History Characters / GameOfThronesHouseGreyjoy

19th Mar '17 7:18:39 PM karategal
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* BadassLongcoat: The clothing worn by Balon, Yara, and some of their men are heavily reminiscent of this, making them look less like Vikings and more like pirates. The costume department put a lot of thought into this (Michele Clapton said the ironborn were probably her favorite region she designed for), rationalizing that the ironborn spend most of their time on cold wind-swept ship decks at sea, so they need to wear heavy longcoats water-sealed with wax and fish oil to protect against the bone-freezing winds (they are ''not'' operating in warm Caribbean waters).

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* BadassLongcoat: The clothing worn by Balon, Yara, and some of their men are heavily reminiscent of this, making them look less like Vikings and more like pirates. The costume department put a lot of thought into this (Michele Clapton said the ironborn Ironborn were probably her favorite region she designed for), rationalizing that the ironborn Ironborn spend most of their time on cold wind-swept ship decks at sea, so they need to wear heavy longcoats water-sealed with wax and fish oil to protect against the bone-freezing winds (they are ''not'' operating in warm Caribbean waters).



* ButtMonkey: Everyone hates them, and they're always making incredibly poor decisions that lead to them getting their asses kicked in one way or another. [[labelnote:From the books...]]Even worse when you consider that, when the Targaryens invaded, the ironborn (though not the Greyjoys; at the time they were ruled by House Hoare and Harren the Black, builder of Harrenhal) ruled the whole Riverlands, and then lost it all, thanks to Aegon's dragons. The Tullys, the current lords of the Riverlands, earned their title for leading the rebellion that helped oust Harren during Aegon's conquest.[[/labelnote]]

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* ButtMonkey: Everyone hates them, and they're always making incredibly poor decisions that lead to them getting their asses kicked in one way or another. [[labelnote:From the books...]]Even worse when you consider that, when the Targaryens invaded, the ironborn Ironborn (though not the Greyjoys; at the time they were ruled by House Hoare and Harren the Black, builder of Harrenhal) ruled the whole Riverlands, and then lost it all, thanks to Aegon's dragons. The Tullys, the current lords of the Riverlands, earned their title for leading the rebellion that helped oust Harren during Aegon's conquest.[[/labelnote]]



* ThickerThanWater: Usually averted, but then zig-zagged. Among the ironborn in general, they constantly fight civil wars against their own brothers to seize power...yet will also fight civil wars to avenge their own brother's death at the hands of someone else. In the older generation, there isn't much familial honor: Balon sees his own son Theon as a failure that was lost to the Starks anyway, while Balon's brother Euron is a psychopath who would gleefully kill any of his other family members. Balon is sort of proud of Yara, whom he raised as a surrogate son, but even she says that she "survived" her father and didn't exactly have a warm relationship with him (albeit Balon never disinherited her, the way he basically did to Theon). Balon's other brother Aeron is a priest and he doesn't like to pick political sides. A major part of Theon's storyarc which comes to a head in Season 2 is picking between Balon as his biological father, and staying loyal to his adoptive brother Robb Stark to avenge the death of his adopted father Ned. Theon picks Balon (blood thicker than water) -- but then fails miserably, breaks down sobbing that he was given a choice and he chose wrong, and Ned was his real father. On the other hand, it turns out that Yara has a BigSisterInstinct for Theon, and he reciprocates this loyalty (she cares about him more than Balon ever did); in Season 6 they reunite and form a Brother-Sister Team, with Theon even voluntarily setting aside any claim to rule ahead of her and saying all he wants is to help her rule over the Iron Islands.

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* ThickerThanWater: Usually averted, but then zig-zagged. Among the ironborn Ironborn in general, they constantly fight civil wars against their own brothers to seize power...yet will also fight civil wars to avenge their own brother's death at the hands of someone else. In the older generation, there isn't much familial honor: Balon sees his own son Theon as a failure that was lost to the Starks anyway, while Balon's brother Euron is a psychopath who would gleefully kill any of his other family members. Balon is sort of proud of Yara, whom he raised as a surrogate son, but even she says that she "survived" her father and didn't exactly have a warm relationship with him (albeit Balon never disinherited her, the way he basically did to Theon). Balon's other brother Aeron is a priest and he doesn't like to pick political sides. A major part of Theon's storyarc which comes to a head in Season 2 is picking between Balon as his biological father, and staying loyal to his adoptive brother Robb Stark to avenge the death of his adopted father Ned. Theon picks Balon (blood thicker than water) -- but then fails miserably, breaks down sobbing that he was given a choice and he chose wrong, and Ned was his real father. On the other hand, it turns out that Yara has a BigSisterInstinct for Theon, and he reciprocates this loyalty (she cares about him more than Balon ever did); in Season 6 they reunite and form a Brother-Sister Team, with Theon even voluntarily setting aside any claim to rule ahead of her and saying all he wants is to help her rule over the Iron Islands.



Lord Balon Greyjoy is Lord of the Iron Isles, and the Lord Reaper of Pyke -- capital of the Isles. More than a decade ago, Lord Balon claimed the title of Iron King and rose in rebellion against King Robert. Robert, Eddard and Jon Arryn put an end to it, destroying his army and killing his eldest sons. Ned Stark then took Balon's youngest surviving son Theon as hostage to keep Balon loyal to the Iron Throne. Balon has been itching for revenge and another shot at independence ever since, and the great houses' distraction with the War of the Five Kings has given him the opportunity to crown himself Iron King once again. Instead of attacking the traditional Ironborn enemies (Tullys[=/=]Mallisters, Lannisters, and Tyrells), Balon unleashed his forces on the North, which was largely undefended due to Robb's campaign in the south.

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Lord Balon Greyjoy is Lord of the Iron Isles, and the Lord Reaper of Pyke -- capital of the Isles. More than a decade ago, Lord Balon claimed the title of Iron King and rose in rebellion against King Robert. Robert, Eddard Eddard, and Jon Arryn put an end to it, destroying his army and killing his eldest sons. Ned Stark then took Balon's youngest surviving son Theon as a hostage to keep Balon loyal to the Iron Throne. Balon has been itching for revenge and another shot at independence ever since, and the great houses' distraction with the War of the Five Kings has given him the opportunity to crown himself Iron King once again. Instead of attacking the traditional Ironborn enemies (Tullys[=/=]Mallisters, Lannisters, and Tyrells), Balon unleashed his forces on the North, which was largely undefended due to Robb's campaign in the south.



* {{Hypocrite}}: Balon is quick to point out the flaws of others and is especially critical of Theon for not paying the 'iron price' and being raised by the Starks...when Balon himself is the man who gave Theon away after being utterly destroyed when he got too big for his watery boots. He also resents his losses and shames before Westeros, when by all rights his own belief in the Iron Price means everything was taken from him fairly and through no one's fault but his own for not being stronger.

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* {{Hypocrite}}: Balon is quick to point out the flaws of others and is especially critical of Theon for not paying the 'iron price' and being raised by the Starks... when Balon himself is the man who gave Theon away after being utterly destroyed when he got too big for his watery boots. He also resents his losses and shames before Westeros, when by all rights his own belief in the Iron Price means everything was taken from him fairly and through no one's fault but his own for not being stronger.



* HeirClubForMen: Aeron is the first to cast doubt on Yara's position as heir to the Salt Throne, giving her a blunt reminder that the Ironborn have never once elected a Queen. The fact that he invoked that Yara should be elected, when Balon was never elected, is further indication of his sexism.[[labelnote:From the Books]]Aeron argued for an election because he disagreed with Balon's choice of Yara/Asha as a heir and also because of a genuine succession dispute between Theon, Victarion and Euron, who had physically seized the throne upon Balon's death. The Kingsmoot hadn't been held for ''centuries'' before the Conquest, later Ironborn Kings like the Hoares were hereditary monarchy. Aegon the Conqueror did allow the Ironborn to elect their new Lord Paramount and the Greyjoys became hereditary FeudalOverlord, and Balon certainly didn't submit himself to election, so the kingsmoot is less a case of Ironborn custom and more an instance of MovingTheGoalposts to prevent a woman from making her claim. In the books of course, he doesn't deny her right to a candidacy -- he simply thinks no true ironborn will vote for her. When she actually gets a sizable portion of the votes midway through the kingsmoot he is stunned and has no fallback plan -- then Euron shows up.[[/labelnote]]

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* HeirClubForMen: Aeron is the first to cast doubt on Yara's position as heir to the Salt Throne, giving her a blunt reminder that the Ironborn have never once elected a Queen. The fact that he invoked that Yara should be elected, when Balon was never elected, is further indication of his sexism.[[labelnote:From the Books]]Aeron argued for an election because he disagreed with Balon's choice of Yara/Asha as a heir and also because of a genuine succession dispute between Theon, Victarion and Euron, who had physically seized the throne upon Balon's death. The Kingsmoot hadn't been held for ''centuries'' before the Conquest, later Ironborn Kings like the Hoares were hereditary monarchy. Aegon the Conqueror did allow the Ironborn to elect their new Lord Paramount and the Greyjoys became hereditary FeudalOverlord, and Balon certainly didn't submit himself to election, so the kingsmoot is less a case of Ironborn custom and more an instance of MovingTheGoalposts to prevent a woman from making her claim. In the books of course, he doesn't deny her right to a candidacy -- he simply thinks no true ironborn Ironborn will vote for her. When she actually gets a sizable portion of the votes midway through the kingsmoot he is stunned and has no fallback plan -- then Euron shows up.[[/labelnote]]



* MinorMajorCharacter: Aeron's very slim on screentime, but he's actually a vital cog in Ironborn politics. It is he who calls the Kingsmoot, he who conducts it, and it is he who legitimizes Euron as king (via drowning). As unofficial leader of the Drowned Men he's basically the nearest thing the Ironborn have to a pope.

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* MinorMajorCharacter: Aeron's very slim on screentime, but he's actually a vital cog in Ironborn politics. It is he who calls the Kingsmoot, he who conducts it, and it is he who legitimizes Euron as king (via drowning). As unofficial leader of the Drowned Men Men, he's basically the nearest thing the Ironborn have to a pope.



*** In the books, Balon considers Yara his heir, given that he thinks Theon is outright dead, even though he could easily name his younger brother Victarion (cut from the show) as his heir, or even his other brother Aeron the priest. In fact this was a particular sign of favoritism by Balon, given how shocking the ironborn consider it for a woman to rule, and he must have known it risked a succession crisis when anti-Yara lords rallied behind her uncles.

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*** In the books, Balon considers Yara his heir, given that he thinks Theon is outright dead, even though he could easily name his younger brother Victarion (cut from the show) as his heir, or even his other brother Aeron the priest. In fact this was a particular sign of favoritism by Balon, given how shocking the ironborn Ironborn consider it for a woman to rule, and he must have known it risked a succession crisis when anti-Yara lords rallied behind her uncles.



* BadassGay: Or Bisexual. She is a battle-hardened ironborn raider who is at the very least into pretty ladies.

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* BadassGay: Or Bisexual. She is a battle-hardened ironborn Ironborn raider who is at the very least into pretty ladies.



* ThereAreNoTherapists: She truly loves Theon, but when he still has PTSD when they're in Volantis in Season 6, she tells him that if he doesn't want to live he should just kill himself, or he should keep going - though she does apologize for being a little insensitive. This might seem kind of blunt to us, but in the behind-the-scenes videos, the showrunners directly explained that "Yara isn't a trained psychotherapist", most people in Westeros don't really know about PTSD and the ironborn in particular are more blunt than others, so they felt that it would be untrue to her background if she wasn't kind of blunt in this scene.
* TheSmurfettePrinciple: She's the only prominent female Ironborn shown onscreen (exactly as in the novels, in which the ironborn are very misogynistic and her status as a tomboyish warrior is quite unusual).

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* ThereAreNoTherapists: She truly loves Theon, but when he still has PTSD when they're in Volantis in Season 6, she tells him that if he doesn't want to live he should just kill himself, or he should keep going - -- though she does apologize for being a little insensitive. This might seem kind of blunt to us, but in the behind-the-scenes videos, the showrunners directly explained that "Yara isn't a trained psychotherapist", most people in Westeros don't really know about PTSD and the ironborn Ironborn in particular are more blunt than others, so they felt that it would be untrue to her background if she wasn't kind of blunt in this scene.
* TheSmurfettePrinciple: She's the only prominent female Ironborn shown onscreen (exactly as in the novels, in which the ironborn Ironborn are very misogynistic and her status as a tomboyish warrior is quite unusual).
19th Mar '17 6:39:59 PM karategal
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* OutnumberedSiblings: Balon's only daughter.

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* OutnumberedSiblings: OutnumberedSibling: Balon's only daughter.
19th Mar '17 3:20:58 PM karategal
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** Yes and no: the TV series has been playing this a little loose, as at other points Tyrion says that Yara and Theon brought "the Iron Fleet" to Meereen, etc., but then says they only brought part of it. In the books, strictly speaking the Iron Fleet is the "national" fleet of the Iron Islands sworn directly to their ruler, but each vassal has their own fleets - the TV show just calls any ships from the Iron Islands part of "the Iron Fleet". Either way, it seems that Yara and Euron in the TV version were talking about ''expanding'' the Iron Fleet to have even more ships in it.

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** Yes and no: the TV series has been playing this a little loose, as at other points Tyrion says that Yara and Theon brought "the Iron Fleet" to Meereen, etc., but then says they only brought part of it. In the books, strictly speaking the Iron Fleet is the "national" fleet of the Iron Islands sworn directly to their ruler, but each vassal has their own fleets - -- the TV show just calls any ships from the Iron Islands part of "the Iron Fleet". Either way, it seems that Yara and Euron in the TV version were talking about ''expanding'' the Iron Fleet to have even more ships in it.



** In the books they make it more explicit that ''any'' ship captain can put themselves forward as a candidate - it's just that the main families like the Greyjoys tend to be the most famous and successful, so they usually win. In turn, this means they will probably continue to have opportunities to be successful, so power does tend to be concentrated in a few families (they only tend to get voted out of power if they really screw up). In the book version three other minor fringe candidates try to run against Yara and Euron but they don't even make it through the first round of voting and quickly give up.
** Democracy is Flawed also applies in the sense that the ship captains voting at the Kingsmoot tend to be easily swayed by grandstanding and empty promises - in the books, it was considered unusual that a few of the smarter lords actually support Yara, based on her appeal to ''reason and logic'' ("What the hell do you think will happen if we keep harassing the mainlanders?")
* DemotedToExtra: A significant portion of their subplots and screen-time were removed from the first four seasons. Namely, Aeron and Victarion Greyjoy are entirely absent. Season six brings them back into the limelight with the introduction of Euron and later Aeron.

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** In the books they make it more explicit that ''any'' ship captain can put themselves forward as a candidate - -- it's just that the main families like the Greyjoys tend to be the most famous and successful, so they usually win. In turn, this means they will probably continue to have opportunities to be successful, so power does tend to be concentrated in a few families (they only tend to get voted out of power if they really screw up). In the book version three other minor fringe candidates try to run against Yara and Euron but they don't even make it through the first round of voting and quickly give up.
** Democracy is Flawed also applies in the sense that the ship captains voting at the Kingsmoot tend to be easily swayed by grandstanding and empty promises - -- in the books, it was considered unusual that a few of the smarter lords actually support Yara, based on her appeal to ''reason and logic'' ("What the hell do you think will happen if we keep harassing the mainlanders?")
* DemotedToExtra: A significant portion of their subplots and screen-time were removed from the first four seasons. Namely, Aeron and Victarion Greyjoy are entirely absent. Season six 6 brings them back into the limelight with the introduction of Euron and later Aeron.



** Turning into an EnemyCivilWar after the Kingsmoot in mid-Season 6. Euron is crowned king and promptly orders the deaths of his niece and nephew who stood against him in the election, but they flee with a sizable portion of the fleet which is still loyal to them. [[labelnote:In the books...]] As of the most recent novel, it hasn't turned into an outright civil war yet but is on the verge of doing so. Victarion (cut from the show) is sent east with the Iron Fleet but plans to later turn it against Euron - in the show Yara takes his place but openly takes the Iron Fleet. In the books Yara only flees with her own ship back to Deepwood Motte, where she only commands about 200 men, who are soon destroyed by Stannis while she is captured. As in the show, Euron controls the Iron Islands themselves and most of their forces, though privately several major Houses have grown fearful of him and regret that Yara didn't win. They don't speak up because Euron outright executed Lord Blacktyde for vocally supporting Yara at the election. Meanwhile, the Drowned priests absolutely ''loathe'' Euron and are actively planning to raise an insurrection among the smallfolk of the islands against him.[[/labelnote]]
* ElectiveMonarchy: They're the ''only'' one of the Seven Kingdoms that, back when they were independent, chose their own rulers through a form of limited democracy. All of the lords and ship captains gather together at an assembly known as a "Kingsmoot", where anyone can present themself as a candidate, not just the previous king's family. Candidates give stump speeches, and whoever wins over the crowd to get the most votes becomes the new king. They revive this after declaring independence again during the War of the Five Kings (though according to the "Histories and Lore" extras of season 6, in the intervening period when their ruler was just a "Lord Paramount" under the Targaryens and Baratheons, the Kingsmoot still existed but only as a formality, always "choosing" the eldest Greyjoy heir). The only other group in Westeros that has formal elections like this is the Night's Watch. The Watch has even more formal elections, in which literally ''every'' member gets to cast a vote - though that isn't really a fair comparison, given that while the Watch does control territory and castles they're not really a "kingdom" but a monastic knightly order.

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** Turning into an EnemyCivilWar after the Kingsmoot in mid-Season 6. Euron is crowned king and promptly orders the deaths of his niece and nephew who stood against him in the election, but they flee with a sizable portion of the fleet which is still loyal to them. [[labelnote:In the books...]] As of the most recent novel, it hasn't turned into an outright civil war yet but is on the verge of doing so. Victarion (cut from the show) is sent east with the Iron Fleet but plans to later turn it against Euron - -- in the show Yara takes his place but openly takes the Iron Fleet. In the books Yara only flees with her own ship back to Deepwood Motte, where she only commands about 200 men, who are soon destroyed by Stannis while she is captured. As in the show, Euron controls the Iron Islands themselves and most of their forces, though privately several major Houses have grown fearful of him and regret that Yara didn't win. They don't speak up because Euron outright executed Lord Blacktyde for vocally supporting Yara at the election. Meanwhile, the Drowned priests absolutely ''loathe'' Euron and are actively planning to raise an insurrection among the smallfolk of the islands against him.[[/labelnote]]
* ElectiveMonarchy: They're the ''only'' one of the Seven Kingdoms that, back when they were independent, chose their own rulers through a form of limited democracy. All of the lords and ship captains gather together at an assembly known as a "Kingsmoot", where anyone can present themself as a candidate, not just the previous king's family. Candidates give stump speeches, and whoever wins over the crowd to get the most votes becomes the new king. They revive this after declaring independence again during the War of the Five Kings (though according to the "Histories and Lore" extras of season Season 6, in the intervening period when their ruler was just a "Lord Paramount" under the Targaryens and Baratheons, the Kingsmoot still existed but only as a formality, always "choosing" the eldest Greyjoy heir). The only other group in Westeros that has formal elections like this is the Night's Watch. The Watch has even more formal elections, in which literally ''every'' member gets to cast a vote - -- though that isn't really a fair comparison, given that while the Watch does control territory and castles they're not really a "kingdom" but a monastic knightly order.



** FridgeLogic: All of their successes in the first rebellion, such as burning the Lannister fleet at anchor, were when they had ''Euron'' leading their assaults for his older brother Balon. Tyrion even says to Theon regarding their victory that "I believe your uncles were responsible" - not his father. Euron is a cunning strategist in all the ways Balon is not, but then he was gone from the islands, and the ironborn lost their most dangerous commander.

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** FridgeLogic: All of their successes in the first rebellion, such as burning the Lannister fleet at anchor, were when they had ''Euron'' leading their assaults for his older brother Balon. Tyrion even says to Theon regarding their victory that "I believe your uncles were responsible" - -- not his father. Euron is a cunning strategist in all the ways Balon is not, but then he was gone from the islands, and the ironborn lost their most dangerous commander.



* ThickerThanWater: Usually averted, but then zig-zagged. Among the ironborn in general, they constantly fight civil wars against their own brothers to seize power...yet will also fight civil wars to avenge their own brother's death at the hands of someone else. In the older generation, there isn't much familial honor: Balon sees his own son Theon as a failure that was lost to the Starks anyway, while Balon's brother Euron is a psychopath who would gleefully kill any of his other family members. Balon is sort of proud of Yara, whom he raised as a surrogate son, but even she says that she "survived" her father and didn't exactly have a warm relationship with him (albeit Balon never disinherited her, the way he basically did to Theon). Balon's other brother Aeron is a priest and he doesn't like to pick political sides. A major part of Theon's storyarc which comes to a head in Season 2 is picking between Balon as his biological father, and staying loyal to his adoptive brother Robb Stark to avenge the death of his adopted father Ned. Theon picks Balon (blood thicker than water) - but then fails miserably, breaks down sobbing that he was given a choice and he chose wrong, and Ned was his real father. On the other hand, it turns out that Yara has a BigSisterInstinct for Theon, and he reciprocates this loyalty (she cares about him more than Balon ever did); in Season 6 they reunite and form a Brother-Sister Team, with Theon even voluntarily setting aside any claim to rule ahead of her and saying all he wants is to help her rule over the Iron Islands.

to:

* ThickerThanWater: Usually averted, but then zig-zagged. Among the ironborn in general, they constantly fight civil wars against their own brothers to seize power...yet will also fight civil wars to avenge their own brother's death at the hands of someone else. In the older generation, there isn't much familial honor: Balon sees his own son Theon as a failure that was lost to the Starks anyway, while Balon's brother Euron is a psychopath who would gleefully kill any of his other family members. Balon is sort of proud of Yara, whom he raised as a surrogate son, but even she says that she "survived" her father and didn't exactly have a warm relationship with him (albeit Balon never disinherited her, the way he basically did to Theon). Balon's other brother Aeron is a priest and he doesn't like to pick political sides. A major part of Theon's storyarc which comes to a head in Season 2 is picking between Balon as his biological father, and staying loyal to his adoptive brother Robb Stark to avenge the death of his adopted father Ned. Theon picks Balon (blood thicker than water) - -- but then fails miserably, breaks down sobbing that he was given a choice and he chose wrong, and Ned was his real father. On the other hand, it turns out that Yara has a BigSisterInstinct for Theon, and he reciprocates this loyalty (she cares about him more than Balon ever did); in Season 6 they reunite and form a Brother-Sister Team, with Theon even voluntarily setting aside any claim to rule ahead of her and saying all he wants is to help her rule over the Iron Islands.



** To Theon. In ''Mhysa'', he refuses to save Theon from the Boltons because Theon disobeyed him by attacking Winterfell and because he is "no longer a man."

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** To Theon. In ''Mhysa'', "Mhysa", he refuses to save Theon from the Boltons because Theon disobeyed him by attacking Winterfell and because he is "no longer a man."



** He isn't ''quite'' as nasty to Theon in the books: Balon still insults him and plans to disinherit him in favor of his daughter, but he actually compliments Theon's guts for standing up to him, saying "Well, at the least you are no craven", and Theon's mission to the Stony Shore is actually strategically valuable, giving him far more ships and soldiers and is treated as less of an [[YouGetMeCoffee embarrassingly unimportant task to get him out of the way]]. Furthermore he doesn't completely ignore Theon's return to Pyke and sends his uncle Aeron to greet him, and his refusal to negotiate and save Theon from Ramsay is entirely original to the show - Book!Balon never actually finds out if Theon survived the Bolton attack on Winterfell.

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** He isn't ''quite'' as nasty to Theon in the books: Balon still insults him and plans to disinherit him in favor of his daughter, but he actually compliments Theon's guts for standing up to him, saying "Well, at the least you are no craven", and Theon's mission to the Stony Shore is actually strategically valuable, giving him far more ships and soldiers and is treated as less of an [[YouGetMeCoffee embarrassingly unimportant task to get him out of the way]]. Furthermore he doesn't completely ignore Theon's return to Pyke and sends his uncle Aeron to greet him, and his refusal to negotiate and save Theon from Ramsay is entirely original to the show - -- Book!Balon never actually finds out if Theon survived the Bolton attack on Winterfell.



* AdaptationalWimp: In the books he's revered for bringing back the Ironborn way despite his bad track record with the whole rebellion thing, to the point where most of the kingsmoot hopefuls are trying to ride his legacy. Here the Ironborn see him as a GeneralFailure who did nothing for them.

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* AdaptationalWimp: In the books books, he's revered for bringing back the Ironborn way despite his bad track record with the whole rebellion thing, to the point where most of the kingsmoot hopefuls are trying to ride his legacy. Here the Ironborn see him as a GeneralFailure who did nothing for them.



* AssholeVictim: [[spoiler: He's an AbusiveFather and SoreLoser who recklessly led his people on a pointless rebellion twice. Euron, his murderer, even got elected as King of the Salt Throne by playing up his ZeroPercentApprovalRating.]]

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* AssholeVictim: [[spoiler: He's an AbusiveFather [[AbusiveParents Abusive Father]] and SoreLoser who recklessly led his people on a pointless rebellion twice. Euron, his murderer, even got elected as King of the Salt Throne by playing up his ZeroPercentApprovalRating.]]



* TheGhost: Before the casting of season 5, we didn't hear anything about Euron, only that Theon had 'uncles' during a talk between Tyrion and Theon early in season 1.

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* TheGhost: Before the casting of season Season 5, we didn't hear anything about Euron, only that Theon had 'uncles' during a talk between Tyrion and Theon early in season Season 1.



* NoTrueScotsman: Balon notes that Euron always mocked their customs and traditions. Euron then arrives at the kingsmoot and states that by killing Balon he was a true Ironborn because he "paid the Iron price" rather than wait his turn in the line of succession.

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* NoTrueScotsman: Balon notes that Euron always mocked their customs and traditions. Euron then arrives at the kingsmoot Kingsmoot and states that by killing Balon he was a true Ironborn because he "paid the Iron price" rather than wait his turn in the line of succession.



* PlayingGertrude: The guy playing Euron is actually a year younger than the actress playing Yara and just four years older than the actor playing Theon. And nearly ''forty'' years younger than the actors playing Balon and Aeron, the latter of whom is supposed to be ''younger'' than him. In the novels themselves, when Euron returns to the Iron Islands other characters are surprised that he doesn't look like he has aged a day, almost unnaturally so - hinting that this might be due to the black magic he dabbles in. In both the TV show and books, Euron's hair doesn't show even a day of his age, being totally untouched by gray.

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* PlayingGertrude: The guy playing Euron is actually a year younger than the actress playing Yara and just four years older than the actor playing Theon. And nearly ''forty'' years younger than the actors playing Balon and Aeron, the latter of whom is supposed to be ''younger'' than him. In the novels themselves, when Euron returns to the Iron Islands other characters are surprised that he doesn't look like he has aged a day, almost unnaturally so - -- hinting that this might be due to the black magic he dabbles in. In both the TV show and books, Euron's hair doesn't show even a day of his age, being totally untouched by gray.



* WhatTheHellIsThatAccent: Played by Danish actor Pilou Asbæk, who doesn't fully hide his accent while playing Euron, even though the ironborn speak with the same accent as the mainland (because they're the same Andal/First Men mix - except Theon, but he spent years living in the North and picked up their accent). This is probably justified in that Euron has been away from both the Iron Islands and Westeros for ''years'', as he says sailing the world oceans from Oldtown to Qarth, even raiding in the distant Jade Sea - logically, he's probably been speaking in a dozen different foreign languages for years and it must have affected his own accent.

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* WhatTheHellIsThatAccent: Played by Danish actor Pilou Asbæk, who doesn't fully hide his accent while playing Euron, even though the ironborn speak with the same accent as the mainland (because they're the same Andal/First Men mix - -- except Theon, but he spent years living in the North and picked up their accent). This is probably justified in that Euron has been away from both the Iron Islands and Westeros for ''years'', as he says sailing the world oceans from Oldtown to Qarth, even raiding in the distant Jade Sea - -- logically, he's probably been speaking in a dozen different foreign languages for years and it must have affected his own accent.



* AdaptedOut: In Season 2 he was replaced by a nameless Drowned Man and his part of greeting Theon upon his arrival to the Iron Islands is given to Yara.

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* AdaptedOut: In Season 2 2, he was replaced by a nameless Drowned Man and his part of greeting Theon upon his arrival to the Iron Islands is given to Yara.



* BadassPreacher: It's not very clear, but back in season 1 Tyrion says Theon's uncle'''s''' were responsible for the destruction of the Lannister fleet and the burning of Lannisport, the absolute high mark of the First Greyjoy Rebellion. Euron and Aeron are Theon's only uncles, so it stands to reason Aeron is (or was) one Hell of a reaver.[[labelnote:From the books...]]Euron came up with the plan to burn Tywin's fleet at anchor, but Balon's other brother Victarion carried it out. Victarion was cut from the TV show. Aeron ''did'' take part in the battle in the novels, but only as the commander of his own ship. The line that "your uncles were responsible" was intentionally ambiguous, so the TV show could later say that Tyrion meant that both Euron and Aeron were involved ''in some fashion'', without needing to introduce Victarion.[[/labelnote]]

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* BadassPreacher: It's not very clear, but back in season 1 Season 1, Tyrion says Theon's uncle'''s''' were responsible for the destruction of the Lannister fleet and the burning of Lannisport, the absolute high mark of the First Greyjoy Rebellion. Euron and Aeron are Theon's only uncles, so it stands to reason Aeron is (or was) one Hell of a reaver.[[labelnote:From the books...]]Euron came up with the plan to burn Tywin's fleet at anchor, but Balon's other brother Victarion carried it out. Victarion was cut from the TV show. Aeron ''did'' take part in the battle in the novels, but only as the commander of his own ship. The line that "your uncles were responsible" was intentionally ambiguous, so the TV show could later say that Tyrion meant that both Euron and Aeron were involved ''in some fashion'', without needing to introduce Victarion.[[/labelnote]]



* TheGhost: Before the casting of season 6, we didn't hear anything about Aeron, only that Theon had 'uncles' during a talk between Tyrion and Theon early in season 1.
* HeirClubForMen: Aeron is the first to cast doubt on Yara's position as heir to the Salt Throne, giving her a blunt reminder that the Ironborn have never once elected a Queen. The fact that he invoked that Yara should be elected, when Balon was never elected, is further indication of his sexism.[[labelnote:From the Books]]Aeron argued for an election because he disagreed with Balon's choice of Yara/Asha as a heir and also because of a genuine succession dispute between Theon, Victarion and Euron, who had physically seized the throne upon Balon's death. The Kingsmoot hadn't been held for ''centuries'' before the Conquest, later Ironborn Kings like the Hoares were hereditary monarchy. Aegon the Conqueror did allow the Ironborn to elect their new Lord Paramount and the Greyjoys became hereditary FeudalOverlord, and Balon certainly didn't submit himself to election, so the kingsmoot is less a case of Ironborn custom and more an instance of MovingTheGoalposts to prevent a woman from making her claim. In the books of course, he doesn't deny her right to a candidacy - he simply thinks no true ironborn will vote for her. When she actually gets a sizable portion of the votes midway through the kingsmoot he is stunned and has no fallback plan - then Euron shows up.[[/labelnote]]
* HighPriest: Seems to be the top Priest of the Drowned God faith.[[labelnote:From the books...]]The Drowned Men who serve as priests in their religion actually don't have any ruling hierarchy - theoretically all of the priests are equal and any priest can ordain another man as a priest if he is worthy. They don't have an equivalent to the High Septon in the Faith of the Seven. ''In practice'', of course, Drowned Priests who have been serving the longest and successfully revived the most initiates in drowning ceremonies are respected much more than others, and often in every generation or so there will be one Drowned Priest that all of the others look up to for guidance. Aeron is universally respected by the others - on the level of al Old Testament style prophet - and thus he is their ''unofficial'' leader, first among equals, etc.[[/labelnote]]

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* TheGhost: Before the casting of season Season 6, we didn't hear anything about Aeron, only that Theon had 'uncles' during a talk between Tyrion and Theon early in season Season 1.
* HeirClubForMen: Aeron is the first to cast doubt on Yara's position as heir to the Salt Throne, giving her a blunt reminder that the Ironborn have never once elected a Queen. The fact that he invoked that Yara should be elected, when Balon was never elected, is further indication of his sexism.[[labelnote:From the Books]]Aeron argued for an election because he disagreed with Balon's choice of Yara/Asha as a heir and also because of a genuine succession dispute between Theon, Victarion and Euron, who had physically seized the throne upon Balon's death. The Kingsmoot hadn't been held for ''centuries'' before the Conquest, later Ironborn Kings like the Hoares were hereditary monarchy. Aegon the Conqueror did allow the Ironborn to elect their new Lord Paramount and the Greyjoys became hereditary FeudalOverlord, and Balon certainly didn't submit himself to election, so the kingsmoot is less a case of Ironborn custom and more an instance of MovingTheGoalposts to prevent a woman from making her claim. In the books of course, he doesn't deny her right to a candidacy - -- he simply thinks no true ironborn will vote for her. When she actually gets a sizable portion of the votes midway through the kingsmoot he is stunned and has no fallback plan - -- then Euron shows up.[[/labelnote]]
* HighPriest: Seems to be the top Priest of the Drowned God faith.[[labelnote:From the books...]]The Drowned Men who serve as priests in their religion actually don't have any ruling hierarchy - -- theoretically all of the priests are equal and any priest can ordain another man as a priest if he is worthy. They don't have an equivalent to the High Septon in the Faith of the Seven. ''In practice'', of course, Drowned Priests who have been serving the longest and successfully revived the most initiates in drowning ceremonies are respected much more than others, and often in every generation or so there will be one Drowned Priest that all of the others look up to for guidance. Aeron is universally respected by the others - -- on the level of al Old Testament style prophet - -- and thus he is their ''unofficial'' leader, first among equals, etc.[[/labelnote]]



* AdaptationalHeroism: At the end of Season 3, she finds out that Theon is Ramsay's prisoner, and against her father's wishes decides to take a ship, 50 good men, and go rescue him. In the books, she does no such thing. In Season 6, after her bid for the Seastone Chair fails at the Kingsmoot, she and Theon steal nearly half the Iron Fleet and sail to Meereen to pledge themselves to Dany's cause before Euron does, knowing that he will most likely use her to conquer Westeros and then kill her once the Iron Throne is his. In the books, Asha just quietly drops out of prominence once Euron is crowned king, and Victarion sails to Meereen to pledge himself to Dany--on Euron's orders.

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* AdaptationalHeroism: At the end of Season 3, she finds out that Theon is Ramsay's prisoner, and against her father's wishes decides to take a ship, 50 good men, and go rescue him. In the books, she does no such thing. In Season 6, after her bid for the Seastone Chair fails at the Kingsmoot, she and Theon steal nearly half the Iron Fleet and sail to Meereen to pledge themselves to Dany's cause before Euron does, knowing that he will most likely use her to conquer Westeros and then kill her once the Iron Throne is his. In the books, Asha just quietly drops out of prominence once Euron is crowned king, and Victarion sails to Meereen to pledge himself to Dany--on Dany -- on Euron's orders.



** Despite the bickering and vicious mocking, she and Theon care about each other deeply. She even defies her father in organizing a rescue mission for Theon immediately after receiving his castrated penis. When Theon returns to Pyke again in Season 6, Yara - already on edge and a bit paranoid after Balon's death - is furious at first, but when Theon tearfully confesses that he's there purely to support her as the new ruler of the Iron Islands, she is stunned and untenses at once. All the bravado leaves her, and she nearly hugs him on the spot.
** Yara also isn't terribly fond of her father, but still swears gruesome, bloody vengeance when [[spoiler: Euron murders him]]. Even when they're arguing at the beginning of Season 6 Balon never threatens to disinherit Yara, and mentions he expects that she'll rule after he's dead - though in the very angry climax to their last argument he says that if she won't obey he'll make another who will (it's unclear how much he meant that last one).

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** Despite the bickering and vicious mocking, she and Theon care about each other deeply. She even defies her father in organizing a rescue mission for Theon immediately after receiving his castrated penis. When Theon returns to Pyke again in Season 6, Yara - -- already on edge and a bit paranoid after Balon's death - -- is furious at first, but when Theon tearfully confesses that he's there purely to support her as the new ruler of the Iron Islands, she is stunned and untenses at once. All the bravado leaves her, and she nearly hugs him on the spot.
** Yara also isn't terribly fond of her father, but still swears gruesome, bloody vengeance when [[spoiler: Euron murders him]]. Even when they're arguing at the beginning of Season 6 6, Balon never threatens to disinherit Yara, and mentions he expects that she'll rule after he's dead - -- though in the very angry climax to their last argument he says that if she won't obey he'll make another who will (it's unclear how much he meant that last one).



* BirdsOfAFeather: With Daenerys, as strong-willed women looking to make their mark in a patriarchal society. The admiration between the two when they first meet is instant and obvious - [[LesYay and perhaps not entirely platonic, either...]]

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* BirdsOfAFeather: With Daenerys, as strong-willed women looking to make their mark in a patriarchal society. The admiration between the two when they first meet is instant and obvious - -- [[LesYay and perhaps not entirely platonic, either...]]



* OnlySaneMan: Compared to the other Ironborn leaders including her own father, she's seemingly the only one with a basic grasp of large-scale political and military strategy. Balon's "plan" was to opportunistically attack the North purely because they were an easy victory while their army was away - then keep fighting to hold the towns and castles they'd captured long after that war in the south ended. TV-Yara even gives a variation on book-Asha's famous "pinecones and rocks" speech, pointing out that attacking ''the North'' of all places has brought them absolutely nothing - as opposed to say, trying to capture the mines of the Westerlands or the farms of the Reach (after all, winter is coming). She outright berates her father for trying to fight mainland armies when their strength is ''at sea''. Only Theon also brought up these concerns - that the North was their natural ally and they should have teamed up against the Lannisters - but he caved because he wanted to impress his father.

to:

* OnlySaneMan: Compared to the other Ironborn leaders including her own father, she's seemingly the only one with a basic grasp of large-scale political and military strategy. Balon's "plan" was to opportunistically attack the North purely because they were an easy victory while their army was away - -- then keep fighting to hold the towns and castles they'd captured long after that war in the south ended. TV-Yara even gives a variation on book-Asha's famous "pinecones and rocks" speech, pointing out that attacking ''the North'' of all places has brought them absolutely nothing - -- as opposed to say, trying to capture the mines of the Westerlands or the farms of the Reach (after all, winter is coming). She outright berates her father for trying to fight mainland armies when their strength is ''at sea''. Only Theon also brought up these concerns - -- that the North was their natural ally and they should have teamed up against the Lannisters - -- but he caved because he wanted to impress his father.



** Book!Theon had fingers and toes removed, his hair had turned white and since Ramsay tortured him by keeping him in a cell covered in feces, he was constantly filthy as opposed to the more grubby servant garb he wears. He is unrecognizable from the earlier Theon Greyjoy to such an extent that when Asha/Yara sees him she doesn't recognize him at all whereas in Season Four, she easily recognizes Theon at once.

to:

** Book!Theon had fingers and toes removed, his hair had turned white and since Ramsay tortured him by keeping him in a cell covered in feces, he was constantly filthy as opposed to the more grubby servant garb he wears. He is unrecognizable from the earlier Theon Greyjoy to such an extent that when Asha/Yara sees him she doesn't recognize him at all whereas in Season Four, 4, she easily recognizes Theon at once.



* HeelFaceDoorSlam: Late season 2, Luwin attempts to reason with a desperate Theon that he is in over his head. Theon himself [[HeelRealisation admits as much]] but then states that [[DidntThinkThisThrough he's in too deep]]. He can't return home because he'd be returning a failure. Robb, the one person who actually respected Theon, would kill him on the spot. He's too scared to join the Night Watch and face Jon Snow after everything he's done. Finally gets somewhat of a chance of redemption when he is welcomed back by his sister and the two align with Daenerys in Essos.

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* HeelFaceDoorSlam: Late season Season 2, Luwin attempts to reason with a desperate Theon that he is in over his head. Theon himself [[HeelRealisation admits as much]] but then states that [[DidntThinkThisThrough he's in too deep]]. He can't return home because he'd be returning a failure. Robb, the one person who actually respected Theon, would kill him on the spot. He's too scared to join the Night Watch and face Jon Snow after everything he's done. Finally gets somewhat of a chance of redemption when he is welcomed back by his sister and the two align with Daenerys in Essos.



* HesBack: In the season 5 finale Theon begins to break free from his Reek persona, killing Myranda and saving Sansa while the Greyjoy theme plays. At the end of Season 6, the sight of the flag of the (dissident) Greyjoys as part of the Targaryen armada brings a smile to his face, signalling that he's well on the path to recovering from his ordeal.

to:

* HesBack: In the season Season 5 finale finale, Theon begins to break free from his Reek persona, killing Myranda and saving Sansa while the Greyjoy theme plays. At the end of Season 6, the sight of the flag of the (dissident) Greyjoys as part of the Targaryen armada brings a smile to his face, signalling that he's well on the path to recovering from his ordeal.



* IronicHell: His attempt to resolve his identity crisis (Northman[=/=]Stark or Iron Islander[=/=]Greyjoy) in the first couple of seasons, results in his capture and torture by Ramsay Bolton, where he struggles between his born identity as Theon Greyjoy of the Iron Islands, and the 'Reek' identity Ramsay Bolton forced upon him. He eventually becomes Theon Greyjoy again, but still not the same guy he'd had in mind - rather, he's a mentally and physically mutilated version of Theon Greyjoy that still can't shake some of Reek's mannerisms.

to:

* IronicHell: His attempt to resolve his identity crisis (Northman[=/=]Stark or Iron Islander[=/=]Greyjoy) in the first couple of seasons, results in his capture and torture by Ramsay Bolton, where he struggles between his born identity as Theon Greyjoy of the Iron Islands, and the 'Reek' identity Ramsay Bolton forced upon him. He eventually becomes Theon Greyjoy again, but still not the same guy he'd had in mind - -- rather, he's a mentally and physically mutilated version of Theon Greyjoy that still can't shake some of Reek's mannerisms.



** The season 5 finale resurrects Theon again.

to:

** The season Season 5 finale resurrects Theon again.



* UndyingLoyalty: To Ramsay for most of Season 4 and 5, averted finally when he kills Myranda and runs away with Sansa.

to:

* UndyingLoyalty: To Ramsay for most of Season Seasons 4 and 5, averted finally when he kills Myranda and runs away with Sansa.



* AdaptationalBadass: When Reek gets to him in the books, he's so sick with fever that he's bedridden and utterly delirious and has to be mercy-killed before even getting a single line. Here he's in full possession of his faculties and continues to defy the Boltons to the bitter end.

to:

* AdaptationalBadass: When Reek gets to him in the books, he's so sick with fever that he's bedridden and utterly delirious and has to be mercy-killed before even getting a single line. Here Here, he's in full possession of his faculties and continues to defy the Boltons to the bitter end.
17th Feb '17 5:06:10 PM Vox
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* ArmorPiercingSlap: Enough to throw Theon almost to the other side of the room. Somehow...

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* ArmorPiercingSlap: Enough to [[PunchedAcrossTheRoom throw Theon almost to the other side of the room.room]]. Somehow...
17th Feb '17 5:05:17 PM Vox
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** He isn't ''quite'' as nasty to Theon in the books: Balon still insults him and plans to disinherit him in favor of his daughter, but he actually compliments Theon's guts for standing up to him, saying "Well, at the least you are no craven", and Theon's mission to the Stony Shore is actually strategically valuable, giving him far more ships and soldiers and is treated as less of an [[YouGetMeCoffee embarrassingly unimportant task to get him out of the way]], he doesn't completely ignore Theon's return to Pyke and sends his uncle Aeron to greet him, and his refusal to negotiate and save Theon from Ramsay is entirely original to the show - Book!Balon never even finds out if Theon survived the Bolton attack on Winterfell.

to:

** He isn't ''quite'' as nasty to Theon in the books: Balon still insults him and plans to disinherit him in favor of his daughter, but he actually compliments Theon's guts for standing up to him, saying "Well, at the least you are no craven", and Theon's mission to the Stony Shore is actually strategically valuable, giving him far more ships and soldiers and is treated as less of an [[YouGetMeCoffee embarrassingly unimportant task to get him out of the way]], way]]. Furthermore he doesn't completely ignore Theon's return to Pyke and sends his uncle Aeron to greet him, and his refusal to negotiate and save Theon from Ramsay is entirely original to the show - Book!Balon never even actually finds out if Theon survived the Bolton attack on Winterfell.
17th Feb '17 4:52:45 PM Vox
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* CurbStompCushion: [[spoiler:Euron kicked his ass, but Balon managed to slash his face and give him a big scar.]]

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* CurbStompCushion: [[spoiler:Euron kicked his ass, but Balon managed to slash his face and give Euron a scar to remember him a big scar.by.]]
17th Feb '17 4:49:42 PM Vox
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* CripplingOverspecialization: As long as they are at sea, they're formidable. On terrain combat, their individual competence varies, but they're largely ineffective.

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* CripplingOverspecialization: As long as they are at sea, they're formidable. On terrain combat, their individual competence varies, but they're largely ineffective.ineffective due to a lack of numbers and poor discipline.
3rd Feb '17 6:32:56 PM Vox
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** He isn't ''quite'' as nasty to Theon in the books: Balon still insults him and plans to disinherit him in favor of his daughter, but he actually compliments Theon's guts for standing up to him, saying "Well, at the least you are no craven", Theon's mission to the Stony Shore gives him considerably more ships and soldiers and is treated as less of an [[YouGetMeCoffee embarrassingly unimportant task to get him out of the way]], he doesn't completely ignore Theon's return to Pyke and sends his uncle Aeron to greet him, and his refusal to negotiate and save Theon from Ramsay is entirely original to the show - Book!Balon never even finds out if Theon survived the Bolton attack on Winterfell.

to:

** He isn't ''quite'' as nasty to Theon in the books: Balon still insults him and plans to disinherit him in favor of his daughter, but he actually compliments Theon's guts for standing up to him, saying "Well, at the least you are no craven", and Theon's mission to the Stony Shore gives is actually strategically valuable, giving him considerably far more ships and soldiers and is treated as less of an [[YouGetMeCoffee embarrassingly unimportant task to get him out of the way]], he doesn't completely ignore Theon's return to Pyke and sends his uncle Aeron to greet him, and his refusal to negotiate and save Theon from Ramsay is entirely original to the show - Book!Balon never even finds out if Theon survived the Bolton attack on Winterfell.
1st Feb '17 12:40:16 PM Morgenthaler
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* ShoutOut: With their banner being a squid, their populace degenerate and violent, and their religion's motto being "What is dead may never die," the Greyjoys invoke many of the tertiary elements of the CthulhuMythos.

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* ShoutOut: With their banner being a squid, their populace degenerate and violent, and their religion's motto being "What is dead may never die," the Greyjoys invoke many of the tertiary elements of the CthulhuMythos.Franchise/CthulhuMythos.
5th Jan '17 5:16:02 AM DeadlyAssassin
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* SparedByTheAdaptation: Temporarily. He lives long enough to brag about being the last surviving original King of the War of the Five Kings. He dies very shortly afterwards. In the books, Stannis is the last of the five standing.



* SparedByTheAdaptation: He died in the third book, which was around Seasons 3 and 4 in the show. He's still alive as of the Season 5 finale. [[spoiler:Then in the second episode of Season 6 he is murdered.]]

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* SparedByTheAdaptation: [[spoiler:Temporarily.]] He died in the third book, which was around Seasons 3 and 4 in the show. He's still alive as of the Season 5 finale. 6 and brags about being the last surviving original King of the War of the Five King, whereas in the books, Stannis is the last of the five standing. [[spoiler:Then in the second episode of Season 6 he is murdered.]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Characters.GameOfThronesHouseGreyjoy