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LordGro
topic
04:44:19 PM Feb 20th 2012
Removed this example. Apart from it being a YMMV trope, it's phrased as an aversion and we don't usually list aversions. Maybe there is another trope played straight in it, so dumped here.
  • Fair for Its Day - Utterly averted in the chapters featuring the savage, black-skinned Tsalal: those passages are ugly stuff by nearly any century's standards.
Jhimmibhob
01:52:42 PM Feb 21st 2012
Fair enough—though in my defense, that trope wasn't YMMV when I added it. The observation certainly seems to belong somewhere in the main article, under a valid trope, but I'll have to do some homework to determine where/how.
LordGro
02:43:15 PM Feb 21st 2012
You don't have to defend yourself, things of this kind happen all the time. As for the trope, I think it is Values Dissonance.
Jhimmibhob
04:47:47 PM Feb 22nd 2012
edited by Jhimmibhob
Maybe, but the problem with Values Dissonance is that the Tsalal chapters of Pym would arguably have struck an average mid-19th-century reader as a bit much. In other words, Poe appeared to be behind the cultural curve of his day in this case. I'm not sure if any trope applies to that.
LordGro
03:39:49 AM Mar 4th 2012
edited by LordGro
I think it's okay to go with "Fair for Its Day inverted".

Of course, the whole thing might be a Stealth Parody of evil natives/cannibals in 19th century adventure stories (just a guess).

Edit: Took out this trope, as its an aversion too:
  • Door Stopper: At 72,000 words, the novel is a major aversion.
I don't think a "short novel" is a trope in itself.
Jhimmibhob
11:33:02 AM Mar 5th 2012
Yeah, Stealth Parody is a distinct possibility—it's certainly present in other parts of the book.

Novella has its own page, but overly short books, in and of themselves, don't. I'm not sure if that's even tropeworthy ... but there is a distinct subclass of books that aren't exactly novellas, but are so brief that publishers almost never release them without including ANOTHER novel of the author's, or a few short stories for padding. (My own version of Pym comes packaged with a sixty-page introduction/criticism and Verne's '"Sphinx of the Ice Fields.")
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