History Creator / AlanMoore

23rd Sep '17 12:36:50 AM JulianLapostat
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* TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt: Apocalypse is a major theme in many of Moore's stories. His stories, especially as they reach the climax, often have characters and event cause a major event that either erases the status-quo, or ensure that NothingIsTheSameAnymore or likewise inaugurate the DawnOfAnEra, examples include but are not limited to: ''ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}, ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}, ComicBook/{{Promethea}}, ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen, Comicbook/{{Providence}}''.
20th Sep '17 7:29:11 PM MackWylde
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* RousseauWasRight: Surprisingly so.
20th Sep '17 7:27:59 PM MackWylde
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* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVsCynicism: Alan Moore has been called "The Cynical Optimist"
9th Sep '17 2:23:26 PM JulianLapostat
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* AlternateCompanyEquivalent / {{Expy}}: Such characters abound in many of his works.

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* AlternateCompanyEquivalent / {{Expy}}: AlternateCompanyEquivalent: Such characters abound in many of his works.works, notable instances include ''ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}'' (of Superman and Captain Marvel), and Supreme (of Silver Age Superman), ''Watchmen'' also began as one to MLJ and Charlton Comics but gradually became its own thing.
9th Sep '17 1:39:16 AM JulianLapostat
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Moore had a huge knowledge of comics history and a canny instinct for re-configuring and resurrecting forgotten and little known or weakly selling titles. He had planned to do a story about superheroes that involved a murder mystery around one of their numbers, with his initial concept involving the MLJ run published by Archie Comics which he had assumed, wrongly, that DC had rights to. What DC did have was rights to the properties of Creator/CharltonComics and Moore made his pitch using them, but his publishers, while impressed by the pitch, pointed out that Moore's premise would render a number of the characters unusable by the end of the story and so invited him to create an entirely new series. So ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'' was born, with Moore using characters who can be recognized as AlternateCompanyEquivalent of the Charlton characters, but who gradually differed sharply from their inspiration and from most superhero comics of their time. Collaborating with Dave Gibbons, the comic was sophisticated on a level that mainstream comics had not known at the time, having a character and plot that could rivaled the most highbrow books (and continues to rival the best that many writers can come up with), ''Watchmen'' proved to be a massive sensation, and with Frank Miller's ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' is credited with launching UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks, and starting a new market for graphic novels, along with other comics such as Art Spiegelman's ''ComicBook/{{Maus}}'' and Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez's ''ComicBook/LoveAndRockets''.Ironically, the popularity of ''Watchmen'' was the first nail in the coffin for Moore's relationship with DC. The contract that he and artist David Gibbons had signed promised them that full rights to the comic would be returned to them if the book fell out of print for more than two years. At this point in time, paperback collections of comic books were virtually unheard of and the idea that ''Watchmen'' would remain in print that long was absurd. However, the book's popularity has kept it in print from 1987 through the present day, and neither Moore nor Gibbons ever received the rights. Moore's relationship with Creator/MarvelComics was also strained, mainly for what he perceived as its NetworkDecay and drop in quality, and the lawsuit pushed by the company to rebrand ''Marvelman'' into ''ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}'' even if the former existed before Timely renamed itself as Marvel.

In either case, Moore began his career in independent comics and was happy about working in creator-owned independent titles again. Other notable works include ''Brought To Light'', a history of the CIA[[note]] Which led to the persistent rumour for years that he was banned from entering the USA; in fact, he'd simply not bothered renewing his passport.[[/note]]; ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy, the abandoned ''Big Numbers'' (which fell apart with only the first issue published), and a graphic novel collaboration with Eddie Campbell (''ComicBook/FromHell'') that would take years to finish but which he properly began work on in the late '80s. He also began work on ''Lost Girls'', a piece of highbrow erotica (though he insists it be called [[InsistentTerminology porn]]), his first collaboration with artist Melinda Gebbie (who he later married). Moore cut himself off DC and Marvel, but in the '90s, he was willing to work-for-hire on a number of titles for mainstream-but-alternative companies such as Creator/WildStorm Comics and Creator/ImageComics. For Image, Moore worked on a number of titles but found most success with ''ComicBook/{{Supreme}}'', a {{Homage}} to Silver-Age Superman via AlternateCompanyEquivalent that surprised readers for its change in tone from his dark work of the '80s, as well as ''1963'', a parody and {{Reconstruction}}.

to:

Moore had a huge knowledge of comics history and a canny instinct for re-configuring and resurrecting forgotten and little known or weakly selling titles. He had planned to do a story about superheroes that involved a murder mystery around one of their numbers, with his initial concept involving the MLJ run published by Archie Comics which he had assumed, wrongly, that DC had rights to. What DC did have was rights to the properties of Creator/CharltonComics and Moore made his pitch using them, but his publishers, while impressed by the pitch, pointed out that Moore's premise would render a number of the characters unusable by the end of the story and so invited him to create an entirely new series. So ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'' was born, with Moore using characters who can be recognized as AlternateCompanyEquivalent of the Charlton characters, but who gradually differed sharply from their inspiration and from most superhero comics of their time. Collaborating with Dave Gibbons, the comic was sophisticated on a level that mainstream comics had not known at the time, having a character and plot that could rivaled the most highbrow books (and continues to rival the best that many writers can come up with), ''Watchmen'' proved to be a massive sensation, and with Frank Miller's ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' is credited with launching UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks, and starting a new market for graphic novels, along with other comics such as Art Spiegelman's ''ComicBook/{{Maus}}'' and Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez's ''ComicBook/LoveAndRockets''.Ironically, the popularity of ''Watchmen'' was the first nail in the coffin for Moore's relationship with DC. The contract that he and artist David Gibbons had signed promised them that full rights to the comic would be returned to them if the book fell out of print for more than two years. At this point in time, paperback collections of comic books were virtually unheard of and the idea that ''Watchmen'' would remain in print that long was absurd. However, the book's popularity has kept it in print from 1987 through the present day, and neither Moore nor Gibbons ever received the rights. Moore's relationship with Creator/MarvelComics was also strained, mainly for what he perceived as its NetworkDecay and drop in quality, and the lawsuit pushed by the company to rebrand ''Marvelman'' into ''ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}'' even if the former existed before Timely renamed itself as Marvel.

In either case, Moore began his career in independent comics and was happy about working in creator-owned independent titles again. Other notable works include ''Brought To Light'', a history of the CIA[[note]] Which led to the persistent rumour for years that he was banned from entering the USA; in fact, he'd simply not bothered renewing his passport.[[/note]]; ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy, the abandoned ''Big Numbers'' (which fell apart with only the first issue published), and a graphic novel collaboration with Eddie Campbell (''ComicBook/FromHell'') that would take years to finish but which he properly began work on in the late '80s. He also began work on ''Lost Girls'', a piece of highbrow erotica (though he insists it be called [[InsistentTerminology porn]]), his first collaboration with artist Melinda Gebbie (who he later married). Moore cut himself off DC and Marvel, but in the '90s, he was willing to work-for-hire on a number of titles for mainstream-but-alternative companies such as Creator/WildStorm Comics and Creator/ImageComics. For Image, Moore worked on a number of titles but found most success with ''ComicBook/{{Supreme}}'', a {{Homage}} to Silver-Age Superman via AlternateCompanyEquivalent that surprised readers for its change in tone from his dark work of the '80s, as well as ''1963'', a parody and {{Reconstruction}}.
{{Reconstruction}} of the Silver Age Marvel era.
9th Sep '17 1:36:07 AM JulianLapostat
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Moore was encouraged by Creator/DCComics editor Len Wein to start work on ''ComicBook/SwampThing'', Wein's classic horror comic. Much as he did for Captain Britain and Miracleman, Moore proposed a radical revision that changed the comic from the ground-up, and leading the story into a GenreShift that gradually deepened the character and his setting. Moore took the Swamp Thing through a number of unusual adventures, that involved many run-ins with the regular DC Universe, which also saw the introduction of characters, such as ComicBook/JohnConstantine, who have since gone on to become major icons. ''Swamp Thing'' proved to be a massive success, and Moore was gradually encouraged by the editors, to take on other projects: including landmark stories for ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' (''ComicBook/WhateverHappenedToTheManOfTomorrow'' and his first collaboration with Dave Gibbons -- ''ComicBook/ForTheManWhoHasEverything''), ''Franchise/GreenLantern'' ("Mogo Doesn't Socialize", with Dave Gibbons and "Tygers", his first collaboration with Kevin O'Neill) and ''Franchise/{{Batman}} (''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke''). Yet the best was still to come.

to:

Moore was encouraged by Creator/DCComics editor Len Wein to start work on ''ComicBook/SwampThing'', Wein's classic horror comic. Much as he did for Captain Britain and Miracleman, Moore proposed a radical revision that changed the comic from the ground-up, and leading the story into a GenreShift that gradually deepened the character and his setting. Moore took the Swamp Thing through a number of unusual adventures, that involved many run-ins with the regular DC Universe, which also saw the introduction of characters, such as ComicBook/JohnConstantine, who have since gone on to become major icons. ''Swamp Thing'' proved to be a massive success, and Moore was gradually encouraged by the editors, to take on other projects: including landmark stories for ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' (''ComicBook/WhateverHappenedToTheManOfTomorrow'' and his first collaboration with Dave Gibbons -- ''ComicBook/ForTheManWhoHasEverything''), ''Franchise/GreenLantern'' ("Mogo Doesn't Socialize", with Dave Gibbons and "Tygers", his first collaboration with Kevin O'Neill) and ''Franchise/{{Batman}} ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' (''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke''). Yet the best was still to come.
9th Sep '17 1:34:54 AM JulianLapostat
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Probably the most widely recognised (and ''CrazyAwesome'') ComicBook writer of all time, Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953 in Northampton, England) got his start writing and drawing cartoon strips for magazines such as ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' and ''The NME''. He moved on to get regular work at Marvel UK, where he wrote the ''ComicBook/CaptainBritain'' comic, and ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'', where he wrote a series of acclaimed stories, including ''ComicBook/DRAndQuinch'' and ''ComicBook/TheBalladOfHaloJones''. This period included ''ComicBook/VForVendetta'', about an anarchist planning to take down a fascist UK Government, and ''ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}'', a reinvention of a 1950s British superhero.

Moore was then encouraged by Creator/DCComics editor Len Wein to start work on ''ComicBook/SwampThing'', Wein's classic horror comic. Originally about a scientist, Alec Holland, who had been transformed into a living plant monster after an explosion in his lab, Moore proposed a radical revision that revealed that Alec had in fact died in the explosion, and that the swamp creature had been created by plant elementals using Holland's memories as a basis for its character. Swamp Thing was not a man turned into a monster; he was never a man at all! Moore then took the Swamp Thing through a number of unusual adventures, including an entire issue [[{{Squick}} dedicated to psychic, psychedelic sex between Swampy and his human girlfriend, Abby.]] Moore also created the character of ComicBook/JohnConstantine for the comic. Along the way, he wrote a tiny handful of Franchise/{{Superman}} stories which are now considered some of the very greatest ever written for the character (one was even adapted into an episode of ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueUnlimited'') and set the groundwork for a more extensive examination of Superman later in his career, through the [[CaptainErsatz pastiche character]] ComicBook/{{Supreme}}. Not to mention a tiny handful of Franchise/GreenLantern stories that have become integral to ''its'' history ("Mogo Doesn't Socialize" and "Tygers").

''Swamp Thing'' proved to be a massive success, and in the last years of Moore's run on the title, he was also handed another gaggle of existing characters to play with. DC had recently acquired the properties of Creator/CharltonComics and Moore was asked to come up with a proposal for them. He came back with a dark tale that drew heavily on the mid-'80s UsefulNotes/ColdWar angst, in which the Charlton heroes discover that one of their number has been killed and that his death is connected to something that could lead to nuclear armageddon. DC was impressed by the pitch but was worried that Moore's pitch would render a number of the characters unusable by the end of the story. Instead, they advised him to create an entirely new series, and so ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'' was born, with Moore using [[{{Expy}} Expies]] of the Charlton characters. Mature beyond anything that mainstream comics had published up to that point and with a level of complexity that rivaled the most highbrow books of the time (and continues to rival the best that many writers can come up with), ''Watchmen'' proved to be a massive sensation, and with Frank Miller's ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'', effectively launched UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks. (Moore's Franchise/{{Batman}} one-shot ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'' in 1988 was another big success in this regard -- it became the TropeNamer for MultipleChoicePast, if somewhat ironically, considering it was actually presenting a single, contradiction-resolving origin story for TheJoker.) It also contributed heavily to the growing realisation in the mainstream media that comics are an art form, along with other comics such as Art Spiegelman's ''ComicBook/{{Maus}}'' and Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez's ''ComicBook/LoveAndRockets''.

Ironically, the popularity of ''Watchmen'' was the first nail in the coffin for Moore's relationship with DC. The contract that he and artist David Gibbons had signed promised them that full rights to the comic would be returned to them if the book fell out of print for more than two years. At this point in time, paperback collections of comic books were virtually unheard of and the idea that ''Watchmen'' would remain in print that long was absurd. However, the book's popularity has kept it in print from 1987 through the present day, and neither Moore nor Gibbons ever received the rights. Moore's relationship with Creator/MarvelComics was also strained, and for similar reasons.

After ''Watchmen'', Moore moved into independent comics, writing ''Brought To Light'', a history of the CIA[[note]] Which led to the persistent rumour for years that he was banned from entering the USA; in fact, he'd simply not bothered renewing his passport.[[/note]]; ''Lost Girls'', a piece of highbrow erotica (though he insists it be called [[InsistentTerminology porn]]), and ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy. In the mid-90s, he also began doing more work-for-hire writing for companies such as Creator/WildStorm Comics and Creator/ImageComics. Through Wildstorm, he published his own imprint, America's Best Comics (ABC), which included ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'', a 32-issue treatise on magic (Moore has been a practicing magus since his 40th birthday); ''ComicBook/TopTen'', a pastiche of PoliceProcedural TV series set in a superhero-populated city; and ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', a call back to a more innocent era of comic writing. Perhaps the best-known ABC comic, ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', is a Victorian-era superhero story set in a universe in which all stories exist alongside one another. Thus, the titular team comprises Mina Murray (Mina Harker of ''{{Literature/Dracula}}'', reverting back to her maiden name), Allen Quatermain (''Literature/KingSolomonsMines''), Captain Nemo (''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''), Hawley Griffin (''Literature/TheInvisibleMan'') and Dr. Jekyll/Mister Hyde ([[Literature/TheStrangeCaseOfDrJekyllAndMrHyde duh]]).

However, Wildstorm was bought out by Creator/DCComics and Moore subsequently left America's Best Comics. As of 2008, the only title he plans to write with any regularity is ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', which after ''The Black Dossier'', will be published through Top Shelf Productions. In October 2016, he released his second novel, the [[DoorStopper 1,300-page]] ''Jerusalem''.

[[Webcomic/SomethingPositive Apparently]], his amazing talent comes from Satan. [[MemeticBadass Not by selling his soul for it]], mind you, but because he used to beat Satan up for his lunch money until the Devil bribed Moore with genius to leave him alone. Additionally, [[http://www.somethingpositive.net/sp02132008.shtml Death is afraid of him]].

He is known, with a particularly vivid description of ''ComicBook/FromHell'', to have driven [[Creator/NeilGaiman Neil "Scary Trousers" Gaiman]] to [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=337-ycZz6IM&feature=related leave a restaurant to go outside and get some fresh air so he wouldn't vomit.]] Twice. Gaiman also wrote [[http://lysad.blogspot.com/2007/08/neil-gaiman-writes-alan-moore.html this]] short comic about him, which pretty much sums up how many people view him.

Did we mention he's also a [[{{Polyamory}} polyamorous]], vegetarian [[UsefulNotes/{{Anarchism}} anarchist]] and an accomplished ceremonial magician?

Sometimes goes by the name of Translucia Baboon to [[http://www.neilgaiman.com/mediafiles/exclusive/Audio/SinisterDucks-MarchoftheSinisterDucks.mp3 warn us all about ducks]]. Is the quintessential modern MadArtist.

to:

Probably Novelist, artist, occultist, performing artist, film-maker, musician, and public intellectual, Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953 in Northampton, England) is perhaps, the most widely recognised (and ''CrazyAwesome'') ComicBook writer of all time, Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953 in Northampton, England) and one of the most influential artists from TheEighties, whose work has decisively influenced artists from multiple mediums for nearly three decades.

He
got his start writing and drawing cartoon strips for magazines such as ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' and ''The NME''. He moved on to get regular work at Marvel UK, where he wrote the ''ComicBook/CaptainBritain'' comic, and ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'', as well as a series of essays on the comics medium in ''The Daredevils'' (one of which was a critique of Creator/StanLee ''in a Marvel branded 'zine'') where he wrote a series of acclaimed stories, including ''ComicBook/DRAndQuinch'' and ''ComicBook/TheBalladOfHaloJones''. This period included ''ComicBook/VForVendetta'', about an anarchist planning to take down a fascist UK Government, and ''ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}'', a reinvention of a 1950s British superhero.

superhero. The latter attracted attention from DC, which led to the start of the period of his biggest influence (even if it would ultimately turn out to be among [[BrieferThanTheyThink the briefest]]).

Moore was then encouraged by Creator/DCComics editor Len Wein to start work on ''ComicBook/SwampThing'', Wein's classic horror comic. Originally about a scientist, Alec Holland, who had been transformed into a living plant monster after an explosion in his lab, Much as he did for Captain Britain and Miracleman, Moore proposed a radical revision that revealed that Alec had in fact died in changed the explosion, comic from the ground-up, and that leading the swamp creature had been created by plant elementals using Holland's memories as a basis for its character. Swamp Thing was not a man turned story into a monster; he was never a man at all! GenreShift that gradually deepened the character and his setting. Moore then took the Swamp Thing through a number of unusual adventures, including an entire issue [[{{Squick}} dedicated to psychic, psychedelic sex between Swampy and his human girlfriend, Abby.]] Moore also created that involved many run-ins with the character of ComicBook/JohnConstantine for the comic. Along the way, he wrote a tiny handful of Franchise/{{Superman}} stories regular DC Universe, which are now considered some of also saw the very greatest ever written for the character (one was even adapted into an episode introduction of ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueUnlimited'') and set the groundwork for a more extensive examination of Superman later in his career, through the [[CaptainErsatz pastiche character]] ComicBook/{{Supreme}}. Not to mention a tiny handful of Franchise/GreenLantern stories that characters, such as ComicBook/JohnConstantine, who have since gone on to become integral to ''its'' history ("Mogo Doesn't Socialize" and "Tygers").

major icons. ''Swamp Thing'' proved to be a massive success, and in Moore was gradually encouraged by the last years editors, to take on other projects: including landmark stories for ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' (''ComicBook/WhateverHappenedToTheManOfTomorrow'' and his first collaboration with Dave Gibbons -- ''ComicBook/ForTheManWhoHasEverything''), ''Franchise/GreenLantern'' ("Mogo Doesn't Socialize", with Dave Gibbons and "Tygers", his first collaboration with Kevin O'Neill) and ''Franchise/{{Batman}} (''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke''). Yet the best was still to come.

Moore had a huge knowledge
of Moore's comics history and a canny instinct for re-configuring and resurrecting forgotten and little known or weakly selling titles. He had planned to do a story about superheroes that involved a murder mystery around one of their numbers, with his initial concept involving the MLJ run on the title, published by Archie Comics which he was also handed another gaggle of existing characters to play with. had assumed, wrongly, that DC had recently acquired rights to. What DC did have was rights to the properties of Creator/CharltonComics and Moore was asked to come up with a proposal for them. He came back with a dark tale that drew heavily on the mid-'80s UsefulNotes/ColdWar angst, in which the Charlton heroes discover that one of their number has been killed and that made his death is connected to something that could lead to nuclear armageddon. DC was pitch using them, but his publishers, while impressed by the pitch but was worried pitch, pointed out that Moore's pitch premise would render a number of the characters unusable by the end of the story. Instead, they advised story and so invited him to create an entirely new series, and so series. So ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'' was born, with Moore using [[{{Expy}} Expies]] characters who can be recognized as AlternateCompanyEquivalent of the Charlton characters. Mature beyond anything characters, but who gradually differed sharply from their inspiration and from most superhero comics of their time. Collaborating with Dave Gibbons, the comic was sophisticated on a level that mainstream comics had published up to not known at the time, having a character and plot that point and with a level of complexity that could rivaled the most highbrow books of the time (and continues to rival the best that many writers can come up with), ''Watchmen'' proved to be a massive sensation, and with Frank Miller's ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'', effectively launched UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks. (Moore's Franchise/{{Batman}} one-shot ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'' in 1988 was another big success in this regard -- it became the TropeNamer ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' is credited with launching UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks, and starting a new market for MultipleChoicePast, if somewhat ironically, considering it was actually presenting a single, contradiction-resolving origin story for TheJoker.) It also contributed heavily to the growing realisation in the mainstream media that comics are an art form, graphic novels, along with other comics such as Art Spiegelman's ''ComicBook/{{Maus}}'' and Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez's ''ComicBook/LoveAndRockets''.

''ComicBook/LoveAndRockets''.Ironically, the popularity of ''Watchmen'' was the first nail in the coffin for Moore's relationship with DC. The contract that he and artist David Gibbons had signed promised them that full rights to the comic would be returned to them if the book fell out of print for more than two years. At this point in time, paperback collections of comic books were virtually unheard of and the idea that ''Watchmen'' would remain in print that long was absurd. However, the book's popularity has kept it in print from 1987 through the present day, and neither Moore nor Gibbons ever received the rights. Moore's relationship with Creator/MarvelComics was also strained, mainly for what he perceived as its NetworkDecay and for similar reasons.

After ''Watchmen'',
drop in quality, and the lawsuit pushed by the company to rebrand ''Marvelman'' into ''ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}'' even if the former existed before Timely renamed itself as Marvel.

In either case,
Moore moved into began his career in independent comics, writing comics and was happy about working in creator-owned independent titles again. Other notable works include ''Brought To Light'', a history of the CIA[[note]] Which led to the persistent rumour for years that he was banned from entering the USA; in fact, he'd simply not bothered renewing his passport.[[/note]]; ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy, the abandoned ''Big Numbers'' (which fell apart with only the first issue published), and a graphic novel collaboration with Eddie Campbell (''ComicBook/FromHell'') that would take years to finish but which he properly began work on in the late '80s. He also began work on ''Lost Girls'', a piece of highbrow erotica (though he insists it be called [[InsistentTerminology porn]]), and ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds his first collaboration with artist Melinda Gebbie (who he later married). Moore cut himself stalked by a strange little boy. In off DC and Marvel, but in the mid-90s, '90s, he also began doing more was willing to work-for-hire writing on a number of titles for mainstream-but-alternative companies such as Creator/WildStorm Comics and Creator/ImageComics. For Image, Moore worked on a number of titles but found most success with ''ComicBook/{{Supreme}}'', a {{Homage}} to Silver-Age Superman via AlternateCompanyEquivalent that surprised readers for its change in tone from his dark work of the '80s, as well as ''1963'', a parody and {{Reconstruction}}.

Through Wildstorm, he published his own imprint, America's Best Comics (ABC), which included ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'', a 32-issue treatise on magic (Moore has been a practicing magus since his 40th birthday); ''ComicBook/TopTen'', a pastiche of PoliceProcedural TV series set in a superhero-populated city; and ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', a call back to a more innocent era of comic writing. Perhaps the The best-known ABC comic, ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', is a Victorian-era superhero story set in a universe in which all stories exist alongside one another. Thus, the titular team comprises Mina Murray (Mina Harker of ''{{Literature/Dracula}}'', reverting back to her maiden name), Allen Quatermain (''Literature/KingSolomonsMines''), Captain Nemo (''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''), Hawley Griffin (''Literature/TheInvisibleMan'') and Dr. Jekyll/Mister Hyde ([[Literature/TheStrangeCaseOfDrJekyllAndMrHyde duh]]).

However, Wildstorm was bought out by Creator/DCComics and Moore subsequently left America's Best Comics. As of 2008,
the only major title that Moore has continued to serially publish for three-decades (the longest he plans to write with any regularity has worked on ''any'' series) is ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', which after co-created with Kevin O'Neill. During his run on the League, Wildstorm was bought out by Creator/DCComics, and while Moore was initially still willing to work with the Wildstorm imprint so long as he didn't have to work on any DC titles, shenanigans over the publication of ''The Black Dossier'', will be led Moore to leave America's Best Comics for good, with the later volumes being published through by Top Shelf Productions. In (currently owned by Creator/IDWPublishing). DC and Warner Bros. own the rights and story for the first two parts of the League, but not the later parts. Since then, Moore has contributed regularly for Creator/AvatarPress, including a trilogy on Creator/HPLovecraft, one of his favorite writers.

Moore has also become known in the '90s-onwards as a performing artist in a variety of mediums. One of his performing art pieces, "The Birth Caul" was later adapted by Eddie Campbell as a graphic novel. He has also written works of fiction, such as ''Voices in the Fire'', and in
October 2016, he released his second novel, the [[DoorStopper 1,300-page]] ''Jerusalem''.

''Jerusalem''. He has also collaborated on a number of films with Mitch Jenkins, a series of shorts that form the anthology ''Show Pieces''. As a writer for comics, Moore is known for his famously dense and detailed scripts, packed with detail that describes the comic panels and everything that happens inside it. [[Webcomic/SomethingPositive Apparently]], his amazing talent comes from Satan. [[MemeticBadass Not by selling his soul for it]], mind you, but because he used to beat Satan up for his lunch money until the Devil bribed Moore with genius to leave him alone. Additionally, [[http://www.somethingpositive.net/sp02132008.shtml Death is afraid of him]].

him]]. He is known, with a particularly vivid description of ''ComicBook/FromHell'', to have driven [[Creator/NeilGaiman Neil "Scary Trousers" Gaiman]] to [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=337-ycZz6IM&feature=related leave a restaurant to go outside and get some fresh air so he wouldn't vomit.]] Twice. Gaiman also wrote [[http://lysad.blogspot.com/2007/08/neil-gaiman-writes-alan-moore.html this]] short comic about him, which pretty much sums up how many people view him.

Did we mention he's also a [[{{Polyamory}} polyamorous]], vegetarian [[UsefulNotes/{{Anarchism}} anarchist]] and an accomplished ceremonial magician?

magician. Sometimes goes by the name of Translucia Baboon to [[http://www.neilgaiman.com/mediafiles/exclusive/Audio/SinisterDucks-MarchoftheSinisterDucks.mp3 warn us all about ducks]]. Is the quintessential modern MadArtist.
2nd Sep '17 1:30:37 PM StFan
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Probably the most widely recognised (and ''CrazyAwesome'') ComicBook writer of all time, Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953 in Northampton, England) got his start writing and drawing cartoon strips for magazines such as ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' and ''The NME''. He moved on to get regular work at Marvel UK, where he wrote the ''ComicBook/CaptainBritain'' comic, and ''[[ComicBook/TwoThousandAD 2000AD]]'', where he wrote a series of acclaimed stories, including ''ComicBook/DRAndQuinch'' and ''ComicBook/TheBalladOfHaloJones''. This period included ''ComicBook/VForVendetta'', about an anarchist planning to take down a fascist UK Government, and ''ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}'', a reinvention of a 1950s British superhero.

to:

Probably the most widely recognised (and ''CrazyAwesome'') ComicBook writer of all time, Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953 in Northampton, England) got his start writing and drawing cartoon strips for magazines such as ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' and ''The NME''. He moved on to get regular work at Marvel UK, where he wrote the ''ComicBook/CaptainBritain'' comic, and ''[[ComicBook/TwoThousandAD 2000AD]]'', ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'', where he wrote a series of acclaimed stories, including ''ComicBook/DRAndQuinch'' and ''ComicBook/TheBalladOfHaloJones''. This period included ''ComicBook/VForVendetta'', about an anarchist planning to take down a fascist UK Government, and ''ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}'', a reinvention of a 1950s British superhero.



''Swamp Thing'' proved to be a massive success, and in the last years of Moore's run on the title, he was also handed another gaggle of existing characters to play with. DC hadrecently acquired the properties of Creator/CharltonComics and Moore was asked to come up with a proposal for them. He came back with a dark tale that drew heavily on the mid-80s UsefulNotes/ColdWar angst, in which the Charlton heroes discover that one of their number has been killed and that his death is connected to something that could lead to nuclear armageddon. DC was impressed by the pitch but was worried that Moore's pitch would render a number of the characters unusable by the end of the story. Instead, they advised him to create an entirely new series, and so ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'' was born, with Moore using [[{{Expy}} Expies]] of the Charlton characters. Mature beyond anything that mainstream comics had published up to that point and with a level of complexity that rivaled the most highbrow books of the time (and continues to rival the best that many writers can come up with), ''Watchmen'' proved to be a massive sensation, and with Frank Miller's ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'', effectively launched UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks. (Moore's Franchise/{{Batman}} one-shot ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'' in 1988 was another big success in this regard -- it became the TropeNamer for MultipleChoicePast, if somewhat ironically, considering it was actually presenting a single, contradiction-resolving origin story for TheJoker.) It also contributed heavily to the growing realisation in the mainstream media that comics are an art form, along with other comics such as Art Spiegelman's ''ComicBook/{{Maus}}'' and Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez's ''ComicBook/LoveAndRockets''.

to:

''Swamp Thing'' proved to be a massive success, and in the last years of Moore's run on the title, he was also handed another gaggle of existing characters to play with. DC hadrecently had recently acquired the properties of Creator/CharltonComics and Moore was asked to come up with a proposal for them. He came back with a dark tale that drew heavily on the mid-80s mid-'80s UsefulNotes/ColdWar angst, in which the Charlton heroes discover that one of their number has been killed and that his death is connected to something that could lead to nuclear armageddon. DC was impressed by the pitch but was worried that Moore's pitch would render a number of the characters unusable by the end of the story. Instead, they advised him to create an entirely new series, and so ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'' was born, with Moore using [[{{Expy}} Expies]] of the Charlton characters. Mature beyond anything that mainstream comics had published up to that point and with a level of complexity that rivaled the most highbrow books of the time (and continues to rival the best that many writers can come up with), ''Watchmen'' proved to be a massive sensation, and with Frank Miller's ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'', effectively launched UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks. (Moore's Franchise/{{Batman}} one-shot ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'' in 1988 was another big success in this regard -- it became the TropeNamer for MultipleChoicePast, if somewhat ironically, considering it was actually presenting a single, contradiction-resolving origin story for TheJoker.) It also contributed heavily to the growing realisation in the mainstream media that comics are an art form, along with other comics such as Art Spiegelman's ''ComicBook/{{Maus}}'' and Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez's ''ComicBook/LoveAndRockets''.
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Moore was then encouraged by Creator/DCComics editor Len Wein to start work on ''Comicbook/SwampThing'', Wein's classic horror comic. Originally about a scientist, Alec Holland, who had been transformed into a living plant monster after an explosion in his lab, Moore proposed a radical revision that revealed that Alec had in fact died in the explosion, and that the swamp creature had been created by plant elementals using Holland's memories as a basis for its character. Swamp Thing was not a man turned into a monster; he was never a man at all! Moore then took the Swamp Thing through a number of unusual adventures, including an entire issue [[{{Squick}} dedicated to psychic, psychedelic sex between Swampy and his human girlfriend, Abby.]] Moore also created the character of ComicBook/JohnConstantine for the comic. Along the way, he wrote a tiny handful of Franchise/{{Superman}} stories which are now considered some of the very greatest ever written for the character (one was even adapted into an episode of ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueUnlimited'') and set the groundwork for a more extensive examination of Superman later in his career, through the [[CaptainErsatz pastiche character]] ComicBook/{{Supreme}}. Not to mention a tiny handful of Franchise/GreenLantern stories that have become integral to ''its'' history ("Mogo Doesn't Socialize" and "Tygers").

to:

Moore was then encouraged by Creator/DCComics editor Len Wein to start work on ''Comicbook/SwampThing'', ''ComicBook/SwampThing'', Wein's classic horror comic. Originally about a scientist, Alec Holland, who had been transformed into a living plant monster after an explosion in his lab, Moore proposed a radical revision that revealed that Alec had in fact died in the explosion, and that the swamp creature had been created by plant elementals using Holland's memories as a basis for its character. Swamp Thing was not a man turned into a monster; he was never a man at all! Moore then took the Swamp Thing through a number of unusual adventures, including an entire issue [[{{Squick}} dedicated to psychic, psychedelic sex between Swampy and his human girlfriend, Abby.]] Moore also created the character of ComicBook/JohnConstantine for the comic. Along the way, he wrote a tiny handful of Franchise/{{Superman}} stories which are now considered some of the very greatest ever written for the character (one was even adapted into an episode of ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueUnlimited'') and set the groundwork for a more extensive examination of Superman later in his career, through the [[CaptainErsatz pastiche character]] ComicBook/{{Supreme}}. Not to mention a tiny handful of Franchise/GreenLantern stories that have become integral to ''its'' history ("Mogo Doesn't Socialize" and "Tygers").



*** In the case of his adaptations, Moore stated that he had permissions and support from the original creators [[note]] which he did not give to ''Before Watchmen'' [[/note]], and tried as much as possible to respect their vision even ArcWelding their stories into his new vision. In the case of ''ComicBook/WhateverHappenedToTheManOfTomorrow'' giving Superman a FullyAbsorbedFinale by collaboration with the original Superman team, and he actually okayed his famous Comicbook/SwampThing retcon with Swampie's creator Len Wein before he wrote it.

to:

*** In the case of his adaptations, Moore stated that he had permissions and support from the original creators [[note]] which he did not give to ''Before Watchmen'' [[/note]], and tried as much as possible to respect their vision even ArcWelding their stories into his new vision. In the case of ''ComicBook/WhateverHappenedToTheManOfTomorrow'' giving Superman a FullyAbsorbedFinale by collaboration with the original Superman team, and he actually okayed his famous Comicbook/SwampThing ''ComicBook/SwampThing'' retcon with Swampie's creator Len Wein before he wrote it.
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