For the ''Film/BladeRunner2049'' YMMV page, see [[YMMV/BladeRunner2049 here]].
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!!''Blade Runner'' (1982)

* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation:
** Does Rachael actually fall in love with Deckard or does she become his mistress because she knows it's the only way she can avoid being retired by other Blade Runners?
** Does Gaff let Rachael go because he has a moment of compassion, wants Deckard's job, or because a Blade Runner having a Replicant mistress is just part of the DirtyCop nature of the work?
* AssPull: The "Deckard as a Replicant" theory comes across as this to the rest of the film since it's barely foreshadowed at all, beyond the unicorn dream/origami:
** For one thing, the point of the film is that the Replicants of the Nexus-7 are stronger, more durable, more acrobatic than the average human. If Rick Deckard is a Replicant of the same make or something older than that, then he clearly doesn't match the Replicants in skills and indeed the film's fight scenes when Deckard hunts down the Replicants, repeatedly shows Deckard winning by scrapping by, being exhausted and fatigued, and winning by fighting dirty. If Deckard is also a replicant, i.e. or an older model or a later up-to-date model, it makes no sense why he should be designated for a job that involves fighting down models far more advanced than he is.
** Defenders, such as Creator/MarkKermode, note that Deckard in the film is often cold, distant, and a little boring and that Deckard being a robot would explain this. Others point out that this explanation contradicts with how Roy Batty, Priss, Zhora are far more visibly emotional, as is Rachel, and that Deckard being a little reserved, unemotional, and cold better illustrates the Replicant-Human face off, with Deckard being human, since otherwise it's one robot with DullSurprise against another robot who quotes Blake and Milton.
* AwesomeMusic: [[AwesomeMusic/BladeRunner Has its own page]].
* BrokenBase: The different cuts, Deckard's true nature, the unicorn, etc.
* CultClassic: Has since become so ubiquitous in pop culture that it's hard to picture now, but at one time the film was very much this. It's also the very reason it got a sequel 35 years after it came out.
* DeathOfTheAuthor: One of the reasons Deckard's being a replicant or not is still hotly debated is because no definite answer was given in the film, and the filmmakers give contradictory answers when asked. Fans who feel that Deckard is a human point out that the theme of the film, and the tragedy of Roy Batty, [[spoiler:i.e. the Replicant who is more human than human, who risks his life to save Deckard despite having every reason to let him die, loses much of its impact if Deckard is a Replicant unaware of his true nature, since it doesn't definitively vindicate the humanity of androids over humans if the AntiHero human we follow around was a robot. Incidentally this is why Harrison Ford and Rutger Hauer insist that Deckard is a human and not a replicant because the dynamic between Deckard and Batty in that climax loses most of its impact if it was the other way]].
* DesignatedHero: Rick Deckard in all versions is a low-rent cop who hunts down and murders humanoid robots for a living. The voiceover in one version even has him remarking that terms like "skin-job", a FantasticSlur used by a co-worker, is analogous to the N-Word. He also forces himself on Rachel, and his killing of Replicants is often quite dishonorable (shooting Zhora in the back) and others when they are injured and weak. Likewise the end of the film has [[spoiler:Roy Batty saving his life, not because he respects Deckard but precisely because he has contempt for him and his kind, and his act of rescue is meant to spite Deckard and taunt him about his lack of worth]].
* DracoInLeatherPants: Roy Batty is an AntiVillain with sympathetic motivations, but he's still a ruthless murderer who's willing to resort to ColdBloodedTorture. His villainous traits tend to get overlooked by fans, especially given his [[spoiler:RedemptionInTheRain and moving FinalSpeech]].
* EarWorm: [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiXioWKF5ig The end titles]].
* EnsembleDarkhorse: Gaff. In the Westwood Studio's video game, he's something of a StealthMentor.
* EvilIsSexy: Most of the antagonists are depicted as almost flawless beings, superior in both mind and body to normal humans (who for the most part are portrayed as grizzled and beaten down). This is especially true of Roy, who as the {{Ubermensch}} is built like a Greek god. Both of the female replicants are also quite easy on the eyes and none of them are above using sexual persuasion as a tool to get what they want (both Priss and Roy come onto Sebastian in an attempt to persuade him to help them, and Zhora is designed for political assassinations which probably involve the promise of sex as a way of getting closer to the target and she shamelessly uses her own nude body as a distraction when Deckard comes for her).
* FauxlosophicNarration: The narration in the theatrical cut is kind of dreadful, and veers straight into this at the end of the film.
* GenreTurningPoint: ''Blade Runner'' is the TropeMaker and TropeCodifier for the futuristic dystopian science-fiction film:
** Before ''Blade Runner'', the only film to conjure a vision on its scale was ''Film/{{Metropolis}}'' by Creator/FritzLang (which did inspire Scott) but Lang's film, owing to its premise and the limitations of the silent film, created a simplistic world lacking in realistic details and references, where Scott made a future version of a real-life Los Angeles come alive in colour, sound, and set-design. Earlier science fiction films did raise the issue of the humanity of artificial intelligence and robots, but ''Blade Runner'' took it to the next level by making the line between robots and humans far more blurred, and interchangeable.
** It was the first Creator/PhilipKDick adaptation in motion pictures and, as Creator/AlanMoore noted in an essay on science-fiction, it marked a more post-modern approach to movie science-fiction compared to earlier films, openly making dystopias an allegory for contemporary concerns, issues of identity, and urbanization, with set-design, costumes, and other props visually communicating its aesthetic via WorldBuilding, an aspect that many later science-fiction films, such as ''Film/TotalRecall1990'', ''Film/MinorityReport'' (both are PKD adaptations), ''Film/AIArtificialIntelligence'' and ''Franchise/TheMatrix'' would incorporate.
* HarsherInHindsight:
** The "Blade Runner Curse" is a bit of folklore developed around the film centered on how many of the companies with prominent ProductPlacement in the film would go bankrupt or go through disastrous setbacks in the following decade:
*** Atari was hammered by UsefulNotes/TheGreatVideoGameCrashOf1983, barely survived because of its computer business, and is now a shadow of its former self.
*** Pan-Am is long extinct.
*** Coca-Cola launched the infamous New Coke shortly after the movie was released, although managed to bounce back stronger than ever.
*** Bell (or AT&T) was broken up for monopolistic practices. Most of the subsidiaries that were broken off of it have come back together as either Verizon or the new AT&T.
*** Cuisinart went bankrupt and was bought out by a rival company, living on only as a brand name (and a joke on Spaceballs).
*** [=RCA=] (big neon sign out Deckard's apartment window), as a company, bit the dust in '86. (The name is still trademarked by Technicolor, however, and sometimes used on products that come from its licensees, as well as [[Creator/RCARecords the venerable record label]].)
*** Polaroid photos are seen in the movie -- the Polaroid company still exists today but has ceased making cameras and film.
*** TDK, whose sign appears on the building opposite the Bradbury near the end, seems to have made it through more or less OK--although its sign is partially obscured.
** Gaff's last words to Deckard are [[spoiler: "It's too bad [Rachael] won't live, but then again who does?]] In "Blade Runner 2049," we find out [[spoiler: she doesn't]].
** The whole Deckard and Rachel relationship becomes this come the sequel. [[spoiler: The BigBad all but states outright that Tyrell [[PerfectlyArrangedMarriage set the whole thing up]] just to test his theory that Replicants could reproduce. Given Tyrell's resources, Rachel being a Replicant, Deckard ''possibly'' being a Replicant, and the plans for Replicant offspring...]]
** The movie is set in the then-future of the 2010s and has a scene where a policeman (Deckard) shoots an unarmed replicant in the back. Fast forward three decades later and coincidentally, there have been several controversies in the U.S. in the 2010s where policeman have shot unarmed people in the back.
*** Unfortunately emphasized by the concept that Replicants are often referred to as "skin jobs," a term stated to be analogous to the N-word. The most controversial of the murder-by-cop cases have been against African Americans.
* HilariousInHindsight:
** Bryant referring to Replicants as [[Series/BattlestarGalactica2003 "skin jobs."]]
** In one of the interviews recorded for the [[LimitedSpecialCollectorsUltimateEdition Five-Disc Collector's Edition Blu-Ray set]], Creator/EdwardJamesOlmos slips up and calls the Replicants "Cylons" before correcting himself.
** It's very nearly 2019, and for the last few years, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eix8Ptl8g34 many cities]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3t4eWie6U0 have begun installing talking crosswalk signs]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6JdN_cgtBU4 to accommodate people with vision disabilities.]] MostAnnoyingSound indeed.
* HypeBacklash: With a movie being hailed as a masterpiece of sci-fi, a good many people might walk away feeling disappointed, praising the visuals and some of the acting, but feeling that ''Blade Runner'''s story is hollow and empty. Its alleged philosophical value (which goes to the extent that the film is not rarely screened in schools and colleges) can also easily fall into this, as the plot neither opens so many questions that weren't addressed by many other and more known sci-fi works nor presents them in an overtly [[{{Applicability}} applicable]] way; the viewer can go watch the film expecting to see a straight MindScrew fest and leave dissappointed that it was just a slightly contemplative noir film in a cyberpunk setting.
* MostAnnoyingSound: [[MachineMonotone "CROSS NOW. CROSS NOW. CROSS NOW. CROSS NOW. DON'T WALK. DON'T WALK. DON'T WALK. DON'T WALK."]] WordOfGod says the traffic signals were intentionally made to sound annoying.
* {{Narm}}:
** The unicorn from Deckard's dream sequence.
** It was supposed to be terrifying, but Roy Batty chasing after Deckard, howling like a wolf, and smashing his head through walls like a cartoon character? Amusing.
** Roy biting his own fist.
** [[spoiler: The dying Pris thrashing on her back as if she's throwing a temper tantrum]]. Even between viewings, this scene doesn't necessarily age well. It does not help that the female stunt actress was too exhausted to do the preceding scenes and they had to get a ''man'' in poor makeup to do it.
*** As noted on the [[NightmareFuel/BladeRunner Nightmare Fuel page]], though, many people find that scene disturbing because of how [[UncannyValley unnatural and jerky her movements are]]. That is, she really does look like a robot shorting out or something.
** From the 1997 game adaptation is Clovis reciting "[[Creator/WilliamBlake The Tyger]]" while threatening the pet store owner in the opening, which gives the initial impression that the writers took the "WarriorPoet" concept [[LiteralMinded far too literally]] and ended up writing the BigBad as a big dork.
* SugarWiki/NoProblemWithLicensedGames: Westwood Studios released a lovingly faithful AdventureGame based on this movie in 1997. The game featured randomized plot points and the player's actions could lead the game towards thirteen different alternate endings.
** The 1985 game for the 8-bit home computers, on the other hand, was nothing special. Though, for rights reasons, that's technically an adaptation of the Vangelis sound track.
* OlderThanTheyThink: The title originated from the 1974 novel by Alan E. Nourse called ''The Bladerunner'' which was given a screenplay treatment by William S. Burroughs himself. The screenwriters adapted the title Blade Runner for their film because Ridley Scott wanted a new take on science fiction lore (hence renaming androids as replicants). In the original context, blade runner meant a black market guy who sold drugs in a futuristic dystopia where medical care had become expensive, and was entirely different from cop who retires replicants.
* RootingForTheEmpire: Roy is an AntiVillain, but a villain nonetheless. His quest to stave off an early death is so compelling, and Roy makes for such an interesting, charismatic figure (helped along by Rutger Hauer's inimitable performance), that many viewers can't help but want him to succeed. In many ways, Roy comes off as a more sympathetic and engaging character than [[DesignatedHero Deckard]].
* SeinfeldIsUnfunny:
** Giant buildings, neon lights, multicultural cities, film noir aesthetics, and lots and lots of rain? Meh, we've seen it all before. The film's visuals and themes proved to be such an influence on CyberPunk and grittier science fiction works that it's virtually impossible for them not to reference the film in some form or another, and as a consequence, the impact can be somewhat lost on audiences who have already seen the many imitators and their intellectual androids, ugly dystopias, and drunken future cops. Similarly, the philosophical questions about androids and their relationships with humans have been tackled in so many works and so thoroughly (even before and around the time of ''Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?'''s publication) that the movie can feel empty in comparison.
** Also unlike other science-fiction before it (''Film/{{Metropolis}}'') and after it (''Franchise/TheMatrix'') which pivots on TheHerosJourney and TheChosenOne motifs, ''Blade Runner'' is essentially a simple genre movie with a cop (Rick Deckard) hunting down a series of bad guys (Roy Batty and his Replicants). The plot by itself is not too complicated, and most of the film works on characterization and mood than the overly baroque plots and schemes later works like ''Film/{{Equilibrium}}'' and others trafficked in. Creator/PhilipKDick himself {{Lampshaded}} this during pre-production when he noted that the screenplay drafts he read disappointed him for how much it flattened and simplified his original book, but he was far more impressed with the visual design (that he saw during a set visit and was shown an earlier render of the famous opening) which he felt captured the spirit of his ideas.
** Thom Andersen, the director of ''Los Angeles Plays Itself'', a documentary about how UsefulNotes/LosAngeles has been represented in movies noted that ''Blade Runner'' actually feels more nostalgic as time passes rather than dystopic. He notes that the film's neo-futurist look at public spaces more or less reflected the optimistic theories of avant-garde architects and city-planners, whereas by TheNineties and TheOughties, the greater sub-urbanization and compartmentalization, as well as gentrification has seen a closing down of public spaces. The end result is that ''Blade Runner'' feels {{Zeerust}} and retro-futurist and as dated and bygone as the FilmNoir whose aesthetics it was borrowing from.
* SignatureScene:
** The shots of Los Angeles' cityscape at the start of the film. It was already special during production since it converted Creator/PhilipKDick from a skeptic to a supporter of the film.
** Zhora's death scene.
** Roy's soliloquy in the rain, often listed as one of the finest moments of the science fiction genre and cinema in general.
--->'''Roy''': I've seen things you people wouldn't believe...
* SpecialEffectFailure:
** The skies above Batty when he releases the dove were supposed to be grimly grey, causing an unintended CueTheSun moment. This was changed in the 2007 "Final Cut." Crew members stated in a behind-the-scenes documentary that this error occurred because they couldn't get the dove to fly in the rain. The water soaked the bird's feathers and made it too heavy to take off, so they eventually had to resort to filming the scene without the rain.
** In many scenes featuring a Spinner (flying car), the cables lifting the car up are clearly visible. Like the dove, these are fixed in the Final Cut.
* StrangledByTheRedString: Deckard's love story with Rachel comes off as highly stiff and unconvincing. It's meant to evoke a classic FilmNoir doomed romance but the chemistry between the two leads doesn't work, and the genre it's meant to evoke has several examples that merely show how it falls short. The fact that, at the very least, ''one'' of them is definitely a Replicant either explains or {{Lampshades}} this for some, but undercuts it for others[[note]]since it makes a love story with a replicant unconvincing in a movie that advocates for their individuality[[/note]]. Rachel is likewise a SatelliteLoveInterest and among the Replicants far less interesting than Roy, Priss, Zhora, and ultimately the Replicant who truly triggers Deckard's CharacterDevelopment is Roy Batty.
* TooCoolToLive: [[spoiler:Roy Batty]].
-->'''Tyrell:''' You were made as well as we could make you.
-->'''[[spoiler:Roy]]:''' But not to last.
-->'''Tyrell:''' The light that burns twice as bright burns half as long. And you have burned so very, very brightly, [[spoiler:Roy]].
* TrueArtIsAngsty:
** Played straight with the film's look and themes. The inevitability of death and mortality are both a major focus of the story, as is self-doubt and a feeling of entrapment, plus a good deal of existential angst over what it means to be human. Further emphasized by the Miltonian antagonist Roy Batty, Deckard's apparent alcoholism and depression, and the deliberately and artistically dark neo-noir aesthetic to highlight these themes.
** Goes full well for the 1997 video game as well. Ray is subject to mind games from multiple factions, making him question his own identity and humanity. In one of the endings Clovis laments that he spent his final days fighting and killing in a futile attempt to find a way to extend his own life and the lives of his fellow replicants instead of cherishing the time he had left with his friends.
* UncannyValley: Sebastian's toys are played by little people in prosthetics, and make some very inhuman, jerky movements. The replicants avert this trope as they are so human, physically and emotionally, but the scene where Pris disguises herself as one of the toys has her wearing some pretty UncannyValleyMakeup.
* ValuesDissonance:
** The whole initial meeting with Zhora reeks of this, as it's treated as an IKnowYouKnowIKnow, with Deckard asking if she was asked to do anything unsavory to get her job as a stripper, and the unsavory nature of her job in general making such questions a joke. In the 21st century the view of sex workers has changed enough that such questions would actually be quite normal, making sure her consent was never violated.
** To a modern audience, the ForcefulKiss from Deckard to Rachael has overtones of DateRape, but [[SocietyMarchesOn at the time apparently nobody complained]].
* VindicatedByHistory: Upon its initial release, the film was advertised as an action movie, met with mixed reviews and an underwhelming box office performance (it did decently and made back its budget, but it was in no way the hit that The Ladd Company assumed it would be. It also had the bad luck of coming out the week after the much anticipated ''Film/ETTheExtraTerrestrial'' hit theaters). In the ensuing years it became a CultClassic in its director's cut, and is now generally considered one of the greatest science fiction films of all time.
* VisualEffectsOfAwesome: The designs and the city will ''still'' blow you away, they literally changed sci-fi films.
* TheWoobie: Rachael, whose entire world starts falling apart once she realises that she's a Replicant, and Sebastian, a kindly, lonely man who is manipulated [[spoiler:and murdered]] by the villains.
** JerkassWoobie: Roy and Pris. Roy is a violent killer and Pris callously manipulates Sebastian, but all they want is freedom and a normal lifespan, which they are denied at every turn.
* WikiMagic: ''Film/BladeRunner2049'' brought renewed and much welcome attention to the first film all over the Internet, including on this very wiki.
* WriterInducedFanon: Creator/RidleyScott is quite keen on the idea that Deckard is a Replicant over the objections of the screenwriters and Creator/HarrisonFord himself. Scott got the idea mid-production. It wasn't originally in the original novel nor was it planned at pre-production. Ford feels that Deckard has to be the main human being the audiences can relate to and properly be an AudienceSurrogate and he was openly angry when Scott tried to [[spoiler:insert the Unicorn origami scene since he caught on what he was trying to do]]. Hampton Fancher in any case feels that Deckard's humanity or lack thereof should never be openly addressed and become part of the surface experience of the film, and remain an issue of speculation.
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