of the material collected in and around the Oslo area is written by him, and also many of the legends. Asbjørnsen was the son of a glass maker, and had humble origins. He wrote and edited his own collections of stories before even meeting Jørgen Moe as early as in 1842. In later years, Asbjørnsen ended in a heavy porridge debate (called the "porridge war") with sociologist Eilert Sundt, over the necessity of eating and making porridge. Hilarity ensued.

'''Jørgen Moe''' was the son of a farmer from Ringerike, born 1813. He was the rural one of the two. He studied to become a priest, and was also a poet and writer of children`s books. Many of the dialect examples in the texts are his, and also the more lengthy tales from the upper valleys. He sought out story-tellers in remote areas, and collected some of the more rare and extensive tales from them. Regrettably, he was not always there for long, but he laid out some ground work for the next generation of collectors. His son, Moltke Moe, became the first professor of folklore in Norway. Moe had a chance meeting with Creator/HenrikWergeland in 1841, and Wergeland insisted that he should get to the task of collecting more thorougly. In time he became a respected priest in the parish of Krødsherad, and from there, he was able to collect more stories. Jørgen Moe died in 1882.

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Authors '''Peter Peter Christian Asbjørnsen''' Asbjørnsen and '''Jørgen Moe''' Jørgen Moe were a pair of UsefulNotes/{{Norw|ay}}egian FairyTale collectors. The result of their work is an anthology of roughly 150 tales, properly called "Norwegian Folktales", but more commonly referred to simply as '''Asbjørnsen Asbjørnsen and Moe'''.Moe.

'''Peter Peter Christen Asbjørnsen''' Asbjørnsen was the urban one, born in the city of Christiania in 1812. He died in 1885, a vivid hobby scientist and professional zoologist, engaging in social issues, and in collecting of stories. Most of the material collected in and around the Oslo area is written by him, and also many of the legends. Asbjørnsen was the son of a glass maker, and had humble origins. He wrote and edited his own collections of stories before even meeting Jørgen Moe as early as in 1842. In later years, Asbjørnsen ended in a heavy porridge debate (called the "porridge war") with sociologist Eilert Sundt, over the necessity of eating and making porridge. Hilarity ensued.

'''Jørgen Moe''' Jørgen Moe was the son of a farmer from Ringerike, born 1813. He was the rural one of the two. He studied to become a priest, and was also a poet and writer of children`s books. Many of the dialect examples in the texts are his, and also the more lengthy tales from the upper valleys. He sought out story-tellers in remote areas, and collected some of the more rare and extensive tales from them. Regrettably, he was not always there for long, but he laid out some ground work for the next generation of collectors. His son, Moltke Moe, became the first professor of folklore in Norway. Moe had a chance meeting with Creator/HenrikWergeland in 1841, and Wergeland insisted that he should get to the task of collecting more thorougly. In time he became a respected priest in the parish of Krødsherad, and from there, he was able to collect more stories. Jørgen Moe died in 1882.
23rd Jun '16 12:54:01 AM PaulA
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!!Examples of tropes in Asbjørnsen and Moe's folk tales:

* ActionGirl: The most prominent example is Literature/{{Tatterhood}}, the ugly BadassPrincess who fights hordes of trolls and witches while riding on a goat. There are quite a few other female protagonists who, while not as action-y as Tatterhood, are steadfast {{Determinator}}s who will go to Hell and back to reach their goal.

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!!Examples of tropes in Asbjørnsen and Moe's folk tales:

tales that don't have their own page:

* ActionGirl: The most prominent example is Literature/{{Tatterhood}}, the ugly BadassPrincess who fights hordes of trolls and witches while riding on a goat. There are quite a few other female protagonists who, while not as action-y as Tatterhood, who are steadfast {{Determinator}}s who will go to Hell and back to reach their goal.



* BeatStillMyHeart: Used as a SoulJar in "The Giant Who Had No Heart in His Body".



* BrightCastle: Soria Moria.



* SoulJar: The titular heart in "The Giant Who Had No Heart in His Body".
23rd Jun '16 12:50:34 AM PaulA
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* FamilyUnfriendlyViolence: ''There sure are a lot of beheadings in these stories.''
23rd Jun '16 12:38:50 AM PaulA
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* [[AllTheLittleGermanies All the Little Norways]]: Unlike the brothers Grimm's Germany however, Norway was united when these tales was collected, so this is just a [[TheArtifact cultural artifact]].
24th Jul '15 12:34:56 AM Morgenthaler
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* ActionGirl: The most prominent example is {{Tatterhood}}, the ugly BadassPrincess who fights hordes of trolls and witches while riding on a goat. There are quite a few other female protagonists who, while not as action-y as Tatterhood, are steadfast {{Determinator}}s who will go to Hell and back to reach their goal.

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* ActionGirl: The most prominent example is {{Tatterhood}}, Literature/{{Tatterhood}}, the ugly BadassPrincess who fights hordes of trolls and witches while riding on a goat. There are quite a few other female protagonists who, while not as action-y as Tatterhood, are steadfast {{Determinator}}s who will go to Hell and back to reach their goal.
8th Jul '15 5:02:12 AM Roo
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* CinderellaCircumstances: Shows up in a number of stories, most notably ''Katie Woodencloak,'' which has been called "the Norwegian Cinderella."



* GuileHero: The Ashlad.

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* TheGirlWhoFitsThisSlipper: In ''Katie Woodencloak,'' it's a gold shoe. The trope is played slightly with, because while the prince only has the gold shoe to go by, Katie still has the other shoe ''and'' the entire fancy outfit she turned his head with in the first place, and when she shows up to try the shoe on she's wearing it all underneath her wooden cloak in order to make a dramatic reveal.
* GuileHero: The Ashlad.Ashlad, who traditionally succeeds by using his wits.



* ImpossibleTask
* InvoluntaryShapeshifter
* TheLostWoods

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* ImpossibleTask
ImpossibleTask: Usually what the king sets for the hero in order to win the princess, or the wicked troll sets for the girl to win back her lover.
* InvoluntaryShapeshifter
InvoluntaryShapeshifter: A number of them. If you see a white bear in any of the stories, it's definitely this.
* TheLostWoodsTheLostWoods: A fairly common setting, and there's always at least one big, dangerous troll present. Special mention must go to the three metal forests in ''Katie Woodencloak''; the first is made entirely out of copper, the second of silver and the third of gold, each one is thick and dense and almost impossible to pass through without harming one or more of the metal trees -- and when you involuntarily do, the troll who owns the forest shows up to kill you for your impudence.



* NamelessNarrative

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* NamelessNarrativeNamelessNarrative: The majority of the characters in the stories aren't named, and a fair number of the ones who ''do'' get names are really OnlyKnownByTheirNickname.



* OnlyKnownByTheirNickname: The Ashlad's real name is "Espen" ("John" or "Jack" in some English translations), but he's nicknamed "Ashlad" because he sits in the ashes by the fireplace.

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* OnlyKnownByTheirNickname: The Ashlad's real name is "Espen" ("John" or "Jack" in some English translations), but he's nicknamed "Ashlad" because he sits in the ashes by the fireplace. Likewise, characters like Literature/{{Tatterhood}} and Butterball are specifically mentioned as being called by those names for their appearances; their real names never mentioned.



* ThePromise

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* ThePromiseThePromise: Many heroes and heroines have to make some kind of promise to one of their helpers. Whether or not it's kept depends on the nature of the promise: If the promise is meant to keep the hero(ine) safe from harm then it'll always be broken and lead to complications or danger, but if the promise is meant to aid or reward the ''helper'' it's usually kept.



* RagsToRoyalty: The Ashlad stories almost always follow this -- and even in the stories where he ''doesn't'' marry a princess and become royalty he at least becomes rich.

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* RagsToRoyalty: The Male example in the Ashlad stories stories, which almost always follow this -- and even in the stories where he ''doesn't'' marry a princess and become royalty he at least becomes rich.



* RuleOfThree
* RuleOfSeven

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* RuleOfThree
RuleOfThree: They're fairy tales; of course this trope is in full force. Three brothers, three princesses, three quests, trolls with three heads (or three trolls -- the first one with three heads, the second one with six heads and the third one with nine).
* RuleOfSevenRuleOfSeven: Shows up every so often as well; usually if it's not three brothers it tends to be seven.
28th Feb '15 11:15:51 AM Eilevgmyhren
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* ParentalFavoritism: Clear in the stories with the Ashlad. Ashlad is always the youngest son and TheUnfavorite, while his older brothers are adored by the parents and get all the best stuff, the best food and the greatest benefits, while Ashlad has to make due with their leftovers.

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* ParentalFavoritism: Clear in the stories with the Ashlad. Ashlad is always the youngest son and TheUnfavorite, while his older brothers are adored by the parents and get all the best stuff, the best food and the greatest benefits, while Ashlad has to make due with their leftovers.
* PersonOfMassDestruction: The last of the sevcn helpers in the "Good Helpers" tale has "seven summers and fifteen winters in his body". Thus, he constantly keeps his hand over his mouth, because, as he says: "If I let them all out, they would end the world in an instant..."
29th Jan '15 7:11:15 AM Roo
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** Some versions and translations of the stories further removed objectionable material. The English translation of ''Peik,'' for instance, removes the part where he, while DisguisedInDrag, gets the two princesses pregnant and such clues the king in that he's not actually a girl; in the softer version his disguise is revealed when an old friend of his family comes by and recognizes him.



** The Norwegian version states a classical {{social criticism}} when the CountryMouse leaves for the hills. The Cat is associated with the tax collector, a person who were thoroughly disliked by the farmers. CountryMouse says that he`d rather be at home, than be pestered by "such a hawk".

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** The Norwegian version states a classical {{social criticism}} when the CountryMouse leaves for the hills. The Cat is associated with the tax collector, a person who were thoroughly disliked by the farmers. CountryMouse says that he`d she`d rather be at home, than be pestered by "such a hawk".



** Several adaptations have tried to individualize them to a bigger degree; in these the most common one seems to be to make Peter, the oldest, the bragging SmallNameBigEgo while Paul, the middle child, is a dull-witted YesMan who just follows Peter's lead but is often portrayed as more sympathetic.
* DubNameChange: In English Askeladden is sometimes translated as the Ashlad or the Cinderlad, and sometimes just called "Boots".

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** Several adaptations have tried to individualize them to a bigger degree; in these the most common one seems to be to make Peter, the oldest, the bragging SmallNameBigEgo while Paul, the middle child, is a dull-witted YesMan who just follows Peter's lead but is often portrayed as more sympathetic.
sympathetic. When Peter W. Cappelen adapted many of the fairy tales for stage, he gave the two brothers distinct characterizations; one was a food-obsessed glutton while the other was a penny-pinching and money-obsessed miser... though it varied from play to play which was which.
* DubNameChange: In English Askeladden is sometimes translated as the Ashlad "the Ashlad" or the Cinderlad, "the Cinderlad," and sometimes just called "Boots"."Boots". Likewise, his brothers Per and Pål have had their names anglicized to "Peter and Paul."



* EngagementChallenge

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* EngagementChallengeEngagementChallenge: Quite often the one who sets the challenge deliberately makes it impossible to do, so the hero(ine) won't have a chance of succeeding... when (s)he inevitably does anyway, additional impossible tasks are set. One of the more notable versions of this is in ''The Ashlad and the Good Helpers,'' where the King ''really'' doesn't want the Ashlad to marry his daughter and comes up with one impossible task after the other to stop the wedding from taking place.
3rd Jan '15 12:39:44 PM Roo
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* FakeUltimateHero: Ritter Red, who shows up in a few stories, always tries to step in to take the glory (and the princess) after the hero has done all the work. There are a few other characters like this; usually they're military officers who have owed in the background while the lower-ranked hero has faced all the tasks. They're always exposed and usually executed for their crimes.

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* FakeUltimateHero: Ritter Red, who shows up in a few stories, always tries to step in to take the glory (and the princess) after the hero has done all the work. There are a few other characters like this; usually they're military officers who have owed cowered in the background while the lower-ranked hero has faced all the tasks. They're always exposed and usually executed for their crimes.
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