[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Empire_Earth_2050.jpg]]

A classic military, [[RealTimeStrategy real-time strategy]] game from Stainless Steel Studios, Empire Earth was released in 2001 for the PC. The player controls a civilization as it advances through "epochs" (14 in the original, 15 in the Art of Conquest expansion). Specific buildings allow the construction of units and the research of improvements. The game employs a complex technology tree, with literally hundreds of land, sea, and air-based units. The goal, outside the preset scenarios, is the military destruction of the opponent. Users can play against the computer or other players online.

The original was very well received, prompting the release of Empire Earth II in 2005. This also did fairly well. Empire Earth III, by contrast, was a commercial flop, and is [[FranchiseKiller widely believed to have been the end of the series]].

[[http://ee.heavengames.com/new/eeh/index.shtml A dedicated fanbase lives on.]]

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!!This video-game provides examples of:

* ActionGirl: Molly Ryan, one of the final heroes. Most of the pilots (both tanks and planes) in the final eras are women.
* AIIsACrapshoot: In the Novaya Russia campaign, AI may not be a crapshoot for Novaya Russia, but from the start, Novaya Russia's advances in robotics prove very disastrous for every other country.
** In the skirmish mode A.I. [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard is infamous for heavy cheating]]. It will add resources and units to the enemy team instantly if you do too well. Winning is almost impossible.
* AllThereInTheManual: [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in the fourth mission of the Russian campaign when the briefing recommends you to check out the manual to learn more on [[HumongousMecha cybers]]' abilities.
* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: InUniverse: The final Greek mission "And Alexander Wept" sees Alexander escape an assassination plot [[spoiler:that Philotas was in on. Philotas is executed in the final cutscene.]] The narration notes that it is said [[TitleDrop Alexander wept]] when he had no more lands to conquer, but [[LonelyAtTheTop maybe there were other reasons for him to do so...]]
* AlternateHistory: The first game had the German campaign where it was possible to defeat Britain in UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo. The scenario is actually based on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Sea_Lion Operation Sea Lion]], which of course was never carried out in the real World War II.
* AlwaysChaoticEvil: The barbarians at the beginning of the Roman campaign. You could replace them with orcs without changing much.
* AmericaSavesTheDay:
** Novaya Russia in the first game has conquered Europe, East Russia and all of the world, but they won't manage to conquer the United States; in fact, that's the turning point that erases Novaya Russia from history.
*** Subverted in that America doesn't actually contribute much until Molotov defects to their side. Considering that Grigor II captured the time machine at some point after Molotov and Molly left, it's quite likely the [[InferredHolocaust America of the future was obliterated by the Novaya Russian forces before they traveled back to the past.]]
** In the second game, the US tries to stop a rogue general and his cybernetic experiments from threatening the world TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture, just in time for the 300th Anniversary of the Declaration of Independence.
* AnachronismStew: Infinite possibilities abound when it comes to having one side on the far end of the technology spectrum attacking another side that is way behind in development.
** ArmyOfTheAges: When you use the editor to create an army with units from every epoch, or just start in Prehistory or work your way up. Especially evident when playing with computer allies who send troops to protect your wonders and never retreat them.
* AntiAir: Air units are divided into planes (which can only be hit by planes, AA guns/turrets, cruisers or the specialized AntiAir units) and balloons, helicopters and flying cybers (which can be hit by the aforementioned units and most ranged ground units).
* AnnoyingArrows: Played straight for hand-bow style archers, subverted for arrow towers (which carry a surprising punch), and averted for crossbows (who OneHitKill infantry). It's entirely possible for a crossbow team to destroy a MillionMookMarch of swordsmen single-handedly.
* AreaOfEffect: The nuclear weapon in the first game.
* ArtisticLicenceGeography: Particularly visible on some campaign maps. The next-to-last English campaign has Britain just to the northwest of Spain (the Channel apparently separates the two countries), while the second Russian mission moves it up just off Scandinavia.
* ArtificialStupidity:
** Units ordered to attack will sometimes run like hell the other way, no matter the difference in power between the two.
** Playing on an island-type map makes the computer very stupid indeed; since they can't use their usual ZergRush tactics, they'll settle for sending units one transport at a time, often without any guards. Surrounding the island with towers often ensures the transport sinks before it even lands.
* AsceticAesthetic
* BatteringRam: Most technology epochs have their own version of a siege engine, something that can destroy buildings. In the Stone Age, it's a "Samson," which is just a guy carrying a log he uses to ram enemy huts.
* BaselessMission: The first scenario of the German campaign. One English mission has you rampage around France looting artifacts, while others give you a base and the means to make units but no resources.
* BambooTechnology: The Cyber labs and factories require only lumber to be built.
* BarbarianHero: Hierakles looks exactly like the Barbarian unit (though with a bronze breastplate). One of Alexander's generals ''is'' a barbarian, down to being able to move through trees.
* BeliefMakesYouStupid: Priests cannot convert units that are within range of a university. However, temples prevent the casting of disasters like earthquakes and pestilence.
* BerserkButton: In Skirmish Mode, the AI does ''not'' like it when you finish building a Wonder, and will immediately start to atttack you (and any allies will send troops to protect it) while taunting you. This can be used to set up (very expensive) traps.
* BossBattle: William's duel against a beefed-up French knight in the English campaign, and in the last Russian mission against [[spoiler: Grigor II.]] It has [[DamageSpongeBoss 35000 health points]], compared to the mere 6000 he had [[spoiler:when you could control him]].
* BreakOutTheMuseumPiece: Emptying a now-advanced Fortress you garrisoned in a past epoch, and receiving an army of outdated troops with long-dead tech trees, such as swordsmen, archers, cavalry, or even rock-throwing ''[[UpToEleven cavemen]]''.
** The final level of the German campaign has attacks from the French resistance featuring Napoleonic units.
* BrokenPedestal: [[MyCountryRightOrWrong Molotov]] for much of his appearance in the Novaya Russia campaign idolizes Grigor and all he stood for. [[spoiler:This is completely shattered however upon finding out that Grigor was far from the heroic messiah he thought him to be.]]
* CanineCompanion: The Canine Scout unit serves as, well, a scout (it can move through trees).
* CantCatchUp: Some AIs randomly stop trying to go up on the tech tree for no reason. Especialy painful if it's in the early ages before anyone has AntiAir weapons.
* CityOfWeirdos: [[spoiler:When Molotov and Molly go back in time, nobody says anything about Molotov, a cyborg with a half-robot face, or Molly, whose hair is made of cybernetic cables.]]
* ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve: The presence of a temple is enough to prevent disasters.
* CommieNazis: Novaya Russia seems to combine socialist ideas and nostalgy for Soviet times with ultranationalism, religiousness and expansionism. Note that ideologies which combine leftism with nationalism, such as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Bolshevism national bolshevism]] are pretty popular in modern Russia.
* ColorCodedMultiplayer: Even before ''dye'' is invented. Best exemplified by the earliest Dock, where ownership is shown by a brightly colored ''starfish''.
* CombatMedic: The Strategist hero is the only healer available until actual medics show up in the Industrial era. While they can attack, they won't do so unless specifically ordered to, even with the attack-move command.
* ComicallySmallBribe: In the English campaign, the leader is offered treasure chests in exchange for giving up the invasion. It's an insult, as the chests are filled with tennis balls.
* CoolPet: Caesar keeps two tigers (named Romulus and Remus) which he's trained to attack on command.
* CherryTapping: Hyperions standing just next to water will be targeted by submarines (or underwater and targeted by flyers and ground units), but the torpedoes won't hit. The Hyperion's laser, however, will.
* CreepyCoolCrosses: Novaya Russia heavily uses Orthodox tri-bar crosses in their imagery.
* CriticalExistenceFailure: Every Unit and Building will still be standing with just one HP. Planes, ships, and buildings will smoke and catch fire but won't work any worse for it.
* CripplingOverspecialization:
** Sea Kings target submarines and only submarines.
** Downplayed with galleys and battleships: galleys do disproportionally high damage to battleships, but still die to them in a one-on-one fight. Until they're replaced by submarines, which can't be targeted by battleships.
** Most units are very good at killing a specific unit type, decent at killing others, and bad at killing their counters (swordsmen have anti-arrow armor to kill archers, archers kill spearmen at range, and spearmen have anti-sword armor and high damage). Even then it's not entirely crippling: archers are the only units that can fire over walls, which can protect them from all melee attacks.
* TheComputerIsACheatingBastard: Computer players don't follow any resource-gathering rules; they just build units at an arbitrarily fast pace. Also computers don't seem to be bothered by FogOfWar, since they commonly send bomber planes after your sneaky armies with impunity. They also know where your forces are strong and weak, so attempts to save scum after the loss of a base and send the bulk of your forces to said doomed base will result in the AI switching targets to the other one, even if they have no legitimate way of knowing where your forces are.
** Computer players also build walls everywhere [[ArtificialStupidity for some reason]] (though how stupid this is depends on the terrain: on maps with small chunks of forest it leaves gaping holes in their defenses, on those with long tracts of woodland it makes getting to them a slow arduous process.
* DamageIsFire: Buildings, pre-modern siege engines and aircraft catch fire when damaged. Spacecraft emit bright blue plumes of flames (or possibly oxygen leaks).
* DeadlyDeferredConversation: In the Greek campaign, this is how King Phillip of Macedonia's death is presented: Alexander asks to speak to him after a battle, but the king is busy, and is killed by assassins before he has a chance to talk to his son.
* DeathOfAThousandCuts: Although the P-47 has weak guns, its blinding rate of fire gives it a higher Damage-Per-Second capacity than the more general purpose Fighter-Bomber.
* DefectorFromDecadence: A minor general of the enemy forces in the second scenario of the British campaign deserts to join your side upon seeing how determined William is to retain his title of Duke. Also [[spoiler:Molotov]] during the penultimate scenario of the Russian campaign.
* {{Demythification}}:
** During the Greek campaign, Heracles is a chieftain leading his people away from extinction by raiding the vilage that will become Troy. The only references to gods are the TrojanHorse's sudden appearance and Theseus being called up to Olympus (inspiring his people to beat Sparta and Thebes, no mention of the Minotaur).
** Gilgamesh is present as the first hero unit, a man on a horse (the other option being the historical Sargon of Akkad). Useful against prehistoric-era raiders, but quickly outclassed.
* DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment: One of the enemy factions in the Asian campaign is called "New Novaya".
* DrivenToSuicide: One of the units that cannot be accessed in normal gameplay is the Chinese Spearman. And a gruesome detail about this particular unit is its death animation: The Chinese Spearman sets his spear to the ground and jumps on it.
* EasilyConqueredWorld: Novaya Russia only had a tough time in the Middle-East, North Africa and China and by the time of [[spoiler:Molotov's defection,]] Novaya Russia held [[AllThereInTheManual direct or indirect control]] of pretty much the whole world except North America.
* EasyLevelTrick:
** The second Russian level can be beaten in 10 minutes top on easy mode if you build 3 Titan bombers and spend all your civilization points to make them faster and stronger.
** ''The Art of Conquest'': In the final scenario of the Roman Campaign, you are given the choice of completing the mission by siding with either Cleopatra VII or Ptolemy XIV. If you side with Cleopatra, not only will you need to defend Alexandria but the Great Pyramid of Cheops as well as you'll lose if it falls below 50%. A script bug in the scenario allows you to destroy the Great Pyramid by pressing delete without being defeated, removing the need and risk of defending a structure that's outside the safety of Alexandria's walls.
** The penultimate Russian level has you take over Cuba and build a base there, then [[spoiler:Molotov defects to the US,]] leaving you to face a very powerful army and two bases. However, it's not necessary to eliminate the Cubans entirely, just their Capitol, and it's possible to use a few Ares to take out the Capitol and provide security until you've built the required buildings. [[spoiler:And as for the original base, you can delete your own buildings just before the switch if you don't feel like fighting.]]
* EliteMooks: In addition to the Mk. II versions of cybers, the factional units (Persian Immortals, Spanish Cavalry, German Infantry, etc.) have the same stats as their equivalent unit's upgrade, one epoch early (so the 1800s British Infantry is a WWI Doughboy, WWI's German Infantry is the same as a WW2 Marine, etc.). However, they're only available in the campaign or the editor.
* EnemyExchangeProgram: The Priest's job is to convert enemy units that are not near a University. They're fun to use but they start being useless once you get access to gun units from the Renaissance Age and beyond (though they can convert other priests and enemy buildings past this point). The Poseidon cyber uses this on enemy cybers.
* EverythingFades: This can be averted with a special trigger, as used in the second-to-last mission in the Russian Campaign, to make a dead unit become persistent and never disappear. The blackened area where a building once stood stays around forever unless built on.
* EvolvingWeapon:
** Nearly every unit has a superior version it can be upgraded into by going to a better era. Best seen on the Arquebus unit, which goes from arqubus to rifle to laser gun while the citizens start by dragging their loads on the ground before using buckets and finally using wheelbarrows.
** The humble War Raft (two guys on a raft throwing big rocks at enemies) is the longest-running one, becoming a Frigate and going from rocks to arrows to cannons to lasers.
* EyePatchOfPower: The expansion's intro movie showcases warriors during Earth's history, each with a weird right eye: a caveman with a scarred eye, an 18th century ship captain with a bandage, a WW2 tank commander with an eyepatch, and a SpaceMarine with an ElecttronicEye.
* FogOfWar: Unexplored areas of the map are pitch-black, and areas unobserved by the players' units or buildings do not show enemy movements. Building the Library of Alexandria allows the player to see all enemy buildings and target them, but not the units around them (unless they're standing on farms).
* TheFundamentalist: The Eye of God organization is determined that mankind stay on Earth, and will not hesitate to use nuclear weapons to prove their point. [[{{Hypocrite}} They also use space fighters to attack you, but presumably their own soldiers get a pass.]]
* FromNobodyToNightmare: The Novaya Russia campaign from the first game initially follows Grigor Stoyanovich from a young firebrand to supreme leader before dying. [[spoiler:Later on, Molotov and Molly time travel back to confront the young Grigor before he could assume power.]]
* GameMod: Plenty for the first two games, from simple reskins to massive gameplay changes.
* GarrisonableStructures: Forts are available, but they only serve to reduce your headcount. And for certain structures (especially in the first game) it is wise to do so as garrisoning a certain number of units in them will upgrade the structure. But you won't get the units back after you upgrade said buildings.
* GeneralRipper: Charles Blackworth. His concern over America's apparent diminishing power prompts him to launch a coup d'etat against the US government, which the player foils. [[spoiler:He eventually goes into hiding in South America and attempts to trigger a nuclear holocaust, only to be foiled once again and KilledOffForReal]].
* GullibleLemmings: Luring enemy units into your archers/riflemen/ships is an effective way to avoid and minimize casualties. This is a very important tactic in scenarios where your ability to reinforce your army is limited or nonexistent.
* HardCodedHostility: The diplomacy settings are locked in single-player missions so you can't try to ally with your enemies. Some missions have special conditions to let you ally with them.
* HealThyself: Medics can't heal themselves (though they can heal each other). Heroes have slow regeneration, but they only heal in the presence of a hospital (even the Strategist hero can't heal other heroes).
* HeirClubForMen: Grigor wanted a son or daughter to take over the leadership of Novaya Russia, but even futuristic medecine couldn't cure his sterility. So he named the robot instead.
* HeroUnit: Heroes come in two types: Warriors, which have stronger attacks and increase unit morale around them, and Strategists, with a weaker attack which they don't use by themselves but an automatic healing ability.
* HistoricalDomainCharacter: Every HeroUnit up to the Modern era is an actual historical figure from that era, despite the considerable gaps (Napoleon and Bismark is already a stretch, Julius Caesar and Charlemagne even more so). The two heroes of the Space era are related to each other... some 250 years apart.
* HoverTank: Goes underwater most likely due to engine limitations. Also, it cannot be built outside custom maps.
* HumongousMecha:
** All three games have them in later epochs. Especially the campaign[=/=]editor-only Command Unit[=/=]Grigor II and Blackworth.
** In EE1, cybers are big, but closer to MiniMecha in scale. The expansion's campaign makes them tower above most buildings (but upgrading them reverts them to their usual size).
* ImprobableAimingSkills:
** The animators messed up on Napoleon's attack animation: When he shoots, it looks like he's FiringIntoTheAir. It doesn't stop the bullet from hitting the enemy though.
** Partisans are meant as a CurbstompCushion defense against air units, being available before anti-air defenses can be built. While this makes sense for WW1 planes (the earliest of which were historically armed with ''darts'' tossed by the low-flying pilot), it makes less sense that they're able to shoot down modern planes afterwards, or even top-of-the-line nuclear bombers. Or, as of the expansion, ''orbiting satellites''.
* InterchangeableAsianCultures: All over the place in the Asian campaign, where China is part of a United Federation of Asian Republics (which doesn't include Taiwan or Japan). Japan uses pagodas and has a colony on Mars with a distinctly Chinese-sounding name, while the descendant of the Chinese hero Hu Kwan Do (referred to as Khan by underlings) goes around in future-samurai armor (down to the kabuto and sashimono) DualWielding laser katanas, and his chief spy has a Chinese name but builds Japanese-speaking cyber ninja (note that UFAR and the Japanese are enemies at this point).
* InvadedStatesOfAmerica: Novaya Russia's attempted invasion of America in [=EE1=].
* LighthousePoint: The Pharos of Alexandria can be built repeatedly in multiplayer, as it reveals a vast amount of water (but not land, strangely). In the German campaign, a modern lighthouse can be built for the same effect.
* LittleMissBadass: Molly Ryan put a fifteen-year-old bully in intensive care for a week at the age of ''nine''.
* TheLowMiddleAges: The Dark Age epoch encompasses both the later days of Rome and the beginnings of the MiddleAges (the available heroes for that period are JuliusCaesar and {{Charlemagne}}).
* JustAStupidAccent / PoirotSpeak : Most of the voice acting in the first installment was pretty {{egregious}}.
* TheMafiya: Grigor was an enforcer whose brutality earned him the moniker "the Crocodile". Then he got into politics...
* MeaningfulName: Most of the Cybers. Pandoras are anti-infantry, Minotaurs are anti-tank, Zeus is anti-everything...
* MegaCorp: The UFAR is run by one, and later the Martian colonies are taken over by mega corps more concerned with profits than the miners' well-being.
* MiniMecha: The Cybers[=/HERCs=] were only slightly bigger than infantry units. Possibly a case of UnitsNotToScale.
* MisplacedWildlife: One of the tutorials has you fight off tiger attacks in the Mediterranean.
* ModernMayincatecEmpire: The tutorial for [=EE2=] has the player guide the Aztecs from its founding to [[AlternateHistory fighting off the Spanish conquistadors]], helping the Americans win their independence from Britain, and fight a fascist Inca state in the 1930's.
* MoneyForNothing: Generally averted, you'll need all the resources you can get.
* MoraleMechanic: Morale increases your units' defense (up to 50%), and can be obtained either by being in a capitol/town center's influence if houses are built in it, or by being close to a Warrior hero.
* MusclesAreMeaningless: Animals will spawn tiny offspring that slowly grow to their adult size, but have exactly the same stats including health and food provided. Similarly, the male caveman is much bigger than the female but no stronger.
* MyCountryRightOrWrong: Molotov initially thinks this way about Novaya Russia, but after Grigor II becomes increasingly more ruthless in his pursuit of global domination, he makes the fateful decision to [[HeelFaceTurn join sides with his country's enemies]].
* NiceJobBreakingItHero: Molotov's attempt to [[spoiler:convince Grigor before his rise to power]] is instead used by Grigor II to [[spoiler:jump-start Novaya Russia's revolution, supplying them with troops two epochs ahead.]]
* NonIndicativeName: The Mining Units available in the Asian campaign are strictly combat units.
* OlderIsBetter: Averted, the last Russian mission has you facing final-age troops with only modern (well, 2030s) units. Thankfully, defenses are final-tier as well, and you can use spies to upgrade your units to their future equivalents.
* OneHitKill: The incentive for using Crossbowmen is that they have a small chance of instantly killing enemy infantry. Sharpshooters and Snipers have the same purpose in later epochs with the bonus of being invisible from a distance.
* OneWorldOrder:
** By the later missions of the Novaya Russia campaign, the country has direct and indirect control over much of the world outside of the American sphere and is poised to become one. The flavor text for the generic "Rebel Forces" meanwhile implies that said rebel groups would eventually unite into a single global counter-order to fight Novaya Russia.
* PaletteSwap: Several of the infantry and hero unit models resemble and share the exact same animations as each other, the most notable is the "Diplomat" unit which, excepting the medieval variant, is just a better-dressed swap of that time period's male Citizen unit.
* ThePhilosopher: The second Prophet is the classic bald, bearded, [[HollywoodHistory toga-wearing]] Greek philosopher. Best seen when commanding Aristotle, who figures out how to use local plant life to attract rats towards enemies.
* PowerUpLetdown: Some of the Civ Bonuses are just a waste of rare and irreplaceable Civ Points.
* PraetorianGuard: Grigor's Black Robe goons.
* PsychoForHire: Barbarians and Vikings.
--> 'Oo can I kill?
* RandomlyGeneratedLevels: In skirmish games, while you can set the type of map (inland sea, island continent, landlocked, individual islands...), the terrain itself will never be the same for several games.
* RealTimeStrategy: Gameplay can be paused so the player can take time to view the situation and issue commands, but can still proceed extremely fast for inexperienced players.
* RealTimeWithPause: One of the earliest Real-Time Strategy games that allowed issuing orders during paused mode. This allows micromanagement of formations, very useful in the earlier "epochs".
* RecycledinSpace: The Space Age introduced in Art of Conquest. You build space docks, space battleships, space carriers, space corvettes... there is a crucial difference, however: Only space turrets can hit spacecraft.
* ReligionIsMagic: Prophets are the spellcasters in this game, throwing storms, volcanoes, and plagues at your enemies (unless there's a temple nearby). Priests convert enemies to your side unless in range of a university.
* RenegadeSplinterFaction: The American campaign from [=EE2=] eventually involves the US trying to stop a rogue general named Blackworth and his experimental cybernetic forces.
* RewardedAsATraitorDeserves: When Grigor II and Molotov convince a Chinese town to join their side and help them with invading China, Molotov hopes that the defectors would at least be rewarded for assisting them; Grigor II's response? Execute them, whether because he perceives them as a future threat or just ForTheEvulz isn't made apparent.
* RevolversAreJustBetter: WW1, WW2 and Modern heroes use revolvers where other units use rifles or machines guns.
* RidiculouslyFastConstruction: The buildings also start out as flat and gradually inflate as your villagers build them, even faster the more builders there are.
* RobotWar: The American campaign from [=EE2=] eventually culminates in a battle against Blackworth and his cybernetic army.
** Novaya Russia of the original game may be considered a minor example, especially after Grigor II comes to power; his obvious preference for mechanical, as opposed to organic, troops certainly gives the impression for it.
* RockBeatsLaser: Although AA Missiles are stronger and have a longer firing range, there is a noticeable delay between shooting and hitting the target. AA Guns, on the other hand, hit the target instantly.
** The very first ship (a war raft that throws rocks at enemies) becomes the Frigate in later epochs. It can still attack submarines.
** All towers can attack subs, even the very first one, but only nuclear-missile subs can fight back. It is profoundly hilarious to see a state-of-the-art nuclear-powered submarine be defeated by cavemen in towers throwing big rocks.
* RuleOfCool: No other way to justify the cartoonish mecha, weird futuristic architecture, and lasers. Ninjas with lightsabers are probably the fullest extent of this seen in the first game.
* RuleOfFunny: Prophets in the modern and future eras wear sandwich boards reading "The end is near". [[NakedPeopleAreFunny And nothing else.]]
* RussiaTakesOverTheWorld: The game's Russian campaign is set TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture where the paramilitary group Novaya Russia seizes power and begins a war of expansion against their neighbors. Helped by robotic troops and the US's isolationism, they're able to conquer Asia, Europe, and Africa, and start moving on Cuba when a disillusioned soldier defects to the US and [[spoiler:travels back in time to prevent the fascist regime from ever rising, only to find that future soldiers already got there and need to be eliminated with inferior modern troops.]]
* SacredHospitality: Ceasar apparently has little use for it, as the game's way of choosing which side of the Egyptian civil war you'll fight on is asking his pet tigers which side's envoy they feel like eating.
* SchizoTech: Some units from the [=WW2=] epoch (namely ships, artillery guns, some infantry, and even halftracks) are still used in the modern epoch.
* SequenceBreaking:
** In "The Rise of Athens", Theseus AscendsToAHigherPlaneOfExistence before the final part of the level, defeating both Thebes and Sparta. It is entirely possible to destroy both before he does so, and is in fact easier to do so as they won't send attacks towards your base, can be aggroed one at a time and Theseus provides a big defense aura.
** During the Trojan War, it's possible to sneak around behind Troy and destroy the palace with archers.
* SettingUpdate: In the Russian campaign, you can build a Medical Center, Monument to Grigor and an Espionage HQ which have the same functions as the Temple of Zeus, Gate of Babylon and Library of Alexandria (and except the last one, use the same model). In the German campaign, you build Olympic Stadiums (the Coliseum) and lighthouses (the Pharos lightouse).
* ShoutOut:
** The Cybers and [=HERCs=] are shoutout to another franchise: ''{{VideoGame/Starsiege}}.''
** The spaceship that the Martian rebels claim from the colonial powers is called the ''[[Anime/SpaceBattleShipYamato Yamato]]'', but it is portrayed as an air/spacecraft carrier rather than a battleship.
* SpaceIsAnOcean: This is how space is treated in the expansion pack to ''EmpireEarth.'' See RecycledinSpace.
* SplashDamage: For artillery units in all three games and the nuclear weapon in EEII.
* SpiritualSuccessor: It's no coincidence that this game is identical to VideoGame/AgeOfEmpires.
** From there, between the release of Empire Earth and the sequel, it had one of its own in the form of VideoGame/EmpiresDawnOfTheModernWorld.
* SuperPersistentMissile: A homing projectile will NEVER stop until the unit that it's chasing is dead or the unit that fired it is dead. The same rule applies for torpedoes.
* SuperPersistentPredator: Similarly, attacked units will target solely the attacker, even when he runs behind a wall of his allies.
* SuspiciousVideogameGenerosity: In the German scenario "Somme River", you are given 15000 of each resource to build a base and huge army that you'll need to storm and overrun the allied positions. If you hit the pop cap or a scout discovers your recruitment efforts and gets away to report about the buildup, the gravy train returns to Germany and you're forced to make do with the pitifully scarce amounts of local resources.
* TacticalRockPaperScissors: In early epochs, the classic matchups occur between infantry, cavalry, and archers (with exceptions), though it gets more complicated as the epochs go on, becoming extremely convoluted when robots and lasers are introduced. The same applies to warships, frigates, and galleys (later replaced by submarines).
* TalkLikeAPirate: Ships in pre-Imperial eras, even when the pirate stereotype won't exist for another ten centuries or so.
* TankGoodness: Present in all epochs after World War I. The first game divides them into AP tanks (effective against other tanks) and HE tanks (effective against infantry), while the second game divides them into light tanks and heavy tanks.
* TanksButNoTanks: Not counting the fact that all of the series' factions shared the same units, we have the M18 Hellcat and the Jagdpanther from the second game that resembles a M48 Patton and a SU-85, respectively.
** Anti-tank guns are only referred to by their caliber until the future ages, which are rocket launchers instead.
* TakeAThirdOption: the potential for such exists in the second mission of the English Campaign: with only 4-5 units to your name, you are faced with a blockade of horsemen standing in the road. The three knights that joined you a little bit ago recommend that they pull a HeroicSacrifice and distract the enemy soldiers while William rides on to Falaise. You ''could'' do that...or you could throw all of your units at them, use William's Battle Cry to weaken the enemies, and have him heal your other units as they fight so that ''all'' of them can live and join the battle at the end of the level!
* TakeThat: Two of the cheat codes are "boston food sucks" and "boston rent" (which makes you lose your gold).
* TheThemeParkVersion: Of [[VideoGame/AgeOfEmpires Age of Empires]]; whereas Age of Empires at least attempted to maintain a semblance of historical accuracy, Empire Earth decided to include more "unusual" ideas, [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane some fantastical, some mundane, and sometimes a bit of both]]; such as a Euhemeristic interpretation of Greek legends ([[DoingInTheWizard Heracles as a tribal chief who led his people to Greece]]) to some minor fantastical elements (The Trojan Horse as a gift from the gods and Theseus [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence ascending to Mount Olympus]]) to holy men who wield the ability to summon natural disasters on a whim and a [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture near future]] featuring Star Wars-esque aesthetics mixed with HumongousMecha and FrickinLaserBeams. That's not even going into the alternate history aspect of of the German campaign, [[spoiler:which ends with the successful invasion of Britain]].
* TheWarOfEarthlyAggression: The latter third of the Asian campaign in ''Art of Conquest''. You even [[spoiler:attack the Moon and the Earth at the end!]]
* UnitsNotToScale: Just like ''Age of Empires'', the people in this game are slightly bigger than the houses they live in. The HumongousMecha from the future ages are [[MiniMecha Humongous only in name]]. A miner is bigger than a tank, and nuclear bomber fighter jets are smaller than their bombs. The bombs are smaller than most ''tanks''.
** SpaceCompression: The Creators had to take several liberties with designing the Campaign maps so you can expect a lot of inaccuracies when the locations are compared to real-life.
* WarElephants: Available in ranged and melee versions. Both have the same amount of life, but the arrows somehow deal more damage than tusks.
* WaveMotionGun: From the expansion, the [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Devastating Beam of Death]] ability of the space capital ship.
* WashingtonDCInvasion: Blackworth's attempted coup in the American campaign from [=EE2=] involves an attack from his cybernetic army.
* YouRequireMoreVespeneGas:
** The first game has five resource types that require intensive monitoring of the civilization's economy.
** The second game on the other hand has four basic resource types and two "special resources" which change depending on the age. You won't get iron and uranium the same age, for example.
* ZergRush: The AI has zero qualms about sending a dozen of every unit type at once at you.
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