History Creator / AlanMoore

15th Apr '17 1:30:06 PM nombretomado
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[[SomethingPositive Apparently]], his amazing talent comes from Satan. [[MemeticBadass Not by selling his soul for it]], mind you, but because he used to beat Satan up for his lunch money until the Devil bribed Moore with genius to leave him alone. Additionally, [[http://www.somethingpositive.net/sp02132008.shtml Death is afraid of him]].

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[[SomethingPositive [[Webcomic/SomethingPositive Apparently]], his amazing talent comes from Satan. [[MemeticBadass Not by selling his soul for it]], mind you, but because he used to beat Satan up for his lunch money until the Devil bribed Moore with genius to leave him alone. Additionally, [[http://www.somethingpositive.net/sp02132008.shtml Death is afraid of him]].
13th Apr '17 11:48:16 AM ArtoriusRex
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Ironically, the popularity of ''Watchmen'' was the first nail in Moore's relationship with DC; the contract that he and artist David Gibbons had signed promised them that full rights to the comic would be returned to them if the book fell out of print for more than two years. At this point in time, paperback collections of comic books were virtually unheard of and the idea that ''Watchmen'' would remain in print that long was absurd. However, the book's popularity has kept it in print from 1987 through the present day, and neither Moore nor Gibbons ever received the rights. Moore's relationship with Creator/MarvelComics was also strained, and for similar reasons.

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Ironically, the popularity of ''Watchmen'' was the first nail in the coffin for Moore's relationship with DC; the DC. The contract that he and artist David Gibbons had signed promised them that full rights to the comic would be returned to them if the book fell out of print for more than two years. At this point in time, paperback collections of comic books were virtually unheard of and the idea that ''Watchmen'' would remain in print that long was absurd. However, the book's popularity has kept it in print from 1987 through the present day, and neither Moore nor Gibbons ever received the rights. Moore's relationship with Creator/MarvelComics was also strained, and for similar reasons.
5th Apr '17 12:36:17 PM JulianLapostat
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27th Mar '17 4:34:57 PM BeastC
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** Not to mention his announcement that he is retiring to pursue a career in filmmaking.
22nd Feb '17 8:28:17 AM Larkmarn
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* Character Exaggerating: Comics fans know Alan Moore does hates his early work and writer lighter and softer works Like 1963,Supreme,Tom Strong.
20th Feb '17 3:50:53 AM bt8257
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''Swamp Thing'' proved to be a massive success, and in the last years of Moore's run on the title, he was also handed another gaggle of existing characters to play with. DC had recently acquired the properties of Creator/CharltonComics and Moore was asked to come up with a proposal for them. He came back with a dark tale that drew heavily on the mid-80s UsefulNotes/ColdWar angst, in which the Charlton heroes discover that one of their number has been killed and that his death is connected to something that could lead to nuclear armageddon. DC was impressed by the pitch but was worried that Moore's pitch would render a number of the characters unusable by the end of the story. Instead, they advised him to create an entirely new series, and so ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'' was born, with Moore using [[{{Expy}} Expies]] of the Charlton characters. Mature beyond anything that mainstream comics had published up to that point and with a level of complexity that rivaled the most highbrow books of the time (and continues to rival the best that many writers can come up with), ''Watchmen'' proved to be a massive sensation, and with Frank Miller's ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'', effectively launched UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks. (Moore's Franchise/{{Batman}} one-shot ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'' in 1988 was another big success in this regard -- it became the TropeNamer for MultipleChoicePast, if somewhat ironically considering it was actually presenting a single, contradiction-resolving origin story for TheJoker.) It also contributed heavily to the growing realisation in the mainstream media that comics are an art form, along with other comics such as Art Spiegelman's ''ComicBook/{{Maus}}'' and Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez's ''ComicBook/LoveAndRockets''.

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''Swamp Thing'' proved to be a massive success, and in the last years of Moore's run on the title, he was also handed another gaggle of existing characters to play with. DC had recently hadrecently acquired the properties of Creator/CharltonComics and Moore was asked to come up with a proposal for them. He came back with a dark tale that drew heavily on the mid-80s UsefulNotes/ColdWar angst, in which the Charlton heroes discover that one of their number has been killed and that his death is connected to something that could lead to nuclear armageddon. DC was impressed by the pitch but was worried that Moore's pitch would render a number of the characters unusable by the end of the story. Instead, they advised him to create an entirely new series, and so ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'' was born, with Moore using [[{{Expy}} Expies]] of the Charlton characters. Mature beyond anything that mainstream comics had published up to that point and with a level of complexity that rivaled the most highbrow books of the time (and continues to rival the best that many writers can come up with), ''Watchmen'' proved to be a massive sensation, and with Frank Miller's ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'', effectively launched UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks. (Moore's Franchise/{{Batman}} one-shot ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'' in 1988 was another big success in this regard -- it became the TropeNamer for MultipleChoicePast, if somewhat ironically ironically, considering it was actually presenting a single, contradiction-resolving origin story for TheJoker.) It also contributed heavily to the growing realisation in the mainstream media that comics are an art form, along with other comics such as Art Spiegelman's ''ComicBook/{{Maus}}'' and Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez's ''ComicBook/LoveAndRockets''.



However, Wildstorm was bought out by Creator/DCComics and Moore subsequently parted from America's Best Comics. As of 2008, the only title he plans to write with any regularity is ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', which after ''The Black Dossier'', will be published through Top Shelf Productions. In October 2016, he released his second novel, the [[DoorStopper 1,300-page]] ''Jerusalem''.

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However, Wildstorm was bought out by Creator/DCComics and Moore subsequently parted from left America's Best Comics. As of 2008, the only title he plans to write with any regularity is ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', which after ''The Black Dossier'', will be published through Top Shelf Productions. In October 2016, he released his second novel, the [[DoorStopper 1,300-page]] ''Jerusalem''.
12th Feb '17 10:34:34 AM StatuesqueRangale
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Added DiffLines:

*Character Exaggerating: Comics fans know Alan Moore does hates his early work and writer lighter and softer works Like 1963,Supreme,Tom Strong.
8th Feb '17 5:34:00 PM JulianLapostat
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* ''ComicBook/{{Providence}}'' (2015-2016)
* ''Cinema Purgatorio'' (2016)

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* ''ComicBook/{{Providence}}'' (2015-2016)
(2015-2017)
* ''Cinema Purgatorio'' (2016)(2016-2017)
14th Jan '17 12:05:22 PM JulianLapostat
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** ''Cinema Purgatorio'', his strip in his anthology serial of the same name, suggests that his disinterest in cinema has gradually become active hostility, as every issue focuses on a particular genre of classic cinema to explore why it's really harmful [=/=] exploitative [=/=] founded on lies and injustice [=/=] just bad in general really. In general, even beyond criticisms of adaptations of his work, he generally seems to not be particularly fond of film and cinema. That said, his earlier works makes references to classic movies, League: Century refers to many good films of TheSixties and in his earlier career he expressed admiration for Creator/FrancisFordCoppola, Creator/OrsonWelles (whose characters often in ''League of Extraordinary Gentlemen'') and Creator/RobertAltman (whose HyperlinkStory featuring LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters and deconstructive approaches to FilmNoir and TheWestern greatly inspired ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'').

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** ''Cinema Purgatorio'', his strip in his anthology serial of the same name, suggests that his disinterest in cinema has gradually become active hostility, as every issue focuses on a particular genre of classic cinema to explore why it's really harmful [=/=] exploitative [=/=] founded on lies and injustice [=/=] just bad in general really. In general, even beyond criticisms of adaptations of his work, he generally seems to not be particularly fond of film and cinema. That said, his earlier works makes references to classic movies, League: Century refers to many good films of TheSixties and in his earlier career he expressed admiration for Creator/FrancisFordCoppola, Creator/OrsonWelles (whose characters often in ''League of Extraordinary Gentlemen'') and Creator/RobertAltman (whose HyperlinkStory featuring LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters and deconstructive approaches to FilmNoir and TheWestern greatly inspired ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'').''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'') [[http://thecreatorsproject.vice.com/blog/we-talked-with-alan-moore-about-movies-comics-and-magic and recently]] Creator/AlfredHitchcock.
14th Jan '17 12:02:37 PM JulianLapostat
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** ''Cinema Purgatorio'', his strip in his anthology serial of the same name, suggests that his disinterest in cinema has gradually become active hostility, as every issue focusses on a particular genre of classic cinema to explore why it's really harmful [=/=] exploitative [=/=] founded on lies and injustice [=/=] just bad in general really. In general, even beyond criticisms of adaptations of his work, he generally seems to not be particularly fond of film and cinema.

to:

** ''Cinema Purgatorio'', his strip in his anthology serial of the same name, suggests that his disinterest in cinema has gradually become active hostility, as every issue focusses focuses on a particular genre of classic cinema to explore why it's really harmful [=/=] exploitative [=/=] founded on lies and injustice [=/=] just bad in general really. In general, even beyond criticisms of adaptations of his work, he generally seems to not be particularly fond of film and cinema. That said, his earlier works makes references to classic movies, League: Century refers to many good films of TheSixties and in his earlier career he expressed admiration for Creator/FrancisFordCoppola, Creator/OrsonWelles (whose characters often in ''League of Extraordinary Gentlemen'') and Creator/RobertAltman (whose HyperlinkStory featuring LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters and deconstructive approaches to FilmNoir and TheWestern greatly inspired ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'').
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