History Creator / AlanMoore

14th Jan '17 12:05:22 PM JulianLapostat
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** ''Cinema Purgatorio'', his strip in his anthology serial of the same name, suggests that his disinterest in cinema has gradually become active hostility, as every issue focuses on a particular genre of classic cinema to explore why it's really harmful [=/=] exploitative [=/=] founded on lies and injustice [=/=] just bad in general really. In general, even beyond criticisms of adaptations of his work, he generally seems to not be particularly fond of film and cinema. That said, his earlier works makes references to classic movies, League: Century refers to many good films of TheSixties and in his earlier career he expressed admiration for Creator/FrancisFordCoppola, Creator/OrsonWelles (whose characters often in ''League of Extraordinary Gentlemen'') and Creator/RobertAltman (whose HyperlinkStory featuring LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters and deconstructive approaches to FilmNoir and TheWestern greatly inspired ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'').

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** ''Cinema Purgatorio'', his strip in his anthology serial of the same name, suggests that his disinterest in cinema has gradually become active hostility, as every issue focuses on a particular genre of classic cinema to explore why it's really harmful [=/=] exploitative [=/=] founded on lies and injustice [=/=] just bad in general really. In general, even beyond criticisms of adaptations of his work, he generally seems to not be particularly fond of film and cinema. That said, his earlier works makes references to classic movies, League: Century refers to many good films of TheSixties and in his earlier career he expressed admiration for Creator/FrancisFordCoppola, Creator/OrsonWelles (whose characters often in ''League of Extraordinary Gentlemen'') and Creator/RobertAltman (whose HyperlinkStory featuring LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters and deconstructive approaches to FilmNoir and TheWestern greatly inspired ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'').''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'') [[http://thecreatorsproject.vice.com/blog/we-talked-with-alan-moore-about-movies-comics-and-magic and recently]] Creator/AlfredHitchcock.
14th Jan '17 12:02:37 PM JulianLapostat
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** ''Cinema Purgatorio'', his strip in his anthology serial of the same name, suggests that his disinterest in cinema has gradually become active hostility, as every issue focusses on a particular genre of classic cinema to explore why it's really harmful [=/=] exploitative [=/=] founded on lies and injustice [=/=] just bad in general really. In general, even beyond criticisms of adaptations of his work, he generally seems to not be particularly fond of film and cinema.

to:

** ''Cinema Purgatorio'', his strip in his anthology serial of the same name, suggests that his disinterest in cinema has gradually become active hostility, as every issue focusses focuses on a particular genre of classic cinema to explore why it's really harmful [=/=] exploitative [=/=] founded on lies and injustice [=/=] just bad in general really. In general, even beyond criticisms of adaptations of his work, he generally seems to not be particularly fond of film and cinema. That said, his earlier works makes references to classic movies, League: Century refers to many good films of TheSixties and in his earlier career he expressed admiration for Creator/FrancisFordCoppola, Creator/OrsonWelles (whose characters often in ''League of Extraordinary Gentlemen'') and Creator/RobertAltman (whose HyperlinkStory featuring LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters and deconstructive approaches to FilmNoir and TheWestern greatly inspired ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'').
12th Jan '17 6:45:59 AM DoctorNemesis
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** ''Cinema Purgatorio'', his strip in his anthology serial of the same name, suggests that his disinterest has gradually become active hostility, as every issue focusses on a particular genre of classic cinema to explore why it's really harmful [=/=] exploitative [=/=] founded on lies and injustice [=/=] just bad in general really.

to:

** ''Cinema Purgatorio'', his strip in his anthology serial of the same name, suggests that his disinterest in cinema has gradually become active hostility, as every issue focusses on a particular genre of classic cinema to explore why it's really harmful [=/=] exploitative [=/=] founded on lies and injustice [=/=] just bad in general really.really. In general, even beyond criticisms of adaptations of his work, he generally seems to not be particularly fond of film and cinema.
12th Jan '17 6:44:25 AM DoctorNemesis
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** ''Cinema Purgatorio'', his strip in his anthology serial of the same name, suggests that his disinterest has gradually become active hostility, as every issue focusses on a particular genre of classic cinema to explore why it's really bad[=/=]exploitative[=/=]founded on lies and injustice[=/=]just bad in general really.

to:

** ''Cinema Purgatorio'', his strip in his anthology serial of the same name, suggests that his disinterest has gradually become active hostility, as every issue focusses on a particular genre of classic cinema to explore why it's really bad[=/=]exploitative[=/=]founded harmful [=/=] exploitative [=/=] founded on lies and injustice[=/=]just injustice [=/=] just bad in general really.
12th Jan '17 6:43:51 AM DoctorNemesis
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Cinema Purgatorio'', his strip in his anthology serial of the same name, suggests that his disinterest has gradually become active hostility, as every issue focusses on a particular genre of classic cinema to explore why it's really bad[=/=]exploitative[=/=]founded on lies and injustice[=/=]just bad in general really.
8th Jan '17 12:27:06 PM nombretomado
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After ''Watchmen'', Moore moved into independent comics, writing ''Brought To Light'', a history of the CIA[[note]] Which led to the persistent rumour for years that he was banned from entering the USA; in fact, he'd simply not bothered renewing his passport.[[/note]]; ''Lost Girls'', a piece of highbrow erotica (though he insists it be called [[InsistentTerminology porn]]), and ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy. In the mid-90s, he also began doing more work-for-hire writing for companies such as Creator/WildStorm Comics and Creator/ImageComics. Through Wildstorm, he published his own imprint, America's Best Comics (ABC), which included ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'', a 32-issue treatise on magic (Moore has been a practicing magus since his 40th birthday); ''TopTen'', a pastiche of PoliceProcedural TV series set in a superhero-populated city; and ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', a call back to a more innocent era of comic writing. Perhaps the best-known ABC comic, ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', is a Victorian-era superhero story set in a universe in which all stories exist alongside one another. Thus, the titular team comprises Mina Murray (Mina Harker of ''{{Literature/Dracula}}'', reverting back to her maiden name), Allen Quatermain (''Literature/KingSolomonsMines''), Captain Nemo (''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''), Hawley Griffin (''Literature/TheInvisibleMan'') and Dr. Jekyll/Mister Hyde ([[Literature/TheStrangeCaseOfDrJekyllAndMrHyde duh]]).

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After ''Watchmen'', Moore moved into independent comics, writing ''Brought To Light'', a history of the CIA[[note]] Which led to the persistent rumour for years that he was banned from entering the USA; in fact, he'd simply not bothered renewing his passport.[[/note]]; ''Lost Girls'', a piece of highbrow erotica (though he insists it be called [[InsistentTerminology porn]]), and ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy. In the mid-90s, he also began doing more work-for-hire writing for companies such as Creator/WildStorm Comics and Creator/ImageComics. Through Wildstorm, he published his own imprint, America's Best Comics (ABC), which included ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'', a 32-issue treatise on magic (Moore has been a practicing magus since his 40th birthday); ''TopTen'', ''ComicBook/TopTen'', a pastiche of PoliceProcedural TV series set in a superhero-populated city; and ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', a call back to a more innocent era of comic writing. Perhaps the best-known ABC comic, ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', is a Victorian-era superhero story set in a universe in which all stories exist alongside one another. Thus, the titular team comprises Mina Murray (Mina Harker of ''{{Literature/Dracula}}'', reverting back to her maiden name), Allen Quatermain (''Literature/KingSolomonsMines''), Captain Nemo (''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''), Hawley Griffin (''Literature/TheInvisibleMan'') and Dr. Jekyll/Mister Hyde ([[Literature/TheStrangeCaseOfDrJekyllAndMrHyde duh]]).
6th Jan '17 5:07:01 PM nombretomado
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After ''Watchmen'', Moore moved into independent comics, writing ''Brought To Light'', a history of the CIA[[note]] Which led to the persistent rumour for years that he was banned from entering the USA; in fact, he'd simply not bothered renewing his passport.[[/note]]; ''Lost Girls'', a piece of highbrow erotica (though he insists it be called [[InsistentTerminology porn]]), and ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy. In the mid-90s, he also began doing more work-for-hire writing for companies such as Creator/WildstormComics and Creator/ImageComics. Through Wildstorm, he published his own imprint, America's Best Comics (ABC), which included ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'', a 32-issue treatise on magic (Moore has been a practicing magus since his 40th birthday); ''TopTen'', a pastiche of PoliceProcedural TV series set in a superhero-populated city; and ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', a call back to a more innocent era of comic writing. Perhaps the best-known ABC comic, ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', is a Victorian-era superhero story set in a universe in which all stories exist alongside one another. Thus, the titular team comprises Mina Murray (Mina Harker of ''{{Literature/Dracula}}'', reverting back to her maiden name), Allen Quatermain (''Literature/KingSolomonsMines''), Captain Nemo (''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''), Hawley Griffin (''Literature/TheInvisibleMan'') and Dr. Jekyll/Mister Hyde ([[Literature/TheStrangeCaseOfDrJekyllAndMrHyde duh]]).

to:

After ''Watchmen'', Moore moved into independent comics, writing ''Brought To Light'', a history of the CIA[[note]] Which led to the persistent rumour for years that he was banned from entering the USA; in fact, he'd simply not bothered renewing his passport.[[/note]]; ''Lost Girls'', a piece of highbrow erotica (though he insists it be called [[InsistentTerminology porn]]), and ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy. In the mid-90s, he also began doing more work-for-hire writing for companies such as Creator/WildstormComics Creator/WildStorm Comics and Creator/ImageComics. Through Wildstorm, he published his own imprint, America's Best Comics (ABC), which included ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'', a 32-issue treatise on magic (Moore has been a practicing magus since his 40th birthday); ''TopTen'', a pastiche of PoliceProcedural TV series set in a superhero-populated city; and ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', a call back to a more innocent era of comic writing. Perhaps the best-known ABC comic, ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', is a Victorian-era superhero story set in a universe in which all stories exist alongside one another. Thus, the titular team comprises Mina Murray (Mina Harker of ''{{Literature/Dracula}}'', reverting back to her maiden name), Allen Quatermain (''Literature/KingSolomonsMines''), Captain Nemo (''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''), Hawley Griffin (''Literature/TheInvisibleMan'') and Dr. Jekyll/Mister Hyde ([[Literature/TheStrangeCaseOfDrJekyllAndMrHyde duh]]).
6th Jan '17 5:06:22 PM nombretomado
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After ''Watchmen'', Moore moved into independent comics, writing ''Brought To Light'', a history of the CIA[[note]] Which led to the persistent rumour for years that he was banned from entering the USA; in fact, he'd simply not bothered renewing his passport.[[/note]]; ''Lost Girls'', a piece of highbrow erotica (though he insists it be called [[InsistentTerminology porn]]), and ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy. In the mid-90s, he also began doing more work-for-hire writing for companies such as WildstormComics and ImageComics. Through Wildstorm, he published his own imprint, America's Best Comics (ABC), which included ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'', a 32-issue treatise on magic (Moore has been a practicing magus since his 40th birthday); ''TopTen'', a pastiche of PoliceProcedural TV series set in a superhero-populated city; and ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', a call back to a more innocent era of comic writing. Perhaps the best-known ABC comic, ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', is a Victorian-era superhero story set in a universe in which all stories exist alongside one another. Thus, the titular team comprises Mina Murray (Mina Harker of ''{{Literature/Dracula}}'', reverting back to her maiden name), Allen Quatermain (''Literature/KingSolomonsMines''), Captain Nemo (''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''), Hawley Griffin (''Literature/TheInvisibleMan'') and Dr. Jekyll/Mister Hyde ([[Literature/TheStrangeCaseOfDrJekyllAndMrHyde duh]]).

to:

After ''Watchmen'', Moore moved into independent comics, writing ''Brought To Light'', a history of the CIA[[note]] Which led to the persistent rumour for years that he was banned from entering the USA; in fact, he'd simply not bothered renewing his passport.[[/note]]; ''Lost Girls'', a piece of highbrow erotica (though he insists it be called [[InsistentTerminology porn]]), and ''A Small Killing'', the story of a graphic designer who finds himself stalked by a strange little boy. In the mid-90s, he also began doing more work-for-hire writing for companies such as WildstormComics Creator/WildstormComics and ImageComics.Creator/ImageComics. Through Wildstorm, he published his own imprint, America's Best Comics (ABC), which included ''ComicBook/{{Promethea}}'', a 32-issue treatise on magic (Moore has been a practicing magus since his 40th birthday); ''TopTen'', a pastiche of PoliceProcedural TV series set in a superhero-populated city; and ''ComicBook/TomStrong'', a call back to a more innocent era of comic writing. Perhaps the best-known ABC comic, ''ComicBook/TheLeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'', is a Victorian-era superhero story set in a universe in which all stories exist alongside one another. Thus, the titular team comprises Mina Murray (Mina Harker of ''{{Literature/Dracula}}'', reverting back to her maiden name), Allen Quatermain (''Literature/KingSolomonsMines''), Captain Nemo (''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''), Hawley Griffin (''Literature/TheInvisibleMan'') and Dr. Jekyll/Mister Hyde ([[Literature/TheStrangeCaseOfDrJekyllAndMrHyde duh]]).
2nd Jan '17 11:32:42 AM ElectroKraken
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* PromotedFanboy / RunningTheAsylum: Alan Moore criticizes the fact that contemporary comics seem to be written more by fans who long for their childhood comics heroes rather than professional writers with craft and skill. However, he admits that he himself was this. The young Alan Moore was a serious comics collector who affirms that Franchise/{{Superman}} was his favorite character growing up. His love for the latter character and identification with its creators struggle, led to his famous, poignant story ''ComicBook/WhateverHappenedToTheManOfTomorrow'' which Neil Gaiman noted was a farewell to the Superman that existed in Moore's heart and who he believed would fade away with the CosmicRetcon that followed afterwards. Which, to be fair, is exactly what happened.
7th Dec '16 11:16:13 PM Xtifr
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Probably the most widely recognised (and ''CrazyAwesome'') ComicBook writer of all time, '''Alan Moore''' (born November 18, 1953 in Northampton, England) got his start writing and drawing cartoon strips for magazines such as ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' and ''The NME''. He moved on to get regular work at Marvel UK, where he wrote the ''ComicBook/CaptainBritain'' comic, and ''[[ComicBook/TwoThousandAD 2000AD]]'', where he wrote a series of acclaimed stories, including ''ComicBook/DRAndQuinch'' and ''ComicBook/TheBalladOfHaloJones''. This period included ''ComicBook/VForVendetta'', about an anarchist planning to take down a fascist UK Government, and ''ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}'', a reinvention of a 1950s British superhero.

to:

Probably the most widely recognised (and ''CrazyAwesome'') ComicBook writer of all time, '''Alan Moore''' Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953 in Northampton, England) got his start writing and drawing cartoon strips for magazines such as ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' and ''The NME''. He moved on to get regular work at Marvel UK, where he wrote the ''ComicBook/CaptainBritain'' comic, and ''[[ComicBook/TwoThousandAD 2000AD]]'', where he wrote a series of acclaimed stories, including ''ComicBook/DRAndQuinch'' and ''ComicBook/TheBalladOfHaloJones''. This period included ''ComicBook/VForVendetta'', about an anarchist planning to take down a fascist UK Government, and ''ComicBook/{{Miracleman}}'', a reinvention of a 1950s British superhero.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Creator.AlanMoore