* AdaptationDisplacement- Most people have never even heard of the "Cyborg" novel, or the fact Caidin wrote three sequels, none of which had any connection with the TV series.
** And those who did read the novels after only being familiar with the series were often surprised at how violent Caidin's version of Steve Austin was. For example, his bionic arm was often referred to as a deadly bludgeon. And there was a poison dart gun in his bionic fingertip.
** Also in the novels, Steve's artificial eye was merely a camera. Steve couldn't actually use it to see anything. Oscar Goldman even commented, "Only God can restore lost sight."
* SugarWiki/AwesomeMoment: For fans, too many to count, though many point to the ending of the first episode "Population Zero", in which [[spoiler: Steve javelins a metal pole through a van]], as one of the first examples.
* FridgeLogic: Backstories for Steve or Jamie commonly proclaim that bionic implantation "saved their lives", yet none of their physically-enhanced body parts (limbs, eye, ear) are crucial to sustaining life.
** However ''after'' the transplants many episodes depict how damage to bionic limbs can be life-threatening to Steve and Jamie.
** In the novel ''Cyborg'' on which the TV series was based, Steve Austin not only lost 3 of his limbs and an eye in the crash, his ''heart'' was also badly damaged. His life was saved by a bionic heart valve.
** They could be speaking metaphorically. While their injuries, once stabilized, weren't life-threatening, the loss of multiple limbs and other organs would have been a serious liability to pursuing anything resembling a 'normal' life (certainly in TheSeventies, before handicap accessibility was the law of the land). For vital, athletic people like Steve (test pilot and astronaut) and Jamie (professional tennis player and amateur skydiver) there's a huge psychological factor involved (this would have been true with ''anyone'' but even moreso in their cases).
* GenreTurningPoint: When this series and its SpinOff, ''Series/TheBionicWoman'', each became sustained hits, the SuperHero genre began to be taken much more seriously PrimeTime TV material. That set the stage for Creator/ChristopherReeve to soar as ''Film/{{Superman}}'' to proved that notion true in feature films.
* HolyShitQuotient: The crash footage in the opening credits is still disturbing after all these years.
** Also, anytime a robot-disguised-as-a-human is unmasked.
* {{Narm}}: "Sweet Jaime" as sung by Lee Majors in "The Bionic Woman" (the two-part episode that introduced her). Oh dear.
* NightmareFuel: Anytime a robot-disguised-as-a-human is unmasked.
** Also, Bigfoot was known to scare more than a few kids.
** Also in the title sequence with the footage from Austin's lift body plane's on board camera of his fateful crash seconds before impact is frightening to see obviously he is going to hit the ground ''hard''.
** It must have been especially Nightmare Fuel-ish to test pilot Bruce Peterson, whose spectacular crash was featured in the opening credits. Imagine reliving that week after week.
* MartyStu - Col. Steve Austin. He's ''very'' different in the novel, and he and Goldman hated each other there.
** [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] in that he pretty much had to have been at the peak of physical and mental performance in order to have been an astronaut (especially back then, when nearly all astronauts were originally military pilots with advanced engineering degrees).
* RecycledScript - not so much in ''Six Mil'' itself, but several scripts from this series were later remade for ''The Bionic Woman''.
* RetroactiveRecognition: In "The Return of the Six-Million-Dollar Man and the Bionic Woman", Dr. Shepherd, who performed life-saving surgery on Steve's son Michael, was played by a young Creator/BryanCranston.
** Kate Mason, the second Bionic Woman in "Bionic Showdown", is played by future Oscar-winner Creator/SandraBullock.

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