History Creator / AlanMoore

25th Mar '16 6:32:59 PM Doug86
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''Swamp Thing'' proved to be a massive success, and in the last years of Moore's run on the title, he was also handed another gaggle of existing characters to play with. DC had recently acquired the properties of CharltonComics and Moore was asked to come up with a proposal for them. He came back with a dark tale that drew heavily on the mid-80s UsefulNotes/ColdWar angst, in which the Charlton heroes discover that one of their number has been killed and that his death is connected to something that could lead to nuclear armageddon. DC was impressed by the pitch but was worried that Moore's pitch would render a number of the characters unusable by the end of the story. Instead, they advised him to create an entirely new series, and so ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'' was born, with Moore using [[{{Expy}} Expies]] of the Charlton characters. Mature beyond anything that mainstream comics had published up to that point and with a level of complexity that rivaled the most highbrow books of the time (and continues to rival the best that many writers can come up with), ''Watchmen'' proved to be a massive sensation, and with Frank Miller's ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'', effectively launched UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks. (Moore's Franchise/{{Batman}} one-shot ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'' in 1988 was another big success in this regard -- its approach to the Joker became the TropeNamer for MultipleChoicePast.) It also contributed heavily to the growing realisation in the mainstream media that comics are an art form, along with other comics such as Art Spiegelman's ''ComicBook/{{Maus}}'' and Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez's ''ComicBook/LoveAndRockets''.

to:

''Swamp Thing'' proved to be a massive success, and in the last years of Moore's run on the title, he was also handed another gaggle of existing characters to play with. DC had recently acquired the properties of CharltonComics Creator/CharltonComics and Moore was asked to come up with a proposal for them. He came back with a dark tale that drew heavily on the mid-80s UsefulNotes/ColdWar angst, in which the Charlton heroes discover that one of their number has been killed and that his death is connected to something that could lead to nuclear armageddon. DC was impressed by the pitch but was worried that Moore's pitch would render a number of the characters unusable by the end of the story. Instead, they advised him to create an entirely new series, and so ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'' was born, with Moore using [[{{Expy}} Expies]] of the Charlton characters. Mature beyond anything that mainstream comics had published up to that point and with a level of complexity that rivaled the most highbrow books of the time (and continues to rival the best that many writers can come up with), ''Watchmen'' proved to be a massive sensation, and with Frank Miller's ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'', effectively launched UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks. (Moore's Franchise/{{Batman}} one-shot ''ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'' in 1988 was another big success in this regard -- its approach to the Joker became the TropeNamer for MultipleChoicePast.) It also contributed heavily to the growing realisation in the mainstream media that comics are an art form, along with other comics such as Art Spiegelman's ''ComicBook/{{Maus}}'' and Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez's ''ComicBook/LoveAndRockets''.
1st Mar '16 6:13:07 AM hullflyer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** RealityHasNoSubtitles: Downright ''merciless'' whenever foreign languages (from other countries or other ''planets'') comes up. The man went and invented a whole language for Rann when it popped up for a two-issue arc in ''Swamp Thing''.

to:

** RealityHasNoSubtitles: Downright ''merciless'' whenever foreign languages (from other countries or other ''planets'') comes up. The man went and invented a whole language for Rann when it popped up for a two-issue arc in ''Swamp Thing''. Taken UpToEleven in ''Crossed +100'', which has a variant of English which, while technically not a new language, has so many new slang terms (due to language shift over time) that it can be extremely difficult to understand the characters, and no subtitles or translations are ever provided - the reader has to puzzle out what words have come to mean from the context they are used in.
20th Feb '16 3:20:23 PM Adept
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** RealityHasNoSubtitles: Downright ''merciless'' whenever foreign languages (from other countries or other ''planets'') comes up. The man went and invented a whole language for Rann when it popped up for a two-issue arc in ''SwampThing''.

to:

** RealityHasNoSubtitles: Downright ''merciless'' whenever foreign languages (from other countries or other ''planets'') comes up. The man went and invented a whole language for Rann when it popped up for a two-issue arc in ''SwampThing''.''Swamp Thing''.
9th Feb '16 2:49:45 AM moloch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


After ''Watchmen'', Moore moved into independent comics, writing ''Brought To Light'', a history of the CIA[[note]] Which led to the persistent rumour for years that he was banned from entering the USA; in fact, he'd simply not bothered renewing his passport.[[/note]]; ''Lost Girls'', a piece of [[strike: highbrow erotica]] [[InsistentTerminology porn]], and ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy. In the mid-90s, he also began doing more work-for-hire writing for companies such as WildstormComics and ImageComics. Through Wildstorm, he published his own imprint, America's Best Comics (ABC), which included ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'', a 32-issue treatise on magic (Moore has been a practicing magus since his 40th birthday); ''TopTen'', a pastiche of PoliceProcedural TV series set in a superhero-populated city; and ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', a call back to a more innocent era of comic writing. Perhaps the best-known ABC comic, ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', is a Victorian-era superhero story set in a universe in which all stories exist alongside one another. Thus, the titular team comprises Mina Murray (Mina Harker of ''{{Literature/Dracula}}'', reverting back to her maiden name), Allen Quatermain (''Literature/KingSolomonsMines''), Captain Nemo (''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''), Hawley Griffin (''Literature/TheInvisibleMan'') and Dr. Jekyll/Mister Hyde ([[Literature/TheStrangeCaseOfDrJekyllAndMrHyde duh]]).

to:

After ''Watchmen'', Moore moved into independent comics, writing ''Brought To Light'', a history of the CIA[[note]] Which led to the persistent rumour for years that he was banned from entering the USA; in fact, he'd simply not bothered renewing his passport.[[/note]]; ''Lost Girls'', a piece of [[strike: highbrow erotica]] erotica (though he insists it be called [[InsistentTerminology porn]], porn]]), and ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy. In the mid-90s, he also began doing more work-for-hire writing for companies such as WildstormComics and ImageComics. Through Wildstorm, he published his own imprint, America's Best Comics (ABC), which included ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'', a 32-issue treatise on magic (Moore has been a practicing magus since his 40th birthday); ''TopTen'', a pastiche of PoliceProcedural TV series set in a superhero-populated city; and ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', a call back to a more innocent era of comic writing. Perhaps the best-known ABC comic, ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', is a Victorian-era superhero story set in a universe in which all stories exist alongside one another. Thus, the titular team comprises Mina Murray (Mina Harker of ''{{Literature/Dracula}}'', reverting back to her maiden name), Allen Quatermain (''Literature/KingSolomonsMines''), Captain Nemo (''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''), Hawley Griffin (''Literature/TheInvisibleMan'') and Dr. Jekyll/Mister Hyde ([[Literature/TheStrangeCaseOfDrJekyllAndMrHyde duh]]).
9th Feb '16 2:48:22 AM moloch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


After ''Watchmen'', Moore moved into independent comics, writing ''Brought To Light'', a history of the CIA[[note]] Which led to the persistent rumour for years that he was banned from entering the USA; in fact, he'd simply not bothered renewing his passport.[[/note]]; ''Lost Girls'', a piece of [[strike:highbrow erotica]] [[InsistentTerminology porn]]. and ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy. In the mid-90s, he also began doing more work-for-hire writing for companies such as WildstormComics and ImageComics. Through Wildstorm, he published his own imprint, America's Best Comics (ABC), which included ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'', a 32-issue treatise on magic (Moore has been a practicing magus since his 40th birthday); ''TopTen'', a pastiche of PoliceProcedural TV series set in a superhero-populated city; and ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', a call back to a more innocent era of comic writing. Perhaps the best-known ABC comic, ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', is a Victorian-era superhero story set in a universe in which all stories exist alongside one another. Thus, the titular team comprises Mina Murray (Mina Harker of ''{{Literature/Dracula}}'', reverting back to her maiden name), Allen Quatermain (''Literature/KingSolomonsMines''), Captain Nemo (''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''), Hawley Griffin (''Literature/TheInvisibleMan'') and Dr. Jekyll/Mister Hyde ([[Literature/TheStrangeCaseOfDrJekyllAndMrHyde duh]]).

to:

After ''Watchmen'', Moore moved into independent comics, writing ''Brought To Light'', a history of the CIA[[note]] Which led to the persistent rumour for years that he was banned from entering the USA; in fact, he'd simply not bothered renewing his passport.[[/note]]; ''Lost Girls'', a piece of [[strike:highbrow [[strike: highbrow erotica]] [[InsistentTerminology porn]]. porn]], and ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy. In the mid-90s, he also began doing more work-for-hire writing for companies such as WildstormComics and ImageComics. Through Wildstorm, he published his own imprint, America's Best Comics (ABC), which included ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'', a 32-issue treatise on magic (Moore has been a practicing magus since his 40th birthday); ''TopTen'', a pastiche of PoliceProcedural TV series set in a superhero-populated city; and ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', a call back to a more innocent era of comic writing. Perhaps the best-known ABC comic, ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', is a Victorian-era superhero story set in a universe in which all stories exist alongside one another. Thus, the titular team comprises Mina Murray (Mina Harker of ''{{Literature/Dracula}}'', reverting back to her maiden name), Allen Quatermain (''Literature/KingSolomonsMines''), Captain Nemo (''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''), Hawley Griffin (''Literature/TheInvisibleMan'') and Dr. Jekyll/Mister Hyde ([[Literature/TheStrangeCaseOfDrJekyllAndMrHyde duh]]).
9th Feb '16 2:47:47 AM moloch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


After ''Watchmen'', Moore moved into independent comics, writing ''Brought To Light'', a history of the CIA[[note]] Which led to the persistent rumour for years that he was banned from entering the USA; in fact, he'd simply not bothered renewing his passport.[[/note]]; ''Lost Girls'', a piece of highbrow erotica[[note]]Though he [[InsistentTerminology insists it be called porn]].[[/note]]; and ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy. In the mid-90s, he also began doing more work-for-hire writing for companies such as WildstormComics and ImageComics. Through Wildstorm, he published his own imprint, America's Best Comics (ABC), which included ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'', a 32-issue treatise on magic (Moore has been a practicing magus since his 40th birthday); ''TopTen'', a pastiche of PoliceProcedural TV series set in a superhero-populated city; and ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', a call back to a more innocent era of comic writing. Perhaps the best-known ABC comic, ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', is a Victorian-era superhero story set in a universe in which all stories exist alongside one another. Thus, the titular team comprises Mina Murray (Mina Harker of ''{{Literature/Dracula}}'', reverting back to her maiden name), Allen Quatermain (''Literature/KingSolomonsMines''), Captain Nemo (''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''), Hawley Griffin (''Literature/TheInvisibleMan'') and Dr. Jekyll/Mister Hyde ([[Literature/TheStrangeCaseOfDrJekyllAndMrHyde duh]]).

to:

After ''Watchmen'', Moore moved into independent comics, writing ''Brought To Light'', a history of the CIA[[note]] Which led to the persistent rumour for years that he was banned from entering the USA; in fact, he'd simply not bothered renewing his passport.[[/note]]; ''Lost Girls'', a piece of highbrow erotica[[note]]Though he [[strike:highbrow erotica]] [[InsistentTerminology insists it be called porn]].[[/note]]; porn]]. and ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy. In the mid-90s, he also began doing more work-for-hire writing for companies such as WildstormComics and ImageComics. Through Wildstorm, he published his own imprint, America's Best Comics (ABC), which included ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'', a 32-issue treatise on magic (Moore has been a practicing magus since his 40th birthday); ''TopTen'', a pastiche of PoliceProcedural TV series set in a superhero-populated city; and ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', a call back to a more innocent era of comic writing. Perhaps the best-known ABC comic, ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', is a Victorian-era superhero story set in a universe in which all stories exist alongside one another. Thus, the titular team comprises Mina Murray (Mina Harker of ''{{Literature/Dracula}}'', reverting back to her maiden name), Allen Quatermain (''Literature/KingSolomonsMines''), Captain Nemo (''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''), Hawley Griffin (''Literature/TheInvisibleMan'') and Dr. Jekyll/Mister Hyde ([[Literature/TheStrangeCaseOfDrJekyllAndMrHyde duh]]).
4th Feb '16 2:14:33 AM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[/index]]
3rd Feb '16 1:33:15 AM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''ComicBook/{{Providence}}'' (2015)

to:

* ''ComicBook/{{Providence}}'' (2015)(2015-2016)
* ''Cinema Purgatorio'' (2016)


Added DiffLines:

* LargeHam: His interviews in documentaries and [[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/avatarpress/alan-moores-cinema-purgatorio his Kickstarter pledge]] complete with a really bad wig.
25th Jan '16 5:41:24 AM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* BrieferThanTheyThink: Creator/AlanMoore's most well known and influential work came in TheEighties for Creator/DCComics, where he worked on ''ComicBook/SwampThing, ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}, ComicBook/TheKillingJoke'' as well as a few ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' stories. This was a five year period, a small part of his career, (even smaller when you consider that it takes far less time to write scripts for comics than it is for the artist to draw them). This is one reason why Moore tends to be cranky about people asking questions about his DC era, because from his perspective, the greater part of his career was spent for alternative and independent publications, self-published ventures and other multi-media projects (performance, film, novels) and his time with mainstream comics was an exception and not a rule.
20th Jan '16 9:32:01 PM jormis29
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Moore was then encouraged by Creator/DCComics editor Len Wein to start work on ''Comicbook/SwampThing'', Wein's classic horror comic. Originally about a scientist, Alec Holland, who had been transformed into a living plant monster after an explosion in his lab, Moore proposed a radical revision that revealed that Alec had in fact died in the explosion, and that the swamp creature had been created by plant elementals using Holland's memories as a basis for its character. Swamp Thing was not a man turned into a monster; he was never a man at all! Moore then took the Swamp Thing through a number of unusual adventures, including an entire issue [[{{Squick}} dedicated to psychic, psychedelic sex between Swampy and his human girlfriend, Abby.]] Moore also created the character of [[ComicBook/{{Hellblazer}} John Constantine]] for the comic. Along the way, he wrote a tiny handful of Franchise/{{Superman}} stories which are now considered some of the very greatest ever written for the character (one was even adapted into an episode of ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueUnlimited'') and set the groundwork for a more extensive examination of Superman later in his career, through the [[Main/{{CaptainErsatz}} pastiche character]] ComicBook/{{Supreme}}. Not to mention a tiny handful of Comicbook/GreenLantern stories that have become integral to ''its'' history ("Mogo Doesn't Socialize" and "Tygers").

to:

Moore was then encouraged by Creator/DCComics editor Len Wein to start work on ''Comicbook/SwampThing'', Wein's classic horror comic. Originally about a scientist, Alec Holland, who had been transformed into a living plant monster after an explosion in his lab, Moore proposed a radical revision that revealed that Alec had in fact died in the explosion, and that the swamp creature had been created by plant elementals using Holland's memories as a basis for its character. Swamp Thing was not a man turned into a monster; he was never a man at all! Moore then took the Swamp Thing through a number of unusual adventures, including an entire issue [[{{Squick}} dedicated to psychic, psychedelic sex between Swampy and his human girlfriend, Abby.]] Moore also created the character of [[ComicBook/{{Hellblazer}} John Constantine]] ComicBook/JohnConstantine for the comic. Along the way, he wrote a tiny handful of Franchise/{{Superman}} stories which are now considered some of the very greatest ever written for the character (one was even adapted into an episode of ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueUnlimited'') and set the groundwork for a more extensive examination of Superman later in his career, through the [[Main/{{CaptainErsatz}} [[CaptainErsatz pastiche character]] ComicBook/{{Supreme}}. Not to mention a tiny handful of Comicbook/GreenLantern stories that have become integral to ''its'' history ("Mogo Doesn't Socialize" and "Tygers").
This list shows the last 10 events of 139. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.AlanMoore