History Creator / AsbjornsenAndMoe

24th Jul '15 12:34:56 AM Morgenthaler
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* ActionGirl: The most prominent example is {{Tatterhood}}, the ugly BadassPrincess who fights hordes of trolls and witches while riding on a goat. There are quite a few other female protagonists who, while not as action-y as Tatterhood, are steadfast {{Determinator}}s who will go to Hell and back to reach their goal.

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* ActionGirl: The most prominent example is {{Tatterhood}}, Literature/{{Tatterhood}}, the ugly BadassPrincess who fights hordes of trolls and witches while riding on a goat. There are quite a few other female protagonists who, while not as action-y as Tatterhood, are steadfast {{Determinator}}s who will go to Hell and back to reach their goal.
8th Jul '15 5:02:12 AM Roo
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* CinderellaCircumstances: Shows up in a number of stories, most notably ''Katie Woodencloak,'' which has been called "the Norwegian Cinderella."



* GuileHero: The Ashlad.

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* TheGirlWhoFitsThisSlipper: In ''Katie Woodencloak,'' it's a gold shoe. The trope is played slightly with, because while the prince only has the gold shoe to go by, Katie still has the other shoe ''and'' the entire fancy outfit she turned his head with in the first place, and when she shows up to try the shoe on she's wearing it all underneath her wooden cloak in order to make a dramatic reveal.
* GuileHero: The Ashlad.Ashlad, who traditionally succeeds by using his wits.



* ImpossibleTask
* InvoluntaryShapeshifter
* TheLostWoods

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* ImpossibleTask
ImpossibleTask: Usually what the king sets for the hero in order to win the princess, or the wicked troll sets for the girl to win back her lover.
* InvoluntaryShapeshifter
InvoluntaryShapeshifter: A number of them. If you see a white bear in any of the stories, it's definitely this.
* TheLostWoodsTheLostWoods: A fairly common setting, and there's always at least one big, dangerous troll present. Special mention must go to the three metal forests in ''Katie Woodencloak''; the first is made entirely out of copper, the second of silver and the third of gold, each one is thick and dense and almost impossible to pass through without harming one or more of the metal trees -- and when you involuntarily do, the troll who owns the forest shows up to kill you for your impudence.



* NamelessNarrative

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* NamelessNarrativeNamelessNarrative: The majority of the characters in the stories aren't named, and a fair number of the ones who ''do'' get names are really OnlyKnownByTheirNickname.



* OnlyKnownByTheirNickname: The Ashlad's real name is "Espen" ("John" or "Jack" in some English translations), but he's nicknamed "Ashlad" because he sits in the ashes by the fireplace.

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* OnlyKnownByTheirNickname: The Ashlad's real name is "Espen" ("John" or "Jack" in some English translations), but he's nicknamed "Ashlad" because he sits in the ashes by the fireplace. Likewise, characters like Literature/{{Tatterhood}} and Butterball are specifically mentioned as being called by those names for their appearances; their real names never mentioned.



* ThePromise

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* ThePromiseThePromise: Many heroes and heroines have to make some kind of promise to one of their helpers. Whether or not it's kept depends on the nature of the promise: If the promise is meant to keep the hero(ine) safe from harm then it'll always be broken and lead to complications or danger, but if the promise is meant to aid or reward the ''helper'' it's usually kept.



* RagsToRoyalty: The Ashlad stories almost always follow this -- and even in the stories where he ''doesn't'' marry a princess and become royalty he at least becomes rich.

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* RagsToRoyalty: The Male example in the Ashlad stories stories, which almost always follow this -- and even in the stories where he ''doesn't'' marry a princess and become royalty he at least becomes rich.



* RuleOfThree
* RuleOfSeven

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* RuleOfThree
RuleOfThree: They're fairy tales; of course this trope is in full force. Three brothers, three princesses, three quests, trolls with three heads (or three trolls -- the first one with three heads, the second one with six heads and the third one with nine).
* RuleOfSevenRuleOfSeven: Shows up every so often as well; usually if it's not three brothers it tends to be seven.
28th Feb '15 11:15:51 AM Eilevgmyhren
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* ParentalFavoritism: Clear in the stories with the Ashlad. Ashlad is always the youngest son and TheUnfavorite, while his older brothers are adored by the parents and get all the best stuff, the best food and the greatest benefits, while Ashlad has to make due with their leftovers.

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* ParentalFavoritism: Clear in the stories with the Ashlad. Ashlad is always the youngest son and TheUnfavorite, while his older brothers are adored by the parents and get all the best stuff, the best food and the greatest benefits, while Ashlad has to make due with their leftovers.
* PersonOfMassDestruction: The last of the sevcn helpers in the "Good Helpers" tale has "seven summers and fifteen winters in his body". Thus, he constantly keeps his hand over his mouth, because, as he says: "If I let them all out, they would end the world in an instant..."
29th Jan '15 7:11:15 AM Roo
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** Some versions and translations of the stories further removed objectionable material. The English translation of ''Peik,'' for instance, removes the part where he, while DisguisedInDrag, gets the two princesses pregnant and such clues the king in that he's not actually a girl; in the softer version his disguise is revealed when an old friend of his family comes by and recognizes him.



** The Norwegian version states a classical {{social criticism}} when the CountryMouse leaves for the hills. The Cat is associated with the tax collector, a person who were thoroughly disliked by the farmers. CountryMouse says that he`d rather be at home, than be pestered by "such a hawk".

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** The Norwegian version states a classical {{social criticism}} when the CountryMouse leaves for the hills. The Cat is associated with the tax collector, a person who were thoroughly disliked by the farmers. CountryMouse says that he`d she`d rather be at home, than be pestered by "such a hawk".



** Several adaptations have tried to individualize them to a bigger degree; in these the most common one seems to be to make Peter, the oldest, the bragging SmallNameBigEgo while Paul, the middle child, is a dull-witted YesMan who just follows Peter's lead but is often portrayed as more sympathetic.
* DubNameChange: In English Askeladden is sometimes translated as the Ashlad or the Cinderlad, and sometimes just called "Boots".

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** Several adaptations have tried to individualize them to a bigger degree; in these the most common one seems to be to make Peter, the oldest, the bragging SmallNameBigEgo while Paul, the middle child, is a dull-witted YesMan who just follows Peter's lead but is often portrayed as more sympathetic.
sympathetic. When Peter W. Cappelen adapted many of the fairy tales for stage, he gave the two brothers distinct characterizations; one was a food-obsessed glutton while the other was a penny-pinching and money-obsessed miser... though it varied from play to play which was which.
* DubNameChange: In English Askeladden is sometimes translated as the Ashlad "the Ashlad" or the Cinderlad, "the Cinderlad," and sometimes just called "Boots"."Boots". Likewise, his brothers Per and Pål have had their names anglicized to "Peter and Paul."



* EngagementChallenge

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* EngagementChallengeEngagementChallenge: Quite often the one who sets the challenge deliberately makes it impossible to do, so the hero(ine) won't have a chance of succeeding... when (s)he inevitably does anyway, additional impossible tasks are set. One of the more notable versions of this is in ''The Ashlad and the Good Helpers,'' where the King ''really'' doesn't want the Ashlad to marry his daughter and comes up with one impossible task after the other to stop the wedding from taking place.
3rd Jan '15 12:39:44 PM Roo
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* FakeUltimateHero: Ritter Red, who shows up in a few stories, always tries to step in to take the glory (and the princess) after the hero has done all the work. There are a few other characters like this; usually they're military officers who have owed in the background while the lower-ranked hero has faced all the tasks. They're always exposed and usually executed for their crimes.

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* FakeUltimateHero: Ritter Red, who shows up in a few stories, always tries to step in to take the glory (and the princess) after the hero has done all the work. There are a few other characters like this; usually they're military officers who have owed cowered in the background while the lower-ranked hero has faced all the tasks. They're always exposed and usually executed for their crimes.
25th Dec '14 8:42:33 PM Angeldeb82
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* BalefulPolymorph: Happens to a lot of the {{Distressed Damsel}}s and {{Distressed Dude}}s in the story. The lucky ones are transformed into animals and are often still capable of speaking and aiding the hero -- the unlucky ones are turned into stone or inanimate objects.

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* BalefulPolymorph: Happens to a lot of the {{Distressed Damsel}}s [[DamselInDistress Damsels in Distress]] and {{Distressed Dude}}s in the story. The lucky ones are transformed into animals and are often still capable of speaking and aiding the hero -- the unlucky ones are turned into stone or inanimate objects.



* DistressedDude: Not ''as'' common as the DistressedDamsel, but still shows up fairly often. If the hero is male, the DistressedDude is usually one or more of his older brothers; if the hero is female, the DistressedDude is her LoveInterest (and probably a prince).

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* DistressedDude: Not ''as'' common as the DistressedDamsel, DamselInDistress, but still shows up fairly often. If the hero is male, the DistressedDude is usually one or more of his older brothers; if the hero is female, the DistressedDude is her LoveInterest {{Love Interest|s}} (and probably a prince).



* FakeUltimateHero: Ritter Red, who shows up in a few stories, always tries to step in to take the glory (and the princess) after the hero has done all the work. There are a few other characters like this; usually they're millitary officers who have owed in the background while the lower-ranked hero has faced all the tasks. They're always exposed and usually executed for their crimes.

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* FakeUltimateHero: Ritter Red, who shows up in a few stories, always tries to step in to take the glory (and the princess) after the hero has done all the work. There are a few other characters like this; usually they're millitary military officers who have owed in the background while the lower-ranked hero has faced all the tasks. They're always exposed and usually executed for their crimes.



* PragmaticAdaptation: Why many Norwegian tales differ from the German ones. The social environment is ''vastly'' different in the Norwegian ''Literature/{{Cinderella}}'' versions, as far as the meeting with the prince is concerned. In Germany or England, the king holds a ball for the Prince attended by the heroine in disguise. In Norway, the girl in question rides to church three sundays in a row and turns heads there. Churches were the common meeting place in the old days, and Norway had few castles, if any. (In fact, while the English translations often make references to the "King's Palace," the original refers to it as the "King's farm" and has the king live more like a grand, rich farm-owner.)

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* PragmaticAdaptation: Why many Norwegian tales differ from the German ones. The social environment is ''vastly'' different in the Norwegian ''Literature/{{Cinderella}}'' versions, as far as the meeting with the prince is concerned. In Germany or England, the king holds a ball for the Prince attended by the heroine in disguise. In Norway, the girl in question rides to church three sundays Sundays in a row and turns heads there. Churches were the common meeting place in the old days, and Norway had few castles, if any. (In fact, while the English translations often make references to the "King's Palace," the original refers to it as the "King's farm" and has the king live more like a grand, rich farm-owner.)



* VillainProtagonist: Peik, in his story. He starts off fairly innocently; he doesn't want to get a job, so he decides to make a living as a trickster and con man. He tricks the king into giving him a horse, then makes the same king believe he has a magic cooking-pot and selling it to him at a high price -- but then it escalates when he tricks the king into believing he can call the dead back to life, resulting in the king killing his wife and eldest daughter. Then he dresses up as a girl and gets himself adopted by the same king, gets both the surviving princesses pregnant while in disguise as a girl, and when the king then tries to execute him for his crimes, Peik tricks an old man into getting executed in his stead, and for an encore tricks the king into killing himself, so Peik can become king in his stead. Good luck finding AnAesop that isn't [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop Family Unfriendly]] in all this.

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* VillainProtagonist: Peik, in his story. He starts off fairly innocently; he doesn't want to get a job, so he decides to make a living as a trickster and con man. He tricks the king into giving him a horse, then makes the same king believe he has a magic cooking-pot and selling it to him at a high price -- but then it escalates when he tricks the king into believing he can call the dead back to life, resulting in the king killing his wife and eldest daughter. Then he dresses up as a girl and gets himself adopted by the same king, gets both the surviving princesses pregnant while in disguise as a girl, and when the king then tries to execute him for his crimes, Peik tricks an old man into getting executed in his stead, and for an encore tricks the king into killing himself, so Peik can become king in his stead. Good luck finding AnAesop that isn't [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop Family Unfriendly]] Family-Unfriendly]] in all this.
9th Dec '14 7:27:37 AM Roo
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* BloodierAndGorier: Most of the stories don't exactly shy away from violence and killings, but all of them pale to the story of "Peik". Possibly the most gory tale in the entire collection.

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* BloodierAndGorier: Most of the stories don't exactly shy away from violence and killings, but all of them pale to the story of "Peik". Possibly "Peik," possibly the most gory tale in the entire collection.



* DealWithTheDevil: In a couple of stories, like in the very short story ''The Devil and the Tax Collector,'' in which the tax collector makes a deal with the Devil; if the Devil can find someone else that is damned, he'll take that person instead. [[spoiler: What happens, after a few false starts because the Devil won't accept it when a mother says "damn you" to her child, is that they meet two farmers who see the tax collector and mutter "damn that tax collector." The story only lasts a couple more sentences after that.]]

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* DealWithTheDevil: In a couple of stories, like in the very short story ''The Devil and the Tax Collector,'' in which the tax collector makes a deal with the Devil; if the Devil can find someone else that is damned, he'll take that person instead. [[spoiler: What happens, after a few false starts because the Devil won't accept it as legit when a mother says "damn you" to her child, is that they meet two farmers who see the tax collector and mutter "damn that tax collector." The story only lasts a couple more sentences after that.]]



* OnlyKnownByTheirNickname: The Ashlad's real name is "Espen," but he's nicknamed "Ashlad" because he sits in the ashes by the fireplace.

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* OnlyKnownByTheirNickname: The Ashlad's real name is "Espen," "Espen" ("John" or "Jack" in some English translations), but he's nicknamed "Ashlad" because he sits in the ashes by the fireplace.



* PragmaticAdaptation: Why many Norwegian tales differ from the German ones. The social environment is ''vastly'' different in the Norwegian ''Literature/{{Cinderella}}'' versions, as far as the meeting with the prince is concerned. In Germany or England, the king holds a ball for the Prince attended by the heroine in disguise. In Norway, the girl in question rides to church three sundays in a row and turns heads there. Churches were the common meeting place in the old days, and Norway had few castles, if any.

to:

* PragmaticAdaptation: Why many Norwegian tales differ from the German ones. The social environment is ''vastly'' different in the Norwegian ''Literature/{{Cinderella}}'' versions, as far as the meeting with the prince is concerned. In Germany or England, the king holds a ball for the Prince attended by the heroine in disguise. In Norway, the girl in question rides to church three sundays in a row and turns heads there. Churches were the common meeting place in the old days, and Norway had few castles, if any. (In fact, while the English translations often make references to the "King's Palace," the original refers to it as the "King's farm" and has the king live more like a grand, rich farm-owner.)



* ShapeshiftingLover

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* ShapeshiftingLoverShapeshiftingLover: ''White-Bear-King Valemon'' is the most famous example, being the version where the man takes on the form of an animal thanks to a curse, and has to leave the princess when she sees his true form -- leading to the bulk of the story where the princess searches for her lover and has to save him from the hag who cursed him.
9th Dec '14 7:09:08 AM Roo
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* BatmanGambit: Tricksters and {{Guile Hero}}es often pull these off, even if a lot of them only make sense if the trickster knew how the story was supposed to go right down to the exact words someone would say in a given situation.



* DealWithTheDevil

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* DealWithTheDevilDealWithTheDevil: In a couple of stories, like in the very short story ''The Devil and the Tax Collector,'' in which the tax collector makes a deal with the Devil; if the Devil can find someone else that is damned, he'll take that person instead. [[spoiler: What happens, after a few false starts because the Devil won't accept it when a mother says "damn you" to her child, is that they meet two farmers who see the tax collector and mutter "damn that tax collector." The story only lasts a couple more sentences after that.]]



* EarnYourHappyEnding

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* EarnYourHappyEndingEarnYourHappyEnding: Oh yes, especially in the longer fairytales. The protagonists have to go through quite a lot and face many harshships before they can live HappilyEverAfter.



* ForbiddenFruit

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* ForbiddenFruitForbiddenFruit: In some stories the protagonist is explicitly told that there is ''one'' thing (s)he absolutely must not do -- anything from opening a certain door, to look at their lover's true face before a certain amount of time has passed, or to sit on the edge of a well. Normally the protagonist means it when promising to refrain from that one thing, but then the temptation gets too great, or the promise is forgotten in a careless moment, and you can guess the rest.


Added DiffLines:

* NiceJobBreakingItHero: A pretty common tactic to prolong the hero's trial, usually combined with ForbiddenFruit: The protagonist breaks a promise never to do something, and this results in a lot of extra hardships and trials.
9th Dec '14 6:29:16 AM Roo
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* BloodierAndGorier: Most of the stories don't exactly shy away from violence and killings, but all of them pale to the story of "Peik". Possibly the most gory tale in the entire collection.



* {{Determinator}}: If the protagonist of a story is female, she is ''going'' to be this, especially if you take her lover from her -- she'll go anywhere and do anything, no matter how impossible the odds, to get him back. Male heroes, unless they are GuileHeroes like the Ashlad, tend to be more flighty, often straying from their paths and needing help to get back on track.

to:

* {{Determinator}}: If the protagonist of a story is female, she is ''going'' to be this, especially if you take her lover from her -- she'll go anywhere and do anything, no matter how impossible the odds, to get him back. Male heroes, unless they are GuileHeroes {{Guile Hero}}es like the Ashlad, tend to be more flighty, often straying from their paths and needing help to get back on track.



* FakeUltimateHero: Ritter Red, who shows up in a few stories, always tries to step in to take the glory (and the princess) after the hero has done all the work. He's always exposed
and executed.

to:

* FakeUltimateHero: Ritter Red, who shows up in a few stories, always tries to step in to take the glory (and the princess) after the hero has done all the work. He's There are a few other characters like this; usually they're millitary officers who have owed in the background while the lower-ranked hero has faced all the tasks. They're always exposed
exposed and executed.usually executed for their crimes.



* InterludeOfSexAndViolence: As far as the violence is concerned, read the story of "Peik". Possibly the most gory tale in the entire collection. For the rest, see {{getting crap past the radar}}.


Added DiffLines:

* VillainProtagonist: Peik, in his story. He starts off fairly innocently; he doesn't want to get a job, so he decides to make a living as a trickster and con man. He tricks the king into giving him a horse, then makes the same king believe he has a magic cooking-pot and selling it to him at a high price -- but then it escalates when he tricks the king into believing he can call the dead back to life, resulting in the king killing his wife and eldest daughter. Then he dresses up as a girl and gets himself adopted by the same king, gets both the surviving princesses pregnant while in disguise as a girl, and when the king then tries to execute him for his crimes, Peik tricks an old man into getting executed in his stead, and for an encore tricks the king into killing himself, so Peik can become king in his stead. Good luck finding AnAesop that isn't [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop Family Unfriendly]] in all this.
9th Dec '14 5:56:44 AM Roo
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* ActionGirl: The most prominent example is {{Tatterhood}}, the ugly BadassPrincess who fights hordes of trolls and witches while riding on a goat. There are quite a few other female protagonists who, while not as action-y as Tatterhood, are steadfast {{Determinator}}s who will go to Hell and back to reach their goal.



* CunningLikeAFox: Whenever a fox shows up in the stories, it's going to be portrayed as a wily trickster, sometimes helpful and sometimes just out for itself. If a bear appears in the same story, ten to one the fox is going to take on a {{Gadfly}} role towards said bear.

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* CunningLikeAFox: Whenever a fox shows up in the stories, it's going to be portrayed as a wily trickster, sometimes helpful and sometimes just out for itself. If a bear appears in the same story, ten to one the fox is going to take on a {{Gadfly}} [[TheGadfly Gadfly]] role towards said bear.


Added DiffLines:

* {{Determinator}}: If the protagonist of a story is female, she is ''going'' to be this, especially if you take her lover from her -- she'll go anywhere and do anything, no matter how impossible the odds, to get him back. Male heroes, unless they are GuileHeroes like the Ashlad, tend to be more flighty, often straying from their paths and needing help to get back on track.
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