[[quoteright:320:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Crash_Bandicoot_2_236.jpg]]

''Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back'' is the second installment in the ''Franchise/CrashBandicoot'' series, and the second [[UsefulNotes/PlayStation PS1]] Crash game overall.

One year after [[VideoGame/CrashBandicoot1996 the original game]], Dr. Neo Cortex, the BigBad of the previous game, turns to Crash [[EnemyMine for help]] in an effort to prevent the planet Earth from facing certain doom. All the planets in the solar system will align soon, and, according to Cortex, create enough energy to tear the world apart. His solution to the crisis lies in crystals: In the aftermath of the original game, he discovered the Master Crystal, but that alone will not be enough. He needs Crash to collect 25 Slave Crystals scattered through the islands and aboard his space headquarters so he can contain the energy of the planetary alignment and save Earth.

However, Dr. Cortex's former henchman, Doctor Nitrus Brio, has also returned, with a grudge against his former boss. N. Brio would rather have Crash collect 42 Gems instead of the Crystals, in the hopes of destroying Cortex and his space station, the fate of the Earth be damned. To stop Crash, N. Brio has sent out an army of cyborgs, robots, and evolved animal henchmen across the islands.

Using an ancient "Warp Room" as his base, Crash must now go across the islands he explored in [[VideoGame/CrashBandicoot1996 the original game]] ([[http://i.imgur.com/4pcn69Y.jpg which are now experiencing a harsh winter period]]) and up aboard the Cortex Vortex, collecting Crystals and Gems, discovering secret Bonus Rooms and other hidden routes, and defeating Nitrus Brio's henchmen.

''Crash Bandicoot 2'' improves several elements from its predecessor and adds a more player-friendly save feature, a more balanced difficulty, improved graphics, and additional moves. It also marks the introduction of Crash's sister, Coco, who permanently replaces Tawna from the first game.

This game, along with the [[VideoGame/CrashBandicoot1996 first game]] and ''[[VideoGame/CrashBandicoot3Warped Warped]]'', were [[VideoGameRemake remastered]] on the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 4}} with updated graphics and new features, as part of the ''VideoGame/CrashBandicootNSaneTrilogy''.

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!!Tropes Used In This Game:

* AbsurdlySpaciousSewer: The Eel Deal, Sewer or Later and Hangin' Out levels are tunnels large enough to contain Crash, electric eels, robotic cleaners, mechanical mice, rolling barrels, tons and tons of TNT, Nitro crates, and Lab Assistants working with welding torches. Hangin' Out prominently features red-hot pipes and lava as hazards set below overhangs. Despite the setting, the sewer stages are still quite fun and interesting to look at, though they can have rather difficult alternate routes.
* AdvancingWallOfDoom: The snow boulders in Crash Dash and Crash Crush, and Polar's parents in Un-Bearable.
* AdvertisedExtra: The jetpack was featured in plenty of commercials and even shows up in the game's title sequence, but it's only used in two very late levels and the final boss fight.
* AirborneMook: Cybernetic vultures appear in Turtle Woods and The Pits, and attack by swooping down at Crash.
** The floating surveillance robots in Totally Fly are horrible {{invincible minor minion}}s which have to be avoided. Combine this with the BlackoutBasement conditions and the fact that Crash has only a few seconds to get past them before he's in complete darkness, and they come pretty close to being DemonicSpiders.
* AlternativeForeignThemeSong: The Japanese version of the game introduces the "Crash Bandy Kuu!" theme song, which would carry over to other Japanese ''Crash Bandicoot'' games until ''VideoGame/CrashTwinsanity''.
* AmusingInjuries: After taking out one of the arms on N. Gin's mech, he shakes the other fist at you in anger. After destroying the other arm, he attempts to do so again, but only succeeds in waving the shoulder piece at you.
* AntiFrustrationFeatures:
** Die 6 times and the game provides you with an Aku Aku mask for protection. Die 5 more times and checkpoints become more frequent.
** You automatically get a mask upgrade when you begin the second boss fight against the Komodo Brothers.
** Side-paths now commonly have a second gem in them and no crates. In the first game, there was only one gem per level for destroying all crates, and all paths would have crates on them.
** Check points now remember the crates you've broken, unlike the first game. Also the game tells you how many crates are there in each level; pressing triangle now shows you how many boxes you've broken, but you could only see the totals in the end of the levels.
** If you die in a Death Route, the platform will stay, allowing you to repeat the route if you want.
** Breaking crates while being chased by boulders/giant bears being too hard for you? No worries, just let the boulder/giant bear crush the crates for you; the game will count them.
** Lives are almost ridiculously easy to come by, an added boost even with the improved controls and mechanics from the first game.
* ArtisticLicenseAstronomy: Cortex tells Crash that the planets will align, "all 13 of them". At the time of release, there were nine classified planets (although this is probably just a joke).
* {{Backtracking}}: This often got in the way of the fun at times. Crash always has to backtrack whenever he comes across a fork in the path, such as the fork in The Pits, Sewer or Later and Diggin' It.
** The Eel Deal has an interesting case: while most paths have an entrance and an exit, the path leading to the Green Gem here does not. Crash must go down the fork, get the Green Gem at the very end, then go ''all the way back'' to the main path to complete the level.[[note]]With the "death warping" trick, you can simply choose to die after getting the gem which brings you back to the checkpoint, i.e before the fork.[[/note]]
** Piston It Away is the most notorious instance of this. In order to get the box gem, you need to make it to the end of the level to get all the boxes on the main path and the bonus stage, and then make it back to the death route platform around half way through all without losing a life, or else the platform will be deactivated.[[note]]Alternatively, you can enter the death route as soon as you encounter it and then die to go back to the previous checkpoint, keeping the route open.[[/note]]
* BatmanGambit: [[spoiler:Cortex tricks Crash into believing that he's a good guy and that he was forced to assist Nitrus Brio in "his" plot for world domination. He tricks Crash into gathering the crystals, all needed to power a ray that will turn the Earth's populace into his slaves, by convincing him that the crystals will be used to contain the energy of an upcoming solar flux]].
* BearsAreBadNews: [[AdvancingWallOfDoom Gigantic polar bears]] ambush Crash in the Un-Bearable level, chasing after him and smashing up everything else in their way. Get caught by one and it's a OneHitKill. Subverted with Polar, the baby bear you get to ride in that level and in three others. [[spoiler: There's also a secret path barricaded off [[NiceJobFixingItVillain until a polar bear smashes into it.]]]]
* BeeAfraid: Diggin' It and Bee-Havin' contain bees which pursue Crash if he runs past their hive, and sting him if he isn't quick enough or does not spin them away successfully. Judging from his reaction, Crash is allergic to bee stings. They come out one at a time in Diggin' It, making it easy to spin them there, but Bee-Havin' has swarms come out, which are much more difficult to spin away without getting stung and losing a life.
* BehindTheBlack: Sometimes at the end of a level segment Crash will drop down to a new area. The position of the camera sometimes hides Wumpa fruit, crates, or entire hidden areas that you can only see by walking towards the screen.
* BigBad: [[spoiler: It's not Brio, whatever Cortex says. You're much better off trusting the game's subtitle than Cortex here]].
* BlackoutBasement: Night Flight and Totally Fly, where your only sources of light are the fireflies temporarily whirling around. Downplayed with Totally Bear as there's at least a few lighting following you around, but still, the fact that you can only see to a certain distance in front of you while running at high speed still poses quite a problem.
* BonusDungeon: Totally Fly and Totally Bear are very tough secret levels.
* BonusStage: On occasion, Crash can find "?" platforms which take him to bonus stages. These are quite forgiving; there are no enemies, no lives are taken if you die, and whether you fall or are blown up, the player is plonked right next to the platform to start again. A few "Skull Route" platforms exist, which are [[BrutalBonusLevel considerably harder]]; not only do you have to get past the level up to that point without dying[[note]]alternatively, you can die, but without taking any checkpoint beforehand[[/note]], but the stages themselves are tougher, can feature enemies, and generally play out like the regular levels UpToEleven. Hidden Gem stages also exist, which appear only when Crash has found the relevant colored gem. They vary in their difficulty, but otherwise are much like Skull Routes.
* BookEnds: Every level (except the intro and the boss fights) begins and ends with the Warp Room. The various Warp Rooms are also themed based on some of the level locations: Warp Room 1 is N. Sanity Island; Warp Room 2 is completely covered in snow; Warp Room 3 is around the ruins of Cortex Power; Warp Room 4 is the ruins (though it looks like a mine); Warp Room 5 is (mostly) set aboard the Cortex Vortex space station, and [[spoiler:Warp Room 6 is set on the top of Cortex's Castle]].
* BossArenaIdiocy: Tiny is invincible. The only way to harm him is to hop around on the platforms, avoiding him, until they blink red. Once they do, the player must hop Crash onto a non-blinking platform and hope that Tiny lands on a blinking platform and falls, hurting him.
* BottomlessPits: In all the levels, even the jetpack ones, there will be some pits down which Crash should not fall.
* BrainsAndBrawn: Komodo Joe and Komodo Moe, [[InformedAttribute apparently]].
* BrainwashedAndCrazy: [[spoiler:Cortex's true goal is to brainwash everyone on the planet in one shot, thus bringing them under his control.]]
* BrilliantButLazy: Crash is implied to be this at the beginning and the end of the game. He's capable of tremendous feats of acrobatics, has insane amounts of stamina, can beat an explosives-crazed kangaroo, a pair of samurai Komodo dragons, an insanely strong thylacine, a HumongousMecha piloted by a cyborg genius, and anything the woods, rivers, glaciers, mountains, ruins and space station can throw at him, and yet he'd much rather lie down on the beach and take a kip.
* BrutalBonusLevel: Everything after the Purple Gem in Bee-Having (which you get not long after you enter its secret route). It is the hardest area in the entire game, it gives you nothing, and the end platform, unlike Air Crash, Piston it Away and the like, takes you back to the last checkpoint rather than the warp room. Basically, the only reason to try to complete it is bragging rights.
* BulletSeed: More like Bomb Seed, but still, a type of enemy plant in Diggin' It and Bee-Havin' can shoot exploding seeds at you.
* ButThouMust: An inversion: Cortex tells you to give the crystals you've gathered to N. Gin, but there is no option of actually doing so. N. Gin just demands you give him the crystals and then attacks you when you don't. Another inversion is where, after you get any gem, N. Brio will show up in the projector, telling you not to get the crystals; the problem is that you can't go on without collecting crystals and beating the boss.
* CameraScrew:
** The camera remains behind Crash whenever he is progressing forwards. This is fine so long as you don't want to walk back, because the only concession the camera then makes is to back off a little bit. This makes most of the backtracking particularly frustrating.
** In the chase levels, Crash is running towards the screen, which means you can't see more than a few feet in front of you. Unlike last time, however, the Boulder carries Crash a few feet before planting him on the camera.
** The ''convenient'' positioning of some of the crates. For instance, ever find yourself wondering where you missed those two boxes in Un-Bearable [[spoiler:even after you've found its secret area]]? They were both hidden [[BehindTheBlack just offscreen]]! [[spoiler:In that same secret area, actually.]] ''Surprise!''
** There's a similar hidden box in the level Cold Hard Crash. [[spoiler:It's located offscreen above two bounce boxes in the bonus stage.]]
* CatAndMouseBoss: Tiny Tiger begins the battle by chasing after Crash, trying to crush him with his leaping.
* CharacterizationMarchesOn:
** Tiny (labelled Taz Tiger in the NTSC version) here serves N. Brio in his plans to stop Cortex. Most games afterwards present Tiny as a consistent minion to Cortex, if not [[UndyingLoyalty an outright devotedly loyal one.]]
** Cortex and N. Gin, despite seemingly being good guys this time, are actually far more sinister and reserved in presence, their bumbling qualities far more subtle compared to later games.
* CheckPoint: If Crash opens a crate marked with a "C", it becomes the new checkpoint in case he dies. This system was an improvement over the original, since now it remembers all the crates opened before that point.
* ChekhovsGun: Those seemingly useless gems do have a purpose later in the game.
* ChildProdigy: Assuming she is either a child or a teenager at this point in the series, then Coco Bandicoot is an exemplary computer genius. She can hack into Cortex's secret computers, so either this says a lot about Coco's computing skills or Cortex has a really lousy system protection program.
* ChuckCunninghamSyndrome: Tawna is absent in this game. Tawna's disappearance is a pretty big PlotHole, since her fate was never mentioned in the epilogue of the last game. In reality, the designers lost interest in her[[note]]Specifically, a [[ExecutiveMeddling marketing exec]] didn't like her design and forced them to change it. They hated the new design so much they just replaced Tawna outright.[[/note]] and came up with a flimsy excuse for her absence (she dumped Crash for Pinstripe Potoroo).
* ClassyCane: Ripper Roo has one of these despite still wearing his straitjacket from the first game.
* CollectionSidequest: At first, the gems appear to be this, since you don't need them to reach the final boss, but to complete the game, and to complete the story's canonical ending, all 42 gems need to be collected.
* CollisionDamage: Walk into any enemies and Crash is heading up to that great Australian outback in the sky.
* CombatPragmatist: Crash. Most notable are [[GrievousHarmWithABody using Komodo Joe to hit Moe]] for the second boss and [[WhenAllYouHaveIsAHammer lobbing Wumpa Fruit at N. Gin's mech]].
* ContinuingIsPainful: As the access to Death Route platforms (note: not the ones that need trick jumping or colored gem) are only available by not dying until you reach it, you better off just quit the level if you die while you're on the way to the platform.
* ContinuityNod: The WhereAreTheyNowEpilogue from the first game revealed that, after "intensive therapy", Ripper Roo got his doctorate and became an author. This is referenced heavily in his boss fight in this game.
* ConvectionSchmonvection:
** Crash can wander around the snowy levels without anything as insulating as a thick fur coat, and [[IdleAnimation the worst that he'll do is shiver if you leave him alone for a bit]].
** The theme of the fourth warp room is a mine, and Crash is separated by what looks like lava from no more than a metal grate. It's one of the few times lava appears in the series where it absolutely cannot kill you... merely because you can't touch it.
* CoolGate: The gates that take you into the levels are themed based on some of the levels you're jumping into, such as being covered in snow for SlippySlideyIceWorld or covered in metal plates and cables for sewer levels.
* CoversAlwaysLie: Not only there is no blue warp room with greek ornaments in the final version, but yet it also seems that it's actually mishmashed with the [[BookEnds teleport rooms you always start and end the levels with]]. For example, the hologram heads never appear on the spot where you're supposed to ''teleport''. Plus, while the ingame warps look no different to each other, having the same "twisty and twirly" look, one warp on the cover has the same door the teleport rooms usually have, along with the jetpack.
* CrateExpectations: New crates are added to this game, including one which cannot be opened except by a body slam. [[HairTriggerExplosive The Nitro crate, a crate so volatile that even touching it causes an explosion,]] also saw its debut in this game. Also included is the Nitro Switch crate, a green ! crate that detonates all of the Nitro crates in the level.
* CuteButCacophonic: The giant mice in the Road to Ruin and Ruination levels make horrible screeching sounds when you get close.
* CuttingOffTheBranches: This game ignores the 100% ending of the original game, namely in regards to Cortex's fate (where he's said to have never been heard from again after Crash foiled his plans), and the appearance of Cortex's Castle in Road to Ruin and Ruination (even though it was said to have been sold by Papu Papu to a resort developer). That said, the possibility of Cortex still being around was suggested. Also, despite these inconsistencies, the game goes out of its way to acknowledge Ripper Roo's ending in his boss fight.
* {{Cyborg}}:
** N. Gin is one of the minor examples, since his cyborg customizations are restricted to the right side of his face, courtesy of an industrial accident which is explained in the manual.
** Most of the animal enemies are cyborgs, which is usually limited to a metal plate covering their [[RedEyesTakeWarning red right eye]].
** The Lab Assistants are implied to be these, as they (at different points) are able to emit electricity from their hands and when defeated they somehow lets out electric arcs and sparks.
* DamnYouMuscleMemory: "Ruination" actually uses this against you, twice. In "Road to Ruin", first there's a stack of 4 boxes with one extra crate behind it, then there's a series of scattered wireframe boxes with an ! box nearby, which causes the wireframe boxes to turn into normal crates. "Ruination" features this exact same setup both times, only this time, the stack of 4 boxes have a single Nitro behind them, and the switch spawns ''Nitro crates'' instead. You ''will'' [[YetAnotherStupidDeath blow yourself up]] if you don't see the traps coming, although you don't need to activate the wireframe Nitro trap to complete the level's box gem.
* DeadlyRotaryFan: These appears in the sewer levels. In order to pass through them, Crash has to run/slide in between the fan blades. Or spin the respawning sweeper enemies at them to reduce the number of blades.
* DeathIsASlapOnTheWrist: By the time you're midway through the game, it is easy to earn more lives than you lose, which can also overlap with MeaninglessLives; decent players can have the full 99 lives by the time they finish the third warp room 100% ''without'' jumping on Polar. Even if Crash loses all his lives, the continue screen allows you to return to that level's Warp Room with new lives, ready for another attempt. Of course, the game also becomes harder the further you go, especially for the secret routes and Skull Routes, where you'll need those lots of lives.
* DefectorFromDecadence: Brio isn't all that heroic, but he hates Cortex and is willing to ally himself with Crash to take him down.
* DegradedBoss: Ripper Roo goes from being the second boss (and a good candidate for ThatOneBoss status) in the original game to being the first boss in this one. Now he can also be hurt by Crash's spin and jump attacks, which were useless against him in the previous one, and his area is easier to move around.
* DevelopersForesight: In the beginning of the game, if you enter a level but fail to retrieve its crystal (either by exiting back to the Warp Room through the Pause menu or by just flat-out ignoring it), Cortex will chew you out when you return. ''Three different times'', as a matter of fact, before he [[TranquilFury gives up and decides you're on your own]].
* DifficultyByRegion: The European version is very slightly easier: the Belly Flop has a wider radius, the shield enemies are slower, and it's easier to jump over a wall of boxes without breaking any (in a level that requires you to avoid breaking any boxes to get a gem). However, if you die during a "Death Route" you don't get another chance (unlike the North American version, which only required you to reach it without dying the first time).
* DisconnectedSideArea: Most levels are perfectly linear, but there are all sorts of level segments that are impossible to get to from their respective levels. You have to find secret elevators from other levels and eventually the secret Warp Room in order to get to them, rendering HundredPercentCompletion for those levels (breaking all the boxes) impossible until very late in the game.
* TheDragon: Tiny is this to Brio. Dr. N. Gin replaces Brio as Cortex's supporter for the penultimate boss, where he tries to take Crash's crystals by force.
* DualBoss: The Komodo Brothers are fought together, with Joe spinning around the room and Moe in the center throwing scimitars at Crash. They share the same HP meter.
* DumbMuscle: Tiny is powerful enough to rip through metal, and dumb enough to fall for Crash's trick three times.
* DummiedOut: Tiny's original name was Taz Tiger. How do we know this? In the NTSC version, they accidentally left this name in the pause menu. Corrected in the PAL version, as well as all future releases.
* EarlyBirdCameo: Remember that penguin enemy from the ice levels? Well, right after another cameo in ''3'', he would get in to become a [[AscendedExtra standalone character]], Penta the Penguin.
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: While elements such as a few key main characters and gameplay mythos are now becoming present, some oddities are still present. Aku Aku is still a silent power up rather than Crash's mentor and Tiny, usually Cortex's most loyal minion, here serves N Brio to stop Cortex. Also while the Crystals have now appeared as key Macguffins, the Time Relics (and the time trial tasks that earn them) have not.
* EnemyMine: Cortex asks Crash for help in order to gather enough crystals to avert an EarthShatteringKaboom. Later, N. Brio tries to recruit Crash to his side. Both of them claim to be working for the common good, but this trope fits N. Brio best because he ''hates'' Cortex and would rather side with his own arch-nemesis (Crash) than work for his former employer.
* EternalEngine: The Piston It Away, Rock It, Pack Attack and Spaced Out levels, which take place aboard the Cortex Vortex.
* EverythingsBetterWithPenguins: [[InvertedTrope Inverted]] in that the penguins are actually enemies in the SlippySlideyIceWorld levels. Although their SpinAttack does look quite cute.
* EverythingsBetterWithSpinning: Crash, by default. Penguins as well.
* ExplodingBarrels: TNT and Nitro crates, and actual barrels in the sewer levels.
* ExtendedGameplay: You can claim to have "beaten" the game after collecting the crystals and defeating the final boss, but after that the player can go back and find the gems as well.
* FakeTrap:
** In Bee-Havin', there's a staircase-like structure made of metal boxes and the normally lethal Nitro boxes. However, this time they don't blow up and the Nitro boxes don't wobble and jump like the normal ones. Climb them, go on, [[spoiler: teleport to a secret area.]] Incidentally, this was made [[UpToEleven all the more obvious]] in the beta version as there were wumpa fruit conveniently placed on top of the nitros.
** In the Un-Bearable level, after the bear crashes through the bridge. That "bottomless pit" isn't as bottomless as you may think.
* FalselyReformedVillain: [[spoiler:Cortex wants Crash to believe that he has seen the error of his ways.]]
* FastTunnelling: The levels Diggin' It and Bee-Havin' have special red grounds in parts of those levels. Pressing the SpinAttack button while standing there will instead make Crash burrow underground; he's also able to do SpinAttack from underground by sprouting his legs out of the ground before doing so. This move makes for easy escaping obstacles (including those bees!).
* FluffyTheTerrible: Whoever gave [[IronicName Tiny]] his name had an ironic sense of humour.
* FreeSamplePlotCoupon: Cortex tells Crash that he already has the Master Crystal, and Crash's job is to find the 25 Slave Crystals that look similar to the one Cortex has.
* FrickinLaserBeams: N. Gin's initial line of offense in the penultimate boss fight is to fire laser beams from his {{Humongous Mecha}}'s arms. Near the end of the fight, the stomach opens up to release a larger green laser blast that can melt metal in seconds. In the Rock It and Pack Attack levels, laser beams will occasionally fire across the pathway, connecting two pairs of receptors in a predictable pattern. [[spoiler: In the final cutscene, Brio has an [[WaveMotionGun enormous laser]] which, with the help of Crash, he uses to blast Cortex's space station]].
* FriendOrFoe: Whether Cortex has really done a HeelFaceTurn or not is not revealed until the end. Brio is also slightly suspicious until the end.
* GadgeteerGenius: N. Gin, the MadScientist who pilots a HumongousMecha when facing Crash, is one of these.
* GameOverMan: Cortex. This was later reused in the sequel. It is never quite explained why he is the GameOverMan, though. [[spoiler:Until you learn of his plans to conquer the world.]]
* GetBackHereBoss: The final boss, whom you must defeat before the end of the arena or else you lose a life.
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: The "Piston It Away" level title is a pun on "pissing it away".
* GoodIsDumb: Crash is [[GullibleLemmings gullible enough]] to [[spoiler:be fooled by Cortex into collecting the crystals for him. He later starts suspecting about the plan, as he refuses handing the crystals to N. Gin despite Cortex's orders.]]
* GoodIsNotDumb: Coco is a computer genius, [[spoiler:first hacking into Cortex's holographic projector, and then accessing Cortex's computer files to expose his plans.]] Crash is the opposite.
* GoofyPrintUnderwear: Several of Crash's death sequences reveal he wears pink boxers with red hearts.
* TheGoomba: The armadillos in the Turtle Woods, The Pits and the introductory level can be beaten by any of Crash's attacks.
* GoombaStomp: Crash's second attack, which can be used if spinning doesn't work. Be careful how you use it against TheSpiny (see below).
** Partially averted by a plant enemy in Diggin' It and Bee-Having; if you get too close, it hides in a ring of spikes and covers itself with leaves, making Crash bounce on it instead of defeating it if he jumps on it. Belly-flopping or digging underneath in special areas and spinning them will defeat them.
* GottaCatchThemAll: The crystals are needed to reach the last boss, while the gems are needed to complete the game.
* GotVolunteered: Crash is teleported away from home and essentially forced to do Cortex's work by being trapped in a set of inescapable warp rooms with only five levels, and thanks to NoSidepathsNoExplorationNoFreedom, those are no better. ButThouMust, Crash Bandicoot, ButThouMust!
* GravityScrew: The majority of the Rock It and Pack Attack levels and the FinalBoss fight function in zero gravity, which makes sense on an earth-orbiting satellite. However, at the beginning and the end of the Rock It/Pack Attack levels, the gravity acts as it would do on the planet surface, as if artificial gravity had just been switched off and on.
* GreenHillZone: The introductory level, Turtle Woods, and The Pits act like this.
* GroundPound: Crash gains a Ground Pound attack in this game, with which he can belly-flop onto unsuspecting enemies or bust open metal-enforced crates that would otherwise seem impenetrable.
* GuideDangIt:
** [[spoiler:In a game where you do a lot of smashing up crates, you can only get the Blue Gem featured in the first level by making it to the end while not smashing ANY crates, including checkpoint ones. And you're supposed to know this. The game gives a subtle hint, however -- if you obtain the Clear Gem (by getting all the crates) in the level, then play through it again, you'll notice the end-of-level "crate count" now reads (your current number of crates)/0. Make it 0/0 and you get the Blue Gem (this is also complicated by the fact that there is a crate wall halfway through the level; one of the crates is a bouncy crate, and you need to bounce off this crate to clear the wall without breaking anything). Not only that, it's also possible to get both gems at one run: get the blue first by the method above, then die and respawn at the start, then make it back to the finish, this time while breaking the crates.]]
** The secret areas in this game are even more so, often requiring extreme acrobatic feats and/or ViolationOfCommonSense to reach. One requires you to [[spoiler:[[LeapOfFaith fall down into a pit]] the polar bear chasing you recently opened, despite every video game ever telling you that ''pits are bad'']]. Another has you [[spoiler:jumping on top of a stack of Nitro crates, which you have been taught up to this point to avoid like the plague (although this one is a bit less insane, since they're off the beaten path and are stair steps, and they also don't wiggle and bounce like the others)]]. Yet a third has you [[spoiler:passing through an innocuous-looking fake wall in a Nitro-filled room]]. With bizarre requirements like these, it's no wonder future secret areas were basically relegated to Gem and Skull Routes.
** A secret area in "Hangin' Out" involves a long hanging section that requires you to lift up your legs at certain moments to allow indestructible enemies to pass harmlessly below you. You have never been required to use this move before, and ''even the manual makes no reference to it''. Newcomers to the series are thus forced to rely on [[TrialAndErrorGameplay trial and error]] in order to make it through successfully. [[note]]This doesn't really count as a NoobBridge since it's in a secret area. Still frustrating, though.[[/note]]
** Those annoying logs tossed at you in the "Ruin" levels and the shrink rays in the space station levels? You can spin those away safely.
* HairTriggerExplosive: Nitro Crates, which explode with even the slightest touch, are introduced in this game. They even bounce randomly on the ground as a visual indicator of their volatility.
* HalfDressedCartoonAnimal: Tiny has ShouldersOfDoom, an animal lioncloth, and red sneakers.
* HeavilyArmoredMook: Metal-shelled armadillos appear in the secret underground routes in Un-Bearable and Bee-Having. They can only be defeated by a GroundPound, which removes their metal armor and makes them vulnerable to the rest of Crash's attacks.
* HeroicMime: Emphasis on the 'mime' -- just watch Crash's animations and you'll see just how expressive his new model is.
* HubLevel: Crash can access five levels from each of these hubs, or Warp Rooms, and the platform in the center of the room takes him up to the next boss fight. There is also a load/save screen in each one. This was the first game to introduce the Warp Room concept, which became a staple in the Crash series after that. There's also a secret Warp Room that is only accessible via certain subtle means.
* HumongousMecha: N.Gin pilots one of these for the penultimate boss battle. It looks good, but see RockBeatsLaser below.
* HundredPercentCompletion: What counts for the completion are the crystals, gems, the final boss, and finding secret levels (and, in the Japanese version, getting the 10 lives from Polar). Completing them all unlocks the true ending, which leads on to the next game. See SequelHook below.
* IconicSequelCharacter: Coco, N.Gin and Tiny, introduced in this game, become mainstays in later games.
* IdiotHero: Crash is either the victim of circumstances or duped very easily.
* IdleAnimation: Evident - leave Crash for a while and he reverts to his old Crash 1 animation. Now, leave him alone in one of the snowy levels.
* ImmediateSequel: The game starts with Dr. Cortex discovering the plot-driving Power Crystals by accident after his defeat in the first game.
* IndyEscape: Crash's response to the AdvancingWallOfDoom. Since you are running into the camera, this makes what should be easy-to-dodge obstacles really tricky.
* InexplicableTreasureChests: Beyond being a gameplay feature, the crates that Crash finds are placed in some pretty odd locations, from temple ruins to snowscapes to sewers.
* InfiniteOneUps: In one of the levels, after you get into a secret area, there'll be a checkpoint crate, 2 OneUp crates floating offscreen, and a BottomlessPit nearby. Get the 2 life crates, fall into the pit and lose a life, respawn, and you can get the 2 crates again, so everytime you lose a life, you gain two - this can be repeated ad nauseam.[[note]]Normally, life crates will turn into wumpa crates if Crash dies, but not for these particular two crates. May be a case of a GoodBadBug.[[/note]]
* InternalReveal: The game doesn't try very hard to keep [[spoiler:Cortex being the BigBad]] a secret. By the end, the only one who appears to be unaware until the final boss is Crash.
* InstantGravestone: Being killed by a sledge hammer produces a grave stone with Crash's face on it. You also get the grave stone if you run into a Nitro box while underground (those and the sledge hammer men can still kill Crash when he's underground).
* InstantIceJustAddCold: One of Crash's ''many'' death animations. This one comes up if you fall in the water in the "ice" levels.
* InvincibleMinorMinion: Occasionally you can find these, such as in the sewer levels and in the "factory" levels.
* IronicName: ''Tiny'' Tiger is massive and powerful.
* JungleJapes: See GreenHillZone, since these two overlap.
* KaizoTrap:
** Amazingly ''[[InvertedTrope inverted]]''; if you sit through the entire opening cutscene, you get to play an intro stage which gives you the opportunity to earn an Aku Aku mask and a couple of extra lives. This intro stage also has bottomless pits here and there. This effectively means that it's possible to kill yourself and get a Game Over ''[[EpicFail before the game proper even starts]]''.[[note]]Resuming a Game Over will just skip you to the warp room, much like skipping the cutscene will.[[/note]]
** Played straight in Tiny Tiger's boss battle; when you succeed in making Tiny leap over the falling platform, several other platforms will also start to fall down. Stand on the right platform (i.e the one that doesn't flash red) and you're safe.
** Another straight example in the fight against the Komodo Brothers; after landing the final hit, you can still be killed if you touch the brothers before their defeat animation finishes.
* KillerRabbit: Armadillos, the giant mice in the ruin levels, the penguins in the ice levels, and the gophers that lurk in The Pits: They all look innocent enough, but will still harm Crash on contact.
* KnightTemplar: According to the manual, to emphasize the unknown morality of the people Crash faces, N. Brio will do anything to get back at Cortex, even if he blows Earth's only chance of survival in the process. [[spoiler:Of course, it turns out Brio was telling the truth and Cortex is a big fat liar.]]
* LagCancel: You can cancel Crash's slide into a spin for a faster spin and to avoid the slide's recovery. Spamming slide + spin makes you move faster than running normally.
* LargeHam: Doctor Neo Cortex, thanks to Creator/ClancyBrown.
* LastLousyPoint:
** If you don't know what is in the secret warp rooms, some gems will act like this, but it is averted thanks to a user-friendly display above each Warp Room gate, which shows you what items you have collected from the level. The slots accept each crystal and gem when Crash collects them and gets to that level's end point, and any empty slots will mean that there is still a crystal or gem yet to be recovered. What makes them lousy, though, is about how hard it is to get some of those gems.
** You'll also have some Last Lousy Crates in some levels. There is one well hidden in the bonus round of Cold Hard Crash, which is [[GuideDangIt easy to miss]] as it's ''[[BehindTheBlack offscreen]]''.
* LaughingMad: Ripper Roo reverts to his old mad self whenever a TNT blows up underneath his feet.
* LawOfOneHundred: As usual, collecting one hundred wumpa fruit will earn Crash a new life.
* {{Leitmotif}}: Cortex, N. Brio and Coco all have distinct themes play during their projection cutscenes. Cortex and N. Brio's themes (along with Ripper Roo's boss music) are remixed from their boss music from the original game, making it something of recurring Leitmotifs for the characters.
* LongSongShortScene: N. Brio and Coco's {{Leitmotif}}s are only heard during their intermissions drowned out by their dialogue (Cortex also has a theme play during his intermissions [[spoiler: though it plays during his boss battle]]). [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xX3lVsCKwX0 An alternative track for the snow levels]] was also made but never used.
* LostInTransmission: Coco has some vitally important message to give to Crash, except that [[HisNameIs each time she tries to warn him]], the holographic projection cuts out at a critical moment. It noticeably gets better as the game progresses, so by the time Crash has collected all the crystals, [[DevilInPlainSight she can finally give him the full warning]]. [[spoiler:By then, of course, she is too late, and Crash has to chase down Cortex.]]
* MacGuffinDeliveryService: This is what Cortex has recruited Crash for.
* MadBomber: In the first game, the explosive crates in Ripper Roo's stage were just an environmental hazard. This time, Roo intentionally uses them to attack Crash.
* MadScientist: Cortex, N.Brio, and N.Gin all qualify for this in some capacity.
* MadeOfIron: Cortex ''falls from an airship down to the factory on the island'' and doesn't die. In fact, it leads to him setting off the events of the game.
* MamaBear: Polar's parents chase you throughout the "Un-Bearable" level, and they're not too happy about Crash using their son as a mount.
** PapaWolf: The Japanese name for said level is "Escape from Papa Bear", meaning that one of the giant polar bears that chases you throughout the level may be Polar's father.
* ManEatingPlant: There are carnivorous plants in the river levels Hang Eight, Air Crash, and Plant Food which can snap up Crash and swallow him whole.
* TheManyDeathsOfYou: The UrExample in this series. The game features lots of humorous death animations, intended to prevent players from snapping their controllers in frustration from dying over and over again.
* MinimalistRun: In one of the levels, the only way to aquire the other gem is to beat the level without destroying a single crate.
* MookMaker: The beehives in Diggin' It and Bee-Havin', which respawn a swarm every time Crash passes a certain point.
* MorallyAmbiguousDoctorate: Another one introduced in this game: Dr. N. Gin.
* MuckingInTheMud: The levels Turtle Woods and The Pit feature pools of mud as obstacles that will slow Crash down if he gets into them.
* NoDamageRun: One half of the challenge on the time challenges on some of the river levels[[note]]the other half of it is beating the timer[[/note]]. A perfect run is also required to access death routes, although you can die once they've been activated and they will remain open for the run.
* NiceJobBreakingItHero: [[spoiler:Crash almost hands the crystals over to the BigBad and dooms the planet, and following this near miss, detonates Cortex's space station, inadvertently leading to a chain of events that are revealed in the following game to lead to the release of Uka Uka, the BigBad of ''Videogame/CrashBandicoot3Warped''.]]
* NonDubbedGrunts: This is the only game in the series to not have changed Crash Bandicoot's voice within the Japanese version of the game.
* NonLethalBottomlessPits: See FakeTrap for a hint. Go on, go have a look.
* NoodleIncident: It's AllThereInTheManual, otherwise you would never know what happened to N.Gin to make him a cyborg.
* NoOSHACompliance:
** The sewer levels (The Eel Deal, Sewer or Later, and Hangin' Out) are chock-full of radioactive waste barrels and pools of electrified water. Hangin' Out also features networks of red-hot piping and pools of lava.
** Piston It Away, Rock It, Pack Attack, and Spaced Out are set aboard the Cortex Vortex, and are riddled with pits, exposed wiring, crushing pistons, laser beams, and shrink ray traps.
* NoSidepathsNoExplorationNoFreedom: Played with.
** Crash can only proceed along a linear path with the occasional bonus stage along the way. He can also progress to the next warp room only if he has collected all five crystals for the levels in it. At least the Warp Room levels can be tackled in any order. Occasionally backtracking is required.
** Sometimes, however, taking the secret paths in the levels will bring you to another level or to the Secret Warp Room, making for a nonstandard item completion.
* NostalgiaLevel:
** Ripper Roo's boss fight is very evocative of the same boss fight from the original game. It might even be the same level [[RemixedLevel after redecoration]].
** The jungle and boulder levels (and to an extent the river ones) are also similar to those in the first game.
* NotTheFallThatKillsYou: If you look closely during Tiny's boss fight, you will notice that he loses health when he starts falling. Evidently the very ''idea'' of plummeting to his death gives him a heart attack. And he falls at the speed of frozen molasses.
* OhCrap: During chase levels, Crash will look behind while running to see what's chasing him. The look on his face when he turns back shows the poor Bandicoot is terrified.
* OneManArmy: Seriously, think a moment about how many {{Mook}}s Crash beats up in this game.
* OneUp: How the life system works.
* PermanentlyMissableContent: Don't skip the opening cutscene -- in the end, there'll be an "intro level" where Crash runs into the jungle and then gets warped against his will. Doing this isn't required for 100% completion, however.
* PipeMaze: The sewer levels sometimes have secret passageways and forks, which all taken together would just barely pass as a maze.
* PiranhaProblem: The mechanical piranhas in the river levels leap out of the water.
* PlotCoupon: The game almost entirely revolves around collecting crystals and gems. Still, that does not make it any less fun.
* PowerCrystal: Obviously the crystals themselves, which will fuel Cortex's Cortex Vortex so that he can capture the solar flux energy, but Brio also wants the gems so that he can focus a laser on the space station and blow it to bits.
* PowerupMount: The polar bear (appropriately named [[ADogNamedDog "Polar"]]) that appears in several levels moves very quickly and can make really long jumps.
* PsychoElectricEel: Electric eels appear in the sewer stages to periodically electrocute the water, forcing Crash to try to find dry footing when they do so as he tries to cross the water.
* PuzzleBoss: Ripper Roo and his exploding crates.
* RaceAgainstTheClock: If you want to obtain the gems on those river levels.
* RememberTheNewGuy: This is Coco Bandicoot's first introduction, and there is absolutely nothing in the last game to suggest that Crash even had a sister. Since Tawna simply vanished from the series after the first game, Coco was brought in to replace her.
* ReptilesAreAbhorrent: The Komodo Brothers are two samurai-style komodo dragons who can make swords appear in their hands like magic. Their boss battle is the aforementioned one with one of the AntiFrustrationFeatures built in.
* RevengeOfTheSequel: Look at the title.
* RockBeatsLaser: How does the unarmed nature-loving Crash defeat the insane cyborg doctor N. Gin, who pilots a futuristic mecha? By throwing Wumpa fruits at it, of course! AttackItsWeakPoint has never failed yet!
* RuinsForRuinsSake: Two levels are based on this theme, and feature such horrors as frilled lizards, leaping monkeys, rabid giant mice, and lumber apes.
* SaveGameLimits: The game can only be saved at the Warp Room load/save screen, but if you pause the game, you can quit a level so that you can reach any SavePoint.
* SeaMine: Frustratingly common in the river-based levels such as Air Crash and Plant Food.
* SecretLevel: There are two secret levels and three secret level sidepaths which can only be accessed by a secret Warp Room, which itself can't be accessed except via secret routes in the main level.
* SeldomSeenSpecies: Bandicoot, of course, but also Komodo dragon and thylacine. Think also of some of the enemies encountered in the levels.
* SequelDifficultyDrop: The game as a whole is far less difficult than its predecessor, with the exception of a few gem challenges and Skull Routes, which are [[NintendoHard absolutely insane]].
* SequelHook: [[spoiler:Cortex's EvilLaugh is heard midway through the good ending credits, showing that he is still at large despite spinning out of control in space, although this detail is missing from the ''Trilogy'' release due to all three games sharing the same credits sequence.]]
* SequenceBreaking:
** It's possible to go completely over the gopher pits in the jungle levels (that normally traps you in with the gophers until you defeat every one of them) by quickly doing a slide jump spin (you slide, you jump, and you spin, in that order, in very quick succession) over it. Even if you fall in, you can still do the same before the first gopher appears.
** You can get the Red Gem in the Snow Go level much earlier than intended (i.e. taking an alternate route to get there) by doing a slide jump spin up, then a body slam, the latter of which extends your altitude a little at the peak of the jump before the slam, enough to reach the gem. It's easier to do with the bounce crate placed to the right of it.
** Said jump trick also lets Crash jump into the secret path in Road to Ruin from its exit instead of its intended entry (the 6th warp room), allowing him to break the extra crates in said path quicker and easier. It also allows him to get the second gem without getting the death route platform.
** You also don't need to get the green gem to get the second clear gem in Ruination. Again, it's the slide jump spin trick.
** You can die on Diggin' It and still enter the death route, by jumping along the side of the colossal pit at the end of the fork.
* SequentialBoss: N.Gin functions as this after clearing the fourth Warp Room. Crash first has to take out his machine's laser arms, then he must go for N.Gin's shoulder rocket launchers, and finally, Crash has to dodge blasts from the machine's core while blasting it to destroy the machine and proceed to the last Warp Room.
* SharedLifeMeter: The Komodo Bros share a life bar. Moe is invulnerable, but Joe isn't -- and to damage them you have to smack Joe, which will spin towards Moe, hurting them both.
* ShieldBearingMook: A few mooks in Piston It Away and Spaced Out wield shields that could [[KnockBack push Crash back quite a distance]]. Hint: Their legs aren't covered.
* SiblingYinYang: EstablishingCharacterMoment in the opening cutscene: Crash is [[BrilliantButLazy laid back and idle]], while Coco [[RapidFireTyping pounds furiously on the keyboard]] and gets him off his back to fetch a new battery for the laptop.
* SquashedFlat: In a variation, one of the many death animations features Crash getting squashed into a WaddlingHead. He gets squashed more traditionally pancake-flat in the Japanese version instead, due to the former animation's [[TooSoon disturbing similarity]] with killings a SerialKiller in Japan was perpetrating at the time.
* SlideAttack: A new feature introduced in this game. By sliding and then doing a SpinAttack, he can move much faster; jumping after sliding also makes him jump higher.
* SlippySlideyIceWorld: Snow Go, Snow Biz, and Cold Hard Crash are completely frozen over, but Naughty Dog evidently liked snow, because they included the Polar levels Bear It, Bear Down, and Totally Bear, and added snow features to decorate Crash Dash, Crash Crush, Un-Bearable, Diggin' It, and Bee-Havin'. The concept art for the game shows that the islands are experiencing winter times. This was apparently a result of AuthorAppeal, as the creators liked the appearance of snow during the sunset.
* SpaceZone: The theme for the last Warp Room, and for four of its five levels. Three of the five boss battles occur in space, apparently on the Cortex Vortex.
* SpeechImpediment: Doctor Nitrus Brio has an obvious stutter and an apparent inability to control the volume of his own voice. He also bursts out into barely suppressed cackles at random moments, implying he's not all there in the head, either.
* TheSpiny:
** Several varieties of TheSpiny appear, to accommodate the fact that the player can perform several types of attacks. For example, a basic turtle enemy either has the sides of its shell laced with deadly spikes (making the full-frontal spin attack impossible), or it has sawblades on its back instead (which prevents players from defeating them by jumping). Some enemies switch back and forth between being unable to be spun into and being unable to be jumped on, especially in the later levels.
** Tall enemies with fire-rimmed necks appear in the later stages, requiring a SlideAttack to be defeated.
** Variant: Porcupine enemies, if you're happen to be close, will extend their spikes and run around quickly, and Crash cannot attack them at all while they're in said state. You have to wait for them to stop and lower their guard.
* SpoilerTitle: You can guess that Cortex is up to no good looking from the title alone, even if he then appears to be helpful (or trying to be). And the title isn't lying.
* StockScream: The Howie scream is heard whenever Crash kills certain types of Lab Assistants.
* SuddenlyVoiced: Aku Aku in the Japanese version. Crash also talked in a promotional video for the game that was shown at E3. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w47m7yEr1W4 Thank goodness he did not talk like this in the game.]]
* SuperDrowningSkills: Yes, Crash can ride a jet board, but don't let him fall into the water! He has two animations for falling in: One plays the trope graphically straight, as Crash struggles to surface for air before finally dying. The other is actually a double subversion - he floats face-up, dazed but still very much alive (as evidenced by his eyes still blinking), but you will still lose a life for falling in.
* SuspiciousVideoGameGenerosity:
** The Purple Gem is found in a secret area, but is easily obtainable after only three easy jumps. Everything afterwards is incredibly difficult, so it is easier to leap into the nearby BottomlessPit and die than go through the BrutalBonusLevel.
** The game is very liberal about doling out free lives, especially in the early stages where you can hit double-digits fairly quickly (plus, you can always go back and grind out more). That's because ''you will need them''.
* TacticalSuicideBoss: All of them are guilty of this to some degree. For example, Ripper Roo lays down TNT and Nitro crates and then deliberately detonates them, knocking himself out long enough for Crash to exploit the opening. TooDumbToLive, considering he supposedly [[DumbassNoMore Took A Level In Smartass]] during the interrim between ''Crash 1'' and ''2''.
* TechnoWizard: Coco can hack into Cortex's holographic projector, a skill [[ChekhovsSkill which becomes useful later]].
* TemporaryPlatform: The collapsing towers in the ruins levels. Also the platforms in the sewer levels and the hippos in the river levels.
* ThrowingYourSwordAlwaysWorks: The Komodo Brothers, Joe and Moe. They are throwing scimitars at one another, catching them, before they see that Crash has arrived. Once the fight has started, Joe is spun at Crash, while Moe tosses his magically respawning blades at him.
* TimedMission: The Yellow Gem and one of the Clear Gems are obtained by racing a clock to the end of certain levels.
* TimeLimitBoss: [[spoiler:Dr. Neo Cortex]]. You're on a jetpack and have to reach him before he reaches the end of the hall, where he laughs, you lose a life, and you start the fight over.
* TitleScream: The title is spoken aloud if the player didn't skip it.
* TopHeavyGuy: Tiny, just like Koala Kong before him.
* TransformationRay: In the Piston It Away and Spaced Out levels, if Crash gets hit by a blue ray (activated by a pressure pad in the floor), he will [[IncredibleShrinkingMan shrink down into nothing]], losing him a life. [[ControllableHelplessness You can still control Crash while he's shrinking, but don't expect to get very far.]]
* TurtlePower: Turtles reappear as enemies; now they require different means of defeating (see TheSpiny above).
* UnexpectedGameplayChange: The Polar-riding levels, as well as the jetpack levels. Downplayed with the water-boarding levels as the actual water-boarding only happens at the middle of the levels.
* UnexpectedShmupLevel: During the fight with N. Gin you throw Wumpa fruit rather than jumping and spinning to attack him.
* TheUnfought: [[spoiler:N. Brio never shows up as a boss, despite Cortex insisting that he is the true enemy. This is because Cortex is the true BigBad.]]
* UniqueEnemy: Hunter Lab Assistants. Only found in two levels, and in secret areas to boot, meaning you can reasonably beat the game without ever finding one.
* VictoryPose: Crash dances after completing a level with a collected gem, as well as after defeating a boss. Said dance is the popular Crash Dance, which originates in the Japanese version of the first game and is retained in several later games.
* VideoGameCrueltyPotential: You can attack or jump on Polar in the second Warp Room. Doing so enough times even grants you ten extra lives!
* VideoGameLives: The rules of the last game carry on over to this one.
* WarmupBoss: Ripper Roo causes more harm to himself than Crash does. Lampshaded by Cortex himself.
* WingedSoulFliesOffAtDeath: One of TheManyDeathsOfYou, and Crash's "default" death animation. There's a variant that appears if killed by a Nitro crate where Crash is playing the didgeridoo, and a variant in the Polar levels where he'll be carrying an alive and intact Polar up.
* WhatTheHellPlayer: If you go into a level, but leave it without retrieving the crystal, Cortex will chew you out upon returning. He gets increasingly frustrated each time you do it, and by the third time, he's so ticked off that he [[TranquilFury cannot even yell at you]], and decides to [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere leave you on your own]] until you finally get the crystal.
* WorldOfPun: A lot of the level names are puns.
* XMustNotWin: According to the manual, N. Brio will do ''anything'' to make sure Crash and Cortex fail, even if it means dooming the planet. [[spoiler:As it turns out, though, there's a good reason Brio did what he did: the world isn't actually in danger.]]
* XRaySparks: Happens to Crash in the sewer levels and the AdvancingWallOfDoom and bee levels whenever he hits an electric fence or is in the sewer water when the resident eel is electrifying it. His boxer shorts also become visible.

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