Video Game: Police 911

Police 911 is a Light Gun Arcade Game made by Konami, about a police officer either in the Los Angeles LAPD or Tokyo police against an international Yakuza organization called Gokudou-kai. It is a spin-off from Lethal Enforcers.

The first game has been ported to PlayStation 2.

Tropes:

  • Awesome but Impractical: The games give you increasingly impressive bonuses for advancing through the ranks, with the ultimate one, for Commissioner, being 100 lives. Once you get that, you can keep playing until...well, you run out of time. Worse,you don't get any benefits whatsoever once you reach Commissioner, meaning that once the clock runs down, you're sunk. And needless to say, if you continue, your lives get reset to 3. Unless you're a real ace at this game to the point where time isn't an issue, it's much better to pick up the first two bonuses (5 seconds and 10 seconds, respectively) and then die on purpose to reset them, tacking on the third bonus (1 life) only when you're on your last life.
  • Another Side, Another Story: In the PS2 port, beating the game once unlocks the "Another Story" mode, which has you playing as the American cops (or if you're playing the European version, which is Police 24/7, beating the game once has the Another Story mode playing as the Japanese cops).
  • Always Close: If you reach the true final stage by shooting three targets marked with orange rings, once you beat the first final boss in the second game, Hung Ko Cheung, Shigenobu Matsuyama will attempt to flee. Regardless of whether you shoot him or not, your colleagues will eventually arrest him.
  • Big Bad: Katsuji Haraguchi is the leader of Gokudou-kai in the first game. In the second game, Shigenobu Matsuyama becomes the new leader.
  • Censor Box: The eyes of criminals in their portraits are censored out, not unlike in Japanese television broadcasts. When you fight them, their faces are pixellated.
  • Cultural Translation: In the Japanese version of the first game, you start in Tokyo, then travel to Little Tokyo in Los Angeles. In the US version, it's the other way around, in addition to the stages being in a slightly different order.
  • Darker and Edgier: To the first two Lethal Enforcers games.
  • Dual Boss: Bai Ei Lee and Noriko Nagata in the Japanese version of the first Police 911 game.
  • Dynamic Difficulty: The game's extremely fast, with bosses running and shooting around. Players have to aim more precisely in order to defeat the boss.
  • Five-Bad Band
  • High Speed Battle: You need to Take Cover and return fire in a quick succession in a limited time to avoid getting hit by enemy gunfire. Also, all bosses, despite being Cat and Mouse Boss, runs at fast movements.
  • Hostage Spirit Link: You don't actually die, you just get treated to a time-wasting cutscene, and you lose a few ranks. The same applies to Lethal Enforcers 3, in which it shows a news headline reading "[occupation of civilian] shot by mistake."
  • Infinite 1-Ups: Reaching the highest rank is no easy feat, as deaths and shooting civilians will demote you. But if you can pull it off, you'll get a 100-life bonus as a reward. However it is not a guaranteed win, because you can still get a Game Over by running out of time.
  • Market-Based Title: The original title was The Keisatsukan, before released overseas as Police 911 and Police 24/7.
  • Meaningful Name: It's a police simulator. The first Police 911 has "Shinjuku 24", in which the players start out in Shinjuku, Tokyo at midnight. The second game has "Nationwide Tracking Special", involves multiple cities in Japan.
  • No Koreans In Japan: Bai Ei Lee is a Korean in the first game. However, he's outside Japan. In the second game, the Koreans are absent. Instead, The Triads and the Tongs replaced them.
  • Oddly Named Sequel 2: Electric Boogaloo: It was intended to be a separate game series, before Lethal Enforcers 3 arrives.
  • Painfully Slow Projectile: Bullets are so slow you can easily follow their trajectories.
  • Ruthless Foreign Gangsters / The Triads and the Tongs: Ryuuto, the Chinese criminal organization based in Hong Kong. They appear on the second game.
  • Sequel Difficulty Spike: This is faster-paced compared to the first two Lethal Enforcers games. With Cat and Mouse Boss in, this spinoff can be extremely difficult, as the mooks, bosses and innocents run at rapid sequences.
  • Shout-Out: The bosses are named after the staff members of Konami.
  • Songs in the Key of Panic: If the player either loses a life, shot an officer or a civilian, or is down to their last life, more distressing music plays.
  • Take Cover: The series is an expansion of this idea, using motion sensors instead of a foot pedal.
  • Vehicular Assault: This is what distinguishes most of the bosses in Police 911 2, since every foe, like you, is a One-Hit-Point Wonder. Your pistol isn't powerful enough to destroy the vehicles, so you take out the drivers by firing through the windows.
  • Video Game Cruelty Punishment: Shooting innocents in the Japanese version will lose you a life as well as your rank.
  • Video Game Lives: The game gives you one hundred more extra lives above your starting three if you reach the top rank of Comissioner - but since the process of losing a life and restarting takes about 15 seconds of your rarely more than 2 minute timer (the game ends instantly if the timer runs out) this is solely a Bragging Rights Reward. And if you die on your way to Commissioner rank, you lose every promotion and have to start over.
  • Wolf Pack Boss: One level ends with a dozen standard Mooks ganging up on you, and it's treated exactly like the normal level-ending bossfight (Which is more of a Multi-Mook Melee).
  • Yakuza: Gokudou-kai.

Player died on duty.