* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: The 2005 film does this with the Pevensie children:
** It's implied that the others think Lucy's stories of Narnia are her way of coping with the trauma of having to be evacuated; creating an adventure for herself to avoid driving herself mad with worry.
** In the book, Edmund's betrayal of his siblings is said to be due to magic in Jadis's Turkish Delight - and helped along by horrible influences at school. The film puts forward the interpretation that it's more due to Peter's BigBrotherBully tendencies, and Jadis is the [[BecauseYouWereNiceToMe first person to really show him affection in a long time]].
** Peter and Susan seem more concerned with trying to look like responsible older children, Peter picking on Edmund to keep him in line and Susan scoffing at Lucy's stories. But in doing so they just expose their own immaturity, only behaving how they ''think'' adults should act. Both call each other out for this at different points in the film. At times one gets the impression that ''Lucy'' is the most sensible one of the children; she displays WiseBeyondHerYears traits and has no problem calling her siblings out, especially in ''Film/PrinceCaspian''.
--> "I wish you'd all stop trying to act like grown-ups."
* BetterThanCanon: Susan's status as the AgentScully in the Walden Media film is widely accepted by fans. Partly because Susan was OutOfFocus for the two books she was in, and thus didn't have [[TheGenericGuy much of a personality]]. It also acts as {{Foreshadowing}} that she will eventually convince herself that Narnia was AllJustADream.
* EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory: WordOfGod says the book is hypothetical speculation on Christianity if Jesus existed in worlds that were quite different from ours. Of course, most people just thought it was a charming fairy tale.
* FairForItsDay: Lewis has taken a lot of flak for his ValuesDissonance-laden statement that "battles are ugly when women fight." But other books do show that Susan and Lucy and Jill Pole are capable enough to hold their own in a battle. Even the U.S. Military didn't allow women in combat zones until the 1990s, and not in direct combat at all until ''2013''. (Technically, anyway; in practice, lack of clear battle zones meant women were fighting anyhow.) MenAreTheExpendableGender, after all. That's not to mention that Jadis is quite the badass herself - as she took control of Narnia entirely on her own and Beruna was practically a CurbStompBattle for her until Aslan showed up.
* FirstInstallmentWins: ''The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe'' is the best-known and most adapted book of the series. It's been adapted four times.
* FoeYay:
** Some signs of it between Jadis and Edmund. Though it goes a little on the MemeticMolester territory since she's an immortal adult and Edmund ....10. Tilda Swinton even flirted with Skandar Keynes between takes to bring some of this out on screen.
** In the 2005 film there is ''definite'' sexual tension between Jadis and Peter in their sword fight. The fight ends with Jadis baring down on top of him, not unlike that of a rapist.
* HarsherInHindsight: There's a scene in the 2005 film where Susan apologises to Lucy for not being as much fun as she used to be, and the two sisters bond. It's too bad that in book canon [[spoiler: Susan eventually grows apart from her siblings, dismisses Narnia as "childish fantasies" and is left alone when the rest of them die in a train accident]].
* HilariousInHindsight:
** One RunningGag in the novel is that one should never shut oneself in a wardrobe, because if you do you'll be locked in. Edmund forgets this key piece of advice and does so anyway (although he is able to get out later). When the bloopers for TheMovie came out, one of them was Skandar Keynes (who plays Edmund) shutting himself in the wardrobe, and consequently getting locked in.
** When Edmund complains that it's raining outside, Susan mentions that they have a "wireless" inside to entertain them. At the time the word referred to wireless radio, but now gives off the impression of wireless Internet.
* ItWasHisSled: [[spoiler:Aslan surrenders himself to be killed by the White Witch in the place of Edmund, but comes back to life through ThePowerOfLove.]]
* JerkassWoobie: Edmund, while the White Witch's prisoner. It's during this point that he actually redeems himself.
* {{Narm}}: Plenty of it to be found in the BBC adaptation:
** Barbara Kellerman is a LargeHam who behaves in a ridiculously over the top manner as Jadis. She responds to a simple question from Edmund with a hilarious BigNO.
** The scene where the Pevensies and the beavers have to escape from the wolves. Mrs Beaver holds them up by insisting on packing loads of ridiculous things. It's the same scene as the book and 2005 film but lacks any of the urgency - because the rest of the characters treat this as a mild annoyance, as if she's going to make them late for a train rather than get them all killed with her SkewedPriorities.
** Peter's use of expressions like "by jove" and "by golly" don't even sound anything other than forced.
** When the Stone Table cracks, Lucy says "they must be doing something worse to him", hops on the spot for a good few seconds and ''then'' says "come on!"
* NarmCharm:
** The BBC version has a lot of Narm, but some of it is endearing because it is still very faithful to the books.
** The Father Christmas scene. Silly? Yes. A little cheesy? Of course. Is it still heartwarming? Absolutely.
* VisualEffectsOfAwesome: All the various fantasy creatures in the climactic battle in the 2005 film are near perfectly rendered.
* WTHCastingAgency: The choice of actors in the BBC adaptation. Lucy is of course the youngest sibling but is the tallest of them. Meanwhile Peter is the oldest but is played by the shortest actor.
* WhatAnIdiot: In the 2005 film, Susan starts arguing with Peter over whether or not the huge, menacing wolf at the head of the Witch's SecretPolice is really their enemy, even agreeing with Maugrim that Peter should drop the sword (that he was given by Father Christmas, of all people). Bonus points for taking this patently ridiculous stance while they're trying to cross a river that's melting under their feet.
* WhatMeasureIsANonBadass: Susan gets hit with this a lot, given that she doesn't get to display her archery skills a lot in the story. She tends to get thought of as weak for not being able to fight Maugrim off herself. This ignores the fact that she gets Lucy and herself to safety and manages to sound an alarm to warn the others of the danger. It's possibly for this reason that the second film gives her more to do in battle.
* TheWoobie:
** Mr. Tumnus, particularly in the movie, where there's an added scene of him meeting Edmund in prison and, despite obviously having been hurt during his stay, is more concerned about Lucy's wellbeing than his own. Not to mention that his petrified body looks like he was either terrified or in a lot of pain, before being frozen.
** Lucy can count in the initial parts of the book. It's very sad for her when her siblings don't believe her about Narnia, as she's a very truthful girl - and being accused of making something up is one of the most offensive things in the world to her. It gets even worse when Edmund goes in and then pretends it was all a game just to mess with her.
* {{Woolseyism}}: An ad-lib from Georgie Henley - "my mother's name is Helen" - adds a nice bit of symbolism. The Pevensie mother had not been named in the books. But in the film, she now shares the same name as the first Queen of Narnia.
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