History Creator / AlanMoore

18th Feb '18 12:14:41 AM nombretomado
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[[caption-width-right:350:Not actually [[JuliusBeethovenDaVinci Rasp]][[RasputinTheMadMonk utin]]... ''[[FalseReassurance far]]'' [[FalseReassurance harder to kill.]]]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:Not actually [[JuliusBeethovenDaVinci Rasp]][[RasputinTheMadMonk Rasp]][[UsefulNotes/RasputinTheMadMonk utin]]... ''[[FalseReassurance far]]'' [[FalseReassurance harder to kill.]]]]
4th Feb '18 8:20:11 PM frogpatrol
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He got his start drawing comics and writing for magazines such as ''The NME'' and ''Sounds''. He went on to regular work at Marvel UK, where he wrote scripts for ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'', ''ComicBook/CaptainBritain'' comic and ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'', as well as a series of essays on the comics medium in ''The Daredevils'' (one of which was a critique of Creator/StanLee ''in a Marvel branded 'zine'') where he wrote a series of acclaimed stories, including ''ComicBook/DRAndQuinch'' and ''ComicBook/TheBalladOfHaloJones''. This period included ''ComicBook/VForVendetta'', about an anarchist planning to take down a future fascist UK Government, and ''[[ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}|Marvelman'' (later ''Miracleman''), a reinvention of a 1950s British superhero. The latter attracted attention from DC, which led to the start of the period of his biggest influence (even if it would ultimately turn out to be among [[BrieferThanTheyThink the briefest]]).

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He got his start drawing comics and writing for magazines such as ''The NME'' and ''Sounds''. He went on to regular work at Marvel UK, where he wrote scripts for ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'', ''ComicBook/CaptainBritain'' comic and ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'', as well as a series of essays on the comics medium in ''The Daredevils'' (one of which was a critique of Creator/StanLee ''in a Marvel branded 'zine'') where he wrote a series of acclaimed stories, including ''ComicBook/DRAndQuinch'' and ''ComicBook/TheBalladOfHaloJones''. This period included ''ComicBook/VForVendetta'', about an anarchist planning to take down a future fascist UK Government, and ''[[ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}|Marvelman'' ''[[ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}'' (later ''Miracleman''), a reinvention of a 1950s British superhero. The latter attracted attention from DC, which led to the start of the period of his biggest influence (even if it would ultimately turn out to be among [[BrieferThanTheyThink the briefest]]).
4th Feb '18 8:19:38 PM frogpatrol
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Moore was encouraged by Creator/DCComics editor Len Wein to start work on ''ComicBook/SwampThing'', Wein's classic horror comic. Much as he did for Captain Britain and Miracleman, Moore proposed a radical revision that changed the comic from the ground-up, and leading the story into a GenreShift that gradually deepened the character and his setting. Moore took the Swamp Thing through a number of unusual adventures, that involved many run-ins with the regular DC Universe, which also saw the introduction of characters, such as ComicBook/JohnConstantine, who have since gone on to become major icons. ''Swamp Thing'' proved to be a massive success, and Moore was gradually encouraged by the editors, to take on other projects: including landmark stories for ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' (''ComicBook/WhateverHappenedToTheManOfTomorrow'' and, with Dave Gibbons, 'ComicBook/ForTheManWhoHasEverything''), ''Franchise/GreenLantern'' ("Mogo Doesn't Socialize", with Dave Gibbons and "Tygers", his first collaboration with Kevin O'Neill) and ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' (''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke''). Yet the best was still to come.

Moore had a huge knowledge of comics history and a canny instinct for re-configuring and resurrecting forgotten and little known or weakly selling titles. He had planned to do a story about superheroes that involved a murder mystery around one of their numbers, with his initial concept involving the MLJ run published by Archie Comics which he had assumed, wrongly, that DC had rights to. What DC did have was rights to the properties of Creator/CharltonComics and Moore made his pitch using them, but his publishers, while impressed by the pitch, pointed out that Moore's premise would render a number of the characters unusable by the end of the story and so invited him to create an entirely new series. So ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'' was born, with Moore using characters who can be recognized as AlternateCompanyEquivalent of the Charlton characters, but who gradually differed sharply from their inspiration and from most superhero comics of their time. Collaborating with Dave Gibbons, the comic was sophisticated on a level that mainstream comics had not known at the time, having a character and plot that rivaled the most highbrow books (and continues to rival the best that many writers can come up with), ''Watchmen'' proved to be a massive sensation, and with Frank Miller's ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' is credited with launching UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks, and starting a new market for graphic novels, along with other comics such as Art Spiegelman's ''ComicBook/{{Maus}}'' and Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez's ''ComicBook/LoveAndRockets''.Ironically, the popularity of ''Watchmen'' was the first nail in the coffin for Moore's relationship with DC. The contract that he and artist David Gibbons had signed promised them that full rights to the comic would be returned to them if the book fell out of print for more than two years. At this point in time, paperback collections of comic books were virtually unheard of and the idea that ''Watchmen'' would remain in print that long was absurd. However, the book's popularity has kept it in print from 1987 through the present day, and neither Moore nor Gibbons ever received the rights. Moore's relationship with Creator/MarvelComics was also strained, mainly for what he perceived as its NetworkDecay and drop in quality, and the lawsuit pushed by the company to rebrand ''Marvelman'' into ''ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}'' even if the former existed before Timely renamed itself as Marvel.

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Moore was encouraged by Creator/DCComics editor Len Wein to start work on ''ComicBook/SwampThing'', Wein's classic horror comic. Much as he did for Captain Britain and Miracleman, Moore proposed a radical revision that changed the comic from the ground-up, and leading the story into a GenreShift that gradually deepened the character and his setting. Moore took the Swamp Thing through a number of unusual adventures, that involved many run-ins with the regular DC Universe, which also saw the introduction of characters, such as ComicBook/JohnConstantine, who have since gone on to become major icons. ''Swamp Thing'' proved to be a massive success, and Moore was gradually encouraged by the editors, to take on other projects: including landmark stories for ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' (''ComicBook/WhateverHappenedToTheManOfTomorrow'' ("ComicBook/WhateverHappenedToTheManOfTomorrow" and, with Dave Gibbons, 'ComicBook/ForTheManWhoHasEverything''), "ComicBook/ForTheManWhoHasEverything"), ''Franchise/GreenLantern'' ("Mogo Doesn't Socialize", with Dave Gibbons and "Tygers", his first collaboration with Kevin O'Neill) and ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' (''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke''). Yet the best was still to come.

Moore had a huge knowledge of comics history and a canny instinct for re-configuring reconfiguring and resurrecting forgotten and little known or weakly selling titles. He had planned to do a story about superheroes that involved a murder mystery around one of their numbers, with his initial concept involving the MLJ run published by Archie Comics which he had assumed, wrongly, that DC had rights to. What DC did have was rights to the properties of Creator/CharltonComics and Moore made his pitch using them, but his publishers, while impressed by the pitch, pointed out that Moore's premise would render a number of the characters unusable by the end of the story and so invited him to create an entirely new series. So ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'' was born, with Moore using characters who can be recognized as AlternateCompanyEquivalent of the Charlton characters, but who gradually differed sharply from their inspiration and from most superhero comics of their time. Collaborating with Dave Gibbons, the comic was sophisticated on a level that mainstream comics had not known at the time, having a character and plot that rivaled the most highbrow books (and continues to rival the best that many writers can come up with), ''Watchmen'' proved to be a massive sensation, and with Frank Miller's ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' is credited with launching UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks, and starting a new market for graphic novels, along with other comics such as Art Spiegelman's ''ComicBook/{{Maus}}'' and Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez's ''ComicBook/LoveAndRockets''.Ironically, the popularity of ''Watchmen'' was the first nail in the coffin for Moore's relationship with DC. The contract that he and artist David Gibbons had signed promised them that full rights to the comic would be returned to them if the book fell out of print for more than two years. At this point in time, paperback collections of comic books were virtually unheard of and the idea that ''Watchmen'' would remain in print that long was absurd. However, the book's popularity has kept it in print from 1987 through the present day, and neither Moore nor Gibbons ever received the rights. Moore's relationship with Creator/MarvelComics was also strained, mainly for what he perceived as its NetworkDecay and drop in quality, and the lawsuit pushed by the company to rebrand ''Marvelman'' into ''ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}'' even if the former existed before Timely renamed itself as Marvel.
4th Feb '18 8:18:33 PM frogpatrol
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Moore was encouraged by Creator/DCComics editor Len Wein to start work on ''ComicBook/SwampThing'', Wein's classic horror comic. Much as he did for Captain Britain and Miracleman, Moore proposed a radical revision that changed the comic from the ground-up, and leading the story into a GenreShift that gradually deepened the character and his setting. Moore took the Swamp Thing through a number of unusual adventures, that involved many run-ins with the regular DC Universe, which also saw the introduction of characters, such as ComicBook/JohnConstantine, who have since gone on to become major icons. ''Swamp Thing'' proved to be a massive success, and Moore was gradually encouraged by the editors, to take on other projects: including landmark stories for ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' (''ComicBook/WhateverHappenedToTheManOfTomorrow'' and his first collaboration with Dave Gibbons, namely''ComicBook/ForTheManWhoHasEverything''), ''Franchise/GreenLantern'' ("Mogo Doesn't Socialize", with Dave Gibbons and "Tygers", his first collaboration with Kevin O'Neill) and ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' (''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke''). Yet the best was still to come.

to:

Moore was encouraged by Creator/DCComics editor Len Wein to start work on ''ComicBook/SwampThing'', Wein's classic horror comic. Much as he did for Captain Britain and Miracleman, Moore proposed a radical revision that changed the comic from the ground-up, and leading the story into a GenreShift that gradually deepened the character and his setting. Moore took the Swamp Thing through a number of unusual adventures, that involved many run-ins with the regular DC Universe, which also saw the introduction of characters, such as ComicBook/JohnConstantine, who have since gone on to become major icons. ''Swamp Thing'' proved to be a massive success, and Moore was gradually encouraged by the editors, to take on other projects: including landmark stories for ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' (''ComicBook/WhateverHappenedToTheManOfTomorrow'' and his first collaboration and, with Dave Gibbons, namely''ComicBook/ForTheManWhoHasEverything''), 'ComicBook/ForTheManWhoHasEverything''), ''Franchise/GreenLantern'' ("Mogo Doesn't Socialize", with Dave Gibbons and "Tygers", his first collaboration with Kevin O'Neill) and ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' (''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke''). Yet the best was still to come.
4th Feb '18 8:17:37 PM frogpatrol
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Novelist, artist, occultist, performing artist, film-maker, musician, and public intellectual, Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953 in Northampton, England) is perhaps, the most widely recognised (and ''CrazyAwesome'') ComicBook writer of all time, and one of the most influential artists from TheEighties, whose work has decisively influenced artists from multiple mediums for nearly three decades.

He got his start writing and drawing cartoon strips for magazines such as ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' and ''The NME''. He moved on to get regular work at Marvel UK, where he wrote the ''ComicBook/CaptainBritain'' comic, ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'', as well as a series of essays on the comics medium in ''The Daredevils'' (one of which was a critique of Creator/StanLee ''in a Marvel branded 'zine'') where he wrote a series of acclaimed stories, including ''ComicBook/DRAndQuinch'' and ''ComicBook/TheBalladOfHaloJones''. This period included ''ComicBook/VForVendetta'', about an anarchist planning to take down a fascist UK Government, and ''ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}'', a reinvention of a 1950s British superhero. The latter attracted attention from DC, which led to the start of the period of his biggest influence (even if it would ultimately turn out to be among [[BrieferThanTheyThink the briefest]]).

Moore was encouraged by Creator/DCComics editor Len Wein to start work on ''ComicBook/SwampThing'', Wein's classic horror comic. Much as he did for Captain Britain and Miracleman, Moore proposed a radical revision that changed the comic from the ground-up, and leading the story into a GenreShift that gradually deepened the character and his setting. Moore took the Swamp Thing through a number of unusual adventures, that involved many run-ins with the regular DC Universe, which also saw the introduction of characters, such as ComicBook/JohnConstantine, who have since gone on to become major icons. ''Swamp Thing'' proved to be a massive success, and Moore was gradually encouraged by the editors, to take on other projects: including landmark stories for ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' (''ComicBook/WhateverHappenedToTheManOfTomorrow'' and his first collaboration with Dave Gibbons -- ''ComicBook/ForTheManWhoHasEverything''), ''Franchise/GreenLantern'' ("Mogo Doesn't Socialize", with Dave Gibbons and "Tygers", his first collaboration with Kevin O'Neill) and ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' (''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke''). Yet the best was still to come.

to:

Novelist, artist, occultist, performing artist, film-maker, musician, and public intellectual, Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953 in Northampton, England) is perhaps, the most widely recognised (and ''CrazyAwesome'') ComicBook writer of all time, and one of the most influential artists from TheEighties, whose work has decisively influenced artists from multiple mediums for nearly three decades.

He got his start drawing comics and writing and drawing cartoon strips for magazines such as ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' and ''The NME''. NME'' and ''Sounds''. He moved went on to get regular work at Marvel UK, where he wrote the scripts for ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'', ''ComicBook/CaptainBritain'' comic, comic and ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'', as well as a series of essays on the comics medium in ''The Daredevils'' (one of which was a critique of Creator/StanLee ''in a Marvel branded 'zine'') where he wrote a series of acclaimed stories, including ''ComicBook/DRAndQuinch'' and ''ComicBook/TheBalladOfHaloJones''. This period included ''ComicBook/VForVendetta'', about an anarchist planning to take down a future fascist UK Government, and ''ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}'', ''[[ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}|Marvelman'' (later ''Miracleman''), a reinvention of a 1950s British superhero. The latter attracted attention from DC, which led to the start of the period of his biggest influence (even if it would ultimately turn out to be among [[BrieferThanTheyThink the briefest]]).

Moore was encouraged by Creator/DCComics editor Len Wein to start work on ''ComicBook/SwampThing'', Wein's classic horror comic. Much as he did for Captain Britain and Miracleman, Moore proposed a radical revision that changed the comic from the ground-up, and leading the story into a GenreShift that gradually deepened the character and his setting. Moore took the Swamp Thing through a number of unusual adventures, that involved many run-ins with the regular DC Universe, which also saw the introduction of characters, such as ComicBook/JohnConstantine, who have since gone on to become major icons. ''Swamp Thing'' proved to be a massive success, and Moore was gradually encouraged by the editors, to take on other projects: including landmark stories for ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' (''ComicBook/WhateverHappenedToTheManOfTomorrow'' and his first collaboration with Dave Gibbons -- ''ComicBook/ForTheManWhoHasEverything''), Gibbons, namely''ComicBook/ForTheManWhoHasEverything''), ''Franchise/GreenLantern'' ("Mogo Doesn't Socialize", with Dave Gibbons and "Tygers", his first collaboration with Kevin O'Neill) and ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' (''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke''). Yet the best was still to come.
4th Feb '18 8:13:58 PM frogpatrol
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** The effect of the presence of superheroes or the supernatural on "real world" culture and society. This involves averting ReedRichardsIsUseless and CutLexLuthorACheck - the latter of which Moore's ''ComicBook/SwampThing'' run is the TropeNamer for.
** Reinvention of existing characters.

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** The effect of the presence of superheroes or the supernatural on "real world" culture and society. This involves averting ReedRichardsIsUseless and CutLexLuthorACheck - CutLexLuthorACheck. The TropeNamer of the latter of which comes from Moore's ''ComicBook/SwampThing'' run is the TropeNamer for.
of ''ComicBook/SwampThing''.
** Reinvention of existing characters.characters (as referenced during Alan Moore's appearance on ''TheSimpsons'')



** Lots of sex. ''Lost Girls'' and ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen: The Black Dossier'' stand out.
** He also has a thing for RapeAsDrama. However, it is almost always done tactfully (unless you're reading ''ComicBook/{{Neonomicon}}'').
* BlackComedy and KafkaKomedy: A lot of his work from his early days at ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'' is overflowing with this (especially ''DR & Quinch'' and his collection of ''ComicBook/ThargsFutureShocks''). These themes remain in his later works, but they are not nearly as prevalent as they are in some of his oldest stories.

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** Lots of sex. Sex! ''Lost Girls'' and ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen: The Black Dossier'' stand out.
** He also has a thing for RapeAsDrama. However, it is almost always usually done tactfully (unless you're reading ''ComicBook/{{Neonomicon}}'').
* BlackComedy and KafkaKomedy: A lot of his work from his early days at ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'' is overflowing with this (especially ''DR & Quinch'' and his collection of ''ComicBook/ThargsFutureShocks''). These themes remain in his later works, but they are not nearly as prevalent as they are in some of his oldest older stories.
13th Nov '17 7:59:51 PM CaptainColdCutCliche
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* ''Script/TheTwilightOfTheSuperheroes'' (1987)


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* ''Albion'' (2005)


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* MassiveMultiplayerCrossover: ''The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen'', ''Providence'', ''Lost Girls'', ''Albion'', ''Youngblood: Judgement Day'', and ''The Twilight of the Superheroes'' are all this. He does it kind of a lot.
2nd Oct '17 11:26:25 PM BeastC
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* SelfParody: Completely willing to make a few jokes at his own expense.
** ''From Hell'' has Abberline sardonically predicts that 100 years from now people will still be writing stories on the Whitechapel murders and adding "some supernatural twaddle."

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* SelfParody: SelfDeprecation: Completely willing to make a few jokes at his own expense.
** ''From Hell'' has Abberline sardonically predicts predict that 100 years from now people will still be writing stories on the Whitechapel murders and adding "some supernatural twaddle."


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** His "biography" on the ''League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: Century'' collection portrays him as a [[GrumpyOldMan mentally-ill figure of folklore who mainly goes around calling children and their interests stupid so he can feed off their tears]].
23rd Sep '17 12:36:50 AM JulianLapostat
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* TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt: Apocalypse is a major theme in many of Moore's stories. His stories, especially as they reach the climax, often have characters and event cause a major event that either erases the status-quo, or ensure that NothingIsTheSameAnymore or likewise inaugurate the DawnOfAnEra, examples include but are not limited to: ''ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}, ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}, ComicBook/{{Promethea}}, ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen, Comicbook/{{Providence}}''.
20th Sep '17 7:29:11 PM MackWylde
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* RousseauWasRight: Surprisingly so.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.AlanMoore