History Anime / LupinIIIRedJacket

21st Feb '17 7:56:42 PM gewunomox
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* CulturalCrossReference: In the original Japanese, [[Recap/LupinIIIS2E13 “I Left My Mind in San Francisco”]] involved Lupin and Jigen breaking into a NASA base to steal a microfilm reel. Two of the secret passwords to open the door are references to The Music/{{Beatles}} and Music/ElvisPresley, respectively. The English dub replaces these with ''Franchise/StarTrek'' references – which admittedly makes more sense considering it's ''NASA'', but still an odd replacement to make.

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* CulturalCrossReference: In the original Japanese, [[Recap/LupinIIIS2E13 “I Left My Mind in San Francisco”]] involved Lupin and Jigen breaking into a NASA base to steal a microfilm reel. Two of the secret passwords to open the door are references to The Music/{{Beatles}} Music/TheBeatles and Music/ElvisPresley, respectively. The English dub replaces these with ''Franchise/StarTrek'' references – which admittedly makes more sense considering it's ''NASA'', but still an odd replacement to make.
11th Jul '16 12:14:40 PM dotchan
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* RightOutOfMyClothes: The first opening for features Lupin leaping out of his clothes to get into bed with a naked Fujiko.

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* RightOutOfMyClothes: The first opening for features Lupin leaping out of his clothes to get into bed with a naked Fujiko.Fujiko....who promptly smacks him in the face with a spring-loaded punching glove hidden in a box under the covers.
** In the anime itself, any of Lupin's attempts to bed Fujiko begin and end similarly.
15th Apr '16 6:39:06 AM rafi
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* SkinnyDipping: Episode 110 has a nudist beach with some guys does this. Episode 141 has Fujiko Mine swim naked in a swimming pool and then takes a shower.
28th Mar '16 10:20:29 AM rafi
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Added DiffLines:

* FreakyFridayFlip: The episode ''Steal Everything of Lupin's'' involve a scientist use a machine to trasnfer the brain of Mr. Steel, an elderly millionare, in Lupin's body. At the end, Lupin regain his body using Zenigata.
21st Feb '16 9:39:35 AM rafi
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Added DiffLines:

* TheBluebeard: Episode 75 dealt with this: a rich man married 99 women, murdered them, and encased their bodies in wax so he could preserve them. He planned to add Fujiko to his collection, but Lupin and the gang put a stop to that.


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* KidDetective: Episode 72 had Baranco who was the son of the famous Columbo. The entire police force is willing to follow his plans.
19th Feb '16 7:19:24 PM C2
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Instead of being a typical 12-13 or 24-26 episode season, Creator/TMSEntertainment chose to make the series "open-ended", meaning a brand new episode of ''Lupin'' once a week, ''every'' week, for the whole year.[[note]] This no-reruns style had already started to become common on Japanese television, with ''Manga/SazaeSan'' having used it since 1969, and ''Manga/AstroBoy'' using it during its four-year run back in the 60's.[[/note]] The series only missed three weeks (due to preemptions from New Year's programming and coverage of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_House_of_Councillors_election,_1980 1980 upper house election results]]) , airing 155 episodes in a row. That's three years, out of which there were six seasons of between 25 and 27 episodes apiece (they're marked by changes in the opening and ending). This series' longevity, coupled with its popularity, made it into essentially the "baseline" for all future entries into the ''Lupin'' franchise.

to:

Instead of being a typical 12-13 or 24-26 episode season, Creator/TMSEntertainment chose to make the series "open-ended", meaning a brand new episode of ''Lupin'' once a week, ''every'' week, for the whole year.[[note]] This no-reruns style had already started to become common on Japanese television, with ''Manga/SazaeSan'' having used it since 1969, and ''Manga/AstroBoy'' using it during its four-year run back in the 60's.[[/note]] The series only missed three weeks (due to preemptions from New Year's programming and coverage of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_House_of_Councillors_election,_1980 1980 upper house election election]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_general_election,_1980 results]]) , airing 155 episodes in a row. That's three years, out of which there were six seasons of between 25 and 27 episodes apiece (they're marked by changes in the opening and ending). This series' longevity, coupled with its popularity, made it into essentially the "baseline" for all future entries into the ''Lupin'' franchise.
19th Feb '16 7:17:20 PM C2
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Instead of being a typical 12-13 or 24-26 episode season, Creator/TMSEntertainment chose to make the series "open-ended", meaning a brand new episode of ''Lupin'' once a week, ''every'' week, for the whole year.[[note]] This no-reruns style had already started to become common on Japanese television, with ''Manga/SazaeSan'' having used it since 1969, and ''Manga/AstroBoy'' using it during its four-year run back in the 60's.[[/note]] The series only missed three weeks (due to preemptions from New Year's Day programming and coverage of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_House_of_Councillors_election,_1980 1980 upper house election results]]) , airing 155 episodes in a row. That's three years, out of which there were six seasons of between 25 and 27 episodes apiece (they're marked by changes in the opening and ending). This series' longevity, coupled with its popularity, made it into essentially the "baseline" for all future entries into the ''Lupin'' franchise.

to:

Instead of being a typical 12-13 or 24-26 episode season, Creator/TMSEntertainment chose to make the series "open-ended", meaning a brand new episode of ''Lupin'' once a week, ''every'' week, for the whole year.[[note]] This no-reruns style had already started to become common on Japanese television, with ''Manga/SazaeSan'' having used it since 1969, and ''Manga/AstroBoy'' using it during its four-year run back in the 60's.[[/note]] The series only missed three weeks (due to preemptions from New Year's Day programming and coverage of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_House_of_Councillors_election,_1980 1980 upper house election results]]) , airing 155 episodes in a row. That's three years, out of which there were six seasons of between 25 and 27 episodes apiece (they're marked by changes in the opening and ending). This series' longevity, coupled with its popularity, made it into essentially the "baseline" for all future entries into the ''Lupin'' franchise.
19th Feb '16 7:15:14 PM C2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Instead of being a typical 12-13 or 24-26 episode season, Creator/TMSEntertainment chose to make the series "open-ended", meaning a brand new episode of ''Lupin'' once a week, ''every'' week, for the whole year.[[note]] This no-reruns style had already started to become common on Japanese television, with ''Manga/SazaeSan'' having used it since 1969, and ''Manga/AstroBoy'' using it during its four-year run back in the 60's.[[/note]] The series only missed three weeks (due to preemptions from New Year's Day programming and coverage of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_House_of_Councillors_election,_1980 1980 upper house election results]] , airing 155 episodes in a row. That's three years, out of which there were six seasons of between 25 and 27 episodes apiece (they're marked by changes in the opening and ending). This series' longevity, coupled with its popularity, made it into essentially the "baseline" for all future entries into the ''Lupin'' franchise.

to:

Instead of being a typical 12-13 or 24-26 episode season, Creator/TMSEntertainment chose to make the series "open-ended", meaning a brand new episode of ''Lupin'' once a week, ''every'' week, for the whole year.[[note]] This no-reruns style had already started to become common on Japanese television, with ''Manga/SazaeSan'' having used it since 1969, and ''Manga/AstroBoy'' using it during its four-year run back in the 60's.[[/note]] The series only missed three weeks (due to preemptions from New Year's Day programming and coverage of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_House_of_Councillors_election,_1980 1980 upper house election results]] results]]) , airing 155 episodes in a row. That's three years, out of which there were six seasons of between 25 and 27 episodes apiece (they're marked by changes in the opening and ending). This series' longevity, coupled with its popularity, made it into essentially the "baseline" for all future entries into the ''Lupin'' franchise.
19th Feb '16 7:14:55 PM C2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Instead of being a typical 12-13 or 24-26 episode season, Creator/TMSEntertainment chose to make the series "open-ended", meaning a brand new episode of ''Lupin'' once a week, ''every'' week, for the whole year.[[note]] This no-reruns style had already started to become common on Japanese television, with ''Manga/SazaeSan'' having used it since 1969, and ''Manga/AstroBoy'' using it during its four-year run back in the 60's.[[/note]] The series only missed three weeks (due to preemptions from other programs) , airing 155 episodes in a row. That's three years, out of which there were six seasons of between 25 and 27 episodes apiece (they're marked by changes in the opening and ending). This series' longevity, coupled with its popularity, made it into essentially the "baseline" for all future entries into the ''Lupin'' franchise.

to:

Instead of being a typical 12-13 or 24-26 episode season, Creator/TMSEntertainment chose to make the series "open-ended", meaning a brand new episode of ''Lupin'' once a week, ''every'' week, for the whole year.[[note]] This no-reruns style had already started to become common on Japanese television, with ''Manga/SazaeSan'' having used it since 1969, and ''Manga/AstroBoy'' using it during its four-year run back in the 60's.[[/note]] The series only missed three weeks (due to preemptions from other programs) New Year's Day programming and coverage of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_House_of_Councillors_election,_1980 1980 upper house election results]] , airing 155 episodes in a row. That's three years, out of which there were six seasons of between 25 and 27 episodes apiece (they're marked by changes in the opening and ending). This series' longevity, coupled with its popularity, made it into essentially the "baseline" for all future entries into the ''Lupin'' franchise.
19th Feb '16 7:10:15 PM C2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Instead of being a typical 12-13 or 24-26 episode season, Creator/TMSEntertainment chose to make the series "open-ended", meaning a brand new episode of ''Lupin'' once a week, ''every'' week, for the whole year.[[note]] This no-reruns style had already started to become common on Japanese television, with ''Manga/SazaeSan'' having used it since 1969, and ''Manga/AstroBoy'' using it during its four-year run back in the 60's.[[/note]] The series never missed a single week, airing 155 episodes in a row. That's three years, out of which there were six seasons of between 25 and 27 episodes apiece (they're marked by changes in the opening and ending). This series' longevity, coupled with its popularity, made it into essentially the "baseline" for all future entries into the ''Lupin'' franchise.

to:

Instead of being a typical 12-13 or 24-26 episode season, Creator/TMSEntertainment chose to make the series "open-ended", meaning a brand new episode of ''Lupin'' once a week, ''every'' week, for the whole year.[[note]] This no-reruns style had already started to become common on Japanese television, with ''Manga/SazaeSan'' having used it since 1969, and ''Manga/AstroBoy'' using it during its four-year run back in the 60's.[[/note]] The series never only missed a single week, three weeks (due to preemptions from other programs) , airing 155 episodes in a row. That's three years, out of which there were six seasons of between 25 and 27 episodes apiece (they're marked by changes in the opening and ending). This series' longevity, coupled with its popularity, made it into essentially the "baseline" for all future entries into the ''Lupin'' franchise.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Anime.LupinIIIRedJacket